The Vanderlick and Leckie Families

The Vanderlick and Leckie Families

Of Central Louisiana

Welcome

to the

Gene A. and Barbara Vanderlick Leckie Families

Our intent is to trace the Leckie, Vanderlick, Ducote, Fuqua, Jammaer, Peterman, and Van Gossen Families of Central Louisiana, USA. Many ancestral family members been identified along with many peripheral families. We do not claim total accuracy and welcome added data and information to improve upon our family genealogical data and history.

FAMILY HISTORIES

Leckie

Ducote

Fuqua

Vanderlick

Peterman (Peetermans)

Jammaer

Van Gossen (Van Gossum)

Belgians of Central Louisiana

Belgian Immigrants to Central Louisiana in the late 19th and early 20th centuries

FAMILY GENEALOGICAL DATA

LECKIE

DUCOTE

FUQUA

JAMMAER

VON DER LIECK/VAN DER LIECK

VANDERLICK

VAN GOSSEN/VAN GOSSUMS

PETERMAN/PEETERMANS

SURNAMES

INDIVIDUAL NAMES

FAMILY PICTORIAL DATA

 

Contact Us

Belgians Families of Central Louisiana


Central Louisiana has been blessed with some of the most productive immigrants to the United States. These are the Belgian immigrants who settled principally along Bayou Rapides from Alexandria, Louisiana to near Boyce, Louisiana. They also settled in the communities of Elmer and Hinston, Louisiana as well as in Sabine Parish in the Many, Louisiana area.

When the first settlers came to the area around Elmer, Louisiana is was called Spring Creek, Louisiana. To this day many of descendants of the Belgian immigrants still refer to it as Spring Creek. Prior to his death, Robert Blanchard Andries related that his grandfather Daniel Andries owned 360 acres of land in Elmer and that the main spring that feeds Spring Creek was located on this 360 acres. Daniel Andries' property surrounded the property where the current St. Peter's Catholic Church and graveyard is located. Before he died, Daniel Andries wanted the fence moved over so that he could be buried on his own land. Before Robert Blanchard Andries' grandmother passed away she gave each of her children 40acres and his family's 40 acres happened to be located adjacent to the grave yard and his father and mother are buried on what used to be Andries property.

Many of the Belgian immigrants and their descendants are buried in the Catholic Cemetery at Elmer, Rapides Parish, Louisiana or in the oldest cemetery in Rapides Parish, Rapides Cemetery, Pineville, Rapides Parish, Louisiana.

Most of the Belgians who immigrated to Central Louisiana were farmers. Many came to take advantage of the Homestead Act, but most immigrated due to the conditions existing in Europe in the 1800's. The Belgians immigrants also practiced the masonry, carpentry, and blacksmith trades. All were industrious and could not stand to be in debt; thus they guarded their hard-earned moneys with care and spent it only on the essentials.

The Belgian immigrants were primarily from the Vlaams-Brabant (Flemish Brabant) Province of Belgium. Some of the villages were Linden, Kessel-Lo, Kortrijk-Dutsel, Zichem, Sint Joris Winge, Miskom, Rillaar, Bekkevoort, and many others. Some of the Surnames of the Belgian immigrants are Van Gossen (Van Gossum), Vanderlick, Vandersypen, Mertens, Michiels, Vandegaer, Tutenel (Mathews), Vanderhoven, Peterman (Peetermans), Verzywvelt, Andries, Thiels, Jammaer, Van Hoof, Vanlangendonck, Melder, DeKeyzer or DeKeyser and many others.

Some surnames of the wives of the Belgium immigrants are: Vits, Ons, Van Rillaer, and Alaerts. (RETURN FAMILY HISTORIES)

The Van Gossen/Van Gossum Family

From Zichem, Vlaams-Brabant Belgium to Central Louisiana


Joannes Cornelius Van Gossum, his wife Elisabeth Alaerts Van Gossum and their nine children were the first Van Gossum/Alaerts Belgium immigrants to Central Louisiana. They arrived in New York, New York in the fall of 1881 and then made their way south to Louisiana via New Orleans and then to Alexandria. At the time of their passage to the USA Elisabeth was pregnant with their tenth child, Joseph.

Upon arrival in Central Louisiana they made their way to Hineston, Louisiana, an area where other immigrants from Belgium lived. The Van Gossum's rented what was then known as the "Peggy Place." There, Joannes Cornelius engaged in the farming trade. Later, Joannes Cornelius and his family moved to Many, Sabine Parish, Louisiana. There he again farmed and practiced the brick masonry trade. Joannes Cornelius eventually purchased some farmland in Sabine Parish.

In 1900, Joannes Cornelius sold his property in Sabine Parish and moved to Alexandria, Rapides,Parish, Louisiana. In Alexandria, La. he purchased about 29 acres. After the death of Joannes Cornelius and his wife, Elisabeth the property was sold to the City of Alexandria and others. The present day Alexandria Zoological Park, City Swimming Pool and City Park is now located on the Van Gossum property.

In 1887, Franiscus Mertens and his wife Anna Maria Rosalia Van Gossum and their children immigrated to the USA and then settled in the Central Louisiana area. Franciscus came in January of 1887 and Rosalia and children followed in September of 1887. Rosalie is the sister of Joannes Cornelius Van Gossum.

Joannes Cornelius and his sister Rosalia were from the village of Zichem, Belgium. In Belgium the surname Van Gossum has several variations in official Belgium records. Some variations are Van Goosen, Van Ghossen, Van Gossum, Van Gossen. Over time Joannes Cornelius anglicized his name to John Cornelius Van Gossum. And over time his descendants adopted either the surname Van Gossen or Van Gossums. In present day Belgium Van Gossum appears to be the predominant surname. (RETURN FAMILY HISTORIES)

The Jammaer Family

From Sint-Joris-Winge, Vlaams-Brabant Belgium to Central Louisiana


The descendants of the Jammaer family are principally from the marriages of the two Jammaer daughters, Celestine and Barbara Regina to the Vanderlick brothers William and Isadore, respectively. Norbert Jammaer and his wife Annie Carolina Ons Jammaer and at least five known children immigrated to Central Louisiana in the late 1800's. The Jammaers lived in the village of Sint Joris Winge, Belgium before they immigrated to the United States.

After arriving in Central Louisiana, the Jammaers first rented property on the Hynson Place near Alexandria, Louisiana and then later purchased the property. One brother, Frank, never married. Louis married Harriet Scallan. They had no natural children but did adopt two children. It is unknown if their adopted children carry the Jammaer surname. If not then there are no Jammaer descendants with the surname Jammaer. Another Jammaer daughter, Maria who is known to have died in Alexandria, Louisiana and to have been the wife of August Daenen. (RETURN FAMILY HISTORIES)

The Vanderlick Family

From Linden, Vlaams-Brabant Belgium to Central Louisiana


The Vanderlick Family of Belgium and France and most of the Vanderlick family in the USA are traced to Mathias von der Lieck and his wife Maria Helena Jansen. Thus, the Vanderlick Family History begins with two brothers, sons of Mathias von der Lieck and Maria Helena Jansen.

Mathias von der Lieck was born December 18, 1750 Havert, Rheinland, Prussia. Maria Helena Jansen was born February 11, 1754 in Oberbuscherheydt (Breberen), Rheinland, Prussia. It was in the village of Breberen, Rheinland, Prussia where Mathias and Maria Helena were married and became the parents of eleven children, six sons and five daughters. Breberen is a German village about two miles east of the Netherlands (Dutch)-German border near the Netherlands cities of Geleen and Sittard. In the late 1700's Breberen was part of the area known as Rheinland, which in turn was part of the Kingdom of Prussia. In the year 2004, Breberen is part of the municipality of Selfkant, County of Heinsberg, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany.

Mathias von der Lieck's occupation was that of a weaver. A trade practiced by at least two of his sons, Joannes Wilhelmus von der Lieck and Joannes von der Lieck

One son of Mathias von der Lieck and Maria Helena Jansen, Joannes Wilhelmus von der Lieck, is known to have left Breberen and take up residency in what is now present-day Belgium. He was living in Rotselaar, Brabant, Belgium in about 1820 as he married Barbara Vijvermans in Sint Pieters-Rode, Brabant, Belgium 1821. Why did this "Rheinlander" leave his home in Breberen and go to Belgium?

Francois Pierre of Belgium has provided a possible answer. In 1815 the battle of Waterloo was fought between the allied armies of Britain, Prussia and others against the French army of Napoleon. The Battle of Waterloo ended the Napoleonic Wars and the battle was one of the bloodiest in history. Many casualties were suffered on both sides.

Joannes Wilhelmus von der Lieck being about 25 years old in 1815 could very well have been a Prussian soldier and fought at the Battle of Waterloo. As a participant in the battle he could easily have been wounded. Wounded Prussian soldiers were hospitalized and treated at the Abbey of Vlierbeek, which is located near Leuven, Brabant, Belgium. Since Sint Pieters-Rode is also near Leuven he could have been treated by a young 21-year-old Flemish girl, Barbara Vijvermans, with whom he fell in love. At the time of his marriage in 1821 in Sint Pieters-Rode Joannes Wilhelmus von der Lieck lived in Rotselaar which is about 5 Km from Vlierbeek. Could this be the explanation of how the "Prussian Rheinlander" at the age of 25 years came to be in Belgium and stayed?

In the period from the marriage of Joannes Wilhelmus von der Lieck and the birth of his last two children the surname von der Lieck under went a transition. First from von der Lieck to van der Lieck to Vander Lieck and finally to Vanderlick.

Joannes von der Lieck, the youngest son of Mathias von der Lieck and Maria Helena Jansen is known to have been living in the Linden area of Belgium about 1826. He married Anna Maria Schol in Linden in 1827. The reason Joannes von der Lieck left Breberen and went to live in Belgium is probably because his older brother was there. The transition of the spelling of the von der Lieck surname to Vanderlick was evident immediately when his marriage to Anna Maria Schol was registered. Two sons of Joannes von der Lieck (IN Flemish - Joannes Vanderlick) left Linden, Belgium.

One son of Joannes Vanderlick, Petrus Vanderlick, immigrated to Creil, Oise, France. There he is known to have had at least two children. Today the descendants of Petrus Vanderlick reside in France.

An another son of Joannes Vanderlick, Henricus Vanderlick along with his wife, two sons and three daughters immigrated to Central Louisiana in December of 1887 from the village of Linden, Brabant, Belgium via Antwerp, Belgium aboard the Steamer Marseille. Henricus Vanderlick and his wife Anna Maria Coosemans became the progenitors of the Vanderlick Family of Central Louisiana.

A grandson of Joannes Vanderlick and a son of Michel Vanderlick, Henri Vanderlick moved to Chatelineau, Belgium. Two of Henri Vanderlick grandsons and sons of Jean Baptiste Vanderlick immigrated to the United States in late 1960's. They and their descendants reside in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Missouri and Virginia.

Joannes Vanderlick had two other grandsons immigrate to the United States of America. August (Gikki) Vanlangendonck and Frederick (Fre') Vanlangendonck sons of Joanna Maria Vanderlick, daughter of Joannes Vanderlick and sister of Henricus Vanderlick, immigrated to Central Louisiana. In 2004 there are many descendants of August and Frederick Vanlangendonck living in the Central Louisiana area.

Henricus (Henry) Vanderlick and his wife Anna Maria Coosemans immigrated to Central Louisiana with their five living children, William (Guilielmus), Anna Catherine (Anna Catharina), Anna Stasia, Mary Elizabeth (Maria Elisabeth), and Isidore (Judocus Franciscus). Henry Vanderlick and his family arrived at the port of New Orleans, Louisiana aboard the ship Marseille. The Marseille had sailed from Le Havre, France to Antwerp, Belgium where Henricus Vanderlick and his family boarded the ship for New Orleans. The ship arrived in New Orleans, Louisiana on December 14, 1887. From New Orleans, Louisiana the Vanderlick family made their way to Central Louisiana. Exactly how they traveled to Central Louisiana is not known.

For about one year after arriving in Central Louisiana the Vanderlick family lived on what was known as the "Compton Place" near Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. Later, they rented some land from another Belgium immigrant, Joannes Franciscus Peetermans (John Francis Peterman). Their rent was $5.00/acre. Later the Vanderlick family bought property on the "Hynson Place" with a loan from another Belgium immigrant, Ferdinand Peetermans (Peterman). After farming the "Hynson Place" near Alexandria, Louisiana for a few years, the Vanderlick family sold that property and purchased property along Bayou Rapides.

The property purchased along Bayou Rapides was originally part of the Geneva Plantation established by Caesar Archinard. Caesar Archinard was from Switzerland and thus the origin of the name for the plantation.

Henricus Vanderlick and his wife Anna Maria Coosemans both died at the family residence on Bayou Rapides (road). At the time of their deaths, their son Isidore Vanderlick and his family were caring for Henricus Vanderlick and Anna Maria Coosemans. Sometime after the death of Henricus Vanderlick the home was acquired by his oldest son, William Vanderlick, Sr. William Vanderlick, Sr. eventually transferred the home to his eldest son Henry Joseph Vanderlick, Sr.

The sons of Henricus Vanderlick, William and Isidore would eventually marry sisters of the Jammaer (Janmart) family, also immigrants from Belgium. Two of the Vanderlick sisters would join the Roman Catholic religious order of nuns, the Congregation of Divine Providence of Castroville, (now located in San Antonio) Texas. The other sister would marry Louis Vandersypen, another Belgian immigrant.

Since most of the descendants of Henry Vanderlick and Anna Maria Coosemans are off spring of the marriages of William and Isidore Vanderlick to two Jammaer sisters a brief history of the Jammaer Family is also provided in a later section.

About 20-25 other persons in the United States, outside of Louisiana, have been found with the surname Vanderlick. Attempts to contact these persons have proved futile. So it is not known whether these persons are descendants of Mathias von der Lieck or any of his siblings or relatives. All but two of the letters sent were returned or not answered. (RETURN FAMILY HISTORIES)

The Peterman/Peetermans Family

From Linden, Vlaams-Brabant Belgium to Central Louisiana


One of the first Belgium families to immigrate to Central Louisiana was the Peetermans. Two brothers, Joannes Ludovious and Joannes Josephus Peetermans, came to the Alexandria/Elmer area of Rapides Parish, Louisiana in 1835. These brothers were born in Miskom, Belgium and were the sons of Sebastianus Peetermans and Elisabeth Pans. As with many immigrants to the United States, the Peetermans brothers adopted the anglicized version of their given name and surname. Joannes Ludovious Peetermans and Joannes Josephus Peetermans were known as John Louis Peterman and John Joseph Peterman, respectively. They were the beginning of the Peterman Family in Central Louisiana.

John Louis and John Joseph were carpenters. John Joseph worked in Alexandria, Louisiana, while John Louis would travel to area plantations and surrounding communities near Alexandria, Louisiana to practice his trade. He worked in Boyce and Cheneyville, Louisiana. While doing his work, John Louis lived with the people for whom he was working at the time. John Louis Peetermans never married and he died in 1878.

About 1862 when John Joseph was about 45 years old he married Melanie Vandegaer daughter of Gaspar Vandegaer and Johanna Catherina Broweer. Gaspar and Johanna Vandegaer and their children, Arnold, Theresa, John Baptist (J. B.), Felicite, Melanie, and Daniel immigrated to the United States in 1855. The Gaspar Vandegaer and his family settled in Spring Creek, Louisiana. Gaspar Vandegaer died in 1861. It is known that in 1880 Johanna Broweer Vandegaer and some of her children were living in Sabine Parish, Louisiana near present day Many, Louisiana. The Vandegaer family became very prominent citizens of Sabine Parish and many of the early Vandegaer family, including Johanna and some of her children, are buried in the St. John Cemetery in Sabine Parish, Louisiana.

John Joseph Peterman practiced his trade in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana where he eventually became a building contractor. From an account in an Alexandria newspaper John Joseph Peterman was elected as an Alexandria City Councilman in January 1883. From other newspaper accounts John Joseph Peterman and his wife Melanie Vandegaer Peterman were also prominent in the Catholic Church. They resided for many years within two to three blocks of the present day St. Francis Xavier Cathedral in Alexandria, Louisiana.

John Joseph Peterman and Melanie Vandegaer Peterman are known to have had at least seven children. Five of the children have been identified by name. Only two of their children, sons Raymond Joseph Peterman and Justin Augustine Peterman, lived to adulthood.

Raymond Joseph Peterman was the father of five sons. One died in infancy. The other four survived to adulthood and they along with their father, Raymond, and mother moved to New Orleans, Louisiana after the death of Melanie Vandegaer Peterman. None of Raymond's four sons ever married.

Little is known of the descendants of the younger son, Justin Augustine Peterman. He married in Rapides Parish and is known to have had at least three children, one of whom died in infancy. He and his family, probably after the death of his mother in 1919 moved to Port Arthur, Texas. Little else is known of Justin Augustine Peterman or his family or his descendants.

John Joseph Peterman died in 1892 and Melanie Vandegaer Peterman died in 1919. According to their obituaries both were buried in the Spring Creek area of Rapides Parish, probably in what is now St. Peter Catholic Church Cemetery, Elmer, Rapides Parish, Louisiana.

 In 1870 John Louis Peterman made a return trip to Belgium where he persuaded his nephews John Francis Peterman (Joannes Francisicus Peetermans) and John Ferdinand Peterman (Joannes Ferdinand Peetermans) to immigrate to Central Louisiana. John Francis and John Ferdinand Peterman were the sons of Joannes Francisicus Peetermans and Barbara Van Rillaer. Both were born in Linden, Vlaams-Brabant Belgium. (Note that Linden, Belgium, a small village near Leuven (Louvain in French), Belgium is either the birth place or was the home of many of the Belgian immigrants who came to Central Louisiana in the late 1800's and early 1900's.)

So in 1870, John Francis Peterman and his wife Mary Ursula Vits Peterman and two of their children Isabella and John Francis, Jr. along with John Francis's brother John Ferdinand, who was unmarried at the time, immigrated to Central Louisiana.

John Francis Peterman and Mary Ursual Vits
Photograph - Circa 1870 - Courtesy Barbara Ann Vanderlick Jeansonne - Deceased

In Belgium, John Francis was a carpenter and a farmer. He farmed about two acres, which for that time was considered a very good farm. After arriving in Louisiana, John Francis and his family lived with his uncle and aunt, John Joseph and Melanie Vandegaer Peterman, for about one year. During that year, while awaiting his application for a homestead in Elmer, Rapides Parish, Louisiana to be approved, he joined his uncles, John Louis and John Joseph, in the carpentry trade.

After John Francis's homestead was approved, he and his uncles built a log cabin on the homestead. As the years passed John Francis built a larger nicer home and used the log cabin for an outdoor kitchen. Later John Francis built a home along Bayou Rapides, near Alexandria, Louisiana. His bachelor uncle, John Louis, lived with John Francis and his family until his death.

John Francis Peterman and Mary Ursula Vits Peterman were the parents of ten children. Four of their children died in infancy or youth. The six other children grew to adulthood and most becoming prominent farmers or wives of farmers in the Bayou Rapides area of Rapides Parish, Louisiana. One son moved to California around 1928 and raised his family there. One daughter became a Roman Catholic nun of the Congregation of Divine Providence of San Antonio, Texas.

John Ferdinand Peterman after his arrival in Louisiana lived a few years with his uncle and aunt, John Joseph and Melanie Vandegaer Peterman. Later he lived and worked in Marlon, Texas. He returned to Alexandria, Louisiana and married Mary Johanna Van Hoof, daughter of Henricus Van Hoof and Barbara Maria Peten. The Van Hoof family was also from the Vlaams-Brabant Province of Belgium. Sometime after his marriage he returned to Marlin Falls, Texas and worked for some time before returning to Rapides Parish permanently.

John Ferdinand Peterman and Mary Johanna Van Hoof Peterman were the parents of eight children.

John Ferdinand Peterman Family
Sitting L-R: Mary Johanna Van Hoof Peterman, Joseph Felix "Jeff" Peterman, John Ferdinand Peterman, Mary Louisa Peterman, Mary Sabina Peterman (Sister Mary Fabian, CDP)
Standing L-R: Mary Theresa Peterman, Henry Francis Peterman, Mary Elizabeth Peterman, Mary Barbara Peterman
Missing Raymond Ferdinand Peterman deceased
Photograph - Circa 1903 - Courtesy of the Estate of Mary Barbara Peterman Van Gossen

One son died as a youth. One daughter became a Roman Catholic nun of the Congregation of Divine Providence of San Antonio, Texas. Two sons and one daughter never married. The sons became farmers while the daughters who married, married farmers.

Another brother of John Francis and John Ferdinand, Peter Joseph Peterman (Petrus Josephus Peetermans) after the death of his wife Maria Theresa Van Langendonck, immigrated to Louisiana in 1903. Four of his children Mary Louise, William, Felix G., and Edward B. immigrated with him. Another son, Louis Joseph Peterman immigrated to Louisiana a short time later. Three of his children Octavia, Anna Marie Philomena and Edmond remained in Belgium. After staying a few years in Louisiana he returned to Linden, Belgium. One son of Peter Joseph Peterman died in youth, the other sons became farmers and the daughters married farmers

John Joseph and his wife Melanie Vandegaer Peterman owned a home on property fronting 4th Street, Alexandria, Louisiana across from the present day St. Francis Xavier Cathedral.

Many of the early Peterman (Peetermans) immigrants and their descendants are buried in St. Peter Catholic Church Cemetery, Elmer, Rapides Parish, Louisiana or Rapides Cemetery, Pineville, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. Apparently many wooden markers were used in the St. Peter Cemetery as many graves in the Cemetery are now unmarked. In the Rapides Cemetery many tombstones have faded or have disappeared. (RETURN FAMILY HISTORIES)

The Ducoté Family

From France to Avoyelles Parish Louisiana


The records of a Ducoté in Louisiana is the census of Pointe Coupee in 1745. Pierre Ducote is listed as being age 66 and married to Antoinette a free Indian. Pierre was a coureurs de bois, a trader-trapper-woodsman. It is from Pierre and his second wife Marie Cabel of Champagne District of France that Louisiana Ducote families are descendants. Pierre Ducote II and his wife Henriette Rabalais along with his sister Marie Madeleine and her husband Joseph Carmouche and both families are known to have been living in Avoyelles Parish in 1785 as evidence by the Census of that year.

Joseph Ducote II, fils of Joseph Ducote I, along with his father-in-law Valery Bordelon are know to have established residences and owned land along Bayou Rouge in an area where the current town of Cottonport, Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana is located. From "Recollections" "The first efforts at planning a town (referring to Cottonport) began in 1835 when Joseph Ducote, Jr. donated some of his property for a road to the one-room school house which was built in the back of his field." Since Valery Bordelon sold property to Joseph Ducote II it is believed that he and Joseph Ducote II could be considered as at least two of the founding father of the town of Cottonport. (RETURN FAMILY HISTORIES)

The Fuqua Family

Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana


One of the Louisiana Fuqua surnames that is known to have originated from an alternate spelling of the Fouquier surname. We have little or no information on the Fouquier surname or its derivative Fuqua. We are trying to trace the Edgar Charles Fuqua lineage. Edgar Charles is known to have lived in Cottonport, Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana. (RETURN FAMILY HISTORIES)

Leckie Family of Rapides and Grant Parishes, Louisiana

From Virginia to Central Louisiana


George F. Black, Ph.D. in his book "The Surnames of Scotland" states that LECKIE is derived from the barony of Leckie in the parish of Gargunnock, Stirlingshire. Various records exhibit many spelling variations such as Lekky, Laiky, Laikie, Lecque, Leuke. Leckie is a Sept of the Scottish Clan MacGregor.

Our earliest known forefather is Andrew Leckie who was living in the Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia between 1760 and 1788. Just who is this Andrew Leckie?

On page 269 of the book "Colonial Caroline, A History of Caroline Co., Virginia" by T. E. Campbell we find the following: "In January 1777 the magistrates ordered all foreign born residents ... Andrew Leckie, however, in some manner managed to evade expulsion ..." It appears from this comment that Andrew Leckie was not born in the English colonies in America. Further, on page 81 of the book "Hidden Village: Port Royal VA 1744-1981" by Ralph Emmett Fall we learn that Andrew Leckie was a Scottish immigrant. Even with these clues we have not been able to determine with any certainty the ancestors of Andrew Leckie.

From various court records of Caroline County, Virginia we know that Andrew Leckie was residing in Caroline County as early as 1763. Using these tidbits of information and the understanding that Andrew Leckie was a "Scottish immigrant" we have found an Andrew Leckie born July 18, 1731 which could be our forefather. This Andrew Leckie is the son of John Leckie and Agnes Craig of Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland. His birth date fits with the 1763 timeframe in Virginia and this Andrew could be the same Andrew who was described as a foreigner and a Scottish immigrant by T. E. Campbell and Ralph Emmett Fall. If this becomes fact then John Leckie and Agnes Craig are the parents of the Andrew Leckie of Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia.

From Ralph Emmett Fall we have also learned that the wife of Andrew Leckie was named Alice. Throughout all of our research we have not been able to establish any more information about Alice. William L. Leckie born in 1764 in Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia is believed to be the first child of Andrew and Alice Leckie. His birth ties closely with the court records and suggests perhaps that Andrew may have married Alice in Virginia after he arrived from Scotland.

Andrew Leckie was one of the founding fathers and a charter member of the Port Royal Virginia Merchant Association. From various accounts in old newspapers and historical books we know that he was in the "inn and tavern business." In about December 1777 Andrew Leckie opened in Port Royal, Virginia "The New Tavern" as announced in the Virginia Gazette No. 14 published on May 8, 1778.

Andrew Leckie was a merchant living in Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia with his wife, Alice. We do not know her surname or any other information about her. From this union, Andrew and Alice are known to have had at least five children, four sons and a daughter. Andrew Leckie died before April 1787 in Caroline County, Virginia.

William L. Leckie is believed to be the oldest known child of Andrew and Alice Leckie. Much information has been obtained about several people named "William L. Leckie." However, tying the information to Andrew and Alice is most difficult. From Chancery Court documents of various Virginia Counties we know Andrew and Alice had a son named William L. Leckie. One William L. Leckie found most closely fits known data about Andrew and Alice. From Revolutionary War records William L. Leckie was born July 9, 1764 in Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia. From the January 21,1803 will of Will of Henry (Harry) Taliaferro of Culpeper County, Virginia we know that he and his wife Elizabeth (surname not known) had a daughter named "Elizabeth Leckie." An 1805 Chancery Suit regarding this will provides additional insight about Elizabeth Taliaferro Leckie.

"William L. Lackie and wife Elizabeth, Robert G. Lackie and wife Sarah, James A. Thom and wife Alice, James Craine and wife Nancy, John Booker and wife Caty, William Seaton and wife Judith and Henry Taliaferro, children of Henry Taliaferro, deceased vs. Lucy Taliaferro, Malinda Taliaferro, and Lindsey Taliaferro, infant children of Henry Taliaferro, deceased."

These two Culpeper County, Virginia Court documents clearly attest that Elizabeth Taliaferro was married to William L. Leckie and Sarah Taliaferro was married to Robert G. Leckie, the sons of Andrew and Alice Leckie. No other record of the marriage of William L. Leckie and Elizabeth Taliaferro has been found.

However, a record of a marriage of an Elizabeth Straughan Lewis to the William L. Leckie born July 9, 1764 in Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia has been found. This marriage took place in October 21, 1790 in Campbell County, Virginia. There is strong suspicion that Elizabeth Straughan Lewis and Elizabeth Taliaferro are one and the same. Since we have no record of the surname of the mother of Elizabeth Taliaferro we "guess" that possibly her maiden name was "Straughan" and following custom named a daughter after herself, "Elizabeth Straughan Taliaferro." We also guess that "Elizabeth Straughan Taliaferro" was married to a Lewis prior to her marriage to William L. Leckie.

William L. Leckie and Elizabeth Straughan Lewis are known to have had at least six children. They are Elizabeth Leckie born March 4, 1792, Sucky Leckie born February 10, 1794, Lucy Stroydor Leckie born February 11, 1796, Sally Leckie born March 31, 1798, Sally Sheppard Leckie born June 8, 1800, and William W. Leckie born April 28, 1802. We know no further information about their children except that in the Federal Census of 1840 for Caldwell Parish, Louisiana a William W. Leckie is listed.

William L. Leckie died October 15, 1842 in Rutherford or Guilford County, Tennessee. We know nothing further of Elizabeth Straughan Lewis.

The second child of Andrew and Alice Leckie was son, Andrew Leckie, Jr. Andrew, Jr. left Caroline County and took up residency in Norfolk City, Virginia. It was there that he met and married Mary Brockenbrough April 26, 1797. She was the daughter of Moore Fauntleroy Brockenbrough and Lucy Roane. Andrew, Jr. and Mary are known to have had at least two children.

Their son John Brockenbrough Leckie went to Maryland and there established a family. He married twice. A son was born from his first marriage (name of his first wife not known), John Quincy Leckie. He was born October 6, 1825 in Somerset County, Maryland. John Quincy Leckie on June 5, 1848 in Dorchester County, Maryland married Rebecca Ann Thomas.

The daughter of Andrew Leckie, Jr. and Mary Brockenbrough is Mary Leckie. On December 16, 1816 in Richmond County, Virginia she married William G. Garland. From this marriage there are at least two children. Moore Fauntleroy Garland married Elizabeth P. Cooke and they were the parents of at least two children. Another son, William D. Garland married but we have no further information.

It is believed that Andrew Leckie, Jr. and Mary Brockenbrough had another daughter, Agnes W. Leckie. There is no tangible evidence to support this belief except some analysis. From the Louisiana Democrat of Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana we have the following: "Died: In the 55th year of her age, Mrs. Agnes W. Fant, wife of Willis Fant, at their residence in Rapides Parish, Louisiana, March 10, 1860. Mrs. Fant was a native of the state of Va., but after the death of her parents removed hither in 1840 to reside with her Uncle Mr. Robert Leckie. Here Miss Agnes W. Leckie was married October 19, 1843."

Based upon data collected, Agnes W. Leckie could not be the daughter of William L. Leckie as he was still living in 1840 and she was certainly not the daughter of Robert Galatin Leckie. So that leaves only Andrew Leckie, Jr. and Mary Brockenbrough as possible parents. Andrew Leckie, Jr. is estimated to have died about 1816 and Mary Brockenbrough died in 1837.

Agnes W. Leckie married Willis Fant in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana October 19, 1843. From the 1860 Federal Census of Rapides Parish, Louisiana there is a daughter listed, Mary C. Fant who was three months old at the time of the Census, August 1860. It is assumed that this child's mother is Agnes W. Leckie. Agnes W. Leckie died March 10, 1860 at the age of 55 and it is assumed that she died as the result of giving birth to Mary C. Fant. There are no other known children of this marriage.

The third son of Andrew Leckie and Alice was John Leckie. John Leckie apparently did not marry, as he died intestate about 1800. His siblings were heirs to his estate.

The youngest child of Andrew Leckie and Alice was their daughter Alice E. Leckie. She married on March 12, 1795 in St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Culpeper County, Virginia John Taliaferro, a son of Henry (Harry) Taliaferro and the brother of Elizabeth Taliaferro wife of William L. Leckie. Alice E. Leckie and John Taliaferro are known to have had at least one son, Robert Leckie Taliaferro. After the death of John Taliaferro, Alice E. Leckie Taliaferro and her son Robert Leckie Taliaferro left Virginia and sought a new home near her brother, Robert Galatin Leckie in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana.

As reported in the Louisiana Herald edition of August 24, 1825 Alice E. Leckie Taliaferro died August 21, 1825 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. She was probably buried in the old Rapides Cemetery in Pineville, Rapides Parish, Louisiana.

Robert Leckie Taliaferro married Providence Sarah Pearce May 24, 1827 in Rapides Parish, Louisiana. They were the parents of ten children. Robert Leckie Taliaferro is known to have become a large plantation owner in Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana in the area of present day Evergreen, Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana.

The fourth son of Andrew Leckie and Alice is Robert Galatin Leckie. Robert Galatin Leckie is the progenitor of the Leckie Family in Rapides and Grant Parishes Louisiana. Robert Galatin Leckie was born between 1773 and 1775 in Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia. On January 31, 1797 in St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Culpeper County, Virginia he married Sarah "Sally" Taliaferro another daughter of Henry (Harry) Taliaferro. So three Leckie siblings married three Taliaferro siblings.

Robert Galatin Leckie and Sally Taliaferro oldest son, William Robert Leckie was born in Culpeper County, Virginia in about 1803. Following the birth of William Robert, Robert Galatin Leckie, his wife and child departed Virginia for other opportunities. They are known to have been in Wilkes County, Georgia from about 1804-1807. Tradition has it that their second son, Edwin Catlett Leckie was born there in about 1805. Their daughter, Maria Emmeline Leckie could also have been born in Georgia, but if not in Georgia certainly in Mississippi where the family moved sometimes between 1807 and 1810. The family settled in Woodville, Mississippi Territory in what is now Wilkinson County. Robert Leckie is shown on the 1810 Territorial Census of Mississippi and on the 1813 Tax Roles of Wilkinson County, Mississippi. Their third son, Charles Sydnor Leckie, was born in Wilkinson County.

Sometime after 1816 Robert Galatin Leckie and his family moved to Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. They are known to have been living in Alexandria from the 1820 Federal Census of Rapides Parish, Louisiana. From an advertisement published in the Louisiana Herald Vol. II No. 17 on January 21, 1820 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana is the first documented evidence found that places Robert Gallatin Leckie and his family in Central Louisiana. In that particular edition the advertisement advises the public that Robert G. Leckie has "commenced keeping ENTERTAINMENT at the old stand, formerly occupied by Mr. Wm. Marshall and now called the Alexandria Coffee-House." However, at the bottom of the advertisement is given the place and initial insert of the advertisement: "Alexandria, Rapide (sic), State of Lou, Feb. 9, 1819. So we know that Robert Galatin Leckie and his family were in Central Louisiana as early as February 1819. Also the advertisement indicates that Robert Galatin Leckie followed in his father's profession of merchant by being in the "inn and tavern" business.

Extracted From the Louisiana Herald Vol. II No. 17 January 21, 1820

From additional editions of the Louisiana Herald over the period 1820- 1825 Robert G. Leckie also was employed as the Deputy Federal Marshall of the Louisiana District as evidenced by several advertisements appearing in the Louisiana Herald for Marshall Sales from Judgements of the Court. Sometime in 1821 Robert G. Leckie was involved in the establishment of a volunteer company of Riflemen. This "company of riflemen" became the "Alexandria Militia."

On March 23, 1821 Robert G. Leckie lost his beloved wife Sarah "Sally" Taliaferro. She died in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana and was probably buried in what is now known as Rapides Cemetery, Pineville, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. In her obituary appearing in the March 24, 1821 edition of the Louisiana Herald there is no mention of any specific children only that there were children.

From a December 1830 Issue of the Mississippi Democrat (Woodville, Mississippi) we learn of Robert G. Leckie's second marriage. "Married on the 29th ult. in the parish of Rapide (sic), Louisiana, Mr. Robert G. Leckie to Mrs. Margaret Mathews." Thus, Robert G. Leckie on December 30, 1830 marries for the second time. This marriage lasted until the death of Margaret Mathews in 1843. There are no known children from this marriage.

Little is known of Margaret Mathews. Based upon other surnames of Mathews appearing in various documents of Wilkinson County, Mississippi Margaret Mathews could have been a widow from Wilkinson County and was someone Robert G. Leckie knew while he was living in Mississippi. From the May 25, 1825 edition of the Louisiana Herald there is a notice of a marriage by John M. Jett Esq. of Mr. John Mathews to Mrs. Margaret Crawford, all of this Rapides Parish. This, also, could be the same Margaret Mathews who married Robert Galatin Leckie. From the notice she appears to have been previously married to a Crawford. There is a Richard Crawford listed in the 1820 Census of Rapides Parish as well as a John Mathews.

Margaret Mathews' estate appears to have been probated in Avoyelles Parish. It is not understood why the succession of her estate was filed in Avoyelles. On November 15, 1843 her property was inventoried accepted by the Avoyelles Parish Probate Court Judge Gervais Baillo. Her estate appears to have been valued at about $700.00.

On April 14, 1845 Robert G. Leckie married in Natchitoches Parish a third time. He married Elizabeth Swafford daughter of Thomas Swafford, Jr. and Laurette Nugent. Elizabeth was born on or before October 29, 1811 in Saddle Bayou, Louisiana. From this union one son was born October 2, 1846, Thomas Lomax Leckie, at the plantation home of Robert G. Leckie and Elizabeth Swafford on Perry Branch of Clear Creek near present day Pollock, Grant Parish, Louisiana.

Between 1849 and 1859 Robert G. Leckie acquired several acres of land in what is now Grant Parish, Louisiana near present day town of Pollock. There he settled in becoming a farmer and land speculator. Robert Galatin Leckie died August 4, 1864 at his home on Perry Branch on Clear Creek, Rapides Parish (now Grant Parish), Louisiana. He was buried on the grounds of the plantation in what in now known as the Leckie Cemetery. Elizabeth Swafford died January 25, 1890 at her home on Perry Branch, Grant Parish, Louisiana and is buried besides her husband in the Leckie Cemetery on the old plantation home grounds. The old plantation home burned in 1892.

William Robert Leckie, oldest son of Robert G. Leckie and Sarah Taliaferro, was born January 2, 1803 in Culpeper County, Virginia. He married April 6, 1826 in Rapides Parish Elvira Sexton. Elvira Sexton came to Alexandria, Louisiana at the age of 16 from New England.

In 1826 William Robert Leckie appeared to be practicing law. At that time he was the curator of the estate of William Beatty, who had died sometime before August 1825. This is the same William Beatty at whose residence his Aunt Alice E. Leckie Taliaferro died. The Beatty name appears in other church documents associated with the Leckie family. It can only be assumed that the Beatty Family and the Leckie Family were close friends. Between 1829 and 1833 William Robert Leckie was employed as the Clerk of the Probate Court for Rapides Parish, Louisiana.

 

The Planters' Intelligencer, Vol. IX, No. 46, issued at Alexandria November 16, 1836 reported that William Robert Leckie, son of Robert G. Leckie was a Cashier of the Deposit bank of the N. O. Gaslight & Banking Company. Sometime between 1843 and 1844 William R. Leckie became Sheriff of Rapides Parish, Louisiana. The Sheriff in 1841 was J. M. Wells and he apparently died between 1843 and 1844 while in Office. After the death of J. M. Wells it is believed that William Robert Leckie was appointed to be Sheriff.

William Robert Leckie was definitely Rapides Parish Sheriff between 1844 and 1846. One of the principal documents showing that William Robert Leckie was the Sheriff of Rapides Parish in 1844 is a hand written Court Order for a Sheriff Sale. Additional Sheriff Sales and Tax Notices placed in the local newspapers between 1844 and 1846 also attest to him being the Rapides Parish Sheriff.

Prior to January 1847 William Robert Leckie relocated to New Orleans, Louisiana and established a "Commission Merchant" business at No. 9 Gravier Street. Between 1847 and 1850 William Robert Leckie joined with P. W. Robert and established the "Leckie, Robert & Company," a Commission and Forwarding Merchants business located at 30 Gravier Street, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Between 1850 - 1851 his son, Henry, had joined him in New Orleans, Louisiana. Henry was a store clerk. It is believed that his wife, Elvira Sexton Leckie and their daughters remained in Alexandria, Louisiana until sometime in 1848. Two daughters, Miss C. B. Leckie (Catherine) and Miss E. S. Leckie (Elvira Susan) are identified as attending the Digges Academy in Alexandria and were to take the annual examinations on June 21, 1847.

William Robert Leckie and Elvira Sexton were the parents of eight children, all born in Rapides Parish. Their eldest is their son, Henry Leckie. He was born January 26, 1825. He served as a Private in Company E, 3rd Louisiana Volunteers in the Mexican War. He enlisted in the Confederate Army March 6, 1862 at New Orleans as a Private in the 5th Company Battalion, Washington Artillery. He was promoted from Private to Corporal April 23, 1862.

He returned to Alexandria and married Helen Olivia Hynson. Helen Olivia Hynson was previously married and was the mother of one child Mollie A. Rohrer born September 16, 1860. They were the parents of three children.

Daughter Harriet M. Leckie was born April 18, 1829 and married Blakely Cicero Duke. They were the parents of three children. Blakely C. Duke fought in the Civil War and was also the Treasurer of the City of Alexandria. Daughter Catherine B. Leckie was born about 1832. She never married. In 1891 she was known to be a Matron in the Asylum for Destitute Orphan Boys at 1400 St. Charles Avenue in New Orleans, Louisiana. She died March 21, 1904 in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana. Son Robert Leckie was probably born between 1826 and 1828 in Rapides Parish, Louisiana.

Daughter Elvira Susan Leckie was born January 12, 1836. She married Robert Cecil Hetherwick and they are known to have had at least one son. Daughter Eliza Newton Leckie was born about 1842 and married James Britton McConnell, Jr. in New Orleans, Louisiana. They were the parents of six children.

Daughter Judith Taliaferro Leckie was born November 25, 1843 and married Robert Winton Bringhurst in New Orleans. They returned to Alexandria and made their home. Robert Winton Bringhurst fought in the Civil War. They were the parents of nine children. Daughter Susanhah Henrietta Leckie was born about 1847 and married Robert R. Breeden. They were the parents of eight children.

William Robert Leckie is believed to have died before June 14, 1860 in New Orleans, Louisiana as he is not listed in the 1860 New Orleans Federal Census but his wife and son Harry are listed. Elvira Sexton Leckie died January 3, 1867 in New Orleans, Louisiana.

The second son of Robert Galatin Leckie and Sarah Taliaferro is Edwin Catlett Leckie. Tradition has it that Edwin was born about 1805 in Wilkes County, Georgia. Edwin Catlett Leckie never married.

Except for the short time that he lived in Georgia and Mississippi as a child with his father and mother the remainder of his life was spent in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. His working career evolved around the Law. In 1836 he served as the Deputy Clerk of the Probate Court. Prior to 1841 was elected a Justice of the Peace of the Alexandria Ward. This is a position he held for many years. Edwin Catlett Leckie was also a practicing attorney and a Notary Public. In September 1844 he entered into a Law partnership arrangement with V. F. Cotton. We do not know how long this partnership remained but we do know that it was not in effect in 1851. In 1851 Edwin Catlett Leckie advertised in the Red River Republican his services as an attorney and Notary Public with offices in the Sheriff's Office. His brother, Charles Sydnor Leckie was Sheriff of Rapides Parish in 1851.

The last documented evidence of Edwin being alive is June 13, 1868. On that date a "meeting of the bar of Rapides, presided over by Michael Ryan, adopted resolutions on the death of Judge W. B. Lewis. The signers were M. Ryan, R. A. Hunter, E. C. Leckie, H. S. Losee, James G. White, J. W. Hickman and W. W. Whittington. Major Canfield died in February, 1867." It is believed Edwin Catlett Leckie died before 1870, as he is not found in the 1870 Federal Census. His niece, Annie Leckie has indicated that he died in New Orleans, Louisiana and is buried in the Odd Fellows Cemetery on Canal Street. If this is fact then all three sons of Robert Galatin Leckie and Sarah Taliaferro Leckie died in New Orleans, Louisiana and was buried there.

Maria Emmeline Leckie is the daughter of Robert Galatin Leckie and Sarah Taliaferro. There is much uncertainty as to when and where she was born. The 1850 Federal Census lists her age as 35, which would indicate she was born about 1815. However we know that she married Robert C. Scott of Ouachita Parish, Louisiana on May 26, 1825 in Alexandria, Louisiana. If the Census data is true then she would have been only 10 years old when she married which is unlikely. The 1820 Federal Census of Rapides Parish, Louisiana indicates no white females under the age of 10 in the household of Robert G. Leckie. It does indicate one female between the ages of 10 and 15. This young female is probably Maria Emmeline Leckie and this would put her birth between 1805 and 1810. This range of birth years is more realistic than 1815. She was probably born in Georgia.

Robert C. Scott in 1823 was living in Monroe, Ouachita Parish, Louisiana and was an attorney. In 1823 he established himself as a practicing attorney in Rapides, Ouachita, Catahoula, and Concordia Parishes, Louisiana. In 1823 Robert G. Leckie was owner of the old "Rapide (sic) Inn", a tavern and inn. This establishment was located very near the Rapides Parish Courthouse and Robert C. Scott probably resided there when he was in Alexandria. It was probably at this establishment that he met Maria Emmeline Leckie. We know little else of Robert C. Scott.

We are uncertain as to where Maria Emmeline Leckie and Robert C. Scott resided. We do know that in July 20, 1825 she is listed has having mail at the Alexandria, Louisiana Post Office. As shown in the 1850 Federal Census of Rapides Parish, Louisiana Maria Emmeline Leckie was living with her father. From this we assume either Robert C. Scott died or he and Maria Emmeline Leckie divorced. There are no known children from this marriage.

Charles Sydnor Leckie is the last known son of Robert Galatin Leckie and Sarah Taliaferro. He was born January 22, 1816 in Woodville, Wilkinson County, Mississippi. Charles Sydnor Leckie married Mary Ann Bowie January 20, 1845 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. Mary Ann Bowie was born January 5, 1821 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. She is the daughter of Stephen Bowie and Mary Ann Compton. Her uncle was James (Jim) Bowie of Alamo fame.

Charles Sydnor Leckie was engaged in various mercantile businesses in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. In the 1840's Charles S. Leckie was in partnership with T. G. Compton in the business "C. S. Leckie & Co." On March 28, 1840 he and T. G. Compton dissolved the partnership with Charles S. Leckie becoming sole proprietor of the business. "C. S. Leckie & Co." was primarily in the "medicine" business. There are several advertisements appearing in the "Red River Whig" where several kinds of "cures" were advertised. Some were for "Carpenters' Preparation", restoration of "hair" and dandruff removal, liniments, "Balm of Columbia" and headache remedies.

During this same time Charles S. Leckie was secretary to the Board of Directors of the Red River Rail Road. For a period of time Charles Sydnor Leckie followed in his father's footsteps and served as the Deputy U. S. Marshall of the Western District of Louisiana. We know he was the Deputy Marshall in 1843 from a bankruptcy sale advertisement in the Red River Republican.

For a period of time Charles Sydnor Leckie followed in his father's footsteps and served as the Deputy U. S. Marshall of the Western District of Louisiana. We know he was the Deputy Marshall in 1843 from a bankruptcy sale advertisement in the Red River Republican.

On August 14, 1847 Charles Sydnor Leckie announced his candidacy for Sheriff of Rapides Parish in the Red River Republican. He was elected Sheriff on the first Monday of November 1847 and acceded to office on or about December 4, 1847.

Charles Sydnor Leckie ran for a second term as Sheriff of Rapides Parish. He was re-elected with 73% of the vote in November 1851. See Election return below as published in the Red River Republican.

Charles Sydnor Leckie died, of consumption aboard the River Steamer El Dorado after it docked in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana December 17, 1855. His granddaughter, Annie Leckie has stated that she believes he was buried in the Odd Fellows Cemetery on Canal Street in New Orleans.

Mary Ann Bowie died August 29, 1878 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. She was probably buried in the Rapides Cemetery in Pineville, Rapides Parish, Louisiana.

Charles Sydnor Leckie and Mary Ann Bowie had four sons. Son Albert Bronaugh Leckie was born February 22, 1846 and died June 23, 1852 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. Son Sydnor Isack Leckie was born January 30, 1848 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. He married Mary Quirk Marsh February 9, 1876 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. Mary Quirk Marsh was born July 4, 1854 in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana. They were the parents of two sons and a daughter.

Sydnor Isack Leckie died March 30, 1899 from an accidental shooting. Mary Quirk Marsh died November 11, 1919. Both are buried in the Rapides Cemetery.

Son William Leckie was born January 5, 1850 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. He was engaged in the mercantile business for many years in Alexandria. He married first Martha Irving on January 30, 1877 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. Martha Irving was born May 16, 1857 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana and died June 8, 1879 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. There were no children from this marriage.

William Leckie married second Dora Irving (relationship, if any to Martha Irving unknown) October 19, 1880 in Ouachita Parish, Louisiana. They were the parents of three sons and one daughter. Their daughter, Eva Louise Leckie, was born after her father died. William Leckie died November 17, 1885 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. After the death of William Leckie, Dora Irving married a Brown. Dora Irving died February 3, 1894.

The youngest son of Charles Sydnor Leckie and Mary Ann Bowie was John Compton Leckie. John Compton Leckie was born January 24, 1852 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. Like his father and older brother William he too was in the mercantile business.

John Compton Leckie married Marie Louise Girard April 8, 1874 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. Mary Louise Girard was born December 10, 1855 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. John Compton Leckie and Marie Louise Girard were the parents of two sons.

In the October 8, 1887 edition of the The Ouachita the following was reported: "RAPIDES. John Leckie, a white man born and raised at Alexandria and who was in the mercantile business just at the edge of the corporation limits, was horribly murdered on the night of the 3 d. When discovered he was found in the small room back of his store on the bed where the body had apparently been placed. Blood stains were visible on the floor and bed. The body was resting on the bed with the legs over the side and the arms folded over the abdomen. The right hand pocket of the pants on the corpse was turned inside out. At the foot of the bed was found money to the amount of $29, where it s supposed the deceased had placed it for security. Toche Jenkins, a colored man who was at Leckiés store after every one else on the night of the murder, had left, has been arrested on suspicion and is now in jail. Bloodstains were found on his shirt. Leckie was a man of family and leaves a wife and children."

So on October 2, 1887 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana John Compton Leckie was brutally murdered. He was buried in the Rapides Cemetery in Pineville, La. After John Compton Leckie's death Marie Louise Girard married Louis Girard. They had two children.

The only child of Robert Galatin Leckie and Elizabeth Swafford was Thomas Lomax Leckie. Thomas Lomax Leckie was born October 2, 1846 on the Leckie home place on Perry Branch of Clear Creek about six miles southeast of Pollock in what is now Grant Parish, Louisiana. At the age of 16, just before he joined Company G, 2nd Louisiana Cavalry to fight in the Civil War, he married Rebecca Catherine Conley in 1862. Tradition has it that she was 14 at the time. However, there is one source that gives her birth as August 4, 1846. She was born in Columbia, Caldwell Parish, Louisiana and is the daughter of John Conley and Rebecca Catherine Neal Havard. After their marriage Thomas Lomax Leckie and Rebecca Catherine Conley lived with his parents in the plantation home on Clear Creek.

In November 1863, shortly after the birth of their first child Alice Lindsey, Thomas Lomax Leckie enlisted in the Confederate Army near Opelousas, St. Landry Parish, Louisiana. From the Commissioner of Louisiana Military Records we know that with the troops surrendered by General E. Kirby Smith and paroled June 8, 1965 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana was Thomas Lomax Leckie. We also know that based upon certification from the National Archive that Thomas Lomax Leckie is listed as a Second Lieutenant of Company B, Rapides Militia, Louisiana.

Since his father, Robert Galatin Leckie died shortly before the end of the Civil War Thomas Lomax inherited his father's estate including the plantation home on Perry Branch of Clear Creek. So after the war Thomas Lomax Leckie returned to his home and got about the business of raising his family.

Thomas Lomax Leckie and Rebecca Catherine Conley were the parents of seven children, all born at the Leckie home place on Perry Branch of Clear Creek in Grant Parish, Louisiana. Their first, daughter Alice Lindsey Leckie was born between 1863 and 1864. She died about two years later on December 26, 1886. She is buried in the Leckie Cemetery on Perry Branch of Clear Creek.

Their second child, daughter Susan Rebecca Leckie was October 30, 1865. She married Hiram Sebron Bonner April 25, 1887 in Grant Parish, Louisiana. He was born January 10, 1858. They were the parents of ten children. Hiram Sebron Bonner died January 17, 1936 in Grant Parish, Louisiana and is buried in the Friendship Baptist Cemetery, Pollock, Grant Parish, Louisiana. Susan Rebecca Leckie died July 27, 1953 in Grant Parish, Louisiana and is buried in the Friendship Baptist Cemetery, Pollock, Grant Parish, Louisiana.

The third child of Thomas Lomax Leckie and Rebecca Catherine Conley was son Robert Albert Leckie. He was born January 19, 1868. He married Eliza Jane Lucinda Morgan November 18, 1891 in Ball, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. She was born May 22, 1876 in Grant Parish, Louisiana. She is the daughter of John Franklin Morgan and Mary Ann Lucinda Smith. Robert Albert Leckie and Eliza Jane Lucinda Morgan were the parents of thirteen children, all born in Grant Parish, Louisiana probably on Clear Creek near his father's old plantation home.

Robert Albert Leckie died February 7, 1950 in Grant Parish and was buried February 8, 1950 in the Clear Creek Methodist Cemetery, Grant Parish, Louisiana. Eliza Jane Lucinda Morgan died July 9, 1967 in Columbia, Caldwell Parish, Louisiana and was buried July 12, 1967 in the Clear Creek Methodist Cemetery, Grant Parish, Louisiana.

The fourth child of Thomas Lomax Leckie and Rebecca Catherine Conley was son Thomas Conley Leckie, Sr. He was born September 3, 1872. He married first Rebecca Ann Lott on December 19, 1892 in Rapides Parish, Louisiana. She was born August 24, 1870 and is the daughter of James H. Lott and Mary Jane Willbanks. They were the parents of two daughters. Rebecca Ann Lott died July 3, 1898 and is buried in the Springhill, Cemetery, Ball, Rapides Parish, Louisiana.

Thomas Conley Leckie, Sr. married second Lela Virginia Richardson on November 1, 1900 in Grant Parish, Louisiana. Lela Virginia Richardson was born June 27, 1873 in Grant Parish, Louisiana. She is the daughter of Charles Wesley Richardson and Zelpah Elizabeth Nugent. They were the parents of five daughters and two sons. Lela Virginia Richardson died April 18, 1930 in Buhl, Twin Falls County, Idaho.

Thomas Conley Leckie, sr. married third Viola Mae Green on March 1, 1931. She was born March 26, 1891 in Clay County, Kansas. They were the parents of two sons. Thomas Conley Leckie, Sr. died April 29, 1941 in Buhl, Twin Falls County, Idaho and Viola Mae Green died December 18, 1980 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

The fifth child of Thomas Lomax Leckie and Rebecca Catherine Conley was son Elisha Neal Leckie. He was born July 22, 1874. He married Sarah Laurette Nugent July 3, 1895 in Rapides Parish, Louisiana. She was born July 16, 1876 in Rapides Parish, Louisiana. She is the daughter of Hugh H. Nugent and Missouri Sills. They were the parents of one daughter and seven sons.

 

Elisha Neal Leckie died October 30, 1932 in Grant Parish, Louisana and is buried in the Friendship Baptist Cemetery, Pollock, Grant Parish, Louisiana. Sarah Laurette Nugent died March 27, 1952 and is buried in the Friendship Baptist Cemetery, Pollock, Grant Parish, Louisiana.

The sixth child of Thomas Lomax Leckie and Rebecca Catherine Conley was daughter Louisa Elizabeth Leckie. She was born March 27, 1884. She married Robert Jackson Willbanks September 20, 1900 in Rapides Parish, Louisiana. He was born January 23, 1884 in Rapides Parish, Louisiana and is the son of Robert Wiley Willbanks and Mary Rosalia Banks. They were the parents of ten children. Robert Jackson Willbanks died March 15, 1942 in West Monroe, Ouchita Parish, Louisiana and is buried March 16, 1942 in the Springhill Cemetery, Ball, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. Louisa Elizabeth Leckie died August 13, 1981 West Monroe, Ouchita Parish, Louisiana and is buried in the Springhill Cemetery, Ball, Rapides Parish, Louisiana.

The seventh child of Thomas Lomax Leckie and Rebecca Catherine Conley was an unnamed infant who was buried in the Leckie Cemetery.

During their residency at the plantation home on Perry Branch of Clear Creek Rebecca Catherine Conley Leckie taught school for her and her neighbors children. J. B. Maxvell in the Colfax Chronicle of May 30, 1958 documented this interesting sidelight. "Catherine Conley Leckie (wife Thomas Lomax) road (sic) a little jenny three miles to teach a school on Fish (Big) Creek, where she taught the neighborhood boys and girls their ABC's from the blue back speller. I was one of those boys. Mrs. Leckie sacrificed to lay the foundation upon which our present day education system is built and she at least taught us to behave. She received a salary of $35 per month." On March 26, 1885 Rebecca Catherine Conley died at her home on Perry Branch of Clear Creek in Grant Parish, Louisiana. She is buried in the Leckie Cemetery.

Following the death of Rebecca Catherine Conley on January 16, 1902 Thomas Lomax Leckie married a second time to Susan Mary Bardwell. She was born October 1879 in Louisiana. No other information is available about Susan Mary Bardwell. On April 10, 1917 Thomas Lomax Leckie married a third time to Lou Kline. It is believed that she was his housekeeper. On July 21, 1917, a few months after his third marriage, Thomas Lomax Leckie died. He was buried in the Leckie Cemetery on Perry Branch of Clear Creek in Grant Parish, Louisiana. (RETURN FAMILY HISTORIES)

Acknowledgments: The Peetermans, Van Gossen, Vanderlick, and Jammaer Family genealogies and brief histories were developed in part utilizing (1) the data and information provided by Michel Vandersypen, a Belgium genealogy researcher; (2) the data and information provided by Anny Coosemans, a Belgium genealogy researcher; (3) genealogy data and history information obtained through the genealogy research efforts of Mrs. Leighton D. Miller, Sr. (Theresa Ursula Van Gossen daughter of Mary Martha Peterman Van Gossen) and Mrs. Jerome Vandersypen; (4) data obtained from the estate of Mary Barbara Peterman (Peetermans) Van Gossen; and (5) data and information developed by Gene A. Leckie, grandson-in-law of Mary Barbara Peterman Van Gossen.

The Ducote' Family history was developed using information and data from: (1) "The Ducote Family History" on the Internet by Susan Ducote Gauthier. Her home page address is: http://genowiz.hypermart.net/index.htm; (2) "Some Early Families of Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana", Ducote Family Section by William Nelson Gremillion Sr. and Lucille Edwards Gremillion; and (3) "Recollections 1823 to 1975" compiled by Mrs. Samual B. Coco, Mrs. Lewis L. Lemoine, Jr., Mrs. Gano D. Lemoine, Jr. and Mrs. Owen Gauthier.

(RETURN FAMILY HISTORIES)

 

Belgian Immigrants to Central Louisiana

19th and Early 20th Century

Buvens, Peeter 1835

van Meldaert (became Melder) 1835

De Herdt, Isabelle & children

van Scarbroucks, Frans 1835

van den Wijngaert, Johan 1835

Frans & his son Jozef Dominik

Mues, (became Muse) Heinrick 1844

Peetermans, Joannes Josephus and Ludovicus (Peterman) 1850

De Witte 1852

Mues, (Muse) Frans 1855

Andries, Jan 1856

Van Hoof, Henricus 1856

Fillette 18__

Sterkx before 1860

Daenen before 1860

Peetermans, Joannes Franciscus 1853

Peetermans, Joannes Ferdinandus 1853

Tutenel, Paulus (became Mathews)

Smets 18__

Michiels, Petrus & Emile Francis 1880

Van Gossum, Joannes Cornelius (became Van Gossen) 1881

Verzwijvelt (Verzwyvelt) 1881-1882

Breen 1883

Van Goidsenhoven 1884

Petrus, Josephus 1884

Vandegaers 18__

Thiels 18__

 

 

 

Verheyden 1886

Mertens, Franciscus 1887

van Antwerpen, Philmore 1887

Vanderlick 1887

Vanlangendonck

ver Meersch 1887

Vermaelen 1887

Boogaerts, Félix Désiré 1888

Vandersijpen, Henricus(Vandersypen) 1889

Goddevriend, Joanness Franciscus 1888

Peeters 1889

van de Velde 1890

Janmaert, Norbert (became Jammaer) 1891

Amphion, Frans Henrich 1893

Frederick Dominik

Peetermans, Petrus Josephus 1903

van Asselburg 1904

van Mol ? 1906

Brydel, Gustaof 1908

van der Hoven 1___

DeKeyser 1___

Bruynickx, David 1909

Praet, Octaaf 1911

van Hoof, Louis (nmn), Sr. 1___

Marien 1906-1913

Swinnen 1913

de Bosscher, René 1911

Labro 1___

Asscherick, Leon 1914

Van Mol 19__

Table Compiled by John Boogaerts, deceased

Principal source: Research by the Belgian American Club of Louiisiana, Alexandria, La., and Louis Ernest Van Hoof, Jr., 66 Winegeart Lane, Lamourie, La. 71346, "History of the Louisiana Belgians," paper prepared about 1980.

Return to Family Histories

 

 

1