Page 436

Page 436

 

WILLIAM J. GLASS. This gentleman is a prominent citizen of DeWitt County, Texas, and one whose constancy to the business in hand, and whose thrift, has added so greatly to the value of the agricultural regions of the section. Everything about his large estate, which comprises 1,400 acres, indicates that he is an agriculturist of advanced ideas and progressive princi­ples, and his farm is one of the most productive and best kept in the com­munity. He has 300 acres in a fine state of cultivation, and devotes a consid­erable portion of the rest to the raising of good graded stock. He has also given considerable land to his children. He was born in the Keystone State, February 7, 1818, to John and Mary (Johnson) Glass, who were born in Maryland and Pennsylvania, respectively, the former of whom died in 1850, and the latter in 1823. The paternal grandfather was a native of the Emerald Isle, while the maternal ancestors were of English descent. William J. Glass was reared in the State of his birth, and was educated at Washington College, Washington County, Pennsylvania, from which institution he graduated in, 1846, and in this class also graduated James G. Blaine, of Maine. He began life as a school teacher in his native State, but in 1848 came to Texas, arriv­ing at Galveston in the fall of that year, on election day, and voted for Henry Clay. In 1850 he became President of the College of Seguin; a position he filled with distinguished ability for six years, winning golden opinions as an educator and disciplinarian.            The attendance greatly increased under his rule, and it was acknowledged by all that the institution was more prosperous under his management than it had ever been before. On account of failing health he was compelled to give up this occupation for some time, and came to Concrete, and here was occupied in “teaching the young idea" until the opening of the Civil War, and built up an excellent school at this place. At the end of that time he began raising stock on his present estate, which is one of the finest and most valuable in the county, and is situated about four miles east of Hochheim. The land is slightly rolling prairie, the soil is rich and productive, and all is susceptible of cultivation. In 1850 Mr. Glass led to the altar Miss Fidelia Stevens, a native of Ohio, and a daughter of Obediah Stevens, who came to the Lone Star State about 1849, and by her is the father of eight living children: Glendora, wife of John Hankins, resides at Kerrville; John A. is married and is a stockman of Brown County, Texas; William J., Jr., is a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, is married and resides in Coke County; Mary F. is the wife of Dr. Davis of Mitchell  County; M. H. is married and resides near his parents; Barney graduated from the Medical Department of Jefferson College, Philadelphia in 1885, and later from a New York institution and became a successful practitioner of Cuero, where he died in 1890, leaving a widow; Kate is the wife of J. B. North; Edward, and Maggie, live at home. . Mr. Glass is a member of the A, F. & A. M., is a man of worthy principles, is a useful citizen and very highly respected.        .