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DR. O. D. COPPEDGE. In giving a history of the prominent citizens of De Witt County, Texas, this work would be incomplete were not mention made of Dr. Coppedge, for he is deservedly ranked among its prominent planters and stockbreeders. His estate comprises about 1,000 acres, of which 350 acres are under cultivation, and he has devoted much attention to rais­ing a good grade or stock, being one of the first to introduce graded Jersey cattle in this section, and has raised many fine animals. His property com­prises the site of the first building erected in the village, which was made of concrete material, and from that fact gave the place its name, which it has since maintained. He has also devoted considerable attention to the raising of fruit, and has large orchards. In 1868 he erected a pleasant residence in Concrete, and is possessed of sufficient philosophy to enjoy the comforts of life.  His lands stretch across the rich bottom of the beautiful Guadalupe River, and are very productive and valuable. Dr. Coppedge was born in North Carolina April 15, 1835, and was the eldest of six children born to William D. and Henrietta (Drake) Coppedge, who were also natives of the Old North State, the father being of English descent, his ancestors having come to this country during colonial times. The maternal grandfather; Will­iam Drake, was a Virginian, and was a soldier of the Revolution. William D. Coppedge died in North Carolina in 1890, and his wife in 1892, both hav­ing been worthy members of the Baptist Church. Dr. O. D. Coppedge was educated in Wake Forest College, and in 1854 began the study of medi­cine, graduating from the University of Pennsylvania two years later. He at once began the practice of his profession in the State of his birth, but six months later moved to Texas, locating at Concrete, where he once more began his labors of healing the sick and afflicted. In 1861 he went to Gonzales and joined Smith's Company, Wall's Legion, C. S. A., but before the force could leave the State Dr. Coppedge was taken seriously ill and was compelled to give up all idea of entering the service, but sent a substitute in his place. He returned home, and upon his recovery, about one year later, he joined the State troops, with which he served until the war was over in the capacity of Lieutenant. Since that time he has practiced his profession but very little, his farming and stock-raising interests fully occupying his time. In 1859 he was married to Miss Mary Stevens, a native of Mississippi and daughter of Joseph Stevens, who came to Texas in 1846 and located near the present site of Concrete, locating on a large tract or land. The family was accompanied by Mrs. Coppedge's maternal grandfather, William Steen, who died at Natchitoches, La., on the way thither. Joseph Stevens died in 1861, and his wife May 1, 1860, both worthy members of the Baptist Church. To the union of Dr, and Mrs. Coppedge the following children have been born: William, Mitchie, wife of Claud N. Blackwell; Ettie and Lawrence. Dr. Coppedge has long been connected with the A. F. & A. M., and he and his wife are members of the Baptist Church.