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HENRY VANDERHIDER. Among the worthy residents of DeWitt County, Texas, it is but just to say that Henry Vanderhider occupies a conspicuous and honorable place, for he has always been honest, industrious and enterpris­ing, and as a result has met with more than ordinary success. He is a man well known in agricultural circles, and is recognized as a careful, energetic farmer, who, by his advanced ideas and progressive habits, has done much to improve the farming interests of his section. No man takes a greater interest in the agricultural and stock affairs of this section than Mr. Vanderhider, and no one strives more actively to promote and advance these interests to a higher plane. He is a product of Missouri, born in 1840, a son of Henry Casper and Lavina (Langton) Vanderhider, who were born in Germany and Kentucky respectively. The father came to the United States in his early youth, and after following the occupation of blacksmithing in Missouri for some time, he engaged in merchandising at Perryville, Perry County, Mo., an occupation to which his attention was successfully given until his death in 1841 or 1842. The maternal grandfather, Walter Langton, came to Missouri from Kentucky at an early day, settled in Perry County, and there passed from life about 1845. In 1850 Mrs. Vanderhider, with her mother and brothers and sisters, came to Texas and settled in Lavaca County, and here they pur­chased a goodly tract of land, on which she died in 1888. From the time he was 10 years old Henry Vanderhider has been a resident of Texas. In 1861 he enlisted in Sibley's Brigade, Company C; was at once sent to New Mexico, and was in the battles of Val Verde and Glorietta. This brigade was after­ward disbanded at San Antonio for a month or so in order to obtain horses, and upon being fully reorganized went to Louisiana, and was in several engagements in that State, after which it was ordered back to Texas, and was in the battle of Galveston, when that city was taken from the Federals. After a few weeks it was sent back to Louisiana, and Mr. Vanderhider was in the engagement at Pleasant Hill, in the Red River campaign after Gen. Banks. After the war was over he returned home, engaged in carpentering, and in 1866 was married to Miss Mary Ryan, a native of Texas and the daughter of James Ryan, a Pennsylvanian, who came to this State at an early day, and was a participant in the Texas Revolution. He died at the home of Mr. Vanderhider in Lavaca County. In the fall of 1874 Mr. Vanderhider bought his present farm near Yoakum, but is the owner of two farms, which comprise in all 815 acres, of which 150 acres are under cultivation. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Vanderhider eleven children have been given, nine of whom are living: Agnes, wife of L. C. Knox; James Henry, who married a Miss Man­ning; Walter Patrick, Augustus, who married a Miss Hart; Viola, died at the age or 14 years; Emma, Guy, Henry Leo, died at the age of 3 years; Ed­mond, Julius, and Annie. The family are members of the Catholic Church.