Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Gen Web Project.

Saskatoon
Gen Web Project


"I remember when..."
History for the Saskatoon, Saskatchewan area
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This page was last modified: Monday, 10-Sep-2018 16:30:13 MDT


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Historical Date/s: Type of Event: Spalding

Spalding School Districts: -Champlain -Chelton #2241 -Clearview #1087 -Kingscourt -Lake Edward #2967 -Littlestone # -Rose Bush # -Spalding #1577 (originally called Pilon S.D.) -Sunny View #2307 -Westasta Valley #2945
Source Title: Spalding Roots and Branches Source ISBN: 0-88925-235-1 Author:
Publisher: Spalding and District Historical Society Copyright: 1981
WWW Address: Http://www.
Submitter: Email: gulrich@sk.sympatico.ca

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Historical Date/s: Type of Event: Beauchamp,SK

There was once a small French community west of Spalding, SK that was known as Beauchamp. It was named after the postmaster , Mr. Beauchamp. Today all that remians of the community is the cemetery with one monument displaing the names of all those that were known to have been buried there.
Source Title: Source ISBN: Author:
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WWW Address: Http://www.
Submitter: Garth Ulrich Email: gulrich@sk.sympatico.ca

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Historical Date/s: Type of Event: Magellan,SK > Spalding,SK

"Then in 1919, the C.P.R. came through and the townsite of Magellan was set up. This was not the beginning of the end. It was the end of old Spalding. The Post Office was moved to Magellan. Businesses were moved or closed up. The name Magellan was changed to correspond with the post office. And so our village of Spalding was not always located here, and was for a brief time known by another name.
Source Title: Spalding Roots and Branches Source ISBN: 0-88925-235-1 Author:
Publisher: Spalding and District Historical Society Copyright: 1981
WWW Address: Http://www.
Submitter: Garth Ulrich Email: gulrich@sk.sympatico.ca

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Historical Date/s: About 1903-05 Type of Event: 30 miles from Saskatoon. (NW quarter of section 4, Township 35, Range 1 west of the 31st Meridian.

I am sending you an excerpts, related to the winter, from an autobiography my grandfather, Barton Wallace Harvey, (1880-1972) wrote. (Although he was born and lived most of his life in Ontario where he died at 92, at the time of these stories, he had been homesteading out west in Saskatchewan, Canada). Although it's a little long, I thought some of you, "ancestor-appreciaters" that you are, might enjoy this. "When the cold weather arrived that fall (sic about 1905) I was sorry my cabin was not sheeted up inside with two by fours. I got out of bed one morning and started to dress; it was so cold I was unable to button my pants so I got into bed again and warmed enough to finish dressing. From then on I had the kindling wood ready the night before and in the morning I would hop out of bed , put it in the stove, then dash a bit of coal oil over it and light it. I would then go back to bed. When the place was warm enough I could dress and cook breakfast. I always emptied the kettle the night before, I had another problem when winter came. I was baking my own bread and could not get it to rise during the night. I finally managed by setting a lantern (with the blaze about half) in an apple barrel, then setting the pan of dough in the top of the barrel and covering the dough with paper. I put a quilt over the whole barrel and that did the job." Another winter story he told: "One winter I drove thirty miles to Saskatoon to get supplies and, as we did not have a thermometer, I did not realize how cold it was. I soon found out when I was out on the trail as I had a hard time to keep my face from freezing. I walked behind the sleigh. I was well-dressed, with a coonskin coat and fur-lined cap which covered my ears and forehead. I had coonskin gauntlets with woolen socks under felt boots and Arctic overshoes. About every five miles the horses would start to stumble off the trail; I had to stop, go to the horses and take off my gauntlet and pull ice off their frozen eyelashes. When I arrived in Saskatoon they told me it was 58 below zero (Fahrenheit) and 63 in Prince Albert. They said I was lucky I had to walk behind the sleigh and let the horses go slowly as I might have frozen the horses' lungs and killed them." "The following winter Dad would persist in leaving the cutter and sleighs near the stable. He also used to clean out the stable and throw it just out on each side of the door when he should have loaded it on the jumper and drawn it out on the field. I told him that if we got a blizzard the snow would cover the stable. Well, we had a three-day blizzard and could not get to the stable until it was over. We had the job of digging out the doorways and the animals had even chewed part of the wood in the mangers. I took the horses out first and, after cutting a hold through the ice on the slough, I watered them and turned them loosed for exercise. Then I brought all the cattle to water, and when I looked back at the stable I saw three horses on the roof pawing to get at the hay under the snow. I ran to the stable and got them down. It was a wonder they did not go through the roof. The only thing that stopped them was about three feet of hay on top of the sod. From then until spring old Polly had to sit down and slide on the hard snow to get into the stable. She finally wore most of the hair off the top part of her tail." "I was sitting on the verandah of the hotel in Saskatoon one summer day watching an English family trying to get a team of oxen and wagon backed up to the door of the box car to load their boxes of belongings onto the wagon. I went over to them and told them that oxen were unable to back up when in harness, neither could they hold a wagon going down a bad hill. I suggested that they unhitch the oxen and back the wagon up to the door by hand and to hitch the oxen to the wagon after they were loaded. They were driving ninety miles to Lloydminter to join the Bar Colony. this Colony came out from England before I arrive on the prairie. A few of them left Lloydminster and settled near out settlement. They were all good neighbours and did well." (sic it was my grandfather's great great grandparents who had first come to Canada from England. Elsewhere in the book, he talks about remembering his great grandmother who had come over as a child. He said "I remember my great grandmother. So, you see, people did live a long time in those days.")
Source Title: Barton Wallace Harvey 1880- 1972 Source ISBN: Unpublished Author: B.W. Harvey
Publisher: Unpublished Copyright:
WWW Address: Http://www.
Submitter: Email: aamys@home.com

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Historical Date/s: 1920 to 1950 Type of Event: Saskatoon & others

Please see this article about my grandmother's cousin, Emily Long. http://www.nyherji.is/~halfdan/westward/emily.htm She lived in a huge rooming house which stood where the Sheraton tower is now. It was the third house from the corner near the Bessborough. Emily's room was so tiny it was filled by a cot, a dresser and cupboard with a hot plate. The house was owned by Maude Devine who eventually sold to the builders of the Cavalier, now the Sheraton. Part of the sale agreement provided Maude with a suite and meals at the Bessborough for life. Emily moved to Betel, a home for Icelandic seniors at Gimli.
Source Title: Personal interviews Source ISBN: Author:
Publisher: Copyright:
WWW Address: http://www.nyher ji.is/~halfdan/westward/emily.htm
Submitter: Darrell Email: jd.gudmundson@sk.sympatico.ca

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Historical Date/s: 1920s Type of Event: Salvador area

http://freepages.history.rootsweb.com/~dickbolt/Saskatoon.html
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WWW Address: htt p://freepages.history.rootsweb.com/~dickbolt/Saskatoon.html
Submitter: Email: dickbolt@his.com

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Historical Date/s: Current Type of Event: Saskatoon

Just wanted to let you know that the "little stoen school" house actually is still standing. It's on the University of Saskatchewan Compus just outside Royal Univeristy Hospital. :-) Cool Page
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Historical Date/s: 1913 Type of Event: Laura, SK

My grandfather, Marvin Julius Frederick Renner, has told me he was born in Laura, Saskatchewan in 1913. His father was a Lutheran minister and his parents had 13 children. He remembered looking down the street from his house at age 3-5 and seeing Indian camps nearby. He also remembered Chinese railroad workers and restaurants in the town.
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WWW Address: Http://www.
Submitter: J. Richter Email: jmrwis@hotmail.com

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Historical Date/s: 1850 and 1904 Type of Event: Le Prairie Rhonde

In the 1850's my great grandfather Charles Trottier wintered in a place called Le Prairie Rhonde (Round Prairie) located near the present day town of Dundurn. He and his extended family built the first church in the area but it burned to the ground. As a member of Louis Reil's Exovedate, he left the area after the fall of Batoche and returned to settle the area in 1904 with several families including my father who was born on the trail near Maple Creek. Charles's wife Ursule Lafromboise was the first person buried at the cemetery but is listed as Priscella. Other family members and relatives are also listed on a new site hosted by Rootsweb. A URL is provided below. To verify this information, there are a couple of books available called Gabriels Children by Rita Schilling and Loyal Till Death by Blair Stonechild.
Source Title: Family Lore Source ISBN: Author:
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WWW Address: ht tp://sites.rootsweb.com/~sksgs/metis_round_prairie_cemetery.htm
Submitter: Email: jackietrotchie@yahoo.com

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Historical Date/s: 1919 Type of Event: Saskatoon,Sk

My grandmother arrived in Saskatoon as a WW1 War Bride from England. They had the last house on the prairie out near the airport. The bitter cold winter winds and the poorly built house made her wish she could go home to England. But the bright blue and sunny skies, the fresh air won her heart and Saskatoon was in her blood. She would never return to live in England again. The fresh air and long walks did her good. She lived to be 109 years old. One of Saskatoon's oldest and finest.
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WWW Address: Http://www.
Submitter: Pam Hill Email: pamelarae87@hotmail.com

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Historical Date/s: Type of Event: The Henry Hamilton Museum In Tisdale

This museum is called: The Tisdale and District Museum. It is located in the Henry Hamilton Park. The building itself was a replica of the old train station originally built in Tisdale. The Station was built in the late 70's. Other building found in the Museum grounds are original to the year, mostly originating from the 20's.
Source Title: Source ISBN: Author:
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WWW Address: Http://www.
Submitter: Email: carg@sasktel.net

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