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Our Brother In Red Methodist Weekly News, Muskogee, I.T.
Compiled and Submitted by
Sharron Jo291914@aol.com

The following records were abstracted from the 1890 issues of Our Brother in Red, a weekly Methodist newspaper. These issues were published in Muskogee, Creek Nation, Indian Territory. The editors were Theo. F. BREWER and J. L. FUTRELL.


4 January 1890


A FLOWER FOR HIS GRAVE Rev. T.F. BREWER, Dr. J.R. BREWER and Sister M.E. LOCKE:—
I was filled with both sadness and grief, but not surprised to hear of the death of Dr. S.R. BREWER, your affectionate and devoted brother and a most highly estimated friend of mine. I can offer you no better evidence of my sympathy, than to give a brief expression of my estimate of him as I knew him.

My first knowledge of him was derived from a letter correspondence between him and a lady friend of mine, who subsequently became to me more than a friend. It was in the fall of ‘58, while he was still a student of Yorkville Academy. His letters showed a decided literary taste and his true bent of mind. The first time I met him was at a Fourth of July celebration at Poplar Grove, near Newbern, Tenn., where he made a master’s speech, for one of his age, on Temperance… And when ‘61 sounded the bugle notes of alarm… he was among the first to respond to the call for volunteers. Entering the service as a private he was, by the vote of his comrades called to his company’s head to lead them to victory or to death. His record as a captain is without blot… Once being captured he patiently and bravely endured the hardships and sufferings of a cold northern prison, Johnson’s Island. Being exchanged he at once returned to his command and remained in office until his superiors in office surrendered him and he got an honorable discharge. Making his way home, much of it on foot, he, like most of the true and brave, found himself without money and with no occupation. But he brought with him the true means of success; a good conscience, an indomitable will, pluck and energy. Having a good education he taught school awhile then entered into the study of law at Trenton, Tenn., which was then my home…

I may truthfully assert that few young men have reached the position he did in so short a time. In the space of three brief years from the surrender he was an honored partner of Judge MARSHAL, of Paducah, Ky… There he soon took rank with the best political speakers as well as a successful lawyer of his age. His partner was a firm Republican while he was equally as strong a Democrat. On several political discussion both in Kentucky and Ohio, his antagonist felt the sharp thrusts of his well wielded blade… In the fall of ‘68 when we had assembled at Paris, Tenn., to hold the Memphis Annual Conference, it was announced that SAM BREWER had been licensed to preach and was coming with a recommendation for admission into the conference… Dr. Brewer was licensed to preach, recommended for admission, was admitted, and appointed to an average station, without ever having prayed in public—this I learned from him. Having been transferred that conference year to the Arkansas conference, I never had the pleasure of hearing that gifted young lawyer, but consecrated preacher… He preached his first sermon in the first church in Paducah, right in the presence of the lawyers, judges and politicians with whom he had a few days before been arguing cases before the juries or discussing on the platform the national issues of the day… Few men of our day or any other day has risen as rapidly and traveled as steadily upward as did SAMUEL RICHARD BREWER, the student, the teacher, the soldier and leader, the lawyer, the statesman, the patriot, the husband, the father, and best of all, the minister of the Lord Jesus Christ…
Cordially and Truly, Yours in sorrow, I.L. BURROW, Oklahoma City, Dec. 26, ‘89.


4 January 1890

FULSOM THOMAS, a Chickasaw Indian, was shot and killed by some unknow party near Dougherty, I.T., Dec. 24, 1889.

Bro. J. T. EWEN was born in Lawden [sic] county, Virginia, Oct 3rd, 1847, emigrated to Texas in 1872, married Miss IDA HARRIAGE, Dec. 24, 1874, moved to the Indian Territory the home of Sistor [sic] EWEN in 1877 and died at his home on Big Creek, Ind. Terr., Dec. 5, 1889. Bro. EWEN was converted and joined the M. E. Church South a few years ago under the ministry of Bro. T.H. SHANNON at Martin’s school house, Coody Bluff circuit, Ind. Mis. Conference. Bro EWEN was a good man and much esteemed in the community in which he lived and died. The universal verdict at his funeral was “our best man is gone.” Bro EWEN will be much missed in the neighborhood of Martin’s school house, not only by his surviving widow and four fatherless children but by the entire community and especially by the preacher on the circuit as he was our steward and the only male member of our little class at Martin’s S. H. God bless the afflicted mother and her fatherless children.
Amen. J.W. COWART, P.C. Coody’s Bluff, I.T., Dec. 28, ‘89.

In memory of JAMES M. KING.
He was born in Mississippi in 1836 between Christmas and New Year’s. He removed to this country with his father when a boy. He was a member of Grand Council two years, and of the Choctaw Council eight years. He was a man of influence among his people and loved by all who knew him. He was a father to the orphans, while he had no children he has raised ten. He professed religion and joined the M. E. Church, South, in which he was licensed to preach. He served as local preacher two years after which he went back to the world and lived a sinful life for seventeen years. The Lord laid the hand of affliction on him and he was confined to his bed for eight weeks. The third week of his sickness he professed faith in Christ, after which he was heard praying often and many times sang, “I am going home to die no more.” He told me he was satisfied and ready to die. He departed this life Dec. 13th, 1889, was laid to rest Dec. 14th, at Whitefield, Sans Bois county, Choctaw Nation. I preached his funeral to a large congregation of friends and relatives.
Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of his saints. Wm. P. PIPKIN.

The death of Mr. O. S. MORGAN—
An account of the finding of whose mangled murdered body was given in the Phoenix two weeks ago was a sad comment on the oft used proverb “procratination [sic] is the thief of time.” Mr. MORGAN was a constant attendant and an attentive auditor at the Brushy Mountain camp meeting in September. We staid(sic) together at Mr. HARRIS’ and I had several talks with him in reference to religion and he seemed much inclined to yield but postponed, and the meeting finally closed and with it his last public opportunity to seek Christ. A few days before the time he must have been murdered he came to Bro. AUSTIN on the train and in his talk he told Bro. A. that he had a good praying mother back in Ga. whom he had no doubt was continually praying for him and that he intended to quit his wild ways very soon and that by Christmas he would go home to see her…

A man giving his name as John A. LOGAN was arrested last Saturday by Marshal WEST for passing counterfeit money. It appears that he had his arrangements for manufacturing in the office at the fair grounds.

Fulsom THOMAS, a Chickasaw Indian, was shot and killed by some unknown party near Dougherty, I.T., Dec. 24, 1889.


11 January 1890

Mr. WILLIAM DUEL, a former student at the Indian University, died in Tahlequah last Sunday morning a week ago.

PINK FORD shot and killed CHAS. VARNER near Marietta, Chickasaw Nation, last Saturday.

Robbery at Gibson Station.
Last Sunday night two men called at the residence of M. B. SHANNON and asked him to go to his store and sell them some burrying clothes. On arriving at the store they each covered him with a revolver and demanded him to open the safe, $150 in money and about $100 worth of merchandise was taken.

Pink FORD shot and killed Chas. VARNER near Marietta, Chickasaw Nation, last Saturday.


18 January 1890

The Rev. J.W. JOHNSON of the West Virginia Conference and preacher in charge of Huntington Station died last week.

WALKER BLAINE, eldest son of Hon. JAMES G. BLAINE, Secretary of State, died in Washington, D.C., Wednesday night of acute pneumonia superinduced by a spell of la grippe.


25 January 1890

Mrs. PAULINE ROSS died last Wednesday at the residence of her father, Mr. A. B. DAVIS, near Muskogee. Mrs. ROSS had been in bad health for some time but her death was not expected so soon. We have not the particulars in reference to her death.


ANDY CRITTENDEN SHOT
ANDY CRITTENDEN was dangerously wounded last Thursday evening by City Marshal JOHN WEST. The shooting occurred in front of Hotel Adams about 10:30 p.m., while the South bound Passenger train was standing at the depot.

WEST fired two shots at CRITTENDEN, the first entering his left breast just below the nipple and passing out near his spinal column, and the other entered his right side and was taken out near the spinal column. Both wounds are ugly and the condition of CRITTENDEN is critical. CRITTENDEN was under the influence of whisky. As there were several conflicting reports as to how the trouble originated we will not comment on this unfortunate affair further than to say that some of those who witnessed the difficulty think WEST was justifiable in shooting CRITTENDEN and others think he was not. [Muskogee Weekly Phoenix, 30 Jan 1890 reported that CRITTENDEN was dead.]

Died—In Muskogee, I. T., night of Jan. 13, 1890,
CLARIE BELLE,
daughter of JOHN A. and M.B. PALMER, aged one year, eleven months and four days…

Seven Men Arrested. Charged with Having Enticed an Old Man from Home and Hanged Him. Gainesville, Tex., Jan. 19.-
Deputy Marshal DAVE WILSON and posse arrested last night near Healdton, Chickasaw Nation, seven men, all farmers, charged with lynching an old farmer in that community some six weeks ago named J.L. KEYS. KEYS was called from his house during the night, and upon going to the gate to meet the callers was forced at the muzzle of a winchester to accompany them a short distance to a strip of woods where he was hanged to a limb where his dead body was found the following morning.

The cause of the tragedy has never been definitely known as KEYS was a quiet and industrious farmer. The parties charged with the lynching were KEYS’ nearest neighbors. Three women, wives of some of the men charged with the crime, were also arrested last night charged with being acressories [sic] to the crime. It was the divulgence of the women that led to the arrest of all the parties. The prisoners are now in Ardmore and will have a preliminary hearing there to-morrow before COMMISSIONER LOW. The arrests have caused considerable excitement in the neighborhood where the prisoners reside, as they are generally well respected citizens. The officers claim the have positive evidence as to the guilt of all the prisoners.—Dallas News.

Died. At his home at Webbers Falls, Jan. 14th 1890,
JOSEPH M. LYNCH aged 54 years.
 
His death was sudden and unexpected. He was returning from Briartown, where he had been attending to some business, when he was taken alarming ill, and died shortly after reaching his home. Judge LYNCH, as he was familiarly called, (he having been elected to the judicial bench in the past, as well as to both branches of the Cherokee Council) will be sadly missed by his many friends here, and elsewhere. He was a good neighbor, public spirited, and charitable, as well as a tender and loving husband and father. His bereaved family have the heartfelt sympathy of our entire community. After brief religious services by Rev’s. R. H. GRINSTEAD and A. J. BOYD, of the Methodist Church, his remains were consigned to their final resting place, on the evening of the 16th by the Masonic fraternity here, of which body he was a member…


1 February 1890

Death of CALVIN WATTS.
Dear Bro. BREWER:
With sadness I inform you of the death of our Bro. in Christ and relative, CALVIN J. WATTS. After 23 days of suffering with malarial fever. He passed away at 8 o’clock this morning. He died in full faith of a blessful immortality. “In the midst of life we are in death.” W.J. WATTS. Muldrow, I.T. Jan. 28 1890.

JIMMIE STARR died in the Fort Smith jail last Sunday from the wounds he received last week in Ardmore.

Mrs. RUTH SMITH wife of FRANK SMITH died Thursday at her home near Brushy Mountain. She was burried [sic] Friday.

Mrs. MARY F. WHEELER.
MARY F. WHEELER, relict of the late Judge JNO. F. WHEELER, died in Ft. Smith the 21st inst.

DEATH OF MRS JORDAN.
On last Wednesday at 2:15 o’clock p.m. Mrs. ARLIE MYERS JORDAN, wife of Mr. JOHN JORDAN, died in San Antonio, Texas, where she had gone two weeks ago in search of health. Mrs.JORDAN has been a great sufferer for several months from consumption. Little hope was entertained of her living through the winter when she and her husband left Muskogee for San Antonio, but her devoted husband and friends were unwilling to leave anything untried that would possibly prolong her life.

She leaves a husband and one child to mourn their great loss. Being once a student of ours and a boarder in our family we knew her wll and take pleasure, in this sad hour to her many friends, in giving ou testimony to her many virtures. She was a pure Christian lady… We deeply sympathize with the husband and friends of the deceased…

Died. Sister MANERVA ALAMAY WARD
was born Dec. 15, 1878 and died Jan. the 21st 1890
.
Sister WARD was converted May 1888 under the ministry of L.W. RIVERS and joined the M. E. Church, South in which she lived a worthy member. She was married to her cousin, MR. WARD, in Nov. 1887. Her sickness was of short duration and of such a nature as to say nothing about her prospects of eternal life. We are glad to learn that her life was consistent and upright leaving the evidence shed died in peace. She leaves a husband, father and mother and many relatives and friends to mourn her departure but their loss is her gain.
R.H. GRINSTEAD, P. C. Webbers Falls, I. T.

Sister H. GOODING after a long and painful illness passed away in great peace at her home at Grant Station, within the bounds of the Sugar Creek Circuit. For more than a year she suffered with that fatal malady, consumption. She leaves a devoted husband and five children to mourn her loss…
É H. T. L. From Antler, I.T. Jan. 21st.


February 15, 1890

Dr. O. P. SLINGER died of congestive chill in Lathan, Kansas, January 30. He was taken sick on the 23d.
Miss MAY, his daughter, has gone to live with her grand parents in Ohio.

The papers of this week report the death of the Rev J. L. PIERCE, D. D., a distinguish-ed member of the North Georgia Conference and brother to the late Bishop PIERCE.
Dr. PIERCE died at the home of his son-in-law, Rev. R. P. POWERS, in Texarcana [sic], Ark.

Mr. M. S. BEST, Manager of the Arkansas Lumber Co. yards, died at his home in Oklahoma City of la grippe last week. [15 Feb 1890]

Miss MORRISON, formerly a teacher in the Presbyterian Mission at Tahlequah, died recently in New York.

AGNES, the 6 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. THOS. ROGERS died recently in Fort Smith.

Wm. STACY died last week at Atoka of pneumonia.

GEORGE BLONT shot and killed N. C. JOHNSON last week near Burneyville in the Chickasaw Nation.

Sister LULA T. HERRING, daughter of WM. and SALLIE HERRING, was born in Montgomery County, Miss., Oct. 29th, 1872. She professed religion about three years ago, joined the M. E. Church, South, and died after a short illness in Lamar County, Texas, Feb. 4th, 1890. She was the only child of her parents. She was devoted Christian, and a worker in the church,  I was called up on to preach her funeral, which I did to a large and weeping audience. Her mother requested this wg.
JESSE H. WALKER. Lamar County Tex., Feb. 5, 1890.

From Winnewood. Our Brother in Red,
Our Monday Morning Notes from this circuit have this time a tinge of sadness, caused by the death of one of our member. Mrs. GENEVA H. WINTERS, daughter of Bro. and Sister S. C. SMITH, Baptist, and wife of Mr. W. P. WINTERS, departed this life on the morning of Feb. 7, 1890, after several weeks of suffering from that dreaded disease, consumption.
Mrs. WINTERS was born Jan. 24, 1868, made a profession of religion during the winter of 1886, joined the M. E. Church, South, Jan. 24, 1890. Her stay with us here was short, but blessed be God, she left a testimony that will out last the fleeting years of time. May God blessings rest upon the bereaved families.
We preached her funeral sermon Saturday the 8th of Feb., text Rev. 21, 1, burying her from the Methodist church
JOHN Y. BRYCE. Winnewood, I.T., Feb 10, 1890.

Wife of BUCNER BURNS and daughter of sister HATRY, died at her husband residence is the Chickasaw Nation, Pauls Valley District, Daugherty Ct. and belonged to the M. E. Church, South, at Oil Creek, was Born Dec. 23, 1860, departed this life, Jan 29, 1890. Sister BURNS died as she had lived strong in the faith of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.
She leaves a husband and a good mother and five children (though one a step-daughter) but seemed to think as much of Sister BURNS as if she had been her real mother. She died of congestion of the stomach. She leaves an infant babe four days old.
May the blessings of heaven rest upon the motherless children. Before she died she called her children around her dying bed, told them to be good children and mind their grandma and asked her husband to met her in heaven.
The writer of this is about 60 years of age and have seen a good many people die but never did I see any person die with such victory. Sister BURNS seemed to have lost sight of things of this world and gave herself wholly to the Lord. We will miss Sister BURNS but the loss to the husband, the loss to the children, the loss to the good old mother and relatives and friends is her eternal gain
J. W. CATHEY.

Our Brother in Red:On the 30th of January old aunt LIZA CONNALLY departed this life at her son-in law, JAS. S. HARRIS, near Brushy Mountain. She was born in March, 1816, joined the Missionary Baptist Church about the year 1850, and lived a good member until her death. She had an attack of paralysis in 1886 and was able to get about with the help of a stick until something over a year ago when she became bed-ridden, and remained so until her death. She passed away very quietly, leaving many friends and kindred to mourn her loss. But our loss is her gain.
JAS. CONNALLY. Muskogee, I.T. Feb. 7, 1890.


[Missing Issues]


April 5, 1890

Died, near Twin Mounds, Cherokee Nation, I.T., March 25, 1890,
Mrs. LUCY F. WILLIAMS, wife of C. W. WILLIAMS and daughter of Rev. A. B. and Mrs. J. F. KIRKPATRICK. She was the mother of two children, one a babe eight days old at her death. Previous to her sickness she had made no profession of ChristÉ A short time before she died she told her mother that she did not think she would get well, and was ready to go.
MILTON A . CLARKE.

Brother T. F. BREWER, This month, March 17 days half-past nine o'clock.
ADAM WEBSTER died, School Spencer Academy. Good boys [sic], 14 years old. ADAM been a good boy and both teachers and boys of the school liked him much, and it is with sad heart that we shall lay him away in the little grave yard this afternoon.
Sincerely, Supt. ALFORD DOCKING.

Mrs. EMER CARPENTER, wife of SAMUEL CARPENTER, was born in 1866; converted and joined the M. E. Church, South, August 1885; married March 7th, 86, and died March the 12th ,1890. She died of pneumonia. Her suffering was intense yet not a word of murmur escaped her lips.
She left a precious babe about twenty months old. Husband and father, could that wife and mother send a message from heaven it would be. Bring up our little one in the nurture and admonition of the Lord.
Her funeral sermon was preached by the writer at her father (Mr. HARMON) after which we committed her body to the grave. May God comfort the bereaved husband, relatives and friends.
R. H. GRINSTEAD, P. C.

The Rev. S. E. BARNWELL who was killed in the recent cyclone in Louisville was a brother-in-law to Mrs. WILL AUSTIN of this city. Mr. BARNWELL was rector of St. Johns Episcopal Church.


April 12, 1890

The subject of this sketch, ALBERT WAILES THOMAS, was the second son of Gen. EDWARD L. THOMAS.
He was born in Walker county, Georgia, Feb. 10th 1858, and died in San Antonio, Texas, March 26th 1890.
The writer of this humble tribute knew him from boyhood. In early life he had the advantages of christian disciptline [sic] under a devoted and pious mother. During the Rebellion he was deprived of his father's counsel (he having enlisted in the cause of his Southland, fought bravely to the close of the war.).
For several years he was a student at Emory College, Oxford, Georgia.
He was true to his friends, brave in spirit, courteous in manners and generous to a fault.
In the year '83 he come [sic] to the Indian Territory, and on July 10th 1884 he was married to Miss MARY I. ROGERS. God blessed their union with two bright, pretty children, JENNIE and EDWARD. His home at Kiowa was indeed a happy one.
Passionately fond of music and song; he excelled in both He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, gave liberally of his means to support the ministry, and many a weary itinerant found rest and refreshment under his roof. Always the preachers friend, nothing afforded him more pleasure than to contribute to their comfort.
During the last year of his life he was a great sufferer, but bore his afflictions with remarkable patience and fortitude. He said to the writer last summer, "I am not afraid to die, but I want to get well."
His love for his family made him anxious to live. Several months ago he went with his wife and children to San Antonio, hoping to recuperate his health.
He leaves a wife and two children, a father, mother and brother to mourn their loss. A host of relatives and friends sympathize with them in their bereavement.
L. W. R.

Death of Dr. BRUTON.
On last Saturday morning Dr. C. W. BRUTON died at the home of his son in Muldrow, I.T. Dr. BRUTON was one of the old and respected citizens of his community. He was a worthy member of the Methodist Church. We hope some one will furnish us with more extended notice of his death.

JOHN ELETCHER [sic] SOUTHERN, infant son of Mr. B. F. and Mrs. JOSIE SOUTHERN, died March 27, aged 17 days. He has gone to Him who said, "Suffer little children to come unto me."
R. N. GRINSTEAD.

Sister FLORENCE FOLSOM departed this life April 1st. at Mr. GREEN MCCURTAINS, where she had been living for about three years except what time she was in school. She was a student at New Hope.
She united with the M. E. Church South, in July 1888. On her death bed she testified of the living faith which she enjoyed. WM. P. PIPKIN.


April 19, 1890

Death of Lieutenant SIXKILLER.
On last Tuesday morning at 5 o'clock Lieut. HENRY SIXKILLER of the Indian police died at the residence of this broth-in-law [sic], Mr. T. R. KNIGHT, Vinita, I.T. in the thirty second year of his age. His disease was consumption. For the last six months his health has been declining. Three weeks ago he started with his family to Colorado but was taken worse at Vinita and died. He was buried from the Methodist church in that town Thursday afternoon.
A large number of friends attended the funeral services which were conducted by the pastor, Rev. L. W. RIVERS and T. F. BREWER. He leaves a wife who is also in a low state of health and one child.
We extend sincere sympathy to them in this hour of great bereavement. HENRY was a good officer and had many friends who will be sorry to learn of his death.

CHARLES GOODWIN, a full blood Creek, was murdered last week at his home fifteen miles west of Tulsa. He was murdered with an ax. His wife is charged with having committed the murder. [19 Apr 1890]

Ex-Chief IRVIN LONG, of the Wyandott Nation, died last Saturday at his home near Prairie City.

JOHN GRIFFITH was shot and killed near Poteau, I.T. last week by FRANK HARRIS. GRIFFITH shot HARRIS twice before he died. The killing is said to have been unprovoked.

Died, JOSEPH R. VANN, oldest son of Hon. W. D. VANN, of Cooweeskoowee district, died at home of his father, of congestion of the brain, April 13 '90.
[from] J. S. LAMAR. Chouteau, I.T., April 14, '90

Distressing Accident. A renter on CAMPBELL RUSSELL'S farm in Young's Bend killed his babe last week.
The babe was sitting on its mother's lap when the father began to amuse it by snapping at what he supposed to be an empty pistol. One chamber of the pistol was loaded and it went off, killing the child and slightly wounding it's mother.

From Choteau, I. T. Our Brother in Red,
Mr. WILLIAM MELTON aged 35 years, died at the home of his brother, DAVID MELTON, April 14th, 1890. He had been struggling for more than three months with that wasting disease, consumption.
The deceased had for more than two years been managing the store of Mr. W. C. ROGERS at this place. He made a profession of religion about one year ago, but had never connected himself with any church. He had many friends and those who knew him best had learned to love him most.
J. S. LAMAR. Choteau, April 15, 1890.

Obituary. Sister E. KIMBERLIN
“fell on sleep” April 5, 1890, at White Bead Hill, I.T.
You doubtless remember her kind attention shown toward preachers during the sessions of the two Annual Conferences held here. Her illness being of a protracted nature, she suffered much and long. But death at last ended her sufferings, we believe forever. She was ready, waiting, and when the hour of release calmly and gladly passed out into the valley of shadows, without a fear of evil… Religious services were conducted by Brothers NAYLOR, GLANVILLE, and the writer. The funeral procession was the largest ever withessed [sic] at this place.
J.C. POWELL. White Bead Hill, April 4, 1890.



Court Notes.

The adjourned term of court met on Monday, January 6, and proceeded to business by empanelling [sic] a jury. Only criminal cases will be heard by the jury and but few of them this term. The first case presented was U.S. vs Henry Graham of Kingfisher, Oklahoma, who was charged with the malicious shooting of a fine buggy horse valued at one hundred and twenty five dollars. The trial resulted in a conviction. In cases of this kind the jury assesses the value of the animal and the court renders judgement in favor of the owner for three times the value. The punishment must also be either fine or imprisonment in addition to the judgement.

The second case gone into was U.S. vs James Edwards charged with assault which was partially tried Momday [sic] evening then dismissed.

The court next took up the charge of assault against Harry Harris of Muskogee and on trial it appearing that he had beaten his wife he was convicted

Court has moved slow as if waiting for some expression from Congress, and if Congress increases the jurisdiction of this court and establishes others as proposed there will be fewer criminals running loose in the Territory and a greater number confined to the Muskogee jail and instead of being a harbor for the outlaws of the United States the Territory will become orderly and civilized in all its parts and people. The jail now contains fifteen prisoners under the care of W. S. Hisey, the enterprising and efficient jailorÉ [ 11 Jan 1890]

The Cronin murderers were formally sentenced last Tuesday by Judge McConnell. Life imprisonment is the penalty given them. Kunze was admitted to bail in the sum of $5,000. [18 Jan 1890]

The President has commuted to imprisonment for fifteen years the sentence of Madison James who was convicted of murder in Arkansas and sentenced to be hanged yesterday. [18 Jan 1890]

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A number of masked men robbed the railroad and express at Wynnwood last week. They knocked the agent, Mr. Lane down with a six shooter. Secured about $200. [25 Jan 1890]

J. M. Osborne and W. F. Bowlin are in jail at Paris, Texas, charged with the robbing of the depot at Wynnewood two weeks ago. [25 Jan 1890]

Andy Crittenden Shot.

Andy Crittenden was dangerously wounded last Thursday evening by city Marshal John West. The shooting occurred in front of Hotel Adams about 1030 p.m., while the South bound Passenger train was standing at the depot.

West fired two shots at Crittenden, the first entering his left breast just below the nipple and passing out near his spinal column, and the other entered his right side and was taken out near the spinal column. Both wounds are ugly and the condition of Crittenden is critical. Crittenden was under the influence of whiskey. As there were several conflicting reports as to how the trouble originated we will not comment on this unfortunate affair further than to say that some of those who witnessed the difficulty think West was justifiable in shooting Crittenden and others think he was not. [Muskogee Weekly Phoenix, 30 Jan 1890 reported that Crittenden was dead.] [25 Jan 1890]

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Seven Men Arrested.

Charged with Having Enticed an Old

Man from Home and Hanged Him.

Gainesville, Tex., Jan. 19. Deputy Marshal Dave Wilson and posse arrested last night near Healdton, Chickasaw Nation, seven men, all farmers, charged with lynching an old farmer in that community some six weeks ago named J. L. Keys. Keys was called from his house during the night, and upon going to the gate to meet the callers was forced at the muzzle of a winchester to accompany them a short distance to a strip of woods where he was hanged to a limb where his dead body was found the following morning.

The cause of the tragedy has never been definitely known as Keys was a quiet and industrious farmer. The parties charged with the lynching were Keys' nearest neighbors. Three women, wives of some of the men charged with the crime, were also arrested last night charged with being acressories [sic] to the crime. It was the divulgence of the women that led to the arrest of all the parties. The prisoners are now in Ardmore and will have a preliminary hearing there to-morrow before Commissioner Low. The arrests have caused considerable excitement in the neighborhood where the prisoners reside, as they are generally well respected citizens. The officers claim the have positive evidence as to the guilt of all the prisoners.&emdash;Dallas News. [25 January 1890]

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Jim Starr, alias, Jim July, husband of the late Belle Starr, was shot last week at Ardmore by Bob Hutchens and Bud Trainor. Starr was out on bond for horse stealing. It is thought Starr will most likely die. [1 Feb 1890]

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Jerome Fitzgerald was brought here from Oklahoma by Dep. Metz charged with assault and the court ordered the attorney to institute proceeding against him for resisting the officers arresting him. His bail was fixed at 750 dollars in total and in default he was consigned to jail. [1 Feb 1890]

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Jimmie Starr died in the Fort Smith jail last Sunday from the wounds he received last week in Ardmore. [1 Feb 1890]

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George Blont shot and killed N. C. Johnson last week near Burneyville in the Chickasaw Nation. [15 Feb 1890]

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Judge John Taylor, of Skullyville, I.T. was robbed last week. From the Fort Smith Elevator we take the following account of the robbery

Judge John Taylor, of Skullyville

County Robbed on Thursday Night Last.

During the past four or five months several robberies have been perpetrated, in different parts of the Indian country and the similarity of each indicates strongly that the same gang, or a part of it, has been engaged in all of them. The latest outrage of this character reported is the robbery of Judge John Taylor, residing near Buck Creek court house, about thirty miles from this city, in the Choctaw Nation. On Thursday evening last a young man came to his house and asked accommodation for the night. He was taken in and after supper hired to the Judge to work on the farm. Some time after supper the stranger stepped out of the house and soon returned with an accomplice, who threw a table cloth over his head and shoulders as he came through the dining hall. Covering Mr. Taylor and his brother-in-law, Sam Nelson, with their guns they forced them to submit to having their hands tied behind them with ropes, and seating them in chairs commanded them not to move on penalty of death. Then while one of them ransacked the premises the other kept watch over the two men. The robbers secured about $30 in cash, a gold watch and chain belonging to Mrs. Taylor, a lot of silver ware, a winchester rifle, a pistol, two or three pocket knives, a razor, a silver thimble and various other articles of more or less value. After being assured that they had secured all the money about the place, they lighted Mr. Taylor's lantern and took that along in order to find their way out in the darkness. One of the miscreants said he believed he would wear Mr. Taylor's boots off if they would fit him and deliberately sat down and tried one of them on, but it did not fit and he left it. After the robbers left Mrs. Taylor untied the ropes and released her husband and brother, but as the robbers had wholly unarmed them they could make no immediate pursuit. On Friday the surrounding country was scoured, but not any of the robbers could be found. They started off with a shot gun, but threw it away a short distance from the house. Mr. Taylor offers $235 reward for their capture, and a description of the robbers and property they got will be found in another column.&emdash; Elevator. [5 Apr 1890]

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Marshal West bagged two whiskey peddlers last Monday&emdash;Chas. Smith and Joe Welch. [5 Apr 1890]

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United States Marshal Yoes took the folowing [sic] convicts to the Arkansas penitentiary on Wednesday

Dr. W. J. Cooper, adultery, 18 months; William Holland, Mack Gee, Spencer Landrum, Arch Landrum, Tobe Lynch, George Heiman, William Partlow, larceny, one year each; One Eunick, George McAlester, introducing and selling liquor in Indian country, one year each; Joe Van Meter, illicit distilling, one year; James Grimes, counterfeiting, eight months; J. N. Wilcox, violating postal law, three months. Elevator. [5 Apr 1890]

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Court Notes.

The United States Court for the Indian Territory once more grinds out law. The attendance is smaller than at any former term but the number of cases for trial will be greater on account of so many cases being continued from last termÉ

ÉPleas of guilty were entered during the first four days by eight parties. Tom Smith for disturbing religious meeting was given five days in addition to the twenty-five he had already spent in jail.

Thos. Hinds for assault was sentenced to one day in jail in addition to the twenty-four already served, together with a fine of $50.

Lewis Spencer got one day and $50 fine for assault.

L. M. Price and J. W. Boffet were arraigned and plead guilty to a charge of timber cutting under the following circumstences [sic]Sickness and cold weather had found the parties without fuel and each party cut a half load of wood from government lands. They were released with a fine of ten dollars which was promptly paid.

Robert With and H. A. Griffith under very mitigating circumstances entered a plea of guilty and were also relased with a fine of ten dollars.

Amos McKenney, another timber cutter plead [sic] guilty and was discharged with a fine of one cent and no costs to pay.

The first trial entered into was against J. C. Hall charged with assault and occupied all Tuesday afternoon and resulted in a verdict of acquittal

On Wednesday the case of assault against Jerome Fitzgerald was tried and a verdict of guilty taken by consent at the close of the government evidence. He was sentenced to 30 days in jail and a fine of $50.

Calvin Willis was put on trial for disturbing religious worship on Wednesday afternoon and acquitted. The case of Joseph Middleton for killing a mule, after considerable discussion was dismissed.

Adam Brady, of Muskogee, was then tried for assault and the case continued until Thursday forenoon when a verdict of guilty was rendered.

- ? -ustave Illo was acquitted from a charge of malicious mischief.

Mary Carrer a colored citizen of the Cherokee Nation was put on trial for assaulting another Cherokee citizen. An able argument was made to the poin that citizens by adoption were entitled to the same rights under the treaty of '66 as Indians by blood, but the court held that while Indians by blood have the right under that treaty to be tried by their own courts only [,] yet negro citizens are subject to this court also. She was convicted and sentenced to one day in jail and $50 fine.

Benjamin Dunlap plead [sic] guilty on Thursday evening to a charge of assault and was sentenced to jail for one day and fifty dollars fine.

J. L. and John Low plead [sic] guilty to cutting timber and like all the other frivolous cases of that kind which were based on cutting timber from the parties own claim the court gave them the lightest the law would allow being one hour in jail and one cent fine. D.C. [12 Apr 1890]

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Capture of the Dora Thieves

The three men who robbed the store of F. M. Rigsby [or Bigsby] at Cherokee (Dora) Station in Crawford Co. Arkansas last Saturday evening while making their way out of the country undertook to rob the three ferrymen at Cache Creek, near Skullyville last Sunday. In the fight one of the robbers, Jim Davis, was killed dead; another, John Boyd, was wounded and captured, and the other, Harry Echols, escaped but is being pursued by officers. John Danby, one of the ferrymen is though to be fatally wounded. [12 Apr 1890]

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Death of Lieutenant Sixkiller.

On last Tuesday morning at 5 o'clock Lieut. Henry Sixkiller of the Indian police died at the residence of this broth-in-law [sic], Mr. T. R. Knight, Vinita, I.T. in the thirty second year of his age. His disease was consumption. For the last six months his health has been declining. Three weeks ago he started with his family to Colorado but was taken worse at Vinita and died. He was buried from the Methodist church in that town Thursday afternoon. A large number of friends attended the funeral services which were conducted by the pastor, Rev. L. W. Rivers and T. F. Brewer. He leaves a wife who is also in a low state of health and one child. We extend sincere sympathy to them in this hour of great bereavement. Henry was a good officer and had many friends who will be sorry to learn of his death. [19 Apr 1890]

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Deputy Marshal Shot.

At the house of Henry Heightman nine miles from Claremore last Friday night Deputy Marshal Floid Wilson was shot through the neck and hip by Alex Cochran and his son Jesse. It seems that Wilson and posse went to Heightman's to arrest Bud Maxwell, an escaped convict and also arrested a friend of Cochran on a whisky [sic] charge. As the Marshals were leaving the house they were told by Cochran that they could not take the man away, when the Marshal threw a cartridge into his gun a general fusilade took place, resulting as above stated. Sentinel. [19 Apr 1890]

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Charles Goodwin, a full blood Creek, was murdered last week at his home fifteen miles west of Tulsa. He was murdered with an ax. His wife is charged with having committed the murder. [19 Apr 1890]

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Capt. W. L. Couch, who was shot by J. C. Acams [Adams] in Oklahoma last week, is reported improving, but the doctors think he will be permanently lamed. [19 Apr 1890]

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John Griffith was shot and killed near Poteau, I.T. last week by Frank Harris. Griffith shot Harris twice before he died. The killing is said to have been unprovoked. [19 Apr 1890]

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There is considerable excitement in our midst over the killing of one and wounding and arrest of another of the men that robbed Judge Taylor a few days ago. Some others made good their escapeÉ J. A. Smith. Oak Lodge, I.T., April 7, 1890. [19 Apr 1890]

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Court Notes.

Pleas of guilty have been entered this week by Marion Webb, assault, fined ten dollars. Edward Madden for disturbing religious worship was given 15 days in jail and $5 fine. William Ward guilty of cutting timber in the Cherokee country explained that is was done under authority of an Indian and was let off with $15 fine. Green Muskgrove for disturbing religious worship was sentenced to ten days in jail and a $50 fine. Jerome Fitzgerald on a plea of guilty to resisting arrest was sentenced to three months in jail and $100 fine in addition to the former sentence for assault of thirty days and $50 fine.

A number of persons this term have plead [sic] guilty to small offenses rather than stand the expense and delay of a trial. This accounts for the smallness of the sentence in many cases.

Young Moses Perryman, nephew of Chief Perryman and Mr. Silas Childers were arraigned and plead [sic] guilty to disturbing religious worship. The minister of the congregation and also the Hon. Pleasant Porter each made a eloquent plea for the the boys and the court liberated them with a fine of $10.

Andrew Nagles was tried for cow killing and the evidence was purely circumstantial as it is in most cases of this kind the jury were directed to return a verdict of acquital [sic] from the box.

Jerome Fitzgerald from Oklahoma was convicted from the box for assault and given thirty days and $50 fine.

Adam brady [sic] was sentenced for one day in jail for assaulting a party at a crap game in Muskogee.

J. B. Miller from Oklahoma was convicted of assault but owing to the circumstance of his wife having died during his trial he was given but one day in jail and then allowed to go home.

On Saturday afternoon the trial of Mr. T. J. Ethridge for assault took place. He was charged with a deadly assault upon one of the Brown Brothers near Bragg Station. His defense was good and he was acquitted.

Andrew Napier from the Chickasaw country was acquitted of a charge of cattle killing.

Robert L. Bales was acquitted from a similar charge on circumstantial evidence.

Chas. Shirely [sic] was arraigned for a similar charge and being a pauper an attorney was appointed for him and his trial resulted in a conviction and judgment for three times the value of the horses which had been proved worth 50c. 75c. and $1 each. Jail sentence was delayed.

An interesting case was that of John and Bell Randolph, Tony Pyson and one Roberts, all negroes from Purcell charged with assault. Six negro witnesses made up the crew and the trial resulted in the conviction of all and the sentence of John Randolph to three months in jail and $100 fine. The other three were granted new trials on an error of the record.

Several civil cases have been dismissed and a few criminal ones continued. John Randolph was tried on an additional charge of disturbing religious worship and on conviction was given thirty days and $25 fine.

Jas. Kirk charged with killing cattle was acquitted after a trial lasting over a day and the hearing of 14 witnessesÉ

David Price after examination and conviction before the commissioner applied for writ of habeas corpus on the ground that he was arrested in Arkansas out of the jurisdiction of the court. The case has not yet been decided. D.C. [19 Apr 1890]

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Judge Parker has passed the death sentence on Eugene Stanley and John Boyd, who were tried before the Fort Smith court for murder. The 21st of April is set for their execution. [17 Jan 1891] [Editor's noteBoyd's and Stanley's sentences were reversed on appeal, both received new trials, were convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to ten years. See Glenn Shirley, Law West of Fort Smith (LincolnUniversity of Nebraska Press, 1968).]

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Court Notes.

John Pemberton, of Muskogee, was recently commissioned a Deputy United States Marshal.

G. W. Hendrix was bound over last Saturday on a charge of carrying a pistol.

Evelyn Allen, the young fellow who was sentenced at South McAlester last term for six months for the larceny of $40, and afterwards discharged from custody on a writ of habeas corpus by Judge Parker, has discovered that he should have let well enough alone. The court for the western district of Arkansas held that the court for the Indian Territory had no jurisdiction, but held the accused there for trial. He was convicted and sent to the house of correction at Detroit for two years.

The jailor's registry shows the following entries since the last issueGeorge Windom, assault, committed; Samuel Walls, weapons, committed; W. L. Wiggins, same.

J. H. Cox was brought in by Deputy Adams and committed on a charge of larceny. James Buck, brought in by Deputy Genung, committed. William Oscar, assault, brought in by Deputy Genung, committed. James Myers, disturbing the peace, brought in by S. T. Wyckoff, committed. Frank Kennedy, assault and battery, brought in by Deputy Wyckoff, committed. Kennedy was surrendered by his bondsmen. [17 Jan 1891]

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[Missing Issues]

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Court Notes.

The following jail record has been made since our last issueChock Thornton, disturbing the peace, brought in by Dept. Frank Sinnett; Dan Stackstill and A. J. Crowl, assault, by Dept. W. C. Simpson; William George, larceny by Dept. Bud Kell; Wm. Anderson, introducing and selling liquor by Dept. J. B. Pemberton; Robert Childers, intro [remainder not legible] [4 Apr 1891]

Judge Shockleford [sic] and Prosecuting Attorney Waldron return to Ardmore Wednesday, where court reconvened on Friday morning.

The force of Dept. Marshalls [sic] have again been put into active work as the officials have directed warrants to go in crimes which have not for some time been prosecuted.

Richard Sorrell, (colored) charged with larceny of a watch, and a white boy charged with stealing a horse were taken to Fort Smith Monday by Dept. West.

Bob Childers who was brought in recently on a whisky charge is the notorious "Bob" who is under bond at Fort Smith on several serious charges.

Express Agent Coover who was arrested last week and taken to Ft. [sic] on charges of selling and introducing was discharged by the commissioner.

Boude Compton, under conviction at Fort Smith for the murder of Morgan near Frozen Rock more than a year ago has not been sentence [sic] since the supreme cort [sic] affirmed the dicision [sic] of the lower court. The supreme court may fix the day of execution. An effort is being made for executive interference. [4 Apr 1891]

[Editor's noteBood Compton, convicted of shooting his companion Sam Morgan in the back, was executed on 30 June 1891. See Glenn Shirley, Law West of Fort Smith (LincolnUniversity of Nebraska Press, 1968).]

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Adams Doomed.

In the trial of Adams for the murder of Capt Cruch [Couch] in Oklahoma some time last year, the jury at Wichita last week brought in a verdict of murder in the first degree. The day of execution is fixed for the 26th of June. [4 Apr 1891]

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The Prisoners Escaped.

Eufaula, I. T. , April 20.&emdash;Those who, through the storm of Sunday, traveled from the country round, the nearest railroad station being this point, some 60 miles distant to the Court House of the Wewaka [sic] district, Creek Nation, to witness the execution of the seven negroes condemned to be shot today were doomed to disappointment. No prisoners were to be seen, and all the officers were scouring the woods in pursuit of four of the condemned men, who through the carelessness of their guards, escaped Friday night and have not been recaptured. Those who escaped were Ross Riley, Perry Johnson, Cudjo Barnett and Douglas Brown. The latter [Éhaving been convicted] for the third time of horse-stealing was, under the laws of the Nation, condemned to be shot. The other three of the seven&emdash;Lake Andy, Prince Hawkins and Jeff Brown&emdash;were pardoned Saturday night by Governor Perryman.

The crime for which six of the men were sentenced was the killing of Robert Reed and Wiley Wallo, two Tulsatowa [sic] Indians, who, with warrants for a negro named Bruner, on October 20, 1889, in attempting to arrest him, killed him. In retaliation Lake Andy, Prince Hawkins, Jeff Brown, Ross Riley, Perry Johnson, Cudjo Barnett and Caesar James, the latter convicted but not captured, rode from a neighboring church, after hearing the news of Bruner's killing, to Tulsatowa [sic] and killed Reed and Wallo, shooting them literally to pieces.

So 20 light horsemen of the Wewaka [sic] and Deep Fork districts had been summoned to the scene of the proposed execution to prevent any rescue by friends of the condemned men, rumors of which were afloat, but arrived too late. The Tulsatowa [sic] Indians are greatly excited and trouble is anticipated. There was but one guard over the men, who were chained together, a negro, Robert Taylor, a light horseman of the Wewaka [sic] district, and it is thought that he connived at their escape. In the light of surrounding circumstances, in fact, it is thought that the authorities were not worried whether the prisoners escaped or not. The Tulsatowa [sic] Indians demand that every effort be made for the recapture of the escaped men. [25 Apr 1891]

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NOTES FROM THE FIELD

A Shocking Crime.

Ardmore, I.T., April 17. James H. Walner and posse came in today from the Wild Horse with William Burlison, Frank Jones and De Armond, charged with the murder of Edward Howell, January 6, 1891. It seems that De Armond and Jones have been living on Howell's place, and thinking if he could be put out of the way they could get possession of the place. Not being equal to the task of dispatching their man they employed Burlison to do the work for them, promising to pay him $500 when the work was done. Howell was killed and buried in an out house on the place, but becoming uneasy lest some one moved into the house and discover the crime, he was taken up and buried in another place. They failing to pay Burlison for his work, he went and reported the matter to Dr. Robertson, taking the doctor with him to the grave, but when an investigation was made the body could not be found. So Burlison goes to his men;De Armond and Jones;who confessed to him that they had taken the body from the grave and burned it, which was found to be correct, as parts of the charred remains were found at the place where they told Burlison that they had done the horrible deed. They were all brought before Commissioner Flemings here today, who had them committed to jail without bond. William Burlison is 22 years old, from Tarrant county, Tex., and has been in the Territory four months. Frank Jones has a family, is 26 years of age, is from Grayson county, Tex., and has been in the Territory four months. De Armond has a family also, is 24 years of age, from Fannin county, Tex., and has been in the Territory four months. Edward Howell was a part Choctaw, and brother to Dr. Thos. Howell of Arbuckle, who is well and favorably know in the Territory. This is a shocking crime, and the guilty parties deserve to be punished. They will go to Paris for trial. Respectfully, J. N. Moore. [25 Apr 1891]

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Court Notes.

The jailer has received and taken the measure of the following prisoners

Charles Carter, introducing [whiskey], arrested by Deputy D.W. Foster; committed. John Wetch, assault, arrested by Deputy West; gave bond. Samuel Rose, surrendered by bondsmen on charge of selling liquor; delivered to jailed by Deputy Parnell. John Brackman, carrying weapons, arrested by Deputy W. C. Simpson; committed.

George Wright, gaming, arrested by Deputy M. Woods; committed. Wright is one of the plaintiffs in the famous horse race replevin suits which are the fruits of a jockey race near Muldrow last fall.

John Turner and Ellis Whistler, by Deputy Bart Solomon, on charges of introducing; each furnished bond. Robert Bybee, carrying weapons. Deputy B. T. Hughes made the arrest; gave bond. Joe Bowers, gaming, by Deputy J. B. Pemberton; gave bond. George Sanders, gaming. Deputy M. Woods delivered prisoner to jailer; committed. John Jones and General Smith, introducing and selling, arrested by Deputy J.S. Ward; committed. Charles Barber, introducing and selling, arrested by Deputy D. Adams; committed.

Deputy Depew was up from McAlester Wednesday. He states that since the court at Ardmore has given the defendants convicted of crime the punishment they deserve, many escapes from officers have occurredÉ [25 Apr 1891]

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[Missing Issues]

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Court Notes.

Robt. Reynolds, breach of the peace, dismissed. Maryland Beck, assault and battery, plea guilty, fine $95. Frank Barton, breach of the peace; plea guilty, fine $20, paid. Joseph Fletcher, assault and battery; plea of guilty, fined $15É Jas. W. Scott, assault and battery, plea of guilty, fined $10É John Fitzgerald, disturbing the peace, pleas of guilty, finedÉ A. R. Burris, breach of the peace, plea of guilty; sentence to pay fine of $15. Solomon Cornell, disturbing worship, pleased guilty; sentenced to $10, paid. James A Deforce, aggravated assault pleaded guilty to simple assault, fined $15, paid. Henry Nicholson and Byrd Nicholson, disturbing the peace, plea of guilty, each fined $10, paid.

Lacy Crain pleaded guilty to gaming, fined $20. Defendant wished to argue question as to amount of fine. Fine paid.

S. V. Capps, disturbing the peace and carrying concealed weapons, jury trial, verdict guilty, motion filed for new trial [not legible].

A. J. Blackwell, carrying weapons, dismissed; also one case of disturbing peace. The defendant pleaded guilty to the third case for breach of the peace, sentence, fine of $10, paid.

Harden Blansett was charged with aggravated assault in two courts, the jury found him guilty on one. Sentenced to pay $50 and one day in jail. This was the minnimum [sic].

There has been little business before the commissioner owing to the absence of Major Nelson for the past week. A full report of the proceedings is withheld because the minute book of the clerk is not accessable [sic].

Joe Gibbs on Monday was arrested by deputy Pemberton for using indecent language. Joe promptly knocked the officer down and on interference of Mr. W. T. Hutchins he too, was assaulted, but

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