A History and Biographical Cyclopaedia of Butler County, Ohio
Pages 268 - 273

RAILROADS.

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The idea of a railroad early took possession of the imagination of the dwellers in Butler County. By the Miami Canal they had been placed in connection with the East, but the progress was still very slow. The earliest projected road that benefited Hamilton and Cincinnati was the Mad River and Lake Erie, and it was also the first built. Its charter was granted January 5, 1832, and it was authorized to construct a railroad from Dayton to Sandusky. To New York, Albany, and Buffalo, said a Buffalo paper of 1835, the Mad River Railroad was of vital importance. There was a road then being constructed from Schenectady to Utica. "This done, to say nothing of a railroad from Utica to this city, the matter of a journey from New York to Cincinnati will stand thus:

"From New York to Albany, five. P.M. to six A.M. next day, by boat; Albany to Utica, nine A.M. to five P.M., by railroad; Utica to Buffalo, four A.M. to six A.M. second day, by stage; Buffalo to Sandusky, nine A.M. to nine A.M., third day; Sandusky to Cincinnati, ten A.M. to nine A.M. next day: In all four days and five nights.

"Thus much for time, now for expense.

From New York to Albany $1.00
Albany to Utica $3.00
Utica to Buffalo $8.00
Buffalo to Sandusky $4.00
Sandusky to Cincinnati $6.00
Total $22.00

"Such, we believe, will cover the distance when conveyance shall have been completed. From Cincinnati to New Orleans, and the whole intermediate distance of navigation, by the largest steamboats, is at no season interrupted by a want of water. The Mad River Railroad from Sandusky to Dayton once completed there, and the travel from the lower Mississippi to New York, with much of the business that now stops short of the latter city, will be brought through by this route. We venture the prediction that a daily line of steamboats between Buffalo and Sandusky will find full employment to convey to and from the railroad the people that will pass upon it after it shall lie in full operation."

The Little Miami Railroad was the first to touch Cincinnati from the north. Construction was begun in 1837, but progressed slowly. It was open for traffic from Cincinnati to Milford in December, 1842, to Xenia in 1845, and to Springfield in 1846.

It is probable the original idea of the Cincinnati, Hamilton, and Dayton Railroad was Henry S. EARHART's. At any rate, he was the first one who did any thing towards putting it into execution. According to his own account, he suggested it to John WOODS, then the great man of Hamilton, one who always kept his eyes open for any thing to improve the town or neighborhood. Mr. WOODS took an active interest in the matter, and with Mr. EARHART obtained subscriptions enough to make a temporary survey. The sums offered varied from three dollars to forty-five, and the aggregate was intended to lie used simply to pay the expenses of the men employed. The engineers were to receive nothing. John W. ERWIN then as now a prominent engineer of this city, was engaged to go with the party, but could not join them until they reached Carthage. Mr. EARHART had with him his sons, Martin and James, who drew no compensation. George R. BIGHAM ran the compass line. The men tented out, and were provided for by a commissary, Henry AUCHEY.

The beginning of the surveying trip was from the end of Third Street. They crossed the ponds at the south part of the town, and laid their course in the direction in which Jones's Station now lies. Mr. JONES had not then taken up his residence in that locality. They camped there the second day. It was all woods, and they staked their way through every hundred feet. There were few settlers along the route at that time. At Jones's Station Dr. CLOSE, of Springdale, since dead, met the surveying party. He wanted them to run their investigating line so as to take in Springdale. Mr. EARHART told him that the land there was much higher than he could get by another route; that he could make an easier road than by way of Springdale. He insisted, however, and so they ran a line taking the eastern side of the Cincinnati and Hamilton Pike, and coming into Carthage by the way of where the county Poor House is now. Between Hamilton and Jones's they had occasion to go through a corn-field. They were as careful as they could be, bending the corn one side in the rows in order to run their line. The owner came out and said:

"What are you doing here? Is that you, Mr. Earhart?"

"Yes," he answered, "it is I, and I am running a railroad line from Hamilton to Cincinnati."

"Well," said the farmer, "I think they had better send you to the lunatic asylum."

From Carthage down they followed the Millcreek Valley, substantially as the road is now. Near the valley the line crossed the creek and struck into Freeman Street, the whole distance measuring twenty-two miles and a fraction. The termination, as they designed it, was in the neighborhood of where Lincoln Park is now.

The Cincinnati, Hamilton, and Dayton Railroad Company was chartered on the 2d of March, 1846, having solicited a charter as the Cincinnati and Hamilton Railroad Company, its present corporate name being conferred by Charles ANDERSON, then a member of the Legislature from Dayton, and afterwards lieutenant-governor of the State. He did this without conference with those interested. The original incorporators were as follows:

John MCLEAN, Samuel FOSDICK, John C. WRIGHT, Jacob BURNET, Josiah LAWRENCE, Jacob STRADER, and George P. TORRENCE, of Hamilton County; John WOODS, William BEBB, Lewis D. CAMPBELL, John W. ERWIN, Charles K. SMITH, Aaron L. SCHENEK, Francis J. TYTUS, Abner ENOCH, Dr. Andrew CAMPBELL, Samuel DICK, George L. WREUN, Solomon BANKER, and John M. MILLIKIN, of Butler County; Jacob ZIMMER, C. N. HUBER, Lewis HASSELMAN, Perry PEASE, Alexander GRIMES, Daniel BECKEL, J. D. PHILLIPS, Jonathan HARSHMAN, H. S. GUNEKLE, James C. NEGLEY, Samuel BOHRER, and Edward W. DAVIES, of Montgomery County, and John D. MULLISON, John G. LAW, George L. DENISE, 0. H. SCHEUCK, Joseph H. BROWN, Aaron B. EARHART, and Denise, of Warren County.

In 1849 the capital stock was increased to $2,500,000, and October 12, 1864, to $3,000,000. In 1866 it was increased to $3,500,000. The original charter was prepared by John WOODS and Lewis D. CAMPBELL, who from the beginning were the chief men. The first meeting of incorporators was held at the Pearl Street House, in Cincinnati, in 1847, when Lewis D. CAMPBELL was elected president. Not long after, actual work began.

On the 9th of December, in that year, the principal part of the survey of the final location of the above road had been made, and the estimates of the engineer received. The route chosen was thought to be shorter and on more favorable ground than was at first expected, and, therefore, involving much less expenditure. A large part of the road was level, the greater part of the grades requiring only from one to five feet elevation to the mile. The highest elevation was thirty feet to the mile, and this extended over a space of but four and a quarter or five miles. The road ready for the superstructure it was estimated could be built for $48,673, and the entire road of single track, with turnouts, etc., for $80,000. For $90,000 persons were then ready to contract. The distance is twenty-one and a half miles. The expense which the construction of the road involved was about half that at which the eastern roads were built.

Mr. CAMPBELL on the 30th of March, 1848, issued the following advertisement:

"RAIIROAD LETTING.

"Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the undersigned in Hamilton, on Saturday, April 29th, between the hours of ten o'clock A. M. and four o'clock P. M., and at the office of King & Anderson, Esquires, Third Street, in Cincinnati, on Monday, May 1st, between the same hours, for the grading and masonry of so much of the Cincinnati, Hamilton, and Dayton Railroad as lies between the point at which the two turnpike roads unite immediately below Hamilton, and the point at which the line of the road crosses the road to Lockland.

"The work will be staked off in sections of proper length, and specifications prepared for examination on the 20th of April. The engineer will be on the line to give such explanations as bidders may desire, and the undersigned will be in attendance on the days above mentioned for the purpose of giving such information as may be required in relation to the terms and conditions of the contracts.

"L. D. CAMPBELL,
"President of the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton Railroad Company.

"P. S.-It is hoped that the work on the south end of the road also will be ready for letting in a short time.''

Mr. CAMPBELL was elected that year to Congress, and was succeeded as president by S. S. L'HOMMEDIEU before October, 1848. DEGRAFF, a noted railroad contractor, built the road. Dayton subscribed little or nothing, as the road in the first place was to be constructed from Hamilton to Cincinnati. It was not long before the work came almost to a standstill because subscriptions could not be obtained to the capital stock, and it was thought in Cincinnati that if forty men could be obtained to subscribe each ten thousand dollars the additional money could be borrowed. These names were procured, and Mr. L'HOMMEDIEU went to New York and obtained the additional capital. CAMPBELL had had much difficulty in making them believe in Cincinnati that there would be enough business to take a loaded train each way every day.

The "First Annual Report of the President and Directors of the Cincinnati, Hamilton, and Dayton Railroad Company" gave a good account of the condition and prospects of this work. The location of the entire section between Cincinnati and Hamilton had been finally and definitely made, and the right of way secured on all but a few unimportant links near this city. A donation had been made by Jacob HOFFNER of five acres of land in Cumminsville for a passenger station, workshops, etc. Nearly five acres had been obtained by the company, in fee, between Fifth and Sixth Streets, in Cincinnati, east of the Whitewater Canal, for a passenger and miscellaneous freight station.

At Hamilton sixteen acres had been granted for depots by Messrs. BEBB, WOODS, CAMPBELL, and ERWIN. In addition several small tracts of land deemed necessary for the uses of the road had been offered between Hamilton and Cincinnati. The first section was a fraction over twenty-five miles in length. Of this section twelve miles had a grade from level to ten feet per mile, and thirteen miles from ten to twenty feet per mile; eighteen miles of it ran straight lines, and one-fourth of a mile described a curve, with less than 3,800 feet radius.

The embankments were nineteen feet wide, single track, and the excavations twenty feet at the sub-grade line. The earth work was to be covered with good gravel two feet deep and twelve feet wide. The masonry was all to be of a strong and permanent character; the bridges, of Howe‘s improved plan; the superstructure, of locust cross sleepers; the T rail, of the most approved pattern, weighing sixty-five pounds to the lineal yard. From Hamilton to Dayton several routes had, on the 23d of May, 1850, undergone preliminary surveys, one of which would be chosen at an early day, and the right of way secured. Between Hamilton and Dayton no curve was required with a radius of less than 5,730 feet to the mile. The length of this section of the work was thirty-four miles, more than three-fourths of which would be straight lines. With reference to other tracks, which would inevitably run into this main and substantial trunk, the report said:

"The board are happy to add that, as the certainty of the early completion of our road through this great avenue to the city became apparent during the past sea- W. DAVIES, of Montgomery County, and John D. MULLISON, John G. LAW, George L. DENISE, 0. H. SCHEUCK, Joseph H. BROWN, Aaron B. EARHART, and Denise DENISE, of Warren County. In 1849 the capital stock was increased to $2,500,000, and October 12, 1864, to $3,000,000. In 1866 it was increased to $3,500,000. The original charter was prepared by John WOODS and Lewis D. CAMPBELL, who from the beginning were the chief men. The first meeting of incorporators was held at the Pearl Street House, in Cincinnati, in 1847, when Lewis D. CAMPBELL was elected president. Not long after, actual work began. On the 9th of December, in that year, the principal part of the survey of the final location of the above road had been made, and the estimates of the engineer received. The route chosen was thought to be shorter and on more favorable ground than was at first expected, and, therefore, involving much less expenditure. A large part of the road was level, the greater part of the grades requiring only from one to five feet elevation to the mile. The highest elevation was thirty feet to the mile, and this extended over a space of but four and a quarter or five miles. The road ready for the superstructure it was estimated could be built for $48,673, and the entire road of single track, with turnouts, etc., for $80,000. For $90,000 persons were then ready to contract. The distance is twenty-one and a half miles. The expense which the construction of the road involved was about half that at which the eastern roads were built. Mr. CAMPBELL on the 30th of March, 1848, issued the following advertisement: "RAIIROAD LETTING. "Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the undersigned in Hamilton, on Saturday, April 29th, between the hours of ten o'clock A. M. and four o'clock P. M., and at the office of King & Anderson, Esquires, Third Street, in Cincinnati, on Monday, May 1st, between the same hours, for the grading and masonry of so much of the Cincinnati, Hamilton, and Dayton Railroad as lies between the point at which the two turnpike roads unite immediately below Hamilton, and the point at which the line of the road crosses the road to Lockland. "The work will be staked off in sections of proper length, and specifications prepared for examination on the 20th of April. The engineer will be on the line to give such explanations as bidders may desire, and the undersigned will be in attendance on the days above mentioned for the purpose of giving such information as may be required in relation to the terms and conditions of the contracts. "L. D. CAMPBELL, "President of the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton Railroad Company. "P. S.-It is hoped that the work on the south end of the road also will be ready for letting in a short time.'' Mr. CAMPBELL was elected that year to Congress, and was succeeded as president by S. S. L'HOMMEDIEU before October, 1848. DEGRAFF, a noted railroad contractor, built the road. Dayton subscribed little or nothing, as the road in the first place was to be constructed from Hamilton to Cincinnati. It was not long before the work came almost to a standstill because subscriptions could not be obtained to the capital stock, and it was thought in Cincinnati that if forty men could be obtained to subscribe each ten thousand dollars the additional money could be borrowed. These names were procured, and Mr. L'HOMMEDIEU went to New York and obtained the additional capital. CAMPBELL had had much difficulty in making them believe in Cincinnati that there would be enough business to take a loaded train each way every day. The "First Annual Report of the President and Directors of the Cincinnati, Hamilton, and Dayton Railroad Company" gave a good account of the condition and prospects of this work. The location of the entire section between Cincinnati and Hamilton had been finally and definitely made, and the right of way secured on all but a few unimportant links near this city. A donation had been made by Jacob HOFFNER of five acres of land in Cumminsville for a passenger station, workshops, etc. Nearly five acres had been obtained by the company, in fee, between Fifth and Sixth Streets, in Cincinnati, east of the Whitewater Canal, for a passenger and miscellaneous freight station. At Hamilton sixteen acres had been granted for depots by Messrs. BEBB, WOODS, CAMPBELL, and ERWIN. In addition several small tracts of land deemed necessary for the uses of the road had been offered between Hamilton and Cincinnati. The first section was a fraction over twenty-five miles in length. Of this section twelve miles had a grade from level to ten feet per mile, and thirteen miles from ten to twenty feet per mile; eighteen miles of it ran straight lines, and one-fourth of a mile described a curve, with less than 3,800 feet radius. The embankments were nineteen feet wide, single track, and the excavations twenty feet at the sub-grade line. The earth work was to be covered with good gravel two feet deep and twelve feet wide. The masonry was all to be of a strong and permanent character; the bridges, of Howe‘s improved plan; the superstructure, of locust cross sleepers; the T rail, of the most approved pattern, weighing sixty-five pounds to the lineal yard. From Hamilton to Dayton several routes had, on the 23d of May, 1850, undergone preliminary surveys, one of which would be chosen at an early day, and the right of way secured. Between Hamilton and Dayton no curve was required with a radius of less than 5,730 feet to the mile. The length of this section of the work was thirty-four miles, more than three-fourths of which would be straight lines. With reference to other tracks, which would inevitably run into this main and substantial trunk, the report said: "The board are happy to add that, as the certainty of the early completion of our road through this great avenue to the city became apparent during the past season, other lines of railroads naturally falling into it have been projected, and several of them put under contract. The Mad River and Lake Erie Company are pressing forward their road to meet us at Dayton, which will unquestionably be completed before our road can be. The Columbus and Xenia Company obtained from the last Legislature a charter for extending their road to Dayton. This work will soon be constructed. The Greenville road is entirely graded. From Hamilton to Eaton, up the valley of Seven-Mile, has been let to responsible and efficient contractors, and is believed will be graded during the present season. A careful survey of a continuation of the road from Eaton to Richmond has just been completed, demonstrating that a most favorable line can he located between these towns, requiring a maximum grade of only twenty-five feet to the mile. Surveys have also been made from Hamilton up the valley of Four-Mile, and thence through Connersville to Rushville. Both these latter branches, passing up beautiful valleys to the table-lands, with an almost imperceptible grade, aim at Indianapolis, where they cross the Madison and Bellefontaine roads at right angles, and meet numerous other connections, among which are the roads to Terre Haute, on the Wabash, and to Chicago, via Lafayette, parts of both which lines are in progress of construction."

The following is a statement of the earnings of the first year by its secretary. The earnings for the month of October, 1852, were over thirty thousand dollars. The abstract is as follows:

EARNINGS OF CINCINNATI, HAMILTON, AND DAYTON RAILROAD COMPANY FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1825.

Number Passenger Freight
Passengers Earnings. Earnings. Total.
October, 1851 18,186 $16,306 $532 $16,838
November 13,716 11,862 608 12,441
December 14,493 11,445 4,888 16,334
January, 1852 11,401 8,736 6,008 14,745
February 12,311 9,893 4,377 14,270
March 16,265 13,557 5,509 19,067
April 17,088 14,314 6,166 20,481
May 18,096 15,386 7,314 22,701
June 19,389 16,315 7,781 24,096
July 22,581 17,768 8,532 26,301
August 19,733 15,458 9,552 25,011
September 20,981
16,943
12,194
29,138
204,198 $167,950 $73,467 $241,427

Of the above earnings, $219,548 was local, and $21,877 was through business.

When it is considered, says the Cincinnati Gazette of that date, that the road had made no pretensions during that year (owing to the want of first-class steamers from Sandusky and the flat-bar rail on part of the Mad River road between Sandusky and Springfield) to compete for through travel, the success of the first year's business must be gratifying to those who take an interest in such improvements. The Hamilton and Eaton road, connecting with the Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton at Hamilton, had only been in partial operation twenty-seven miles for a few months. By the close of that year it would be open to Richmond. Early in March, 1853, the Greenville and Bellefontaine roads would unite at Union, giving uninterrupted railroad connection between Cincinnati, Indianapolis, Terre Haute, and Lafayette. About the same time the Toledo and Norwalk road would be open to Bellevue, connecting the Cincinnati, Hamilton, and Dayton, through the Mad River road, with Toledo and Chicago. From these sources a large accession of freight and travel might be expected. Before the opening of Spring navigation the Mad River and Lake Erie road would be completely relaid with T rail, fully ballasted, and would then, in connection with the Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton road, make one of the most pleasant routes eastward. The companies forming the line would have ready two of the fastest and safest steamers which ever made their appearance on the lakes.

An important decision was made by the board of directors of the Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton company, at a regular meeting, which would give much satisfaction to the business community generally, and tend to lessen the cost of transportation between Cincinnati and all portions of North-eastern Indiana. The board, with a view to accommodate all the Indiana railroads, built and to be built, entered into an agreement with the several roads forming the line from Cincinnati to Chicago to lay down a second track as far as Hamilton, on the narrow or Indiana gauge, by the time the line was finished to Logansport; and the several roads agreed to form an exclusive connection with the Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton road for twenty years.

The first ticket was sold on the 19th of September, 1851, at Hamilton, by Henry S. EARHART. The office was at that time in a brick house, at the corner of Caldwell and Fourth Streets. Mr. EARHART remained ticket agent for more than twenty-five years, and was succeeded by his son.

The number of tickets sold by Mr. EARHART for the north and south line alone, during November and December, 1852, was 4,880, or precisely eighty per day-- an increase of 1,078 over November and December, 1851. The number sold during January and half of February was 4,186, or ninety per day. The number sold at Cincinnati for Hamilton during the Winter was about one-third greater than that of tickets sold for Dayton.

Recently there has been a practical consolidation between the Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton, and Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, and Indianapolis Railroad, and more recently still attempt at organic union. Of the exact status of this we are not advised.

There are upwards of twenty miles of rail on this road proper, within the county, and eleven stations. Jones's is the first one on entering from the south; and then follow Smith’s, Schenck's, Lindenwald, Hamilton. North Hamilton, Overpeck's, Busenbark's, Trenton, Middletown, and Post-town. The Eaton road followed next. It was laid out by John W. ERWIN in the Winter of 1849. Henry S. EARHART was an assistant. it follows the line of Seven-Mile Creek. and goes through Seven-Mile, Collinsville, and Somerville.

John WOODS took an active part in the building of the Eaton and Hamilton Railroad Company, of which he became president, on retiring from the office of auditor of state. Previous to the second election, after Mr. WOODS became president, many of the stockholders had wished a branch road to be constructed from Eaton to Piqua, which was opposed by Mr. Woods. This lost him his election.

The Cincinnati, Richmond and Chicago Railroad Company is the successor to the Eaton and Hamilton Railroad Company, which was chartered February 8, 1847, with authority to construct a railroad from Eaton, Preble County, by such route as the directors might select, to Hamilton, Butler County.

November 1, 1864, the Eaton and Hamilton Company leased that part of the Richmond and Miami Railway extending from the point of connection on the State line to the junction or switch about two miles east of Richmond. Becoming financially embarrassed, suit was brought against it in the Butler County Common Pleas Court, by Joseph B. VARNUM, for foreclosure of mortgage. Pending the proceedings, the company was reorganized, and on the 3rd of May, 1866, the new arrangement was perfected by filing certificates with the Secretary of State, the new company assuming the name of the Cincinnati Richmond and Chicago Railroad Company. On February 19, 1869, the company leased its road in perpetuity to the Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton Railroad Company.

The Junction Railroad Company was incorporated by the State of Indiana February 15, 1848, for the construction of a road from Rushville, through Connersville and Oxford, to Hamilton, with the permission of the State of Ohio. March 8, 1849, the Ohio Legislature passed an act granting the right of way. Other companies were merged and leased, until the road is now known as the Cincinnati, Hamilton, and Indianapolis Railroad.

John WOODS became president of this road after retiring from the Eaton road, to the prosecution to which he bent all his energies to bear, and much of its early success was owed to him. He held his office until the period of his death, half a dozen years.

In 1853 the President of this road made his first annual report to the stockholders. We draw upon it for the following information concerning the progress of the work.

An amount of stock which was deemed sufficient to warrant a commencement of the undertaking was obtained, and, an arrangement having been made with the Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton Railroad Company which secured the completion of the whole road from Rushville to Hamilton, the division from College Corner to Connersville was put under contract in January for the grading, masonry, and bridging. The work was taken in sections and subdivisions by efficient. responsible contractors, at prices much below the rates at which other Western roads had been obliged to pay.

In June a contract was made with Messrs. BATES and NEAL, experienced and energetic railroad builders, for the grading and masonry of the division extending from Connersville to Rushville. This was comparatively the most expensive division of the road. On the 2nd of August the remaining divisions, from Hamilton to College Corner and from Rushville to Indianapolis, were put under contract for the construction of the grade and masonry. The division from Hamilton to College Corner was awarded to William HIGDON and from Rushville to Indianapolis to Messrs. CRAYCRAFT, WILLIAMS, and RYAN.

The superstructure of the bridges on the second division was awarded to Messrs. TYMON and RINDGE, who executed a contract for building the bridges on the plan known as THAYER's Patent Truss Bridge. Bids were also received for building the bridges upon the other divisions Contracts were made to furnish the cross-tics upon the whole road from College Corner to Indianapolis, and bids received for delivering the cross-ties upon the division from Hamilton to College Corner.

The first division from Hamilton to College Corner was awarded to William HIGDON on the 2nd of August. The work was not begun until September and then was vigorously prosecuted. The foundations of tile piers and abutments for the bridge over the Miami at Hamilton were excavated, and the timber and masonry put down during the period of extreme low water, and the masonry raised as high as it was safe to be during the winter. The whole amount of work done on this division was more than thirty thousand dollars. A large force was still at work on this part of the road.

The second division, from Connersville to the State line, was put under contract in January. Nearly three-fourths of the work on this part of the road had been done, amounting to one hundred and ninety-five thousand dollars. The work on the third division, which extended from Connersville to Rushville, had been commenced. The clearing and grading of the fourth division, extending from Rushville to Indianapolis, was begun by Messrs. CRAYCRAFT, WILLIAMS, and RYAN at several points.

The whole amount of the work performed up to that time was two hundred and forty thousand dollars. The estimates were regularly paid to the contractors, and a considerable sum advanced to them on account of the January estimates. Tile divisions from Hamilton to Connersville would he completed in less than one year.

On Saturday, the 4th of June, 1859, the road was opened to Oxford, and two trains of eighteen or twenty cars started at half-past ten o'clock from Hamilton, with about one thousand passengers, to visit the terminus of the road. Upon arriving at the Oxford depot, they were met by a delegation of citizens of that town, headed by Marshal MATSON and the Oxford band, when a procession was formed, which marched down to the college campus, where a collation was served. The immense gathering was addressed by Dr. HALL, president of the Miami University, in an appropriate and pleasant manner. The doctor was followed by William H. MILLER, the energetic president of the Junction Railroad Company, with whose remarks all appeared to be well pleased.

The Junction road was completed as far as College Corner, twenty miles from Hamilton, and the first passenger train passed through at the end of November, 1859. A pleasant company of excursionists had been hastily collected for the "opening." They made the trip without any marked incident, but with much jollity and merriment. As far as completed, the work was of the best and most substantial kind.

The Junction Railroad crosses the river at Hamilton over a handsome bridge. It is, including its culverts and embankments, two thousand and sixty-five feet long, although the main bridge, where it crosses the Miami, is but seven hundred feet long, and is supported by four arches of one hundred and seventy feet each. It is covered with Mosely's corrugated iron, and is fifty feet above low-water mark. The viaduct at the west end is six hundred and sixty-five feet long, crosses three streets at the tops of the houses, and has seventeen arches built of Dayton stone. The grade from the Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton depot for four miles west, to the summit level, is sixty-five feet to the mile. The engineering of this magnificent superstructure was done by John S. EARHART.

The Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati and Indianapolis Railway Company runs through the eastern portion of the county, going nearly north and south. Its original name here was the Cincinnati and Springfield Railway Company, and it wits incorporated by filing a certificate of organization in the office of the secretary of state on the 9th of September, 1870. The road was to extend through the counties of Clarke, Montgomery, Greene, Warren, Butler, and Hamilton. It was projected to form in connection with other roads already constructed, a trunk-line between the Eastern cities and Cincinnati, starting at Cincinnati. The road was constructed from Ludlow Grove to Dayton, a distance of 48.80 miles and the remainder of the original route had been already built.

The Cincinnati Northern runs for a mile through the southeast corner of Union Township.