Green Brown

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Descendants of Green BROWN

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Generation No. 1

1. Green7 BROWN (James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1) was born 10 May 1782 in East Machias, Maine, and died 03 December 1848 in Meddybemps, Maine. He married Nancy CONNICK 27 March 1804 in St. David, N.B., Canada, daughter of Joseph CONNICK and Susanah. She was born 25 June 1786, and died 26 August 1868.

Notes for Green BROWN:

For the early history of Green Brown (which is not repeated here), please see:

"History of James & Green Brown in St. David Parish as well as elsewhere in Charlotte & Washington Counties" prepared by Steve Robbins; online prep by Tom Moffatt tmoffatt@nbnet.nb.ca (December 26, 2000)

Much of the information on children of Green Brown comes from a letter written by Mrs. Donald G. Robbins (10 Stratford Road, Barrington, R.I. 02806) to Roger A. Gray, Wesley, Maine, 6 February 1971. [As Mrs. Robbins supplied birth, marriage and death dates for Green Brown and Nancy Connick, and for their child Joseph Green Brown Jr., who was her grandfather, it is assumed that Mrs. Robbins had this information from a private family record such as a family Bible.]

Note that there is some conflict between Mrs. Robbins' data and other sources. Mrs. Robbins assumes that Green Brown's full name was Joseph Green Brown, as his son was named Joseph Green Brown, Junior. Mrs. Robbins states that Green Brown was a soldier in the War of 1812; this seems unlikely and a request by Steve Robbins in 1974 to U.S. National Archives turned up no service records for any "Joseph Green Brown". Mrs. Robbins states that Green Brown was born May 10, 1781; the published "Earliest Records of Machias, Me." (compiled by Jackman) gives his birth date as 10 May 1782.

 

Roger Gray of Wesley, Maine believed that Green Brown had a daughter who married a Bearce; that this couple's daughter was Agnes Bearce who married the famed Maine author Holman Day. So far, no record has been found to prove this. However, there is a clue: Holman Day's wife helped organize the 50th wedding anniversary of Catherine (Burdin) Wilder who was a granddaughter of Green Brown:

"The house was beautifully decorated in every room with yellow and golden colors predominating. This work was done by the Boston author and artist, Inez G. Thompson, assisted by Mrs. Holman F. Day. These ladies have been here and engaged in this work for several days and nothing could be more artistic or finely done than their decorations." [Newspaper clipping: ""The Golden Wedding of Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Wilder. An All Day Reception at the Wilder Home at Chases Mills --- A Merry Time. Chases Mills, Me., April 21 [1910]" (source not identified, and undated; but was probably Lewiston Journal, April [22?], 1910), in collection of Sarah (Sanborn) Robbins. (Note that this village of Chases Mills is the one in Turner, Maine, not the Chases Mills which is near Machias, Maine.) This article has photographic portraits of "Mrs. and Mrs. H. M. Wilder". Steve Robbins has a photocopy.]

Also, there are several Bearces listed in a 1903-1904 private "census" of Turner, Maine: Turner Post Office census:

"Bearce, Mellen A.

Olive H. (Smith) [wife]

Ralph, non-resident [son]

Bearce, Z. H.

Vestie H. (Ricker) [wife] "

[Turner Town Register, 1903-4. Copy at Maine State Library, Augusta, Maine

In the 1881 atlas of Washington County, there is an "I. Bearce" living in the northeast corner of Meddybemps, Maine. This map also shows that the only residents on Green Hill in 1881 were R. G. Bridges, M. T. Bridges, and A. T. Allen; there was also a school house shown on the west side of Green Hill Road at its intersection with the main highway in Meddybemps; the cemetery is not shown on this map ["Meddybemps", Atlas of Washington Co., Maine. Houlton : Colby & Co., 1881]

Gravestone for Green Brown and wife in Cemetery on Green Hill Road, Meddybemps, Maine:

Green Brown, Died Dec. 3, 1848, Aged 67 yrs 5 mo.

Nancy, his wife, Died Aug. 26, 1868, Aged 82 yrs 9 mo.

Directions to cemetery (written in 1973 by Steve Robbins): Coming from Gillespie's potato farm to Meddybemps Lake, on left is a dirt road with a stop sign at its end. The cemetery is on this dirt road [Green Hill Road], 0.4 miles on the left. Green Brown's stone is near the gate and to the right, lying nearly flat on the ground. Also buried here is his daughter Catherine (Brown) Burdin with husband and two children.

L. Austin Gray, Jr., notes that "There are 6 or 8 old cellars on Green Hill. The old cemetary [sic] was on the road up to Green Hill. But Gillispies [sic] made a new road up there & it goes by the cemetary [sic] and starts out near their potato house. There is another cemetary [sic] somewhere else in Meddybemps." [Notes of L. Austin Gray, Jr., of Wesley, Maine; written probably in the 1970s

Lottie Stole noted that the three sons of Green Brown and Nancy Connick died "leaving no sons to carry on the Green Brown name." [Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. page 22].

More About Green BROWN:

Burial: Cemetery on Green Hill Road, Meddybemps, Maine

More About Nancy CONNICK:

Burial: Cemetery on Green Hill Road, Meddybemps, Maine

More About Green BROWN and Nancy CONNICK:

Marriage: 27 March 1804, St. David, N.B., Canada

Children of Green BROWN and Nancy CONNICK are:

2 i. Anna8 BROWN, born 12 March 1806 in St. David, N.B., Canada. She married PRESCOTT.

More About Anna BROWN:
Baptism: 07 August 1808

+ 3 ii. Catharine BROWN, born 02 June 1808 in St. David, N.B., Canada; died 04 January 1889.

4 iii. Nancy BROWN, born Abt. 1811 in St. David, N.B.. She married HITCHINGS.

Notes for Nancy BROWN:

Records of McColl Methodist Church, St. Stephen, N.B. Microfilm reel #F-28. Provincial Archives of New Brunswick, Fredericton, N.B.

Susanah, dau. of Green Brown, b. 7 Jan. 1811 in St. Stephen; bapt. 7 June 1811. [Note: There may be an error in transcription of birth year. Compare with entry below for her sister Nancy. This should be verified against the original record.]

Nancy, dau. of Green Brown, b. 11 Feb. 1811 in St. David; bapt. 21 June 1816. [Note: There may be an error in transcription of birth year. Compare with entry above for her sister Susanah. This should be verified against the original record.]

More About Nancy BROWN:

Baptism: 21 June 1816

+ 5 iv. Susanah BROWN, born Abt. 1811 in St. Stephen, N.B..

+ 6 v. Philbrook BROWN, born 06 September 1815 in St. David, N.B., Canada; died in Alameda, Calif..

+ 7 vi. Charlotte Green BROWN, born 10 April 1827 in South Princeton, Maine; died 29 April 1914 in Cooper, Maine.

+ 8 vii. Joseph Green BROWN, born 09 March 1831.

9 viii. James BROWN.

Notes for James BROWN:

James Brown "drowned at sea". [Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. page 22]

+ 10 ix. Margaret BROWN.

11 x. Olive BROWN. She married WESTON.

Notes for Olive BROWN: Olive was a twin sister to Jane Brown.

12 xi. Jane BROWN. She married MACDOUGAL.

Notes for Jane BROWN:

Jane was a twin sister to Olive Brown.

 

Generation No. 2

3. Catharine8 BROWN (Green7, James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1) was born 02 June 1808 in St. David, N.B., Canada, and died 04 January 1889. She married John BURDIN. He was born Abt. 1794, and died 15 July 1866.

More About Catharine BROWN:

Baptism: 14 August 1808

Burial: Cemetery on Green Hill Road, Meddybemps, Maine

Notes for John BURDIN:

Burdin burials in Cemetery on Green Hill Road, Meddybemps, Maine (these gravestone are near the gravestones for Catherine's parents):

Catherine, wife of John Burdin, died Jan. 4, 1889, 80 yrs 7 mo 2 da.

John Burdin, died July 15, 1866, Aged 71 yrs 9 mo

Josiah Burdin, died Aug. 5, 1864, AE 36 yr.

Carrie G. Burdin, died Oct. 3, 1834, AE 22 mos

More About John BURDIN:

Burial: Cemetery on Green Hill Road, Meddybemps, Maine

Children of Catharine BROWN and John BURDIN are:

+ 13 i. Catherine C.9 BURDIN.

+ 14 ii. Thomas Green BURDIN, born 22 September 1831 in Meddybemps, Maine; died 25 January in Chases Mills, Maine.

15 iii. Josiah BURDIN, born Abt. 1828; died 05 August 1864.

More About Josiah BURDIN:

Burial: Cemetery on Green Hill Road, Meddybemps, Maine

16 iv. Caroline G. BURDIN, born Abt. 1832; died 03 October 1834.

More About Caroline G. BURDIN:

Burial: Cemetery on Green Hill Road, Meddybemps, Maine

17 v. Jr. John BURDIN, died 1862.

Notes for Jr. John BURDIN:

John Burdin, Jr., had a daughter [name not known] who married Arthur Chase [Newspaper obituary of Thomas G. Burdin of Chases Mills, Maine, who died 25 January [year?] ].

More About Jr. John BURDIN:

Title (Facts Pg): Junior

5. Susanah8 BROWN (Green7, James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1) was born Abt. 1811 in St. Stephen, N.B.. She married ALLEN.

Notes for Susanah BROWN:

Records of McColl Methodist Church, St. Stephen, N.B. Microfilm reel #F-28. Provincial Archives of New Brunswick, Fredericton, N.B.

Susanah, dau. of Green Brown, b. 7 Jan. 1811 in St. Stephen; bapt. 7 June 1811. [Note: There may be an error in transcription of birth year. Compare with entry below for her sister Nancy. This should be verified against the original record.]

Nancy, dau. of Green Brown, b. 11 Feb. 1811 in St. David; bapt. 21 June 1816. [Note: There may be an error in transcription of birth year. Compare with entry above for her sister Susanah. This should be verified against the original record.]

"Mrs. Susan Allen came to the Howe's [at] the time David Howe was reported killed in the Civil War. She lived in Meddybemps, Me. [I] think their son was Judson (Judd), & Judd's daughter was Charles Gillespie's wife Ellie, & Judd's son was Howard Allen, he lived in Meddybemps. Judd's other son was away somewhere." [Information from Roger Gray, Wesley, Maine as recorded by L. Austin Gray, Jr.]. Susan (Brown) Allen was sister to Charlotte (Brown) Howe [Mrs. David Howe].

"Nan (Howe) Gray called Susan's husband "Uncle Allen." [We] don't know his first name." [Notebook kept by Minerva (Sharman) Gray [Mrs. Roger Gray], of Wesley, Maine]

More About Susanah BROWN:

Baptism: 07 June 1811

Notes for ALLEN:

Residence: Meddybemps, Maine

Child of Susanah BROWN and ALLEN is:

+ 18 i. Judson9 ALLEN.

6. Philbrook8 BROWN (Green7, James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1) was born 06 September 1815 in St. David, N.B., Canada, and died in Alameda, Calif..

Notes for Philbrook BROWN:

Resided in Cutler, Maine. In the collection of Sarah (Sanborn) Robbins is a photograph of the "Residence & barn built and occupied by Philbrook Brown, Cutler, Me.; also, two photographs of "Philbroke" Brown [Steve Robbins has a photocopies]. He removed to Alameda, California where he died.

More About Philbrook BROWN:

Baptism: 21 June 1816

Children of Philbrook BROWN are:

19 i. Edgar9 BROWN.

Notes for Edgar BROWN:

Believed to have lived near San Francisco, Calif. (probably in Alameda). "San Francisco" is written next to photos of Edgar Brown and his father "Philbroke" Brown, in the collection of Sarah (Sanborn) Robbins [Steve Robbins has photocopy of this].

20 ii. Nellie BROWN. She married George Alden MOORE; died 08 January in Alameda, Calif..

Notes for George Alden MOORE:

George A. Moore resided at 916 Union Street, Alameda, Calif. In the collection of Sarah (Sanborn) Robbins are photographs of him, his wife Nellie, and their house in Alameda [Steve Robbins has photocopies].

Newspaper obituary of George Moore:

"G. A. MOORE DEAD. Alameda, Jan. 8. Death today called Dr. George Alden Moore, for forty years prominent in insurance circles of San Francisco, at his home, 916 Union street. Dr. Moore had been actively engaged in business until a week ago.

"Dr. Moore, who was 82 years of age and a native of Maine, came to California in 1875. For twenty-five years he was president of the Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Co., of which he was a director at the time of his passing. He was also a director in the El Dorado Oil Works.

"Funeral services will be held Monday afternoon at 1 o'clock at the late residence. "

[Newspaper clipping (source not identified, and undated), in collection of Sarah (Sanborn) Robbins. Steve Robbins has a photocopy]

7. Charlotte Green8 BROWN (Green7, James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1) was born 10 April 1827 in South Princeton, Maine, and died 29 April 1914 in Cooper, Maine. She married David HOWE 11 July 1847 in Meddybemps, Maine, son of Asa HOWE and Susannah FISHER. He was born 03 April 1821 in Cooper, Maine, and died 21 March 1907 in Cooper, Maine.

More About Charlotte Green BROWN:

Burial: Evergreen Cemetery, Cooper, Main

Notes for David HOWE:

Lottie Stole in 1973 compiled a small Howe genealogy. She used material "from our Grandmother's notes" (p. 2), and again mentions having used "Grandma Charlotte's notes" (p. 18). "... I put 'Our Heritage' together from all our grandmother's Bibles and other notes sent to me. I should have done this in 1925 when some of these papers came to me." (p. [79]).

Click for this wonderful poem

[Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. pages 2, 18, [79]].

From Lottie Stole's dedication of her book:

[p. 1:] "To my Great Grand Parents, Asa Howe and Susan Fisher, and Daniel Lane and Temperance Pettigrow.

"Who blazed the trail thru [sic] virgin forests and rocks of Maine. Rocks so big we used one for a play house and had to climb a tree to get up in it.

"The wide rock fences that were wide enough to run and play on top of were still there in 1903, when we visited there.

"The Blazed Blind Trail. The trees were marked on the side they were going to so they could find their way out and knew where to look to going in again. They all used the same mark on tree so they could find each other.

"Faith is all they lived by. Faith in God, Faith in each other, Faith in Relatives, friends, and nature.

"They found Land of Plenty, God leading them, in Washington County, Maine.

"Plenty of wood and trees for log cabins, for cooking with and heating.

"Plenty of game and fish of all kinds in woods and apples, blueberries, cherries, cranberries, beech nuts, spruce green, etc. They never did like any kind of heat but wood heat.

"They were experts in tree grafting, etc., and started good apple orchards grafting on wild apple roots. Wonderful apples on them when I was there in 1903. Grandpa David would pick one for me to taste and throw it away. I said 'Mama won't like that I have to eat all of it.' He said, 'No, just tell me which is the best tree' and I learned to graft when I was eight years old.

"They raised their own meat except game and fish. Raised beef, pork, mutton, lamb, hens, turkeys, etc.

"The principle [sic] stock raised at their new home was sheep. The sheep not only furnished meat but all their clothes and candles, etc. The sheep were sheared by hand and wool washed, dried, carded and spun ready for the loom. The mutton tallow was melted and poured into molds with a wick in it and all they used for lighting.

"It didn't take cash in those days. They took their wheat and corn to mill to get ground and gave a percent of it for grinding.

[p. 2:] "Mill run by water power from creek. They raised all their food.

"There were no churches, schools, doctors. They were religious people and could quote from the Bible as it fitted until they had a church. The children were taught at home until they had a school and it is marvelous what good writing they did all their lives.

"Grandpa David prayed at each meal and before going to bed.

"Their children were born without a doctor or nurse. Healthy normal children.

"God was willing and the women cared for each other at that time. Ironed everything to sterilize it for the delivery and the faith was wonderful.

"The children were raised with responsibility. Responsibility right from the start. Also had the security of knowing their parents were right and their discipline to follow after. No one could pass the buck. Each one his own responsibility.

"From our Grandmother's [Charlotte (Brown) Howe] notes.

"When a new baby is born and dressed the father takes it on his knee and Bible on other knee and the children stand around and help name it.

"Children's little fingers pointing in Bible for a name. Daddy was safe tho [sic], as he was the only one that could read.

"Faith is all we live by. Faith in God, each other, Relatives, Friends and Nature.

"We thank you God for everything.

"We thank you God for your wonderful world and for guiding and heading us thru [sic] it.

"We thank you God for our young lives, out of doors, close to nature and God.

"Thank you God for showing me and letting me see the wonders of your world.

"We thank God for our normal healthy children and bountiful crops. "

[Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. pages 1-2.]

Lottie Stoll writes more on the Howes:

[p. 18:]

"David Howe and Charlotte Green Brown, From Grandma Charlotte's Notes.

"Asa, her father in-law, never was late whether afoot or horse back.

"Asa Howe, with his willow cane, came from Merrimac, Mass. [i.e., Merrimack, N.H.], on the Merrimac river, built his log cabin, planted his willow cane and went back for his bride, Susan Fisher. The original willow trees here are from his willow cane, so willow switches a plenty.

"They cut logs and took them to saw mill (on the creek for water power) and got them sawed into lumber and continued to build on log cabin.

"How I [Lottie Stole] wish each one of you could have made that trip [from Minnesota] to Maine with us in 1903 and seen all of this I am trying to describe.

"I saw my first young kittens there. Grandpa took me out to the barn to see them. I had never seen any before their eyes were open and Grandpa said, 'All kittens are born with their eyes shut. But little girls are born with theirs open and are expected to use them.' And from then on I sure have used mine.

"This Howe Home over 100 years old when pictures were taken, all hand built.

"The rail fences cut out of woods and not even a nail in them and gates too, open and shut but just tree limbs and no hardware in them. They had stood there all these years and never needed any fixing, neither did the rock fence.

"An open well where they hung their food that needed refrigeration and always cold, ice cold.

"Big fireplace to cook on, hanging kettles from top over fire. If log was too long, just let it burn down off the end and push it on into fireplace.

[p. 19:] "Brick baking oven looked like a great big chimney with heavy iron doors. You filled it with hot coals and when it got white inside, raked out the coals and put bread in to bake, door shut 1 hr. Best bread you ever ate.

"Big wood boxes that had to be piled to ceiling each nite [sic] -- all hard wood to burn.

"Wooden flour and sugar bins in cupboards, holding a few hundred lbs.

"Smoke house outside to hang your hams, bacon, corned beef, pigs feet, etc., to smoke with hickory wood.

"Basement cellar full of potatoes, apples, carrots, beets, cabbage, parsnips, squash and pumpkins. Home made vinegar, cider, canned vegetables, canned fruit, especially blueberries.

"Home made vinegar made from cider and borrow a mother from your neighbor. After cider hardens and when vinegar is done, don't forget to take vinegar mother back home.

"A homemade wooden cradle on rockers so mother could rock cradle with her foot and churn and other work sitting at the same time. Wide rock fence we could run and play on.

"Bear and deer skin rugs.

"Patchwork quilts like, 'Log Cabin,' 'Sun Burst,' and 'Wedding Rings.'

"The old oaken bucket that hung in the well. Churns, butter boards, molds, ladles, etc. Milk skimming ladles.

"Spinning wheel, wool carder, quilting frames, apple press, cider mill.

"Attic -- Everything including beans to be hand picked, flour, sugar, cranberries, etc. Curling irons, bustles, hoop skirts, corsets, etc., etc.

"Bull on tread mill threshing wheat. Fanning Mill.

"Dog in Dog wheel pumping water instead of windlass.

"Divining Rod. Willow crotch which was held small sides in each hand, ahead of man holding it and walking until stem side turned down and there was water there under the ground for a well.

"We didn't need one, where I was raised in Minnesota. All we had to do was to drive a sand point into ground anywhere and get a well.

[Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. pages 18-19].

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Family records:

David, son of Asa and Susanna Fisher Howe, b. April 3, 1821, Cooper, Maine; married Charlotte Brown, dau. of Green Brown, at the Meddybemps Baptist Church on July 11, 1847. They went to live in their Cooper home July 12, 1847. [David] d. Mar. 21, 1907 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Cooper, Maine. Charlotte, dau. of Green and Nancy Connick Brown was born in Princeton, Maine on April 10, 1827 and died in Cooper April 29, 1914. She is also buried in Evergreen Cemetery.

[Information from L. Austin Gray of Wesley, Maine, which he appears to have received from Mary (Hall) Luce, daughter of Grace Hall: "David and Charlotte Howe's Family - source - Aunt May's [Florence May Howe] letter to Aunt Edith Emery in 1942 and mother's letter [from Grace Hall to Edith Emery] of 1961." ]

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1846, August 17. "Got dinner at Mr. Houghs in Cooper."

Richard Hayden of Robbinston, Maine was with the Washington County Commissioners, helping to lay out county roads in the vicinity of Cooper, Maine. They had been laying out a new road since 10 August 1846, from Marion, through Township No. 14, to Eastern Ridge in Cooper. On 17 August 1846, Hayden recorded: "We finished the route to the town road on the Eastern Ridge in Cooper & returned back to Perssons [?], having got dinner at Mr. Houghs in Cooper." This "Mr. Hough" could have been David Howe, or his father Asa Howe, or one of David's brothers; it may even have been one of the several Huff families in Cooper.

[Hayden, Richard Vose. Diaries. Special Collections, Fogler Library, University of Maine, Orono, Maine.]

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David Howe went to Minnesota one year, and worked his way out by selling nursery stock along the way out. When he came back (from around Minneapolis somewhere) he was all excited and was ready to go back out there again, but he never did go back.

David Howe's brothers built several houses near each other in Cooper, on land which probably had belonged to their father, Asa. One of David's brothers moved to somewhere near Minneapolis, Minn., and David bought his house. This same house where David lived is occupied [in 1973] by Mildred (Morton) Howe. Directly across the road was where Asa's log house was built, where Asa lived.

[Minerva (Sharman) Gray and L. Austin Gray, Jr. of Wesley, Maine, Interviewed by Steve Robbins, September 1973].

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1866, September 3. Lottie Stole writes of her father's birth in 1866:

"The little 2 pound baby born, Sept. 3, 1866, that everyone helped to raise, with wash tubs filled with warm water, to keep him warm, was my papa Everette. Grandpa 'David' had only 2 sons to grow up and marry. Uncle Win, 1 son, Ralph, no children. Everette had 2 sons, making him producer of 23 Howe sons, so far. Roy and his sons and grand sons and great [-grand] sons 13 Howe sons and Frank with his sons, grand sons and great grandsons, 10 Howe sons. If Grandpa David was alive he would be just as proud of Roy, as when they took the pictures and he had to have Roy next to him in the pictures."

[Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. page 21].

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David Howe's son, Everette, when a young man, decided to go to Minnesota with one of his buddies and work in the woods. His mother [Charlotte (Brown) Howe] told him he should look up his uncle who lived there, but, no, he just wanted to work in the woods, he didn't want to bother to see his relatives. Then his mother told Everette he would need a letter of recommendation before he'd be hired, which his uncles could write for him. But, no, Everette said he didn't need one, his letter of recommendation was the seat of his pants. [It seems, at this point, that Charlotte (Brown) Howe probably wrote a letter ahead to the Minnesota relatives, informing them of Everette's soon arrival there]. Everette and companion got off the train in Minnesota, and were wandering about the train station. It happened that their uncle was there with a wagonload of milk or something, and saw them, and started talking with them. When he found out who the boys were, his own nephews, the uncle invited them to visit his home for the weekend, after they'd finished for the week in the woods. Well, the boys never made it to the woods; they went went to see their uncle and stayed there and worked for him.

[Minerva (Sharman) Gray and L. Austin Gray, Jr. of Wesley, Maine, Interviewed by Steve Robbins, September 1973].

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Lottie Stole praises "Aunt May" for her care of David Howe and Charlotte Brown in their old age:

"Florence May Howe, b. 1869, Cooper, Maine; d. 1945, Cooper, Maine. Our own Aunt May, who lived at home and cared for Grandpa and Grandma Howe, and kept us all in touch with each other, writing Grandma's letters to us and answering all her letters from us and made it possible for us to visit the old home and our grandparents and really enjoy every minute of it even when a crowd of us there kept her busy and she always had time even with dressing and undressing Grandma and moving her from her bed to wheelchair.

"She kept the old home really home to all of us. As long as she lived. Aunt Nan and Roger always came home while we were there and Aunt Em Hitchings and Uncle Winn and his Aunt Em and Blanche and Maud lived across the road and all were regular there while we were there and some crowd of hungry Howes to feed and all the fun we had there and the patience of Aunt May and Grandma. "

[Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. page 24].

Lottie Stole gives a summary of David Howe's service in the Civil War:

"Quota of Cooper, Maine.

Volunteer Enlistment.

Jan. 1, 1864

David Howe, Age 42 years.

Hair - gray, height 5' 7", eyes - hazel, complexion - light.

Regiment of Heavy Artillery, Volunteer Co. A. [correction: should read Company M]

Wife - Charlotte Brown Howe - b. 1827 - d. 1914.

Father - Asa Howe - b. 1780, Beverly, Mass.

Mother - Susan Fisher - b. 1791

Names and dates of his children

Killed in action in field - April 1, 1864

May and June [1864] present in hospital

July and August [1864] present in hospital

Discharged from hospital, Jan. 11, 1865

Mustered out, Sept. 11, 1865

Died - Cooper, Maine 1907.

"The report has many pages. This is just a part of it. Was wounded many times, etc. After having been killed in action, and found, mustered out Sept. 11, 1865. "

[Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. page 21].

David Howe's military service record is classified by the National Archives as: RG:94 7E3 21/2/3/ #2077 Desc: David Howe, 1st Maine H. ARTILLERY A579189.

David Howe's pension record is classified by the National Archives as: RG 94 18E3 1/30/1 Desc: DAVID HOWE WC 634-698 A579188.

The "Civil War Pension Index" [online], as part of <http://www.ancestry.com> (July 22, 2000), gave the following data: Howe, David. M. 1 Maine H. Art.

Date of claim Class Application No. Certificate No. State from which filed

1874 Nov. 14 Invalid 197330 229796

1907 Apr. 8 Widow 867,314 634,698 Maine

Here is a citation for a history of David Howe's military unit, which should be consulted at some time (Thanks to Bruce Towers for the citation): Shaw, Horace H. and House, Charles J. The First Maine Heavy Artillery, 1862-1865, a History of It's Part and Place in the War for the Union, with Organization, Company, and Individual Records. -- Portland : [S.n. ?], 1903. 516 pages. L. Austin Gray, Jr., of Wesley. Maine notes that there is a copy of this book at Bangor Public Library, and that it includes pictures (call no.: 973.7441 S534f ). Also at Bangor Public Library, Calais Public Library, Maine State Library, and Maine State Archives, are copies of the published Reports of the Adjutant General of the State of Maine. for the years 1861 through 1865 (published 1867) which should list David Howe; (Bangor Public Library's call no: 973.7441 A12 ).

"Mrs. Susan Allen came to the Howe's [at] the time David Howe was reported killed in the Civil War. She lived in Meddybemps, Me.

[Information from Roger Gray, Wesley, Maine as recorded by L. Austin Gray, Jr.; "from information Ada Stubbs sent to Grace Hall."].

"[I] think their son was Judson (Judd), & Judd's daughter was Charles Gillespie's wife Ellie, & Judd's son was Howard Allen, he lived in Meddybemps. Judd's other son was away somewhere." [Information from Roger Gray, Wesley, Maine as recorded by L. Austin Gray, Jr.]. Susan (Brown) Allen was sister to Charlotte (Brown) Howe [Mrs. David Howe].

David Howe was at Appomattox Court House and saw Gen. Lee surrender to Gen. Grant (later he was President Grant). Some of David Howe's children are buried in East Ridge Cemetery in Cooper, Maine, where is also buried David's father Asa Howe, Sr. David Howe died of "heart trouble." David Howe and his wife are buried in the "New" Cemetery [Evergreen Cemetery] in Cooper, Maine.

[Information from Roger Gray of Wesley, Maine, recorded by L. Austin Gray Jr.; this "information probably from Mrs. Grace A. Hall." Note that the statement about David Howe being present at Gen. Lee's surrender still needs to be verified with official sources.]

When David Howe received his Civil War soldier's pension money, he used it to buy an organ for Aunt May. This organ was passed on to Roger Gray of Wesley, Maine.

[Minerva (Sharman) Gray of Wesley, Maine, Interviewed by Steve Robbins, 12 October 1978]

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1881. David Howe's home is shown on an 1881 map, marked "D. Howe".

["Cooper", Atlas of Washington Co., Maine. Houlton : Colby & Co., 1881]

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1894. David Howe was instrumental in establishing the Grove Post Office, in Cooper, Maine; he was the its first postmaster, and the Grove Post Office was in part of his house. This story was related in a 1978 newspaper interview with Mildred (Morton) Howe, who was then still living in the former David Howe house. At some time after David Howe's 1907 death, Mildred was one of the Grove postmasters [or, postmistress ?] at the same house:

"A ride to Cooper on a Glorious fall day last week and visits with friends. At Grove where we called on Mildred Howe and her sister, Lizzie Perkins. We were privileged to learn a bit of history about this pretty little settlement. It seems that Grandpa Howe got a bit put out with the Mail Service both in Cooper and Meddybemps ... and so petitioned the Post Master General for a Post Office in the area lying kind of between Cooper on the one side, Meddybemps on the other, Alexander at the back and Howe Ridge running through the middle. The Post Master General decided in his favor but ... the area had to be named. Now Mr. Howe was a strong Democrat and an ardent admirer of Grover Cleveland, who occupied, if not the oval office, at least he was the top man in Washington [D.C.] ... he was president ... and Mr. Howe allowed as how the Post Office should be called 'Grover'. And so the request went in ... but someone along the way goofed and the 'r' was dropped from Grover and the Post Office designation became Grove. Mr. Howe was quite angry but a pretty name it was and still is ... Now when you write to Mildred and Lizzie, address your letters to Grove, Maine.... They will get your letter and they will be pleased you thought of them. "

[Smith, Van. "Gardiners Lake - West Side" [column]. Machias Valley News, October 4, 1978.

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Steve Robbins requested a copy of David Howe's petition for a post office, from the National Archives. Their reply:

"The records of the Post Office Department in the National Archives show that a post office was established at Grove in Washington County, Maine, on August 4, 1894. The postal records do not include petitions for the establishment of post offices."

[Joseph B. Howerton (Assistant Chief of Reference, General Services Administration, Office of Administration, Industrial and Social Branch, Civil Archives Division, Washington, D.C. 20405), Letter to Steve Robbins, 11 January 1979]

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A chronology of the Cooper, Maine and Grove, Maine post offices (both within the Town of Cooper, Maine)

1827 Cooper Post Office established

1894 [August 4] Grove Post Office established

1904 Cooper Post Office discontinued, name "changed to Grove"

1907 January 5 Grove Post Office discontinued, name "changed to Cooper"

1907 Cooper Post Office re-established, name "changed from Grove"

1907 December 27 Grove Post Office re-established, in "new office"

1927 Grove Post Office discontinued

1930 Grove Post Office re-established

1933 Grove Post Office discontinued

1933 July 1 Grove Post Office re-established

[Dow, Sterling T. Maine Postal History and Postmarks. -- Lawrence, Mass. : Quarterman Publications, 1976. pages 118 (table for columns), 124, 133. ]

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1907. Obituary of David Howe.

"David Howe passed away at his home in Cooper, March 21, at the age of 85 years 11 months and 18 days [he was born 3 April 1821].

"He was married to Miss Charlotte Brown of Meddybemps July 7, 1847 [error; should be 11 July 1847]. He died full of years and good works. He descended from pilgrim stock, strong, mentally and physically. His father [Asa Howe] and mother came to Cooper when it was a wilderness. They cleared a farm on a high ridge of land and did their marketing on horseback, with just a bridle path marked by spotted trees over a distance of 20 miles. He [Asa Howe] kept on clearing land till [sic] his seven sons had farm homes adjoining each other and three of the six daughters were well settled on farms not far from the homestead. They were all termed prosperous farmers.

"When the Western Fever was on, before there was any Minneapolis or St. Paul, when it was called St. Anthony Falls, four of the brothers of David Howe sold their farms to him and started with their families to seek their fortunes in the far west. Their eastern friends called it a wild scheme. They as pioneers amassed fortunes and retired from business some time ago. David Howe, the subject of this sketch, was called a prosperous farmer, but he has said when he has visited his brothers in the west he felt like a poor man in comparison. His land was well adapted to the cultivation of potatoes and he has been termed the potato king of Washington County. He was a member of the Baptist Church and always took the side of the right. He has held positions of trust in his town, and has been postmaster ever since the Grove Post Office was established. At the breaking out of the [Civil] war he enlisted in the First Maine Heavy Artillery, Company M. He was a member of Crescent Lodge, No. 78, F. & A. M. [i.e., a Masonic Lodge], Pembroke, and also of Joel A. Haycock Post, G. A. R. [Grand Army of the Republic], Calais and was buried by that order.

"He leaves a widow, two sons, four daughters, one sister and one brother, thirteen grandchildren and one great grandchild to mourn the loss of a man of high integrity. "

[Transcript of obituary, provided by L. Austin Gray, Jr. of Wesley, Maine to Steve Robbins. Original source not specified, but was probably a newspaper account.]

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On: David Howe's gravestone in Evergreen Cemetery, Cooper, Maine: "David Howe, 1821-1907, We will meet again; Charlotte Brown, 1827-1914".

A George Vining "lived at Aunt May's, hired hand" [from L. A. Gray, Jr., 29 Sept. 1973]. George Vining (1862-1931) is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Cooper, Maine.

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1914. Obituary of Charlotte (Brown) Howe.

"She died as she had lived, in the faith of her Lord Jesus Christ.

"Mrs. Charlotte Brown Howe passed away peacefully at her home Wed. morning at 4:40 o'clock, April 29, 1914. Although thus burdened with ill health for a number of years, Mrs. Howe's last sickness was but several weeks. She contracted a cold and all that loving hands could do, she did not recover.

"Mrs Howe was born in Princeton, Maine, Apr. 10, 1847 [error; should be 1827], making her age at the time of death 87 years and 19 days. She was the daughter of Green and Nancy Brown. They moved to Meddybemps where she resided untill [sic] she became the wife of David Howe July 11, 1847, came to Cooper [and] there resided untill [sic] time of death. "

[Obituary was "copied from Nan Gray's own handwriting account". Transcript by L. Austin Gray of Wesley, Maine, given to Steve Robbins. Another note made by Nan Gray at the top of the page: "Father died 7 [P.M. ?] Mar. 21, 1907, before she died April 29."]

More About David HOWE:

Burial: Evergreen Cemetery, Cooper, Maine

Marriage Notes for Charlotte BROWN and David HOWE:

David Howe and Charlotte Brown were married in the Baptist Church in Meddybemps on JUly 11, 1847.

More About David HOWE and Charlotte BROWN:

Marriage: 11 July 1847, Meddybemps, Maine

Children of Charlotte BROWN and David HOWE are:

+ 21 i. Emma Georgianna9 HOWE, born 22 July 1848 in Cooper, Maine; died 25 April 1922 in Milltown, Calais, Maine.

+ 22 ii. James Winslow HOWE, born 03 February 1850 in Cooper, Maine; died 16 June 1922 in Cooper, Maine.

23 iii. Alice Ellen HOWE, born 15 January 1852 in Cooper, Maine; died 17 June 1906 in Calais, Maine. She married Gene LELAND.

More About Alice Ellen HOWE:

Burial: Evergreen Cemetery, Cooper, Maine

Notes for Gene LELAND:

Eugene Leland was a blacksmith. He and his wife had no children.

24 iv. Horace Addison C. HOWE, born 17 December 1853 in Cooper, Maine; died 31 August 1855.

Notes for Horace Addison C. HOWE:

Horace A. C. Howe died as an infant. His gravestone in East Ridge Cemetery, Cooper, Maine:

HOWE, Horace A. C., son of David & Charlotte Howe, died Aug. 31, 1855, AE 1 yr. 9 mo., "Of such is the kingdom of Heaven".

More About Horace Addison C. HOWE:

Burial: East Ridge Cemetery, Cooper, Maine

+ 25 v. Ada Anna HOWE, born 17 December 1855 in Cooper, Maine; died 25 April 1943 in Melrose, Mass..

26 vi. Horace David HOWE, born 17 December 1857 in Cooper, Maine; died 11 May 1859.

Notes for Horace David HOWE:

Horace D. Howe died at age of two years. His gravestone in East Ridge Cemetery, Cooper, Maine: HOWE, Horace D., son of David & Charlotte Howe, died May 11, 1859, 17 mo.

More About Horace David HOWE:

Burial: East Ridge Cemetery, Cooper, Maine

27 vii. John Horton HOWE, born November 1859 in Cooper, Maine; died 07 December 1869.

Notes for John Horton HOWE:

Horton J. Howe's gravestone in East Ridge Cemetery, Cooper, Maine: HOWE, Horton J., died Dec. 7, 1869, age 10 ys. 26 days, son of David & Charlotte Howe.

More About John Horton HOWE:

Burial: East Ridge Cemetery, Cooper, Maine

+ 28 viii. Nancy Jane HOWE, born 28 October 1861 in Cooper, Maine; died 10 March 1940 in Wesley, Maine.

+ 29 ix. Everette Edward HOWE, born 03 September 1866 in Cooper, Maine; died 11 January 1932 in Minneapolis, Minn..

+ 30 x. Florence Mary HOWE, born 06 May 1869 in Cooper, Maine; died 25 December 1945 in Cooper, Maine.

8. Joseph Green8 BROWN (Green7, James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1) was born 09 March 1831. He married Hannah Hill HUNTLEY 01 January 1852. She was born 21 September 1832, and died 13 August 1911.

Notes for Joseph Green BROWN:

Roger Gray of Wesley, Maine knew that his mother had an "Uncle Joel" who was in the Civil War and weighed 90 lbs. when he came out of Andersonville, Georgia Prison. Roger supposed that this "Uncle Joel" might have been Joseph Green Brown, Jr. [Notes of L. Austin Gray, Jr., of Wesley, Maine, given to Steve Robbins]. But it seems probable that this uncle was Joel Howe (son of Asa Howe and Susannah Fisher) and not a Joel Brown. [Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. page 16].

The following article gives an idea of the location of Capt. Brown's residence.

" .... [East Machias] Old County Road. Scotts Hill. Samuel Scott farm 250 acres. House built before 1795. I think Mr. Scott died before the opening of the present century, when the writer of this article was a boy. An old resident pointed out to him a large oak tree which I believe may still be seen a few rods to the rear of Capt. Brown's residence. 'Just at the foot of that big tree,' he said, 'is an old grave-stone lying flat upon the ground. Old Mr. Scott was buried there, and it has his name upon it."

(The handwritten transcription by L. Austin Gray, Jr. of Wesley, Maine, given to Steve Robbins, bears several references to sources; it is not certain which of the following source(s) are the correct one(s) for the excerpt:

1) Machias Valley News, Dec. 1, 1976. Printed at the request of Mrs. Wesley Carroll. The material is copied from Maine Historical Magazine, vol. IX, January 1894-January 1895, Joseph W. Porter, editor and publisher. Machias One Hundred Years Ago.

2)Machias Republican, May 2 and Sept. 5, 1891. ]

Joseph Green Brown, Junior, lived in East Machias, Maine where Jasper Ackley later lived (in the 1930'3 and 1940's, next to Clayton Crane's), near "The Rim" east of the Scott's Hill Road. [ Notes of L. Austin Gray, Jr. of Wesley, Maine]

He was Captain of the bark "Kalalis" which sailed from New York with a load of grain for Portugal, October 2, 1878, and was never heard from. He was a member of Warren Lodge at East Machias.

[From: History of East Machias, by Henry T. Whittier, Nov. 25, 1926:] "Loss of the Barkentine Kalalis. The Barkentine Kalalis built at the yard of the Wiswell Brothers of this town for F. Talbot & Co. and with Capt. Joseph G. Brown in command sailed from New York for Lisbon, Portugal in 1878 and was never afterward heard from. The present Mrs. Alice B. Talbot and Mrs. Frank Sanborn are daughters of the late Capt. Joseph G. Brown lost on the Kalalis."

The following items, sent by Sarah (Sanborn) Robbins [Mrs. Donald Robbins] to Roger Gray, are signed "E.B.S.", the initials of her mother Elizabeth (Brown) Sanborn [Mrs. Frank Sanborn]:

"The Kalalis was a fine vessel only about 3 years old and of 560 tons. She was loaded with grain and it is the supposition that she leaked and water got to the wheat and swelled it near the pumps and choked them. Captain Brown, before taking command of the Kalalis, had some very trying experiences. He had lost the brig Sitka, one of the Talbot vessels of this town, on the island of Grand Manan (during thick fog for days). E.B.S. "

"On another occasion he was to take command of the bark Olustee of this town, then lying in Boston Harbor. The night before Capt. Brown had planned to go on board, the Olustee caught fire and was nearly, if not entirely, destroyed. At another time he was coming home from the West Indies in a vessel on which small pox had broken out, and some of the crew had died and were buried at sea. And finally, when the vessel arrived in the vicinity of New York, Capt. Brown was the only soul on board able to get on deck and attend to the vessel. On first return trip from Rotterdam in 1875, the Kalalis was struck by lightning and was dismasted (the yardmast). E.B.S. "

In the collection of Sarah (Sanborn) Robbins are photographs of Joseph Brown, Jr., and of his wife Hannah (hers is dated 1868). [Steve Robbins has photocopies of these].

More About Joseph Green BROWN:

Title (Facts Pg): Junior

More About Joseph BROWN and Hannah HUNTLEY:

Marriage: 01 January 1852

Children of Joseph BROWN and Hannah HUNTLEY are:

+ 31 i. Elizabeth Cyrena9 BROWN, born 05 March 1863; died 13 May 1943.

+ 32 ii. Alice BROWN.

10. Margaret8 BROWN (Green7, James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1) She married Henry HITCHINGS.

Notes for Henry HITCHINGS:

Residence: Cooper, Maine.

Child of Margaret BROWN and Henry HITCHINGS is:

+ 33 i. Webster9 HITCHINGS.

Generation No. 3

13. Catherine C.9 BURDIN (Catharine8 BROWN, Green7, James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1) She married Howard M. WILDER 1860. He was born 1837 in Pembroke, Maine.

Notes for Howard M. WILDER:

Wilders in a 1903-1904 private "census" of Chases Mills district, in Turner, Maine: post office census, p. 82:

"Wilder, Howard M., carpenter

H. [sic; i.e., K.] M. (Burdin), housewife "

[Turner Town Register, 1903-4. Copy at Maine State Library, Augusta, Maine]

Newspaper article:

"The Golden Wedding of Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Wilder. An All Day Reception at the Wilder Home at Chases Mills --- A Merry Time.

"Chases Mills, Me., April 21 (Special), -- This has been an eventful day for Chases Mills.

"All day long the teams have been coming and going until more than 500 people have been within our gates.

"The particular event which has drawn the people of Turner and surrounding towns to this little hamlet has been to aid in celebrating the golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Howard M. Wilder.

"And the people have come in flocks. Turner Grange, the Universalist Circle and the Nezinscot History Club were all invited in bodies and to all appearances they have been here in bodies. Of course it goes without saying that the village people generally have been included whether they belonged to any of the above societies or not.

"These occasions are always charming and this one has been made doubly so by the prominence and popularity of the parties. For many years they have been leaders in the fraternal, social and religious life of Turner and their acquaintance may be said to extend over the entire county.

"This couple was originally from Washington county and were as prominent there as they have been here. Mr. Wilder was born in the town of Pembroke in 1837 and was the son of Joseph and Mehitable Wilder who were among the pioneer stock of that place. He was educated in the public schools and there he remained until he was 52 years of age. His family had originally come from Hingham, Mass., and they figure consciously in the history of that place. When the first Wilder came from Hingham he was accompanied by a man named Hersey. Each of these men had 40 descendants in Pembroke and while all the Herseys were democrats the Wilders were all republicans.

"Joseph Wilder had six sons and these all became lumbermen and finally ship builders. They formed a corporation to carry on that business and from their yard was launched many a stately craft in the old ship building days. One of their ships was built for the Japan trade and was of the old fast clipper type. This business was followed from 1850 down to 1880 when the ship building industry so declined that it was no longer profitable.

"Mrs. Wilder was formerly Miss Catherine C. Burdin, daughter of John and Catherine Burdin of Meddybemps. Her parents were well to do and she received an excellent education so that at the age of sixteen she was abundantly qualified to take charge of a school as teacher. This profession she followed for many years and [she] became noted as being one of the best teachers in Washington county. Her last work in this line was the grammar school in Pembroke in 1872, and then came the State law which took away the grammar grade of that town. It was her 40th term and this closed her career as a successful teacher.

"Mr. and Mrs. Wilder first met at Pembroke in 1856 and four years later they were married and began housekeeping in that village. The curious part of the matter is that they first met as teacher and pupil. He was a six-footer at the time he was attending school but he had to mind her all the same. By the time of their marriage he had become a member of the Wilder firm and one of the most prominent young men of that place. They have had but one child, and this boy died when but six years of age.

"After the ship building business closed down Mr. and Mrs. Wilder continued to make Pembroke their home for several years. When her brother, Thomas G. Burdin, lost his mill in Chase's Mills by fire Mr. and Mrs. Wilder decided to come to that place. They were comfortably well off in this world's goods, and what nicer place for a retired couple than Chase's Mills? The change was made and they have never had occasion to regret their choice.

"Since living in Turner Mr. and Mrs. Wilder have become identified with every progressive movement and have made a host of friends. Altho [sic] practically retired and under no necessity of physical labor Mr. Wilder has made himself useful in many ways. Being a fine mechanic he has done much cabinet and finishing work and in this way has managed to keep reasonably busy. Mrs. Wilder couldn't keep still even if she tried to do so. She is a dynamo of energy and gives much time to grange and club work as well as philanthropic movements. When anyone in the village is ill she makes it a point to go in and read to them or do any other odd jobs that may add to their comfort. For 25 years she has been an officer and one of the most active workers of the W. C. T. U. organization, the Universalist Circle and the grange. In the last named order she has had the office of chaplain for many years.

"As a musician Mrs. Wilder has long had a prominent place. When but 12 years of age she was singing in the village choir, and all thru [sic] her years as a school teacher she also taught singing schools as a side issue. She tells the Journal that there was no organ or piano in Meddybemps until she was 12 years old [and] when the first one came it made a great excitement among the village people. For many years she and her brother-in-law, Joseph Wilder, furnished the music for all the funerals in Pembroke and vicinity and also sung in the village church.

"As a scholar Mrs. Wilder was very apt and her attainments have always been kept up. At one time the high school teacher of Pembroke held an old-fashioned spelling school match and challenged the whole county to compete for a dictionary which he offered as a prize. The time came and many of the best scholars in Washington county were there but Mrs. Wilder led them all and carried off the prize. The dictionary is still in her home and its well thumbed pages attest that [she] still keeps up her old studies. When in the Calais Academy, as a student, she was accounted as one of the best scholars in that institution of learning, and there are few women among us to-day [sic] better informed in literature than she.

"An All Day Reception. The golden wedding celebration of to-day [sic] has been an elaborate affair. The people have been coming in relays as it would be impossible for them all to get into the house at the same time. The invitation stated that the receptions would begin at 10 o'clock A. M. and continue until 10 P. M. Those who came in the morning would be served with dinner and then give away [sic] to others. The afternoon crowd were to have supper at six o'clock and then leave to make room for the evening crowd. This was the only way that so many people could be handled in a single house, however large.

"Promptly on time in the forenoon crowds began to pour in and in a short time the yard was filled with teams and house with people. The Royal Club Orchestra was present and furnished music at intervals all day. This musical organization is made up of Mrs. George Sampson and son, Ernest, and Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Staples.

"The house was beautifully decorated in every room with yellow and golden colors predominating. This work was done by the Boston author and artist, Inez G. Thompson, assisted by Mrs. Holman F. Day. These ladies have been here and engaged in this work for several days and nothing could be more artistic or finely done than their decorations.

"The banquet was an elaborate affair and hundreds of people ha[v]e been serv[e]d. Occupying a prominent place on the center table was a cake made by Mrs. Wilder exactly 25 years ago on the occasion of a silver wedding. The cake was uncut and has been kept in perfect shape. It was not cut today save one piece that was taken off and sent to the wife of the Journal reporter.

"Those who came nearly all brought some token of remembrance and these gifts were exhibited on a separate table. The dinner hour was one filled with pleasure and many were the congratulations showered upon this worthy couple. Letters of regret were read and these came from all over the country. One of these from Miss Carrie A. Walker, the well-known author, was especially cute. Among other things she said:--

"The invitation says R. S. V. P. Somebody says that these cabalistic characters are intended to mean -- 'Rather Slim Vittles provided.' We are sorry to have to reply-- D. S. C. C. Freely translated these letters mean-- 'Darned sorry can't come!' These letters created much merriment and after their reading John Irish read the following poem that he had written for this occasion: ..... "

[the poem, and texts of other letters, have not been transcribed here, in order to save space and to focus on biographical information -- Steve Robbins]

" .... Over 100 Letters.

"More than 100 letters in all have been received but these could not all be read. The presents are also too numerous to even mention. Of these more than 200 have been received and many of them are very valuable. They have come from Nova Scotia, Central America, California and all over the New England States. Of five and ten dollar gold pieces there has been a shower while other gifts have been of all discriptions [sic] from books to articles of furniture.

"The afternoon attendance has been even larger than during the forenoon. It has been a steady rush coming and going and the ushers have been kept on the jump. Supper will be served at six P.M. and at this time it looks as if the crowd would be much larger than at the dinner tables. All the guests have taken great interest in the fancy work and especially the rugs made by Mrs. Wilder. These rugs are of the old-fashioned braided variety and in some of the largest ones the braid was more than one thousand feet long.

"Another feature of interest for those of a literary turn has been the examination of her scrap books and diary. Mrs. Wilder has long been in the habit of preserving articles and items of historic interest and whenever information is wanted by anyone in the village they always consult Mrs. Wilder. When the house of Solon Chase was burned several years ago nearly all of his documents were destroyed. The old veteran felt the loss very keenly and refused to be comforted until some one told him that he might find duplicates in the home of Mrs. Wilder. In less time than it takes to tell the story he had crossed the street and papers were placed before him. So overjoyed was Uncle Solon that he kissed the papers while the tears were trickling down his cheeks.

"It has been a severe tax to care for the great throng of people who have been at the Wilder home to-day. Very kindly all the young people of the village came favored with offers of help. When Mrs. Wilder with tears in her eyes asked why she was deserving of such kind attention the answers have all been alike. They have said that for many years Mr. and Mrs. Wilder have been doing deeds of charity and kindness for them and their parents and now they wanted to do something to show their appreciation. It has been another illustration of casting bread upon the waters.

"All thru [sic] life Mrs. Wilder has possessed remarkable energy. When but twelve years of age she spun and wove a web of satinet cloth to make clothing for the family. She has truly been a worthy representative of the sturdy pioneer stock from which she sprung. When a mere babe her mother would ride twenty miles on horseback thru [sic] the woods to church with the child sitting in front of her, and even this feat was done by spotted trees. The same early history and hardships fell to the lot of Mr. Wilder, and doubtless this severe discipline is largely responsible for their splendid health thru [sic] life. For more than 40 years a physician has been called to their home but once, and as Mrs. Wilder naively observed this was only a case of over-eating. They have lived the simple life and have been rewarded with health and happiness.

"The celebration is to go on this Thursday evening with still another figure in the lime light. A nephew, Howard Wilder Burdin, is to celebrate his 21st birthday and the young folks will be here in force. Games will be played, a program furnished and refreshments served. This will probably be kept up until the wee small hours.

"It has indeed been an eventful day for Chase's Mills. A worthy couple have rounded out a full half-century of married life, and if every year has brought added duties it has also brought added joys and new friends. If this is their golden hour it by no means represents their setting sun. To us who know them they are ever young as their hearts are ever warm. Loved, respected and honored by all, the tributes received by them to-day [sic] have come from willing hearts and hands and well bespeaks the estimation in which they are held. May many more of these joyous occasions be theirs. "

[Newspaper clipping (source not identified, and undated; but was probably Lewiston Journal, April [22?], 1910), in collection of Sarah (Sanborn) Robbins. This article has photographic portraits of "Mrs. and Mrs. H. M. Wilder". Steve Robbins has a photocopy.]

More About Howard WILDER and Catherine BURDIN:

Marriage: 1860

Child of Catherine BURDIN and Howard WILDER is:

34 i. [son]10 WILDER.

Notes for [son] WILDER:

Died at age 6.

14. Thomas Green9 BURDIN (Catharine8 BROWN, Green7, James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1) was born 22 September 1831 in Meddybemps, Maine, and died 25 January in Chases Mills, Maine. He married Venora E. LOMBARD 1857.

Notes for Thomas Green BURDIN:

Burdins in a 1903-1904 private "census" of Chases Mills district, in Turner, Maine: post office census, p. 81:

"Burdin, Thomas G., retired

Venora E. (Lombard), housewife

Burdin, Harry W., mill worker

M. Addie (Cobb), housewife

Thomas G., student (member of lower grades)

Howard M. W., student "

p. [?]: "Merchants ....

Tubs & barrels -- Chases Mills, Thomas G. Burdin "

[Turner Town Register, 1903-4. Copy at Maine State Library, Augusta, Maine]

Newspaper obituary of Thomas Burdin:

"T. G. Burdin, Chases Mills.

"Mr. T. G. Burdin died at his home, in Chases Mills, January 25. His parents were the late John and Katherine (Brown) Burdin. He was born in Meddybemps, Washington county, Sept. 22, 1831. He was of a family of five children. The eldest, Josiah, died in the Civil war. Thomas Green, the subject of this sketch, was the second child; the third, Caroline, died in infancy; the fourth, Katherine, the wife of Mr. H. M. Wilder, resides in part of Mr. Burdin's house. The fifth child, John, jr., the father of Mrs. Arthur Chase, died in 1862. Mr. Burdin was born and bred with good habits. If not for his many physical ailments and great losses of property, he bade fair to live to a great age. At the age of twelve, he was among the first of his schoolmates to join the Washingtonian society. He broke his hip when sixteen years old, which prevented his entering into sports of which he had greatly enjoyed. Hs [sic; i.e., He] improved every opportunity for learning, which was meagre for children whose parents were not wealthy, and when he arrived at his majority, he was trusted by his townsmen as their treasurer and also served as [sic] school committee.

"He entered into business for himself in his minority, his father giving him his time when 18 years of age. He built a mill in his native town, situated on a fine water power on Dennysville river. He employed a number of men in the manufacture of bedsteads. As his father was a free-soiler, he accepted his political principles and voted the republican ticket until the year 1872, at the time of the "Credit Mobilier," when his love for the party waned, and as he was an ardent temperance man, it was no hard task to affiliate himself with the prohibition party, to which he clung tenaciously to the end of his life, casting his vote for the prohibition candidate for President at the last election, although in his bodily feebleness, a great effort was made on his part to go to the polls. He assisted the late Seth Sampson in bringing the rumsellers to justice and in every way tried to save the boys from being ensnared. He considered cider a gigantic evil in the country towns of Androscoggin county. He was connected many years with the Independent Order of Good Templars of East Buckfield. The Reform Club of his adopted town, Turner, a charter member of the local Woman's [sic] Christian Temperance Union, and always ready to speak and give financial aid for the cause of temperance. He has been a member of Independent Order of Odd Fellows of Auburn, for many years, been trusted with the funds of the town of Turner as treasurer. He was married in 1857 to Venora E., youngest daughter of the late William Lombard. A son and daughter were born to them. The daughter, Mrs. Ruth Snell, died eight years ago.

"At first in Turner, he manufactured wooden bowls and afterward opened up the hub business, and was known all over New England as "The Hub Man." Later he entered into co-partnership with John Knowlton of Farmington, adding carriage manufacture. After the death of Mr. Knowlton and the burning of his hub mill, and with the great increase of apple growing, he entered the manufacture of apple barrels. He has seen three mills burned on the same spot, with no insurance. With the loss of the third mill, two years ago, and at his time of life, with all his physical infirmities and financial losses, his courage failed him, where before he had always been brave and hopeful to meet embarrassments.

"In the different departments of work, he always managed to employ his neighbors as far as possible, giving them remunerative wages. He was exceedingly indulgent with his family, denying self for their comfort. He was always ready to aid the poor, even when it seemed hardly consistent to others. His home was called "The Pilgrim's Tavern," for no one was ever turned away for lack of food or shelter, whether they had means or not. "

[Newspaper clipping (source not identified, and undated), in collection of Sarah (Sanborn) Robbins. The article includes a photographic portrait of "The Late Thomas G. Burdin". Steve Robbins has a photocopy]

More About Thomas BURDIN and Venora LOMBARD:

Marriage: 1857

Children of Thomas BURDIN and Venora LOMBARD are:

35 i. Ruth10 BURDIN. She married SNELL.

36 ii. Harry W. BURDIN. He married M. Addie COBB.

Notes for Harry W. BURDIN:

Burdins in a 1903-1904 private "census" of Chases Mills district, in Turner, Maine: post office census, p. 81:

"Burdin, Thomas G., retired

Venora E. (Lombard), housewife

Burdin, Harry W., mill worker

M. Addie (Cobb), housewife

Thomas G., student (member of lower grades)

Howard M. W., student "

p. [?]: "Merchants ....

Tubs & barrels -- Chases Mills, Thomas G. Burdin "

[Turner Town Register, 1903-4. Copy at Maine State Library, Augusta, Maine]

18. Judson9 ALLEN (Susanah8 BROWN, Green7, James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1)

Children of Judson ALLEN are:

37 i. Ellie10 ALLEN. She married Charles GILLESPIE.

38 ii. Howard ALLEN.

Notes for Howard ALLEN:

Howard Allen lived in Meddybemps, Maine.

21. Emma Georgianna9 HOWE (Charlotte Green8 BROWN, Green7, James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1) was born 22 July 1848 in Cooper, Maine, and died 25 April 1922 in Milltown, Calais, Maine. She married Ellis Loring HITCHINGS, son of Hiram HITCHINGS and Mary HOWE. He was born 1841, and died 17 April 1904 in Milltown, Calais, Maine.

Notes for Ellis Loring HITCHINGS:

Lottie Stole's booklet (p. 24) says Ellis Loring Hitchings d. 1901; this is probably an error. On p. 7, she states he d. 1904. [Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. pages 7, 24]

Children of Emma HOWE and Ellis HITCHINGS are:

39 i. Charlotte May10 HITCHINGS, born 1876; died 1902.

40 ii. Lenna HITCHINGS, born 1881; died 1938. She married Horace CREAMER; died 1972.

41 iii. Ellis Ray HITCHINGS, born 1882; died 1924. He married Inez Mildred YOUNG; born 1889; died 1944.

22. James Winslow9 HOWE (Charlotte Green8 BROWN, Green7, James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1) was born 03 February 1850 in Cooper, Maine, and died 16 June 1922 in Cooper, Maine. He married Emma Flood HITCHINGS. She was born 1843, and died 1921.

Notes for James Winslow HOWE:

James Winslow Howe was called "Winn". His funeral was held 20 June 1922. There was a Ralph Howe born 16 March 1880 [what relation was he?--SLR]. [Notes of L. Austin Gray, Jr. of Wesley, Maine]

Gravestone in Evergreen Cemetery, Cooper, Maine: HOWE, Winslow J. 1850-1922; Emma S., his wife, 1843-1921; son Ralph D., 1881-1940; Hattie O. his wife 1883-1968; Blanche 1884-1970.

More About James Winslow HOWE:

Burial: Evergreen Cemetery, Cooper, Maine

More About Emma Flood HITCHINGS:

Burial: Evergreen Cemetery, Cooper, Maine

Children of James HOWE and Emma HITCHINGS are:

42 i. Ralph D.10 HOWE, born 16 March 1880; died 1940. He married Harriet O. CLARK; born 1883; died 1968.

Notes for Ralph D. HOWE:

Ralph Howe's gravestone has birth year of 1881. This is probably an error. Lottie Stole also gives his birth year as 1881 [Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. page 25]

Ralph Howe and Harriet Clark had no children.

More About Ralph D. HOWE:

Burial: Evergreen Cemetery, Cooper, Maine

Notes for Harriet O. CLARK:

She was called "Hattie".

More About Harriet O. CLARK:

Burial: Evergreen Cemetery, Cooper, Maine

43 ii. Blanche HOWE, born 1884 in Cooper, Maine; died 1970 in Meriden, Conn.. She married ALLEN.

More About Blanche HOWE:

Burial: Evergreen Cemetery, Cooper, Maine

44 iii. Maude HOWE, born 1883; died 1952. She married Herbert A. LOWE; born 1882; died 1950.

25. Ada Anna9 HOWE (Charlotte Green8 BROWN, Green7, James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1) was born 17 December 1855 in Cooper, Maine, and died 25 April 1943 in Melrose, Mass.. She married Thomas Valentine STUBBS 20 January 1883 in Lawrence, Mass., son of John STUBBS and Ann REYNARD. He was born 14 February 1837 in Bramley, England, and died 17 July 1913 in Sanford, Maine.

More About Ada Anna HOWE:

Burial: Evergreen Cemetery, Cooper, Maine

Notes for Thomas Valentine STUBBS:

Thomas and Ada (Howe) Stubbs resided in North Andover, Mass., where some of their children were born.

Birth, death and marriage data for this couple is from " DAR - National # 87780 Myrtie Fisher Seaverns" according to Lottie Stole [Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. page 28]

More About Thomas Valentine STUBBS:

Burial: Bellevue Cemetery, Lawrence, Mass.

More About Thomas STUBBS and Ada HOWE:

Marriage: 20 January 1883, Lawrence, Mass.

Children of Ada HOWE and Thomas STUBBS are:

45 i. Thomas10 STUBBS, born 19 April 1884; died 19 April 1884.

46 ii. John Horton STUBBS, born 17 May 1885; died 19 October 1885.

47 iii. Grace Anna STUBBS, born 28 December 1886 in Andover, Mass.. She married Walter Cummock HALL 26 August 1911 in Somerville, Mass.; born 05 May 1881 in Berwick, Maine; died 23 June 1945 in Berwick, Maine.

Notes for Walter Cummock HALL:

Walter and Grace (Stubbs) Hall resided in Melrose, Mass. [? -- notes of L. Austin Gray, Jr., Wesley, Maine]. They were living in West Somerville, Mass. in 1916. An undated, unmailed envelope from Nan Gray, Wesley, Maine was addressed to: Mrs. Grace Hall, 95 Ossipee Road, West Somerville, Mass. Grace's later address (about 1970?) was: Mrs. Grace A. Hall, Box 557, Berwick, Maine 03901.

Birth, death and marriage data for this couple is from "DAR - National # 87780 Myrtie Fisher Seaverns" according to Lottie Stole [Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. page 28]

1914. Grace Hall wrote to Nan (Howe) Gray and enclosed two photographs:

"Mary Edith Hall is a blond though you may misinterpret the picture for a bald head. She is ready for a lark any time of day or night. We snapped this in front of Mother's last Sunday. We have been here five weeks but expect to fo home some time this week with Walter. Love to All, Grace. 136 North Street, Tufts College, Mass. "

[Grace Hall, Letter to Mrs. Austin L. Gray (Wesley, Maine), portmarked 17 August 1914 in Sanford, Maine]

[Mary (Hall) Luce (109 Sterling St., West Boylston, Mass. 01583), Letter to L. Austin Gray, Jr. of Wesley, Maine, accompanying her compiled notes on the Howe Family, about 1975]:

"Hopefully, someday I'll have all this better arranged and more complete along with anecdotes from Faith's recollections. Aunt Edith passed on more stories of her childhood than mother [Grace (Stubbs) Hall]. Mother, at 89, is no longer mentally able to help us at all. She has severe hardening of the arteries of the brain and doesn't know any of us now. As I have more, I'll relay it. Do you have Lottie Stole's 'Our Heritage - Howes and Lanes'. What a job she did! "

More About Walter HALL and Grace STUBBS:

Marriage: 26 August 1911, Somerville, Mass.

48 iv. Edith Ada STUBBS, born 14 May 1891 in Andover, Mass.; died 05 June 1965 in Sanford, Maine. She married Ralph Benton EMERY 23 June 1921 in Somerville, Mass.; born 18 February 1891; died 19 April 1943 in Sanford, Maine.

Notes for Edith Ada STUBBS:

Lottie Stole gives her death as 1961 [Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. page 27]

Notes for Ralph Benton EMERY:

Ralph Benton Emery was son of Frank Emery and Alice Spinney of Sanford, Maine. Ralph and wife Edith resided in Sanford, Maine. Lottie Stole gives his middle name as "Burton" [Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. page 27]

More About Ralph EMERY and Edith STUBBS:

Marriage: 23 June 1921, Somerville, Mass.

28. Nancy Jane9 HOWE (Charlotte Green8 BROWN, Green7, James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1) was born 28 October 1861 in Cooper, Maine, and died 10 March 1940 in Wesley, Maine. She married Leander Austin GRAY 08 November 1893 in Pembroke, Maine, son of James GRAY and Ann POLLARD. He was born 20 March 1859 in Wesley, Maine, and died 31 July 1944 in Wesley, Maine.

More About Nancy Jane HOWE:

Burial: Wesley Ridge Cemetery, Wesley, Maine

Notes for Leander Austin GRAY:

A Denison Palmeter "worked for L. A. Gray, Sr." [from L. A. Gray, Jr., 29 Sept. 1973]. Denison Palmeter (1861-1941) is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Cooper, Maine.

More About Leander Austin GRAY:

Burial: Wesley Ridge Cemetery, Wesley, Maine

Title: Sr.

More About Leander GRAY and Nancy HOWE:

Marriage: 08 November 1893, Pembroke, Maine

Child of Nancy HOWE and Leander GRAY is:

49 i. Roger Alton10 GRAY, born 01 May 1895 in Wesley, Maine; died 04 March 1972 in Machias, Maine. He married Minerva Allen SHARMAN 26 June 1919 in Robbinston, Maine; born 18 September 1896 in Robbinston, Maine; died 16 December 2000 in Waterville, Maine.

Notes for Roger Alton GRAY:

Roger died in the hospital at Machias, Maine. Roger and Minerva Gray lived a short time after their marriage in Robbinston, Maine, before moving to Wesley, Maine in the fall of 1919, where they engaged in farming, blueberry raising and wood cutting. Much more could be written here about Roger and Minerva (Sharman) Gray.

More About Roger Alton GRAY:

Burial: Northfield Cemetery, Northfield, Maine

Notes for Minerva Allen SHARMAN:

Minerva Sharman was born in the Isaac "Ike" Nash home on the McNeil Road

in Robbinston, Maine, where her parents were living at the time. Minerva

worked in the Holmes Sardine Factory in Robbinston, Maine, with her family

when she was a girl. She went to Calais Academy in mornings and worked

for her board with the Beckett Family in afternoons. She graduated from

Calais Academy, then taught school in Cooper, Crawford, and Wesley, Maine.

After her marriage to Roger Gray, the couple lived a short time at

Robbinston, Me. before moving to Wesley, Maine by the fall of 1919.

Minerva celebrated her 104th birthday on 18 September 2000.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Minerva (Sharman) Gray died on Saturday, December 16, 2000 at 11:35 p.m., in MaineGeneral Hospital, Thayer Unit, Waterville, Maine. She was aged 104 years.

Arrangements will be made through Redington Funeral Home in Waterville, Maine. There will memorial service in spring 2000 ath the time of burial in the Methodist Cemetery, East Vassalboro, Maine.

Marriage Notes for Roger GRAY and Minerva SHARMAN:

Minerva and Roger were married in the living room at Minerva's parents'

home in Robbinston, Maine.

More About Roger GRAY and Minerva SHARMAN:

Marriage: 26 June 1919, Robbinston, Maine

29. Everette Edward9 HOWE (Charlotte Green8 BROWN, Green7, James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1) was born 03 September 1866 in Cooper, Maine, and died 11 January 1932 in Minneapolis, Minn.. He married Emma Dora LANE, daughter of Francis LANE and Eliza STOUT. She was born 1870, and died 22 May 1921.

Notes for Everette Edward HOWE:

Lottie Stole gives his name as "Everette Edward Howe" [Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. pages 20, 33, 34, 40, 45, 52]. Other family sources, copied by L. Austin Gray, Jr. of Wesley, Maine, give his name as "Ernest Everett Howe". [Information from L. Austin Gray of Wesley, Maine, which he appears to have received from Mary (Hall) Luce, daughter of Grace Hall: "David and Charlotte Howe's Family - source - Aunt May's [Florence May Howe] letter to Aunt Edith Emery in 1942 and mother's letter [from Grace Hall to Edith Emery] of 1961." ].

In 1915, he was living in Robbinsdale, Minn.

Note: there is a history of this town, which may be worth consulting some time: Blodgett, Helen W. History of Robbinsdale, Minn. -- Published for Robbinsdale Historical Society (by Printing Arts, Inc., 3819 W. Broadway, Robbinsdale), c1983. Cover title: Robbinsdale, then and now. Supposedly the town was founded by a Robbins from Maine. The book mentions an Albert Robbins (1893-1983) and a Nash family. Thanks to Donald Robbins of East Vassalboro, Maine for the citation and information (received March 1993).

"The little 2 pound baby born, Sept. 3, 1866, that everyone helped to raise, with wash tubs filled with warm water, to keep him warm, was my papa Everette." [Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. page 21].

 

 

David Howe's son, Everette, when a young man, decided to go to Minnesota with one of his buddies and work in the woods. His mother [Charlotte (Brown) Howe] told him he should look up his uncle who lived there, but, no, he just wanted to work in the woods, he didn't want to bother to see his relatives. Then his mother told Everette he would need a letter of recommendation before he'd be hired, which his uncles could write for him. But, no, Everette said he didn't need one, his letter of recommendation was the seat of his pants. [It seems, at this point, that Charlotte (Brown) Howe probably wrote a letter ahead to the Minnesota relatives, informing them of Everette's soon arrival there]. Everette and companion got off the train in Minnesota, and were wandering about the train station. It happened that their uncle was there with a wagonload of milk or something, and saw them, and started talking with them. When he found out who the boys were, his own nephews, the uncle invited them to visit his home for the weekend, after they'd finished for the week in the woods. Well, the boys never made it to the woods; they went went to see their uncle and stayed there and worked for him.

[Minerva (Sharman) Gray and L. Austin Gray, Jr. of Wesley, Maine, Interviewed by Steve Robbins, September 1973].

 

 

Notes for Emma Dora LANE:

Lottie Stole's booklet states that Emma Lane d. in 1943; this is probably an error. [Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. page 34]

 

Children of Everette HOWE and Emma LANE are:

50 i. Frank Everett10 HOWE, born 1893; died 1956 in Hennepin County, Minn.. He married Christine MAGNUSON; born 1896 in Mille Lars Lake, Minn.; died 1945 in Hennepin County, Minn..

51 ii. Charlotte Brown HOWE, born Abt. 1895; died 19 August 1974. She married (1) F. W. RUNCK; born 1890; died 1935. She married (2) Toralf STOLE; born 1892; died 1956.

Notes for Charlotte Brown HOWE:

She was called "Lottie". She wrote a small genealogy on the Howes: [Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. ], but did not give her birth year or any information on her children (if indeed she had any). Her birth year is inferred from her statement on page 1 that she was eight years old when she learned to graft apples in 1903. (See her reminiscences of her 1903 visit to her grandparents, under the notes for her grandfather David Howe).

Lottie's greetings in the preliminary page (p. i) of her book:

"Greetings and Blessings to My Beloved People. Merry Christmas 1973. Happly [sic] New Year 1974.

"Hope all there are well and happy.

"My sincere thanks to each and every one of you who helped make it possible, without census available to go by. Any that comes in now I can send to each one to add to their book.

"You have made me very happy, each and every one of you.

"With all the Blind Alleys I came to and I still have some left to find and finish if I can, but I want what I have of Asa and Susan's children and Daniel and Temperance children, etc., to keep. It was so much more than I had anticipated last year, when I said 'I would have it done for this Christmas.'

"Love to each and every one of you, Aunt Lottie. "

[Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. page [i]. ].

 

 

Lottie's "afterword" page (p. [79] ) gives a little more biographical data on her:

"Please excuse my mistakes. The only training in this line, I have had, was our registered cattle books, and as I lived with the herd, I didn't have to ask any questions.

"How I miss writing down the Silver and Gold Medal Dams, and 4 Star Sires, and how much their off-spring had increased in butter fat over their dams and in number of heifer calves.

"I have so very much to be thankful for on this Thanksgiving Day 1973.

"My right hand, eyes and brain all working at once while I put 'Our Heritage' together from all our grandmother's Bibles and other notes sent to me.

"I should have done this in 1925 when some of these papers came to me. I was in the hospital then and couldn't even feed myself but it has been on my mind ever since to get it done and this year my right arm didn't have a pain. The pain had obliged me and gone to my left arm.

"This has been one of the busiest and happiest years of my life. I hope all of you are as Happy and Thankful as I am today. Love, Aunt Lottie.

"P.S. Please let me know my mistakes so I can correct them. Love, Hop Along Baldie."

[Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. page [79]. ].

1965 address: Lottie Stole, 7120 North 55th Drive, Glendale, Ariz. 85301. Her summer address [about 1973?] was at her brother's home: Roy Howe, 4319 Queene Avenue North, Minneapolis, Minn. 55412. She passed away on Aug. 19, 1974.

[Notes of L. Austin Gray, Jr. of Wesley, Maine sent to Steve Robbins]

52 iii. Vera HOWE, born 1899; died 1915.

53 iv. LeRoy Merton HOWE, born 1901. He married Myrtle Mary HARTKOPF; born 1900.

Notes for LeRoy Merton HOWE:

Address (about 1973?): Roy Howe, 4319 Queene Avenue North, Minneapolis, Minn. 55412. This was "Lottie Stole's summer address, at her brother's". [Note from L. Austin Gray, Jr. of Wesley, Maine to Steve Robbins]

30. Florence Mary9 HOWE (Charlotte Green8 BROWN, Green7, James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1) was born 06 May 1869 in Cooper, Maine, and died 25 December 1945 in Cooper, Maine.

Notes for Florence Mary HOWE:

Florence May Howe was known as "Aunt May". She had an illegitimate child, whom she raised at her parents' home, Lee Howe.

More About Florence Mary HOWE:

Burial: Evergreen Cemetery, Cooper, Maine

Child of Florence Mary HOWE is:

54 i. Lee Forest10 HOWE, born 26 October 1888 in Cooper, Maine; died 12 November 1944 in Calais, Maine. He married Mildred MORTON; born 1896 in Cooper, Maine.

More About Lee Forest HOWE:

Burial: Evergreen Cemetery, Cooper, Maine

31. Elizabeth Cyrena9 BROWN (Joseph Green8, Green7, James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1) was born 05 March 1863, and died 13 May 1943. She married Frank SANBORN 05 December 1885. He was born 05 December 1843, and died November 1931.

More About Frank SANBORN and Elizabeth BROWN:

Marriage: 05 December 1885

Children of Elizabeth BROWN and Frank SANBORN are:

55 i. Sarah Ames10 SANBORN, born 23 June 1889. She married Donald G. ROBBINS.

56 ii. Talbot SANBORN.

32. Alice9 BROWN (Joseph Green8, Green7, James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1) She married TALBOT.

Child of Alice BROWN and TALBOT is:

57 i. Joe10 TALBOT.

33. Webster9 HITCHINGS (Margaret8 BROWN, Green7, James6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Jacob3, John2, Angus1)

Notes for Webster HITCHINGS:

Webster Hitchings got blown up with blasting powder. Milton "Millie" Hitchings was Webster's son and Blanche Allen's half-brother. [Information from Roger Gray, Wesley, Maine as recorded by L. Austin Gray, Jr.]

Child of Webster HITCHINGS is:

58 i. Milton10 HITCHINGS.


[Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. pages 2, 18, [79]].

From Lottie Stole's dedication of her book:

[p. 1:] "To my Great Grand Parents, Asa Howe and Susan Fisher, and Daniel Lane and Temperance Pettigrow.

"Who blazed the trail thru [sic] virgin forests and rocks of Maine. Rocks so big we used one for a play house and had to climb a tree to get up in it.

"The wide rock fences that were wide enough to run and play on top of were still there in 1903, when we visited there.

"The Blazed Blind Trail. The trees were marked on the side they were going to so they could find their way out and knew where to look to going in again. They all used the same mark on tree so they could find each other.

"Faith is all they lived by. Faith in God, Faith in each other, Faith in Relatives, friends, and nature.

"They found Land of Plenty, God leading them, in Washington County, Maine.

"Plenty of wood and trees for log cabins, for cooking with and heating.

"Plenty of game and fish of all kinds in woods and apples, blueberries, cherries, cranberries, beech nuts, spruce green, etc. They never did like any kind of heat but wood heat.

"They were experts in tree grafting, etc., and started good apple orchards grafting on wild apple roots. Wonderful apples on them when I was there in 1903. Grandpa David would pick one for me to taste and throw it away. I said 'Mama won't like that I have to eat all of it.' He said, 'No, just tell me which is the best tree' and I learned to graft when I was eight years old.

"They raised their own meat except game and fish. Raised beef, pork, mutton, lamb, hens, turkeys, etc.

"The principle [sic] stock raised at their new home was sheep. The sheep not only furnished meat but all their clothes and candles, etc. The sheep were sheared by hand and wool washed, dried, carded and spun ready for the loom. The mutton tallow was melted and poured into molds with a wick in it and all they used for lighting.

"It didn't take cash in those days. They took their wheat and corn to mill to get ground and gave a percent of it for grinding.

[p. 2:] "Mill run by water power from creek. They raised all their food.

"There were no churches, schools, doctors. They were religious people and could quote from the Bible as it fitted until they had a church. The children were taught at home until they had a school and it is marvelous what good writing they did all their lives.

"Grandpa David prayed at each meal and before going to bed.

"Their children were born without a doctor or nurse. Healthy normal children.

"God was willing and the women cared for each other at that time. Ironed everything to sterilize it for the delivery and the faith was wonderful.

"The children were raised with responsibility. Responsibility right from the start. Also had the security of knowing their parents were right and their discipline to follow after. No one could pass the buck. Each one his own responsibility.

"From our Grandmother's [Charlotte (Brown) Howe] notes.

"When a new baby is born and dressed the father takes it on his knee and Bible on other knee and the children stand around and help name it.

"Children's little fingers pointing in Bible for a name. Daddy was safe tho [sic], as he was the only one that could read.

"Faith is all we live by. Faith in God, each other, Relatives, Friends and Nature.

"We thank you God for everything.

"We thank you God for your wonderful world and for guiding and heading us thru [sic] it.

"We thank you God for our young lives, out of doors, close to nature and God.

"Thank you God for showing me and letting me see the wonders of your world.

"We thank God for our normal healthy children and bountiful crops. "

[Stole, Lottie B. Our Heritage : Howes and Lanes. [privately printed], 1973. pages 1-2.]