family of worthy farmer kight and anna ruth reilly

FAMILY OF WORTHY FARMER KIGHT AND ANNA RUTH REILLY

WORTHY FARMER KIGHT was born November 25, 1878 in Elmont, Grayson County, Texas, and died March 23, 1956 in Long Beach, California.  He is buried in Long Beach. He married (1) JESSIE MYRTLE KIGHT, daughter of HOFFMAN KIGHT and DOVIE/DORIE BLANTON. She was born November 11, 1880 in Grayson County, Texas, and died June 21, 1944 in Los Angeles County, California - per CA Death index 1940-1997. No known children; they must have divorced. He married (2) ANNA RUTH REILLY January 01, 1901 in Texas. She was born December 02, 1878 in Texas, and died March 22, 1922 in Long Beach, California-buried in Long Beach.

Notes for WORTHY FARMER KIGHT:

TAKEN FROM INFORMATION GIVEN TO ME BY KIGHT RESEARCHERS IN WESTERNPORT, MARYLAND.

"There is some question as to how Worthy got his name. Some say he was named after the Governor of Virginia, Worthe Farmer; while others tell a more colorful tale. It seems Amy, his mother, was fascinated and much impressed by the 'worth-while' farms in her new land of Texas; thus the name, Worthy Farmer derived. Either way, Worthy was a rancher in Texas until his retirement and move to California. He died of heart failure on 3/23/1956 and is buried in Long Beach, California; Anna died from complications of surgery on 3/22/1922 and is buried in Long Beach, California."

CHILD OF WORTHY FARMER KIGHT AND ANNA RUTH REILLY

 

FAMILY OF HENRY HARPER (HARP) KIGHT AND MARY ELISE STEWART

HENRY HARPER (HARP) KIGHT was born February 17, 1881 in Elmont, Grayson County, Texas, and died June 20, 1974 in Lubbock, Lubbock County, Texas.  He is buried in the City of Lubbock Cemetery, Lubbock, Lubbock County, Texas.  He married (1) MARY ELSIE STEWART October 29, 1902 in McKinney, Collin County, Texas, daughter of WILLIAM STEWART and LEAH COVERT.  She was born July 16, 1881 in McKinney, Collin County, Texas, and died February 27, 1911 in Claude, Armstrong County, Texas.  He married (2) ESTELLA RAGSDALE June 02, 1912 in First Christian Church, Claude, Armstrong County, Texas, daughter of MOULDER RAGSDALE and NANCY HUDSPETH.  She was born March 27, 1887 in Collinsville, Grayson County, Texas, and died September 26, 1945 in Lubbock, Lubbock County, Texas.  She is buried in the City of Lubbock Cemetery, Lubbock, Lubbock County, Texas.  He married (3) DORA NICHOLS January 04, 1948 in Lubbock, Lubbock County, Texas.  She was born September 25, 1897 in Oklahoma, and died January 08, 1990 in Lubbock, Lubbock Co. Texas.  She is buried at Resthaven Cemetery, Lubbock, Lubbock County, Texas.

Notes for HENRY HARPER (HARP) KIGHT:

TAKEN FROM INFORMATION SENT TO ME BY KIGHT RESEARCHERS IN WESTERNPORT, MARYLAND.

"Henry Harper moved with his family from Grayson County, Texas to Claude in Armstrong County, Texas at the age of  9.  As an adult, Harp farmed near Claude for awhile and then operated a grocery business in Claude from 1907 until 1915.  He initially married Mary Elise Stewart from McKinney, Collin County, Texas.  From this marriage, there were four children.

After the death of his first wife, Harp married Estella Hudspeth Ragsdale, a clerk in his father's store.  In 1915, Harp bought the shoe and gent's furnishings department of the family mercantile store.  In 1917, he purchased a section of land north of Claude.  From 1924 until 1928, he was the Tax Assessor of Armstrong County.  He moved his family to Lubbock, Texas in 1932 after a brief move to Fort Worth, Texas.  Estella always claimed she persuaded a radio astrologer to predict a move back to the Panhandle was the thing for the family.  Harp promptly returned to the Panhandle with the family.  While a Lubbock resident, Harp was the Lubbock Independent School District tax assessor for two years.  From this marriage there were six sons.  Estella passed away in Lubbock in 1945.

In 1948, Harp married Dora Nichols and they located to a rural property on Kent Road in Lubbock where Harp kept a good vegetable garden and spent his time carving small windmills and other woodwork figures.  He also operated a small grocery store on Avenue T in the 1950s.  He loved to play cards with the grandchildren and they could never figure out how they always lost.  There were many family visits from all his sons.  The Kent Road property survived the Lubbock tornado of 1970, though the tornado's path was close.

"When Harp was 9 years old, his family moved to Claude, Armstrong County, Texas.  They lived in a dugout for awhile.  He attended school in a building made from cedar chopped in Palo Duro Canyon.  As an adult, he farmed for awhile near Claude, Texas, then from 1907 to 1915, he operated a grocery business in Claude.  In 1915, Harp bought the shoe and gent's furnishing department of the family store.  He purchased a section of land north of Claude in 1917.  From 1924 to 1928, he was the Tax Assessor of Armstrong County, Texas.  Harp and his family moved to Lubbock, Texas in 1932."

Notes for MARY ELSIE STEWART:

Mary Stewart's family was also linked to the Burris family in McKinney.  They owned a mill there.  Mary died after the birth of Mary Edith.  Mary's sister took Leah Margaret (Peggy) and Mary Edith with her, while Harp Kight kept H.M.  The girls lived in various places during their childhood including Clayton, New Mexico.

Notes for DORA NICHOLS:

OBITUARY OF DORA NICHOLS KIGHT FROM THE LUBBOCK AVALANCHE-JOURNAL, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1990

DORA KIGHT

Services for Dora N. Kight, 92, of Lubbock will be at 4:30 p.m. today in Resthaven Chapel with the Rev. Herbert G. Tavener, pastor of Asbury United Methodist Church, officiating.  Burial will be in Resthaven Memorial Park under direction of Resthaven Funeral Home.  She died at 12:16 a.m. Monday in Methodist Hospital after a brief illness.

She was born in Oklahoma and had lived in Lubbock since 1941.  She married H.H. Kight January 4, 1947.  He died June 20, 1974.  She was retired from Dunlap's Department Store and was a member of Asbury United Methodist Church.

Survivors include a daughter, Georgia Donley of Lubbock; several grandchildren and  great grandchildren.

CHILDREN OF HENRY HARPER (HARP) KIGHT AND MARY ELISE STEWART

 

FAMILY OF HENRY HARPER (HARP) KIGHT AND ESTELLA RAGSDALE

(Back row-Richard Thomas (Dick), Harper Marion (HM) Kight)

(Front row - Carl Lee, Henry Harper (Harp), Henry Huffman, William Malcolm and Estella (Ragsdale) Kight)

Notes for ESTELLA RAGSDALE:

Estella hailed from Collinsville, Grayson County, Texas.  She met and married Harp Kight while she worked as a clerk in the Kight mercantile store in Claude, Armstrong County, Texas.  She loved her flower garden and was an accomplished china painter.  According to her son,  Carl.   Estella was working at the Pelphrey Dry Goods store in Collinsville when Henry Moses came to town selling his wares.  He spotted Estella, determined to get she and Harp together, he offered her a job in his store in Claude.  She accepted the offer, worked for Henry Moses and married Harp.

CHILDREN OF HENRY HARPER (HARP) KIGHT AND ESTELLA RAGSDALE

 

FAMILY OF MAUDE KIGHT AND LEWIS A. McWHIRTER

MAUDE KIGHT was born April 07, 1882 in Elmont, Grayson County, Texas, and died January 17, 1940 in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas.  She married LEWIS A. MCWHIRTER April 23, 1901 in Claude, Armstrong County, Texas.  He was born December 31, 1880 in Lampassas, Lampassas County, Texas.

Notes for MAUDE KIGHT:

Maude and her husband, Lewis McWhirter lived in Fort Worth, Texas and are both deceased.  Maude died of cancer and Lewis remarried.

Notes for LEWIS A. MCWHIRTER:

He sold wholesale paper and hearing aids.

CHILDREN OF MAUDE KIGHT AND LEWIS A. McWHIRTER

FAMILY OF MALCOMB BENJAMIN (MAL) KIGHT AND VIVIAN (BIZ) BENTON

MALCOMB BENJAMIN (MAL) KIGHT was born February 01, 1884 in Elmont or Van Alstyne, Grayson County, Texas, and died October 11, 1963 in Claude, Armstrong County, Texas. He married VIVIAN (BIZ) BENTON October 04, 1913 in Claude, Armstrong County, Texas, daughter of ROBERT BENTON and ELINOR (LENA). She was born March 29, 1890 in Whitewright, Grayson County, Texas, and died February 01, 1982 in Claude, Armstrong County, Texas.  They did not have any children.

Notes for MALCOMB BENJAMIN (MAL) KIGHT:

TAKEN FROM A COLLECTION OF MEMORIES THE HISTORY OF ARMSTRONG COUNTY, TEXAS 1875-1965, PUBLISHED BY THE ARMSTRONG COUNTY HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION, 1965

"Born in Elmont, Grayson County, Texas, Malcomb moved with his family to Claude in 1890. There he met and married Vivian Benton. When Mal and Vivia married, Mal and his brother, Harp, were partners in the grocery business. This store, located in Claude, was where the present Mitchell-Goodwin store stood in 1965.

In 1906, Mal bought out the H.M. Kight and Bro. store located on the north side of the Claude town square in a two story brick building. Mal traded one-quarter section of land (later the John Wiegman place) as a down payment on the business. In this store, he sold everything - clothing, groceries, hardware and coffins (which were on the second floor of the store). He owned the first horse drawn hearse in Armstrong County.

In 1920, Mal decided to go into the registered Hereford cattle business and became a well known breeder in the Southwest. He disposed of the store and bought the Salt Fork Ranch (five sections of land on the Salt Fork creek 5 miles northeast of Claude). This was an ideal place for his registered herd of Anxiety IV blood line. Vivia kept the books, worked in the care of the cattle with her husband and generally did much of the handyman repair work on windmills and such with Mal supervising from below. They also owned a herd of grade Herefords. Their ranch brand was a diamond on the left shoulder for the registered heifers and the Diamond Bar for their grade cattle. They lived on the ranch until 1947 when they bought the Elmer Bagwell home in Claude. He sold two of the sections of land, but kept the home section and leased it to the Nelson Grain company. Vivian was given a block of the Benton holdings in west Claude in 1912. She and Mal built their dream house on this land.

The couple gave much to the community of Claude, being active in the Methodist Church, the Cattlemen's Association, Warner's Memorial Community Home, the cemetery association, the Old Settlers' Association and various other activities for the good of the community."

He died of a lung infection.

OBITUARY OF M.B. KIGHT

Claude, Oct. 12 - Funeral services for Mal B. Kight, 79, will be held at 10 a.m. Monday at the Claude Methodist Church. The body will lie in state from 9 to 10 a.m. at the church. The Rev. Frank Oklesby, minister of the church, will officiate. Burial will be in the Claude Cemetery under the direction of Blackburn-Shaw Funeral Home of Amarillo. Pallbearers will be Bobby Wood, Paul Hood, Tom Collins, Frank Dunn, Alfred Reck, Ivan Chauveaux. Mr. Kight died at 3:30 p.m. Friday at Northwest Texas Hospital.

Mr. Kight was born Feb. 1, 1884, at Van Alstyne. He had lived in Claude since 1890. His parents had filed on land in Carson County in 1890 shortly before the Rock Island Lines railroad was built. They had the first general store in the area and were undertakers. Mr. Kight was a cattleman for 35 years before he retired to Claude in 1947. He was a member of the Claude Methodist Church.

Survivors include his wife, Vivia of Claude; a brother H.H. Kight of Lubbock; and a sister Mrs. Faye Gibson of Long Beach, California.

Notes for VIVIAN (BIZ) BENTON:

Vivia Cobb Benton was born in Whitewright, Grayson County, Texas. Her family moved to Claude in Armstrong County due to her brother Wendell Benton's health (malaria). In Claude, Vivia's father bought the J.O. Pope ranch five miles south of Claude at a price of six dollars per acre. This included cattle, house and equipment. They had sold their land in Fannin County for $200.00 an acre.

After moving to Claude, Mr. Benton bought the Dodge house from a doctor in addition to the 186 acres west of the house. Vivia attended school for two years at Indianola College in Wynnewood, Indian Territory where her brother, B. B. Cobb was president.

After Mal's death, Vivia remained active in the Methodist Church as well as the cemetery association (one of her favorite activities was in helping care for the Claude cemetery grounds).

MEMORIAL TO AUNT BIZ (VIVIAN KIGHT) from THE CLAUDE NEWS, by Dr. Wayne C. Eubank

To the west, the dying sun implemented it's farewell on a late summer sky. To the south, a green grassy blanket stretched away the to horizon, covered with cattle leisurely clipping the tender blades, red and white dots on a canvas of green. The sound of thudding hoofs came from horses frolicking in a nearby pasture. Out of the evening, resonant with life, came the sound of chickens settling for the night, the call of the bob whites, the lonesome bawl of a dogie lost from his mother and the ringing cry of a coyote with muzzle pointed toward the sky, thus night descended upon the prairie. Such a landscape was typical of the Texas Panhandle about eighty years ago when the Benton family arrived in Armstrong County, from Grayson County, Texas. Their son, Wendell and daughter, Vivian, R.C. and Lena Benton settled on the outskirts of Claude. The remainder of their lives would be blended with the history of the Claude community and Armstrong County.

Aunt Biz loved the Claude Cemetery which she fondly called "Mockingbird Hill". For 6 decades it was a vital part of her heart and thinking. In the late teens, Aunt Biz headed a committee to keep the grounds clean and attractive. Through her leadership, the first addition to the grounds was made. Perpetual care was another one of her pet projects. Aunt Biz headed the move to pave the road from the highway to the cemetery. For decades, she chaired the Memorial Day Services held at the cemetery. I know she feels completely at home sleeping the eons away on Mockingbird Hill. Aunt Biz loved her church and its many activities. She helped organize the first Women's Club in Armstrong County. Aunt Biz was in the fight to secure a Home Demonstration Agent, Mrs. Vaden, who aroused the interest of the community in home canning. Soon the garden and field delicacies of summer were stored for winter use and enjoyment. Thus, the depression days were made much easier to bear.

Of all the lovely attributes that Aunt Biz possessed, two stand out in my thinking. Her love of family and her devotion to friends. As a teenager, nothing was more exciting to me than a weekend with Aunt Biz and Uncle Mal, on the Diamond Bar Ranch. She considered Benton and me, Dorothy Jo and Ben, as her children and we loved her as a mother. Aunt Biz was devoted to her brothers, John, Bruce, Wendell and his wife, Mary, who during the past months was constantly at her side. When my mother, Buena was confined to a nursing home, following her accident, Aunt Biz visited her almost every day for months, usually taking her a home cooked meal each day. Aunt Biz was like a mother to children of the neighborhood. Her kitchen walls were covered with birthday cards, Christmas cards, notes, drawings on cards, all expressing love for Aunt Biz.

Possessed of an insatiable belief in and search for the Good and the Right, she was intensely enchanted and in love with life and all its ramifications, her church, her friends, her family, her home, her garden with its many colored flowers.

Her long life was a great and grand adventure with God and man. Tho for her the grand adventure has closed, she will live on in the minds and hearts of those who love man in all of his goodness and nature in all her beneficence. If everyone to whom she did some loving kindness were to bring a single blossom to her resting place on Mockingbird Hill, she would sleep tonight under an avalanche of flowers. The evening of February 1, God was looking down from His high Heaven and His eyes fell on Aunt Biz on her bed of pain. His Great Heart was touched with pity. He turned to that bright angel standing at His right hand and said: "Go down, Death, go down and bring Aunt Biz to me. Death didn't say word, but he leaped on his fastest horse, pale as a sheet in the moonlight, and out through the Pearly Gates he rode, down past moons and stars and he took her in his icy arms. But Aunt Biz didn't feel any pain. Death began to ride again, up past the evening star and on beyond the morning star and into the glittering Light of Glory and before the Great White Throne he lay Aunt Biz on the loving breast of Jesus. Weep not! She is not dead. She is resting in the bosom of Jesus.

      

 

L.L. Kight 2002