Mo pioneer
Southern MO Pioneer Certificates





Barry County Pioneers


Peter Fishburn

Submitted by Virginia Perry

Peter Fishburn, born January 9, 1783 in Frederick County, Maryland to John and Susanna (Kitterman) Fishburn, was the first child born in a family of nine. His siblings were; John Jacob born March 25, 1785 married Ann Wagner; Frederick born November 19, 1786 married Nancy Boheler; Anna Maria born June 7, 1788 married David Bowman Ritter, Maria Christina born February 22, 1790; Christopher born February 12, 1792 married Mary Bandy; Elizabeth born January 19, 1794 married Nathan Simmons; Barbara born December 19, 1795 married Joel Cliburn.   All children were born in Frederick County, Maryland.
  The  grandparents of our subject were; Philipp Peter and Barbara Fishburn and Christopher and Christina Kitterman. Philipp was born in Worrstadt, Germany and came  with his parents on the ship Phoenix arriving in America October 20, 1744. Christopher was born in Germany and came to America with two brothers and a sister on the ship Patience, arriving August 11, 1750.
When Peter Fishburn was about eleven years old, his parents moved to Franklin County, Virginia.  On May 1, 1805 he married Celia Hagar and this union brought nine children all born in Franklin County, Virginia.  They are; Susanna born July 4, 1806 and died October 1821 in Allen County, Ky.;  John born December 19, 1807 married Faitha Roark, John died in Jasper County, Mo.; Mary Ann born October 11, 1809 married David Roark; Jacob born November 5, 1810 married Elizabeth King; George Hagar born September 5, 1812, married Hester King; Nancy Hail born April 14, 1813 married Joseph Crow; Elizabeth born July 1, 1816 married John King; Frances Harrison born March 1, 1818 married James C. Mayhew; Henry Kitterman born February 18, 1820 and died March 6, 1820
By 1820, Peter decided to move to Allen County, Ky. where his parents John and Susanna Fishburn had relocated in 1816, having purchased 62 1/2 acres on Long Creek.  Peter bought  90 acres on the Big Barren River also in  Allen County. He continued to buy property adding to his farm until 1832 he owned 605 acres of good rich farm land.
 Apparently Peter had heard about the Homestead lands being offered in Missouri as he started selling off his property and in the 1836, 1837 and 1838  tax list  he is listed as a voter but owned no property.
 Celia died May 16, 1837 and is buried in the Old Gibs Family Cemetery. On February 9, 1838 Peter married  Elizabeth Strait and they moved to Mo. where Peter homesteaded 151 acres in Lawrence County.  He and his new wife had four children; Celia married Samuel Walker; Sarah C. married Miles Cline; Paulina Jane and Martha Ellen.
Peter died in 1844 in Lawrence County, Mo. that part of the county became Barry County, Mo. in 1845, thus records are found in both counties regarding this family.  No final resting place has been found for Peter and Elizabeth (Strait) Fishburn.


Douglas County Pioneers


George Washington Kitterman

Submitted by Virginia Perry

George Washington Kitterman, born December 30, 1838 near Kitterman Corners,
Clark Township, Perry County, Indiana, to George Washington and Mary
(Fortune) Kitterman, being the nineth child in order of birth, his siblings
being: Malinda married William Blunk; John married Savilla Rhodes; Benjamin
married Nancy Taylor, Anna married Alfred Crutchfield, Susan married
William Carter, Nancy married William Kellams, Sarah married John Beard,
Johanna married John Shoemaker; Mary married Isaam Stapleton; David married
Maria Louisa Spencer; Elizabeth married Davis L. Dunn; Emily married
Nicholas Workan and Maria Eliza married William B. Searcy.
The father of our subject, George Washington Kitterman Sr. came to Harrison
County, Indiana with his widowed mother at the age of 22 years, his father
having died in Franklin County, Virginia in 1811.  He married Mary Fortune,
daughter of Benjamin and Mildred (Carter) Fortune, early residents of Perry
County, Indiana.
The subject of our sketch served two terms in the War of the Rebellion,
Feb. 8, 1862 Co. F, Captain Shirleys 53 Reg. Ind. Vol. was discharged at
Wilma , Miss. 21  Feb. 1864 and from 22 Feb. 1864 to 21 July 1865 in Co. F.
53 Reg. Ind. Vol. in Company F, 53rd. Indiana Inf., his description from
his pension papers says he was 5 feet, 6 inches tall, 173 pounds,
complexion- fair, eyes- blue, hair- dark, occupation- farmer. After his
discharge from the Civil War, he married Miss. Cornelia Stapleton, August
13, 1865, the daughter of Achem and Mary (Taylor) Stapleton. He bought a
farm near Addyville in Perry County, Indiana and four children were born;
Isaam Freeman June 10, 1866; Benjamin H. April 7, 1868; John T. born March
25, 1869, died July 20, 1871; Mary born Nov. 28, 1871, died June 14, 1872.
Soon after the burial of the two babies, George and Cornelia moved to Ark.,
but only stayed 6 weeks and then moved to Ava, Douglas County, Missouri.
Here three more children were born; George Henderson, June 1, 1874; Walter
Boon, October 10, 1878 and Leo Leonard July 4, 1880.
Cornelia (Stapleton) Kitterman, wife of our subject, died March 27, 1900
and is buried in the Ava Cemetery in Ava, Missouri.
On October 12, 1901, George married Lucy Plybon, daughter of Jacob Plybon
and the widow of Samson Johnson Kitterman, they moved to Copan, Washington
county, Oklahoma.
George Washington Kitterman made his will September 12, 1914 and June 26,
1916 he died. He is buried in Dewey Cemetery, in Dewey, Oklahoma



George Douglas HALE, Sr

Submitted by Susan K. Bruce
Springfield, Missouri

George Douglas HALE, Sr. was born August 25, 1829 in Ohio.  He died May 28,
1889 in Douglas County, Missouri   He was the son of Thomas HALE b PA and
Phebe COON b Ohio.  His family came to Missouri around the 1840s.  He and
his parents are listed in the Webster Co. 1850 census.

George married Malinda CORNELISON b June 15, 1834 in Green Co., Missouri
July 1, 1852 in Greene Co., Missouri.  George and Malinda had the
following children:  Thomas G. HALE b September 18, 1853 who married Sarah
S. LETHCO. Nancy J. HALE b March 10, 1854 who married John Gabriel HARTIN.
Phebe J. HALE b about 1857.

Malinda died November 17, 1857 and is buried in the Huffman cemetery,
Douglas Co., Missouri.  George D. HALE married Elizabeth HUFFMAN on
February 17, 1859 George and Elizabeth lived on Little Beaver about 12
west of Ava in which community  they lived until their death.  George and
Elizabeth had the following children: Henry H. HALE b April 5, 1860 d.
November 17, 1860 George Douglas Jr. HALE b. February 16, 1862 in Illinois
died November 25, 1941.  George Douglas Jr. married first Minerva J.
ROGERS July 31, 1881 and second Rose S. RILEY June 12, 1906. Sarah A. b
1864 in Illinois married a Newbourgh. William R. b 1868 married Ida W.
PAYNE John C,.HALE born October 1870 married Effie T. COX Mary M. HALE b
1873 married a DYKES Martha F. born September 30, 1876 married Albert
FITZGERALD. Jessie L. born May 31, 1879 married a Arlene Clarence born
March 1882 Florence M. HALE born November 13, 1884 and married a Robert A.
FRIEND.

Geroge Douglas HALE was a presiding judge of Douglas county for twelve
years prior to his death.

Submitted by: Susan K. BRUCE Springfield, Missouri



Sarah Haughn, Douglas Co, MO Pioneer
.
Submitted by Olivia Haughn

Sarah Haughn was a 52 year old widow in the 1860 census. she had 2 step
children and 2 of her own plus 3 ? grand children. Her 2 sons would be
involved in the Civil War from beginning to end. Her own
son William M. Haughn 1842-1922. served in different militia groups.
Her step son James Leroy Haughn 1837-1888. served in many
places. (I'm seeking info ) the last unit he was in was made up from
many units that did not have enough men to carry on (??). He served
with valor. Had tuberculosis after. Married and raised a family.
Wm. and his young wife removed to Fulton County, Elizabeth,Arkansas where
Wm. helped his father in law, John J. Wyatt, run a store at Wild Cherry,
until he could get his own property. And he did manage to gain prosperity,
Raised 7 issue to adulthood saw them marry and raise their children.
James moved his family to Arkansas also. Legend is the post war jay
hawkers did not bother much in Fulton County. But it was devastated also.
Sarah removed to her daughter's and lived with the family until her death
in 1880.In Mtn. Grove, Missouri, Wright County. Buried in the old
Swedish, Shrunk cemetery. where a few years ago some one saw fit to
remove the old stones and now several names are on her head stone.
Pieces of the old stones were cut down and sold to unsuspecting grieving
families. There is more research to do on this family.


Ozark County Pioneers


Joseph Herrod Holt and Family

Submitted by:  Shawn

This is a photo of my gggrandfather Joseph Herrod Holt his wife
Emma (TANNEHILL) Holt there children oldest son Walden, Daughter Ollie,
And youngest Son Jimmy. It is believed to have been taken around 1903. If you
have any information about a 1st Lt James Holt Ozark County H.G.
Cavalry  Co "A"  Capt. Stone please let me know.I Have a few more
pictures of the Holts.   This picture believed to be taken also near the
town of Ocie, Ozark County.



James H. SALLEE

Submitted by: Joyce Willhoit

One of the early days settlers of Southern Missouri was James H. SALLEE
b. 10 Apr 1833 in Madison County, AR; son of Arany Chastain "Chat"
SALLEE (1811-1862) and Martha GREENE, dau of Rev. Leven Thomas GREENE
and Mary STEWART. His parents left Arkansas when he was an infant and
moved to Schuler County, IL. After living there a few months, they moved
to Missouri and they lived a short while in Greene County, and then
moved down to Big Beaver Creek in now what is Douglas County. When they
left Beaver Creek, they settled on Little North Fork, a mile and a half
below the present site of Thornfield, MO. "Jim" was a noted Methodist
minister. He began preaching in 1851 in Ozark and Taney Counties, MO and
in Marion County, AR. When the Civil War broke out, "Jim" took sides
with the Union and commanded Company B, 16th Missouri Cavalry which was
under the command of Col. John F. McMahan. His brothers' names were
Stephen, Leven Thomas, Richard L., Levi, and Henderson. "Tom" was a
soldier in the Federal Army and was a member of Company F, Col. John S.
Phelps' Regiment, and he was killed at the Battle of Pea Ridge, AR.
Henderson was killed at Pondfork by bushwhackers. The names of his
sisters were Rebecca Moriah, Mary, Ollie Ann, and Adaline. Mary m. Ben
CLARK, son of Flemmon CLARK. In August 1859 in Ozark County, James m.
(1) Emily MARRITT, dau of Samuel MARRITT and Elizabeth WOLFENBARGER.
They had one son, John Wesley SALLEE b. 11 August 1867. John m. Elsie
Jane RIDENOUR. On 11 August 1867, James m. (2) Emarine (Martin) MAY, a
widow, and daughter of William Perry MARTIN and Martha QUICK. They had
seven children: (1) Martha C. SALLEE b. 31 Oct 1868. Martha m. David
WALLACE. (2) Emily Ann SALLEE b. 10 Feb 1870 in Thornfield, Ozark
County; d. 2 Dec 1950 and she is buried at Thornfield Cemetery. Emily
Ann m. Samuel C. MARRITT in 1886, son of Zachariah MARRITT and Athelia
COFFEE. In 1899, Emily Ann m. Robert LANG. (3) Mary Ann SALLEE b. 25 Dec
1871. Mary Ann m. Bennett CLARK. (4) Richard L. SALLEE b. 20 May 1875 at
Thornfield; d. 1962 and he is buried at Thornfield Cemetery. In 1894,
"Dick" m. Lula Mae RIDENOUR, dau of Edward RIDENOUR and Nancy QUICK. (5)
William SALLEE b. 1877. (6) James Barton "Bart" SALLEE b. 20 Jan 1880;
d. 19 Nov 1959 and he is buried at Thornfield Cemetery. "Bart" m. Mary
Ellen HOBBS b. 18 Mar 1880 in Shenandoah, IA; d. 3 Jan 1944 and she is
buried at Thornfield Cemetery; dau of Newberry HOBBS, Jr. (1856-1928)
and Mary Ellen COX. (7) Leven Thomas SALLEE b. 17 Dec 1881.


JOHN WILSON MCDONALD and MARY JANE MOONEY MCDONALD

Submitted: Bobby C. Watson

Hope that this may contribute to to Ozark County genealogy lore.  My great
great grandparents resided in Ozark Co., (Gainesville).  They were J. They came to Ozark Co in 1872 where they purchased land from one SOLOMON STOUT. (on record in the Gainesville Court House).  Apparently John Wilson died in 1974.  Mary Jane
continued to live in the area.  She is listed in the MO census of 1880
(Ozark Co) as head of the family. She continued to farm in the area.  They
were the parents of the following known children--John Henry (my great
grandfather), William V., George W., Wilson, Mary Nora.  Their descendants
lived in the area for many years, including Beulah, Shelby, 'F lay, Ray
Curtis, Alva Dean, James E. and Glennie.  Mary Nora married Jesse Wood.
In searching for their gravesites I found that Mary Jane and John Wilson
were apparently buried in the Gainesville Cemetery.  I searched it rather
thoroughly and was unable to locate them.  Other McDonalds are buried
there with stones. I have done quite a bit of research on this family (My maternal line).  Will appreciate any further
information on the family.

Bobby C. Watson
P. O. Box 221
Hoxie, Arkansas 72433



John Alogan BIAS

Submitted by: Louise Bias Hill
 
 

John Alogan BIAS was born 10-26-1887 at Dugginsville, MO where MO meets
the AR state line on his father's homesteaded land.  He died at his home
on Highway 160 between Dugginsville and Theodosia, MO.  He was the son of
John BIAS and Mary HENSON.

John married Amie Malinda FRIEND, daughter of Elisha FRIEND and Amanda
HENDERSON.  They were married 4-12-1907 in Ozark Co., MO.

They had 6 children:  Obard Leonard, Ethel Ray (twins), Mary Lethian
(called Mildred), James Elva, Ollie Myrtle and my father John Alogan, Jr.
(J.R. BIAS).

His primary occupation was "farmer", but he did much more than that.

He worked for John Johnson who owned the general store in Dugginsville
driving a wagon team to and from Sparta, MO (that's a LONG way on a
wagon!) for 50 cents an hour hauling supplies back and forth for the
store.

He walked about 5 miles each way to and from work at Joe Long's doing odd
jobs to help raise his family.

There wasn't much to eat at their house and he often had coffee and
cornbread for breakfast.

John walked or took the mail car to people's houses to fix sewing
machines, watches, clocks and anythng else he could.

He saw an add for learning to check eyes and order glasses in a mail-order
catalog.  He knew he could do that so he ordered it and added that to his
collection of ways to make money and provide for his family. Imagine that:
a mail-order optomitrist...:-)

Once he had a horse down and he was trying to help it get back up.  The
horse kicked a board and hurt his leg badly....but he didn't miss a day of
work.

When work was slow doing these jobs, he would go to Muldrow, OK and catch
freight trains to find work to feed his family.  He had family in the
area.  Once he sat down under a bridge with a can of pork and beans. He
had no spoon, but found a old on on the ground under that bridge.  He
washed it off, used it to eat his beans and took it along with him.  He
said it was a "good spoon" because it was flat on the bottom and he could
scoop his food on it better...:-)  He had that old spoon when he died.

Being an industriuos soul, he borrowed a little money for supplies, a cow
and a sow for milk and meat for his family from Joe Long and opened a
store in the back room of his house.  He had it for 10-15 years which
helped allow him to stay home with his family.

He retired about 1959 when Amie passed away.  He just didn't want to run
the store any longer without her.  His family were grown and married so he
could finally rest.

He was the most special person in the world to me at that time in my
life.....he was my grandpa.

John Alogan Bias, Jr.
Ozark County, MO
Written by Louise Hill

My dad was born August 10, 1927, at home with a midwife in our old
homeplace at Dugginsville,Ozark County, Missouri. It was only 1/2 mile
from Bull Shoals Lake and the Marion Co., AR state line.

He was the youngest son of John Alogan Bias, Sr. and Amie Malinda FRIEND.

Dad was a little mischevious (as both he and my aunt (Mary Lethian
"Mildred") tells me. Being the youngest child, he was also a little
spoiled...:-)...Aunt Mildred and Dad told stories at our last Christmas
together at her house and I was fortunate enough to get it all on a video
tape. I will cherish that tape ALWAYS! Aunt Mildred is the only living
sibling now.

One story they told me was about Aunt Mildred getting up on a wagon
hitched up to horses when they were little and the horses taking off with
her. Dad was about to get up there with her, but couldn't reach the wagon.
Aunt Mildred was thrown off and broke her arm.

Another familiar one was when they went to the spring below the old
homeplace. Aunt Midred made him mad and he threw rocks at her.

Apparently they were together more than the other children and were very
close.

When playing "town ball" at the old one-room schoolhouse at Dugginsville,
MO, he thought he had gotten her "out" and she refused to believe it. Dad
called her an "SOB". The teacher, Ida HART, told him if he ever said that
again, she would tan his hide. He always laughed out loud when he told
that story. When Ida was in a nursing home just before she died, he went
to see her. She STILL remembered him as "that little SOB" at age 90-plus.
He loved to tell that, too.

He married my mother, Thelma Lorene HAMPTON, daughter of Oscar and Callie
(ADAMS) HAMPTON September 2, 1947, at Mountain Home, AR. Three children
were born of this marriage: Thelma Louise, Katherine Lorene and Lisa
Michelle.

They moved to Dugginsville in a house built from a torn-down house, barn
or church. We lived there until I was in about the third grade at Lutie
School in the town now known as Theodosia, MO. The name was changed from
"LUTIE" while I was still in grade school by a man who came in to develop
the area. Theodosia is an indian name supposedly about indian tribes that
had lived in the area many years ago.

We moved to Springfield, MO, where I went to first grade at York
Elementary School. Dad worked at an ice plant there for about 10 months.
When he quit that job, we moved back to our house at Dugginsville and I
went to the same one-room school at Dugginsville that Dad did.

Not too much later, Mom or Dad saw and ad for correspondence courses. One
was for television repair. With Mom's help, Dad passed the course and
opened a television repair shop at Theodosia. That was what he did for the
rest of his life.

He joined the Masonic Lodge at Theodosia and was proud of his achievements
there.

Dad played the guitar ever since I can remember. Music was a BIG part of
our lives. I started to sing with him playing backup when I was pretty
small. Dad often said, "You can't sing that song. It's too high for your
voice."...but I always managed to sing it (to prove him wrong, I
think...:-).

We would go to "music parties" and sang at Marshall, AR on the square and
went to the lake and sang for the tourists......everywhere we could find a
place they would let us sing. These are some of my fondest memories. Dad
was proud of our performances and we would sit for hours and practice. I
never felt closer to Dad than when we were doing this. Even in the last
video I mentioned earlier, we were singing with him playing the guitar. I
had recorded the song "Daddy's Hands" a short time before he died and my
sister requested that it was played at his funeral because it was the last
song that we ever sang together so I gave the preacher that recording with
me singing it. I'll always be glad I did that.

Dad and Mom split up in 1969 and Dad eventually opened a TV repair shop in
Liberal, MO where he retired a few years ago.

Dad married Imogene Ward-McGinnis from Ocie, MO on August 7, 1984 in the
state of Nevada.

He had diabetes and athlerisclorosis (sp??)..hardening of the arteries of
the heart...which eventually killed him.

He died October 21, 1997 at St. John's Hospital in Joplin, MO.

We got the call one morning that he had a heart attack and was in
Pittsburg, KS hospital. My sister, Katherine, and I went right on up
there. I remember the happy look on his face when we walked in....as if he
thought we wouldn't come or something....and we talked a good long while.

He had a Masonic funeral and is buried at the front of the Lutie Cemetery,
Theodosia, MO.
 

Contributed by: Louise Hill.
 

See my website at:

http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Estates/6780

for more about him and his family.

LOUISE BIAS-HILL

BIAS Genealogy:
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Estates/6780

HAMPTON Genealogy:
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Woods/3997



Henry Franklin Coble

Submitted by Jay Gentry

Henry Franklin Coble was born 31 Oct 1819, in Lincoln County  TN,  the
oldest of 9 children of Peter and Margaret (Summers) Coble.   The family
migrated to southwest Missouri,  in and around the Dade, Lawrence, Newton
county areas in about 1834, when Henry was about 16 years old.    On 21
April 1844 Henry  was married to Catherine Holt in Greene County. Little
is known of the family of Catherine, but  to this union was born 3 boys.
Peter Nicholas, John Marion and Alfred Luther.  Catherine died of
complications of childbirth of the youngest son, Alfred Luther.  Shortly
thereafter, about 1855,   Henry moved to what was then Ozark County,
before  Douglas County was established,  to be near Catherine's relatives
for assistance in rearing the three boys.

Even with the assistance of the neighbors and relatives, raising a family
and providing a livelihood for the family was too much for Henry, alone.
In 1856 he chose as his second wife,  Lavina June Turnbull and to this
union was born a daughter, Margaret Frances and a son, Abrum Marling
Coble. Henry with his new family made an excursion to the Boston Mountains
of Arkansas in search of prosperity,  but prosperity was not to be found
there.  He lost his second wife,  with now five children to rear. The
older boys were now old enough to help out with the family chores while
Henry provided the livelihood.

Soon thereafter,  the Civil War became a reality and Henry, along with
Peter Nicholas, his oldest son enlisted in the famous Captain Moses L
Alsup's Co "H" 46th Regiment, MO Volunteers,  and Henry was promoted to
the rank of Corporal in charge of all the "Coble Clan".   There were
several of the Coble boys,  brothers, uncles, nephews and cousins.   Some
of the clan were killed at the Battle of Vera Cruz, and others  were
wounded,  but Henry and Peter Nicholas  escaped  virtually unscathed.

During the war Henry married the third time,  a war widow,   Mary Ann
(Russell) Owens whose husband had been hanged by the Confederates in the
early part of the war. She was the daughter of Wiley and Lucinda Russell
and the widow of William Owens of the Rockbridge area.

This marriage was quite productive and to this union was born  eight
children,  Absolum, Christopher, Lucinda, David Wain, Newton, Lawtisha,
Nancy, and Tennessee. At the age of 70 years,  Henry applied for and after
considerable haggling  by the Bureau of Pensions,   was granted a war
pension of  $12  per month until his death on Feb 17 1897. Henry Franklin
Coble  was laid to rest in the Hale Cemetery,  west of Dora, in Ozark
County.

On the fourth Sunday in August,  for the past 35 years, the descendants of
Old Henry Coble have gathered at Table Rock Park to honor their heritage
and renew acquaintances. This event is hosted by Mr & Mrs Ted Shipley of
the Dora Community, descendants of "Old Henry".



Benjamin TURLEY (1783-1855)

Submitted by Angel Jacobsen-Shweika
 

Looking for death and burial records for Benjamin TURLEY (b.1783 in VA)
and his wife Elizabeth. Benjamin died "on or about the 1st day of October
a.1855" in Ozark Co., Missouri (according to Ozark Co Deed book A:120). He
was the son of Ignatius and Rachel TURLEY of Fairfax County, VA.

Some records indicate that Benjamin may have been born in Loudon or
Culpeper County, Virginia. There are records in 1801-1804 showing him in
Spartanburg County, SC; then moving to Warren Co., KY in 1805 and (it is
assumed) married there. The family name of his wife Elizabeth is unknown.

Btwn 1813 and 1820, he and his family moved to IN and lived in Lawrence,
and Greene counties.  He moved to Ozark County, MO sometime after 1840
with (his wife? and) some of his children (and other family members,
including children of his brothers).  According to the Ozark Co Deed book
A:120, Benjamin  died "on or about the 1st day of October a.1855" in Ozark
Co., Missouri.

There were btwn 9-13 children listed for Benjamin and Elizabeth TURLEY
(contradictory info found on census and will records - most children were
born in KY and IN): 1. William TURLEY b.ca.1805 2. Sampson Manoah TURLEY,
b 10 March 1806 3. Charles TURLEY b.ca.1810 4. Julia Ann TURLEY b.ca.1820
5. Oliver C. Perry TURLEY b.15 April 1822 ===??????maybe children:?????===
6. Eliza A. TURLEY (m. Isaac WORKMAN) 7. Mary Ann TURLEY (m. John BRYAN)
8. Susannah TURLEY (m. _____ MOON ) 9. Benjamin TURLEY (of Ozark Co.)
b.ca.1826 10. Jacob TURLEY (of Ozark Co.) b.ca.1810

Information is still being verified. ANY assistance with finding documents
for verification is GREATLY appreciated!

Also, visit the TURLEY GenConnect boards at
http://cgi.rootsweb.com/~genbbs/genbbs.cgi/surnames/tur/Turley

Thanks!


Taney County Pioneers


If you would like to share your Taney county stories, information or biographical sketches, please feel free to send them to me here! Taney Co., Pioneers



Family of Bernard Devlin

Submitted by:Janice Hill

On July 24, 1893 Bernard Devlin purchased all of S.W.1/4 & W. 1/2 S.E. 1/4 all o\in Sec. 15, Township 24 Range 19, Taney County, Missouri for $750.00. This information was obtained from a copy of the Deed.

In the 1900 US Census the following is reported: Living in Swan Township, Taney County Missouri were the following: Bernard (age 63) and Margaret Devlin (age 70), John Devlin(?)(age 50), Maggie Devlin (adopted daughter) (age 15), born February 1875 in England, Lizzie Devlin (granddaughter)(age 12) born April 1894 in Kansas and Mary Devlin (Granddaughter)(age 5) born April 1894 in Missouri.

On December 3, 1919, Bernard Devlin sold for one dollar and other considerations to John Lowes all of the North West Quarter of the South East Quarter and South West Quarter of the North East Quarter of Section Fifteen. Township 24, Range Nineteen.

In the 1920 US Census it was reported that the following people were living in Swan Township of Precinct No. 2, Taney County, Missouri: Barney Devlin, age 87; John Lowes (stepson) age 69; Mollie Devlin (granddaughter0 age 25. The family living next door to them was: Warren Sherman, age 85; Maggie Sherman (wife) age 46; Kittie Sherman (daughter), age 10; and Maggie Sherman (daughter0, age 8. Note: The 1920 census was enumerated on the 26 & 27 of January 1920, so the date on Barnard Devlin's death certificate (January 5, 1920) may be incorrect. Aunt Sissie had given me another date, February 23, 1920. This may be the correct date since he was reported in the 1920 census. Janice Hill



Ambrose J. Breedon and Mary Halley Breedon

Submitted by Linda Slott
 

This story is from the White River Leader, Branson, MO, October 1, 1915,
and is about my ggg grandparents, Ambrose J. Breedon and Mary Halley
Breedon:

Stories of the Pioneers Number 16:Breedon

A. J.  Breedon of Mildred tells the story of a Large Life--Born in the
Shenandoah Valley--Came to Missouri in 1851--Served in the Union Army and
was stationed at Forsyth Two or Three Months--A Panther Story--An old time
Harvest Scene

        While walking through the country recently we met Uncle Jack
Breedon near Kirbyville, and when he found we expected to be in the
neighborhood of his home near Mildred that night, he gave us a pressing
invitation to stay all night at his house.  We accepted the invitation and
about sunset that evening we arrived at his home, which is "beautiful for
situation."  The house is located on high ground, from which one can see
many miles in several direction, but the best view is toward the East.  In
that direction one can see hills and ranges well toward the East line of
the county.  Milligan Bald, that well known mountain, is in plain view.
After breakfast the next morning we sat down in the pleasant sitting room
and Mr. Breedon told us the following story of his life:

        "I was born near New Market, Virginia in 1832 of German Ancestors
who had moved to Virginia from Pennsylvania.  My ancestors were strong and
lived to a good old age.  My grandfather died between the plow handles at
the age 104. My father moved to Kanawha County, Virginia, when I was 16 and
then to Henry County, Missouri in 1851.  Before leaving Virginia I was
married to Mary E. Halley.  After coming to Missouri I worked part of the
time on a farm and part of the time doing carpenter work. "In 1862 I
enlisted in the first Iowa cavalry.  The reason why I enlisted in an Iowa
regiment is that this regiment at this time was in camp at Clinton, the
county seat of Henry County.  Our regiment spent most of the time in
Missouri, Arkansas and Mississippi.  In the fall of 1862 my battalion of
our regiment and the 8th Indiana infantry spent two or three months at
Forsyth. We were in no battles in Taney County, but just before we came,
General Curtis riddled the courthouse with cannon balls. "While I was at
Forsyth I met Alf Bolin, the desperado, who killed so many people.  He used
to stay in the neighborhood of Murder Rocks, on the old Harrison Road. "I
was in 114 different engagements, some of them, of course, only small
skirmishes.  The battle of Prairie Grove, Arkansas, was our most severe
engagement.  The Camden, Arkansas, campaign was the most trying.  This
campaign lasted 42 days and there was fighting 30 of those days.  The
saddles were not off our horses for seven days, and we had nothing to eat
for four days and nights." Here we interrupted him and asked what office he
held.  His reply was "I went in as a private and came out a high corporal."
"When the war closed we were mustered out at Davenport, Iowa, and I went
back to Clinton, where I remained until 1869, when I came to Taney County,
and settled near here on the farm where my son Charles now lives.  We came
to this place 12 years ago." Here we asked him about the Bald Knobbers, and
he said "I never belonged to them, but I had no trouble with them.  There
was considerable bad feeling, and several lives were lost." "Politically I
have always been a Democrat, but I have never been a candidate for any
office.  I think Mr. Bryan is one of the smartest men in the county, and I
read his paper, The Commoner, regularly. "I came here because I fell in
love with the country while I was a soldier here.  I came expecting to buy
a river farm, but the river land was too high for my pocket. "When I came
here there were few schools, and they were nearly all what we called
subscription schools: that is people had to pay tuition for their children.
"Houses were far apart in those days.  There were very few homes between
here and Harrison, Arkansas.  At that time much freighting was done on the
(Illegible) "Game was very plentiful when we came.  The first year I was
here I killed 18 deer and never went hunting.  We always had deer or turkey
meat that year. Here Mrs. Breedon said "Deer are very fond of bean stock,
and for some time we could raise no beans because the deer ate all of
them." Mr. Breedon again resumed his story and said "There were many wild
animals here at that time.  One night I was in bed asleep, and my two dogs
were put in the timber near the house.  I think they had treed a 'coon.
The door to the house was open and one of the dogs came running in the
house, followed by a panther.  The dog rushed into the house and under the
bed.  This awoke me, and I jumped out of bed and went to the door, but the
panther was too far away for me to shoot it.  When I went to the tree where
the dogs had been, I found the other dog with its throat cut. "Yes, there
have been many changes since I can first recollect, and I think they have
been all for the better.  Yet I often think of the old times and old
methods of doing things.  Near our home in Virginia was a man who had a
large farm and raised much wheat.  At that time all the grain was cut with
the cradles, and I remember seeing 56 men in a line cradling wheat.  It was
a fine sight."
        And then Mrs. Breedon spoke up and said "I never used a cook stove
(illegible).  I used to spin a great deal, and still have my old spinning
wheel." For a short time both of these old people were silent, as if
thinking of the past, but then Mr. Breedon said, "Well we have lived a
rather long common place life.  We were always just plain people.  We
raised a family of eight- five boys and three girls-and we brought them up
to be honest and honorable. We have done the best we knew, and are pretty
well satisfied with life.  We have no regrets and when the Master calls we
will be ready to go."

Linda Slott



Edwin Baker Pierce & Etta Mae Masters

Submitted by  John H. Pierce

Edwin Baker Pierce, dob 9-16-1870, of Garber, Taney, MO married Etta Mae
Masters, dob 1-19-1879, of Branson, Taney, MO were married on February 13,
1898.  Their first born was Mae Elizabeth, born November 7, 1898.  Gladys
Anna Evelyn was born on March 19, 1900.  Georgia D. was born on November
2, 1901.  Bonnie Cecil was born on October 7, 1905.  George William was
born on September 9, 1907.  Phillip Sherman was born on April 17, 1910.
Margaret Marie was born on January 22, 1915 and Dorothy Pauline was born
on September 16, 1916.  All in Branson in a house that is still standing.
The address is unknown.

 Joseph Phara Masters, Methodist Minister, born September 3, 1850 in
Jackson County, Mo and died in Branson on January 26, 1936 and is buried
in the Branson City Cemetery.  Mary Jane Wycoff, wife of Joseph Phara
Masters, born may 24, 1855 in Olathe, Kansas, died September 28, 1910 in
Branson, and is buried in the City Cemetery.

Mary A. Spann Masters, the wife of John Masters, father of Joseph Phara
Masters, born May 13, 1828, died January 25, 1918 is buried in the Branson
City Cemetery.

Charles Cecil Masters was born July 18, 1898 in Branson, the son of Joseph
Phara and Mary Jane Masters.



Capt. Alexander C. Kissee

Submitted by Bonnie Muench

Here is Effie S "Cardwell". Davidson's latest history lesson. She's 98,
born in Kissee Mills, taught school at the old Helphrey school and keeps
in contact with Edith Kissee and some of the other pioneers.

Kissee Mills, Missouri

Capt. Alexander C. Kissee Capt. Kissee fought in the civil war, and when
it was over he was looking for a new place to homestead. He came back to
Taney County and homesteaded a large track of land on Beaver Creek. It was
said that he had fathered 24 children, some say 27, but there was only 13
that I knew. He started a grist mill to grind wheat and flour, importing
the stone burr from France. He planted a large orchard, and built a very
large beautiful home there. There was a unusual cold artesian well on the
property, which he built a distillery over.  There was a board walk over
to the distillery, but he did not allow drinking on the property.  The
sprits were sold for home consumption only.  He started a school,
store/post office, cemetery, and others followed to start a small thriving
village of Kissee Mills. One of his son's Benjamin married Minnie
Cardwell, Effie's sister and one of his daughters Gladys married her
brother-in-law Burr Davidson.



James Braden

Submitted by Jere E. Braden
 

1. JAMES3 BRADEN (JOHN2, EDWARD1) was born 02 Jan 1819 in Claiborne
Co. Tennessee (Source: Bible of SARAH (BUELL) BRADEN, wife of FRANCIS
BRADEN, son of SAMUEL GRESWELL BRADEN and SUSANNAH CROBARGER.), and
died 14 Aug 1887 in Taney Co. MO.. He married (1) SARAH MADDY 13 Oct
1838 in Claiborne County Tennessee (Source: Claiborne County Tennessee
Clerk Records.), daughter of MANN MADDY and LUCY STINNETT. He married
(2) NANCY FRANCES WALKER-CUMMINGS-BLUNT 14 May 1868 in Carlinville IL
Macoupin Co.

JAMES BRADEN was in Macoupin County IL. in 1839 and was counted in the
1840 census in Macoupin County Illinois, North Palmyra Township.
Nothing is known about wife Sarah and some of their children after the
1860 Illinois, Macoupin Co. census. It is thought that James and Sarah
had a child named THOMAS BRADEN about 1862-63 as "Tom" is referred to
in later writings by his full brother WILLIAM A. BRADEN.  James's
first wife SARAH MADDY is thought to have died about 1862-3 in
Macoupin Co. IL.  James married a Mrs. NANCY FRANCIS
WALKER-CUMMINGS-BLUNT on 19 May 1868 in Macoupin Co. and was living
near his son-in-law, GEORGE WASHINGTON SAMPLE and daughter LUCY ANN
BRADEN SAMPLE in Chesterfield Township, Macoupin County IL in the 1870
census.  James and Nancy migrated to Missouri after 1871 and applied
for homestead land on 14 October 1885 in Taney County Missouri.  In
his application # 13298 (final document # 9202 - Section 10, Township
22-N, Range 18-W) James stated that he had been on the land since
March 1880.   James died 14 August 1887 before the land grant was
completed and wife Nancy signed the land grant papers.
JAMES BRADEN burial location: Johnson Cemetery Hilda, MO Taney Co.
NANCY FRANCES WALKER-CUMMINGS-BLUNT-BRADEN had one child before
marriage to ALFRED CUMMINGS. (Alfred died in Civil War?)  Nancy used
the last name of BLUNT when she married JAMES BRADEN.  She married Mr.
BLUNT 24 Dec 1865 in Macoupin Co. IL.  ALFRED CUMMINGS and Nancy were
shown in the 1860 Macoupin Co. Illinois census in Palmyra, IL. with
children.  NANCY FRANCES WALKER-CUMMINGS-BLUNT burial Location is
Johnson Cemetery Hilda, MO Taney Co.
Children of JAMES BRADEN and SARAH MADDY are:
i. LUCY ANN4 BRADEN, b. 27 Oct 1839, Macoupin County Illinois; d. 05
Nov 1875, Jasper, Co. MO.; m. GEORGE WASHINGTON SAMPLE, 30 Sep 1858,
Macoupin Co. Illinois.
ii. SARAH JANE BRADEN, b. About 1843, Macoupin Co. Illinois; d.
Unknown; m. JAMES SHEPLAR, 03 Sep 1863, Macoupin Co. Illinois.  JAMES
SHEPLAR was thought to be from Morgan Co. IL around the Murrayville,
Woodson, Nortonville, IL. area but no information can be found for
James and Sarah in Morgan County.
iii. PERMELIA BRADEN, b. 08 Nov 1844, Macoupin Co. Illinois (Source:
Tombstone, Old Union Cemetery Palmyra, IL.); d. 09 Sep 1876, Macoupin
Co. Illinois m. WILLIAM M. HUSON, 22 Oct 1863, Macoupin Co IL.
Permelia and daughter MARTHA HUSON are buried next to each other and
their information is on the same tombstone. WILLIAM M. HUSON buried in
Ross Cemetery on Feb 10 1918. Informant on Death Certificate was EFFIE
M. SHUTT of Virden, Illinois.
iv. JOHN M. BRADEN, b. Abt. 1847, Macoupin Co. Illinois; d. Unknown.
v. WILLIAM A. BRADEN, b. Abt. 1848, Macoupin Co. Illinois; d. 1936,
Delaware Co. OK. Notes for WILLIAM A. BRADEN: MACOUPIN COUNTY ENQUIRER
NOVEMBER 28, 1872 PALMYRA ITEMS Wild turkeys are plentiful near here.
I have seen a number of flocks containing twenty or thirty. BILL
BRADEN brought down two at one shot. WILLIAM A. BRADEN was elected
constable in North Palmyra Township in 1877.  MACOUPIN COUNTY ENQUIRER
MAY 17, 1877 PALMYRA ITEMS Since the decease of our auctioneer, Mr.
WM. B. GARDNER, we hear several spoken of as engaging in the business.
Among then are Mr. WILLIAM BRAIDEN and Mr. WM. MORRELL. MACOUPIN
COUNTY ENQUIRER AUGUST 8, 1877 PALMYRA ITEMS Our mail contract has
again changed hands. It is now in the care of Mr. J.F. RICE, our
efficient constable MR. BRAIDEN retiring. MACOUPIN COUNTY ENQUIRER
OCTOBER 1, 1877 PALMYRA ITEMS Constable Braiden when he thinks someone
is on the dodge is as quick to rush upon them as anyone at the first
opportunity. MACOUPIN COUNTY ENQUIRER NOVEMBER 12, 1877 PALMYRA ITEMS
CONSTABLE BRAIDEN on the watch for horse thief.  WILLIAM A. BRADEN
burial location: Allen Cemetery. Delaware Co. OK. About 5 miles from
Siloam Springs, AR
vi. JAMES BRADEN, b. Abt. 1851, Macoupin Co. IL; d. 30 Jan 1892,
Palmyra, IL. Macoupin Co (Source: Macoupin County Illinois Death
Certificate.); m. ELLA M. QUICK, 21 Oct 1880, Carlinville, IL Macoupin
Co.   JAMES BRADEN: Buried in Hollingsworth Cemetery near Palmyra,
Illinois. No tombstone. He was a farmer and died of La Grippe. ELLA M.
QUICK: Buried in Million Cemetery in rear of Rubicon Township building
in Greene County Illinois.
vii. BENJAMIN F. BRADEN, b. About 1854, Macoupin Co. Illinois; d.
Unknown.
viii. GEORGE W. BRADEN, b. About 1858, Macoupin Co .Illinois; d.
Unknown.
ix. THOMAS BRADEN, b. About 1862-3, Macoupin Co. IL.
Children of JAMES BRADEN and NANCY WALKER are:
x. CHARLES EDWARD4 BRADEN, b. 09 Mar 1869, Macoupin Co. IL; d. 06 Jun
1944, Cleveland OK; m. MARY MARGARET SMITH, 07 Feb 1890, Protem MO
Taney Co. More About CHARLES EDWARD BRADEN: Burial Location: Sennett
Cemetery Cleveland OK MARY MARGARET SMITH burial location: Sennett
Cemetery Cleveland OK
xi. ISAAC RICHARD LANE BRADEN, b. 22 Jan 1871, Macoupin Co. IL; d. 10
Dec 1919, Taney Co. MO; m. EULA HELEN AWBREY, 07 Nov 1897, Taney Co.
MO. .More About ISSAC RICHARD LANE BRADEN: Burial Location: Brown
Cemetery Cedar Creek MO. EULA HELEN AWBREY burial location Brown
Cemetery Cedar Creek MO.
xii. MARTHA AMARILLA BRADEN, b. 25 Mar 1874, MO; d. 08 Nov 1918, Taney
Co. MO; m. JOHN URIAH PATTERSON, 26 Jul 1890, Taney Co. MO..
xiii. ELLA JANE BRADEN, b. 1875, MO; d. 1899, Taney Co. MO.; m. ASA
SHRUM, 24 Dec 1896, Taney Co. MO. ELLA JANE BRADEN burial Location:
Johnson Cemetery Hilda, MO Taney Co.
xiv. ELMER BRADEN, b. Unknown, Taney Co. MO. d. Unknown
For more information on this family contact:
Jere E. Braden  P. O. Box 313 Delavan, Illinois 61734  E-mail:
jereb@accessus.net


AMES BRADEN
BORN 02 JAN 1819
CLAIBORNE COUNTY TENNESSEE
A PIONEER FAMILY IN SOUTHERN MISSOURI

.  James BRADEN, son of John BRADEN b. 1760 Augusta Co. VA., and second
wife Nancy Frances WALKER-CUMMINGS-BLUNT migrated from Macoupin County
Illinois to Missouri after 1871 and applied for homestead land on 14
October 1885 in Taney County Missouri.  In his application # 13298 (final
document # 9202 - Section 10, Township 22-N, Range 18-W) James stated that
he had been on the land since March 1880.   James died 14 August 1887
before the land grant was completed and wife Nancy signed the land grant
papers.  JAMES BRADEN  and Nancy BRADEN  burial location: Johnson Cemetery
Hilda, MO Taney Co.

Children of James BRADEN and Nancy Francis WALKER-CUMMINGS-BLUNT:

CHARLES EDWARD4 BRADEN, b. 09 Mar 1869, Macoupin Co. IL; d. 06 Jun 1944,
Cleveland OK; m. MARY MARGARET SMITH, 07 Feb 1890, Protem MO Taney Co.
More About CHARLES EDWARD BRADEN: Burial Location: Sennett Cemetery
Cleveland OK MARY MARGARET SMITH burial location: Sennett Cemetery
Cleveland OK

ISAAC RICHARD LANE BRADEN, b. 22 Jan 1871, Macoupin Co. IL; d. 10 Dec
1919, Taney Co. MO; m. EULA HELEN AWBREY, 07 Nov 1897, Taney Co. MO. .More
About ISSAC RICHARD LANE BRADEN: Burial Location: Brown Cemetery Cedar
Creek MO. EULA HELEN AWBREY burial location Brown Cemetery Cedar Creek MO.

MARTHA AMARILLA BRADEN, b. 25 Mar 1874, MO; d. 08 Nov 1918, Taney Co. MO;
m. JOHN URIAH PATTERSON, 26 Jul 1890, Taney Co. MO..

ELLA JANE BRADEN, b. 1875, MO; d. 1899, Taney Co. MO.; m. ASA SHRUM, 24
Dec 1896, Taney Co. MO. ELLA JANE BRADEN burial Location: Johnson Cemetery
Hilda, MO Taney Co.
ELMER BRADEN, b. Unknown, Taney Co. MO. d. Unknown

1. JAMES3 BRADEN (JOHN2, EDWARD1) was born 02 Jan 1819 in Claiborne Co.
Tennessee (Source: Bible of SARAH (BUELL) BRADEN, wife of FRANCIS BRADEN,
son of SAMUEL GRESWELL BRADEN and SUSANNAH CROBARGER.), and died 14 Aug
1887 in Taney Co. MO.. He married (1) SARAH MADDY 13 Oct 1838 in Claiborne
County Tennessee (Source: Claiborne County Tennessee Clerk Records.),
daughter of MANN MADDY and LUCY STINNETT. He married (2) NANCY FRANCES
WALKER-CUMMINGS-BLUNT 14 May 1868 in Carlinville IL Macoupin Co.

JAMES BRADEN and first wife Sarah Maddy were in Macoupin County IL. in
1839 and were counted in the 1840 census in Macoupin County Illinois,
North Palmyra Township. Nothing is known about wife Sarah and some of
their children after the 1860 Illinois, Macoupin Co. census. It is thought
that James and Sarah had a child named THOMAS BRADEN about 1862-63 as
"Tom" is referred to in later writings by his full brother WILLIAM A.
BRADEN.  James's first wife SARAH MADDY is thought to have died about
1862-3 in Macoupin Co. IL.
Children of JAMES BRADEN and SARAH MADDY are:

LUCY ANN4 BRADEN, b. 27 Oct 1839, Macoupin County Illinois; d. 05 Nov
1875, Jasper, Co. MO.; m. GEORGE WASHINGTON SAMPLE, 30 Sep 1858, Macoupin
Co. Illinois.

SARAH JANE BRADEN, b. About 1843, Macoupin Co. Illinois; d. Unknown; m.
JAMES SHEPLAR, 03 Sep 1863, Macoupin Co. Illinois.  JAMES SHEPLAR was
thought to be from Morgan Co. IL around the Murrayville, Woodson,
Nortonville, IL. area but no information can be found for James and Sarah
in Morgan County.

PERMELIA BRADEN, b. 08 Nov 1844, Macoupin Co. Illinois (Source: Tombstone,
Old Union Cemetery Palmyra, IL.); d. 09 Sep 1876, Macoupin Co. Illinois m.
WILLIAM M. HUSON, 22 Oct 1863, Macoupin Co IL.  Permelia and daughter
MARTHA HUSON are buried next to each other and their information is on the
same tombstone. WILLIAM M. HUSON buried in Ross Cemetery on Feb 10 1918.
Informant on Death Certificate was EFFIE M. SHUTT of Virden, Illinois.

JOHN M. BRADEN, b. Abt. 1847, Macoupin Co. Illinois; d. Unknown.

WILLIAM A. BRADEN, b. Abt. 1848, Macoupin Co. Illinois; d. 1936, Delaware
Co. OK. Notes for WILLIAM A. BRADEN: MACOUPIN COUNTY ENQUIRER NOVEMBER 28,
1872 PALMYRA ITEMS Wild turkeys are plentiful near here. I have seen a
number of flocks containing twenty or thirty. BILL BRADEN brought down two
at one shot. WILLIAM A. BRADEN was elected constable in North Palmyra
Township in 1877.  MACOUPIN COUNTY ENQUIRER MAY 17, 1877 PALMYRA ITEMS
Since the decease of our auctioneer, Mr. WM. B. GARDNER, we hear several
spoken of as engaging in the business. Among then are Mr. WILLIAM BRAIDEN
and Mr. WM. MORRELL. MACOUPIN COUNTY ENQUIRER AUGUST 8, 1877 PALMYRA ITEMS
Our mail contract has again changed hands. It is now in the care of Mr.
J.F. RICE, our efficient constable MR. BRAIDEN retiring. MACOUPIN COUNTY
ENQUIRER OCTOBER 1, 1877 PALMYRA ITEMS Constable Braiden when he thinks
someone is on the dodge is as quick to rush upon them as anyone at the
first opportunity. MACOUPIN COUNTY ENQUIRER NOVEMBER 12, 1877 PALMYRA
ITEMS CONSTABLE BRAIDEN on the watch for horse thief.  WILLIAM A. BRADEN
burial location: Allen Cemetery. Delaware Co. OK. About 5 miles from
Siloam Springs, AR

JAMES BRADEN, b. Abt. 1851, Macoupin Co. IL; d. 30 Jan 1892, Palmyra, IL.
Macoupin Co (Source: Macoupin County Illinois Death Certificate.); m. ELLA
M. QUICK, 21 Oct 1880, Carlinville, IL Macoupin Co.   JAMES BRADEN: Buried
in Hollingsworth Cemetery near Palmyra, Illinois. No tombstone. He was a
farmer and died of La Grippe. ELLA M. QUICK: Buried in Million Cemetery in
rear of Rubicon Township building in Greene County Illinois.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BRADEN, b. About 1854, Macoupin Co. Illinois; d.
Unknown.

GEORGE W. BRADEN, b. About 1858, Macoupin Co .Illinois; d. Unknown.

THOMAS BRADEN, b. About 1862-3, Macoupin Co. IL.

For more information on this family contact:
Jere E. Braden  P. O. Box 313 Delavan, Illinois 61734  E-mail:
jereb@accessus.net



John George Castoe

Submitted by Wanda Castoe

John George Castoe was born 25 March 1805 in Woods county West
Virginia. The story he ran away from home when about 12 years old. Went
to Gallopolis, Ohio and worked as an apprentice to a blacksmith. He came
to Missouri in 1832. Married Jestern Coots, daughter of Jacob Coots and
Polly Goin, 1837 in Waynesville, Missouri. In 1840 he is living in Taney
county Missouri next door to his mother-in-law Polly Coots (Couch) By
1850 he is living in Barry county Missouri. He was a farmer and Baptist
preacher. John George and Jestern had Mary Louisa b. 1839, married
George David Sears; George W. b. 1840 married Sarah Jane Sears in 1859;
Robert b. 1843, married Letitisha Susanna Sears; Sarah b. 1845, married
James E. Wells; David C. b. 1846, married Salina Clementine Batsel in
1867; Virginia b. Jan 1849, married James Johnson Russell; William Riley
b. Nov 1849, married Mary Catherine Pendleton; John George Jr. b. 1853,
married Arena Easton in 1873; James Calip b. 1857, married (1) Joyce A.
Dunning, (2) Mary Florence Kees in Searcy county Ark. John George Castoe
served in the Home Guard of Barry county Missouri. Jestern died in
Searcy county Ark. and is buried at Witts Springs cemetery. John George
lived with his son William Riley Castoe in Benton county Ark. when he died
7 apr 1903. He is buried in the Gamble cemetery near Centerton, Benton
county Ark.



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