The Town of Seligman, Barry Co., MO

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Photos & Notes Union Depot - Seligman, Barry Co., MO

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Photos & Notes Frisco GP7s wearing their Phase I black and yellow paint schemes.
Arkansas and Ozarks Rwy traffic on the right/east side of depot. Believed to be 1954.
Craig & Carla Fletcher posted on Barry Co., MO GenWeb - Places and Things Remembered
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Photos Union Depot - Seligman, Barry Co., MO

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Photos Union Depot - Seligman, Barry Co., MO

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Historical The first photo is from the photo files of Ramona Williams Fletcher

And the second and third ones are from Betty Lamberson

Historical Information - In 1880 this little village was named Seligman on September 27 in honor of Joseph Seligman who had died in the previous April.

Seligman was first known as Roller's Ridge. Goodspeed's account is that Andrew, George, John, Joshua and Jacob Roller were early settlers arriving sometime around 1830 to 1840 from Scotts Co., VA. Rollers Ridge was a trading post. In the early days there was one store, but after the coming of the railroad the town grew in size and population.
Days Gone By photo
1909 Businesses Photo

Seligman Residents, 1909
Businesses Around 1900 the Linden Hotel was operated by Mr. Babcock.

Later this same building became known as the Cottage Hotel and Mr. and Mrs. George Apple were the hotel operators. And in 1908 the Apples were the owners. It then became the Linden Hotel. And in 1924 the Linden Hotel was moved down the street and became the Gladden Hotel, it was operated by Isom and Lucy Gladden at that time. The rock veneer of the building was added in the 1930's.

The Old Fawver Mill was also called the Victory Mill. It was one mile west of Seligman and on the upper arm of Sugar Creek. It was operated by John Wesley Weston, Christian E. Fawver and R. L. Doss. They took possession of it in 1882. There was a water wheel that supplied the power until Weston, Fawver and Doss took possession and they installed a steam powered engine.

Ernest Schilling, a native of Switzerland was a noted painter of Seligman. He signed his signs as "By Golly". He lived on Indian Creek in Benton Co., AR, and painted signs in Seligman, MO, Eureka Springs, Gateway and Rogers, AR.

Chester Ward Browning was born in 1913 in Stark City, MO. He graduated high school in Exeter and in 1933 brought his family to Seligman. He was known as Seligman's barber but he also served as a mayor to Seligman and was even a fireman at one time. His wife was the former Beatrice "Bea" Davis.

The First Century of Seligman, Missouri, Page 154: "The Seligman Bank suffered two robberies and one attempted robbery in its history.

The first was by Henry Starr, noted outlaw of northeast Oklahoma. Starr came into Seligman and took a room at the Gladden Hotel, visiting in the town about a week before the robbery. He charmed the hotel proprietor into endorsing a check for $100 the day before he robbed the bank. He approached the bank teller with his own personal check - the teller turned it down. Mr. Gladden was present and immediately stepped forward and informed the teller that the check was as clean and good as "cleaned in the sand". The teller told Mr. Gladden to endorse it and he would cash it. Gladden obliged. It was the next day that Starr and his cohorts robbed the bank of $1,200 at gunpoint. They proceeded on to rob the bank at Harrison, AR, and it was there he was shot and killed."

Cassville Republican, August 22, 1895 - Uncle Tommy Gladden, the enterprising and entertaining proprietor of the Gladden Hotel has treated his house to a new coat of paint which gives a very neat and homelike appearance. Uncle Tommy is one of the best known and most popular hotel men on the Frisco.

Photos from the photo files of Darla Marbut.
Days Gone By photo
Business Photos photo

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Notes Around 1900 the Linden Hotel was operated by Mr. Babcock. Later this same building became known as the Cottage Hotel and Mr. and Mrs. George Apple were the hotel operators. And in 1908 the Apples were the owners. It then became the Linden Hotel. And in 1924 the Linden Hotel was moved down the street and became the Gladden Hotel, it was operated by Isom and Lucy Gladden at that time. The rock veneer of the building was added in the 1930's.

The orginal Gladden Hotel was run by Isom and Lucy Gladden and it was destoried by fire in 1923. p. 147, The First Century of Seligman

Cassville Republican, August 22, 1895 - Uncle Tommy Gladden, the enterprising and entertaining proprietor of the Gladden Hotel has treated his house to a new coat of paint which gives a very neat and homelike appearance. Uncle Tommy is one of the best known and most popular hotel men on the Frisco.

The First Century of Seligman, Missouri, Page 154: "The Seligman Bank suffered two robberies and one attempted robbery in its history.

The first was by Henry Starr, noted outlaw of northeast Oklahoma. Starr came into Seligman and took a room at the Gladden Hotel, visiting in the town about a week before the robbery. He charmed the hotel proprietor into endorsing a check for $100 the day before he robbed the bank. He approached the bank teller with his own personal check - the teller turned it down. Mr. Gladden was present and immediately stepped forward and informed the teller that the check was as clean and good as "cleaned in the sand". The teller told Mr. Gladden to endorse it and he would cash it. Gladden obliged. It was the next day that Starr and his cohorts robbed the bank of $1,200 at gunpoint. They proceeded on to rob the bank at Harrison, AR, and it was there he was shot and killed."

One of the first hotels in Seligman was built in 1881 by M. S. Inmon and it was called the Inmon House. It was destroyed by fire in 1883. Another hotel was known as William Trim's exchange Hotel and it was operated by Mark Hurst. It was the building where the 1883 fire originated. Other hotels in Seligman that were destroyed by fire were the Wichita House, Seligman Hotel and Senate Hotel. In 1924 Isom Gladden purchased the Linden Hotel and had it moved south on Front Street to the site of the old Gladden Hotel that was destroyed by fire the year before. The building was moved by a team of horses pulling it down the street on skids.
Businesses
  • Fawver Mill
  • Seligman Sunbeam
  • MFA - Farmer's Exchange
  • Webb's Butane
  • Seligman Telephone Co.
  • Rubow's
  • Cottage Hotel
  • Linden Hotel
  • Gladden Hotel
  • Exchange Hotel
  • M. S. Inmon's Grocery Store
  • Wilkerson & Stephens General Store
  • City Saloon
  • Kern & Maugers Meat Store
  • Scotts Barber Shop
  • Chester Browning's Barber Shop
  • J. M. Pocock's Hardware
  • Edwards Bros. Truck Line
  • Paul Rogers & Sons Truck Line
  • The Bill Frost Restaurant
  • Apple's Livery Barn
  • Dr. Northcutt
  • Dr. Foster
  • Dr. Brown
Early Days Oct 21, 1897, Thursday, Cassville Republican, Barry Co., MO Seligman News: We regret Elmer C. Clark, formerly of this place, was murdered by a miner in Colorado.

Cassville Republican, Barry Co., MO, Thursday, April 19, 1900 Seligman News: A. N. Baxley will start soon on the road to introduce a new churn which he and W. I. Thompson have been manufacturing.

July 15, 1905, Saturday, Cassville Democrat, Weekly Paper, Barry Co., MO We hear there has been some talk of a mob from Arkansas doing violence to Wm Dillard, who killed his brother-in-law William Ford, in Sugar Creek Township recently but was exonerated recently at his preliminary examination at Seligman Monday. Dillard was wild with excitement and took the train at Seligman on Wednesday for parts unknown.

January 6, 1910, Thursday, Cassville Republican, Barry Co., MO Seligman News: James Sons has build a new chicken house where he expects to raise his new breed of white chickens.

August 27, 1914, Thursday, Cassville Republican, Barry Co., MO - The body of Patrick Walsh, a detective for the Frisco, was interred at the Seligman Cemetery, Friday. Walsh was assaulted in Arkansas some days ago by a bunch of hoboes. He died at the hospital in Memphis, Tenn.

May 11, 1916, Thursday, Cassville Republican, Barry Co., MO Seligman News: C. F. Wilcox, clerk at the bank, of Seligman has erected a miniature mine in the window which is creating as much interest as the mining fever is high in our locality.

Newspaper extracts from microfilm
School Photos Seligman School Photos, Reunion Photos, & Year Books
Nearby Schools Photo

Photo Submitted by: Darla Marbut
School Notes New Salem Cemetery began in 1857 by Peter and Mary Imbler. They deeded 9 1/2 acres for a school, church and cemetery. In 1900 trustees were J. L. Trimble, G. V. Skelton and G. L. Brixey. In 1902 trustees were Carter Skelton, Robert Roller and John Ingdall.
Town Photo photo

From the photo files of Ramona Williams Fletcher
Miscellaneous photo

From George Doty - addressed to:

Sable Vanderpool, Marshfield, MO

Back of card

Submitted by: Donna Cooper
Miscellaneous Seligman City Map - Submitted by: Ramona Williams Fletcher

Postcard from Seligman - Submitted by: Megan Zurawicz

Postcard from Seligman- Submitted by: Megan Zurawicz
Books Seligman Books

The First Century of Seligman, Missouri 1881-1981 - by Franschon Mitchell, Zelda Relethford and Gwen Hilburn - Out of print

Seligman Business Directory
Seligman Families photo
Seligman Families James Tennessee and Sarah Melissa (Walden) Dunlap

James Tennessee Dunlap and Sarah Melissa (Walden) Dunlap moved to Seligman in 1923. He was instrumental in the consolidation process of Seligman and Washburn schools. He was a son of Tennessee Dunlap who moved his family to Eureka Springs, AR in 1878, a lawyer, and also the owner of a grocery store in Eureka Springs. He died in 1903. He was buried in Beaver Cemetery in Beaver, AR. Tennessee Dunlap was the person who named the Mt. Zion School (not too far from Eagle Rock).

Tennessee's son, James Tennessee Dunlap, (1869-1960) and Joyce Elizabeth Arnhart (1869-1906) were married on June 17, 1888 in Eagle Rock, MO. Joyce Elizabeth was the daughter of James Mitchell Arnhart (1848-1923) and Cornelia Jane (Jennings) Arnhart (1849-1920).

James Tennessee and Joyce Elizabeth (Arnhart) Dunlap had several children. One son was John L. Dunlap who was born Dec 4, 1898 and married Mary Ellen Wilson (Tinker Wilson's daughter).

On Dec 8, 1907, James Tennessee married Sarah Melissa (Walden) Weddington widow of Jack Weddington (1866-1907), and she had 3 small children. Sarah was the daughter of Henry F. Walden (1820-1896) and Martha P. (Johnson) Walden (1828-1924). James and Sarah had four daughters: Rena Isabelle Dunlap b. Sept 16, 1909, died Jul 25, 1974 m. Cleophas Christian Burnett (1903-1983.

When Jim and Sarah were married and combined their families. They moved from their Eagle Rock farm to Seligman in 1923. Their last 4 girls graduated from Seligman High School and 3 went to college in Springfield, MO. Jimmy and Sarah moved to Springfield during their last years to be near their family. James T. "Jimmy" died Jan 25, 1960 and Sarah M. Dunlap died February 18, 1963 and they are buried in the Eastlawn Cemetery in Springfield, MO.

Photo of James T. Dunlap Children

March 30, 1911, Thursday, Cassville Republican, Barry Co., MO: Miss Grace Weddington Accidentally Killed: Ray Dunlap accidentally shot and instantly killed his step-sister, Grace Weddington, Tuesday morning at their home on Cedar Creek in the southeastern part of this county about sixteen miles from Cassville. The report is that Ray was taking a gun down from the rack when it was accidentally discharged, instantly killing his step-sister who was in the room at the time. Ray and Miss Grace were both said to be about sixteen years of age. Ray is a son of James Dunlap and Grace is a daughter of Mrs. Dunlap, Mrs. Dunlap having been married the second time. Later: We are informed that Ray had been out with the gun to shoot a hawk. Returning to the house he entered to put the gun on the rack when the wind blew the door shut striking the hammer of the loaded gun, discharged it. The full effect of the shot was received by the little girl, Miss Grace, who was lying on the bed at the time.

Grace was thirteen years old, instead of sixteen as above stated.
Early Day Families
  • William & Rutha (Weston) Fountain
  • James & Nancy (Roller) Forgey
  • Floyd & Alice (Vaughn) Fawver
  • Thomas and Lizzie (Whitner) Hulsey
  • William Burl & Jennie Belle (Harbin) Hammers
  • John & Susan (Collier) Haneke
  • George T. & Cynthia (Roller) Apple
  • Charles and Josephine Rubow
  • John Simpson and Minnie (Van Zandt) Anderson
  • W. E. "Lige" Frost
  • Ernest & Jennie (Perkins) Huffman
  • John & Rebecca (Forgey) Hooker
  • Burrell Parks & Margaret Elizabeth (Miller) Northcutt
  • Joe Walter and Maude (McMahon) Northcutt
  • Lot & Elizabeth Ann (Woodard) Banks
  • Rice and Elizabeth (Bailey) Banks
  • Houston and Alener (Ellis) Banks
  • Albert & Gusta (Banks) Roller
  • George and Lena (Anderson) Roller
  • John and Elizabeth (Pippin) Relethford
  • Frank and Hattie McCann
  • J. A. and Alice (Yount) McCann
  • Burl Pleasant & Artie Caroline (Rubow) Mitchell
  • James Walter and Bessie Prudence (Webb) Mitchell
  • Joe F. & Roseanna (Simpson) Mitchell
  • James Monroe and Fannie (Arnold) Mitchell
  • Randolph and Catherine (Frost) Skelton
  • Spencer Lenox and Family
  • James Campbell and Ader (Walker) Pippin
  • Burl Gowen Family
  • James and Cleo Gunnels
  • Neal and Clara (Sengpiehl) Still
  • Chris & Willie Gemmecke
  • George Henry & Ella Mae Gemmecke
  • George Henry and Mary Mae (Martin) Gemmecke
  • John and Villa Goins
  • Sandy & Vinnie Walden
  • Sandy Joe Walden & Adam Lane
Cemeteries Cemeteries of Seligman & Surrounding Areas
Cemetery Stories photo

Seligman Cemetery

Submitted by Darla Marbut
Cemetery Stories The First 100 Years in Exeter, page 182: "There is a bit of history concerning the lone pine tree in the cemetery. Miss Grace Elliott, sister of Ross Elliott, married Patrick Walsh, who was born in Georgia. He was a Frisco Special Agent and detective. He was 30 years old when he met a tragic death in the Frisco railroad yards in Memphis, Tennessee. In 1914 he was buried in the Seligman Cemetery. His sister who lived in Georgia sent a small pine seedling in a shoe box to be set near her brother's grave. Ross Elliott, a small boy then, remembers going to the cemetery with his mother to set the little seedling that came from Georgia in a shoe box. It has grown into a beautiful, stately tree and stands on the Elliott lot as a memorial to Patrick Walsh."
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