Oldest Carney Cemetery, Barry Co., MO

Name Born Died Research Notes & Inscriptions Researcher or Resource
CARNEY, Nancy Susan (WARMOTH) 1789
SC
July 26, 1864
Barry Co., MO
Inscription: "Aged 75 years" - Research Note: Wife of Thomas Carney. They had children: Malinda Carney 1813 - 1813, Mariah Carney 1815- 1847, Calvin Carney 1817 - 1899, Mary Anna Carney 1819 - 1890, Thomas Carney 1821 - 1899, John Moore Carney 1825 - 1899, Absolum Carney 1832 - 1892, Susan Jane Carney 1834 - 1880, Walter Carney 1837 - 1899, and Andrew Jackson Carney 1842 - 1843. Note
Phyllis Long
Photo
Nora Eden
CARNEY, Thomas 1789
Craven Co., SC
March 23, 1867
Barry Co., MO
Inscription: "Aged 77 years" - Research Note: Thomas Carney was born in 1789 in Craven Co., South Carolina. He married Nancy Susan Warmouth about 1810. They, with other young couples (Lot Sams, Isaac Greathouse and Bell) homesteaded in Edwards Co., Illinois, arriving there in 1812. After 30 years, Thomas and family, including his oldest son, Calvin, homesteaded in Barry Co., Missouri, where they are buried. Thomas' father was Thomas Carney, born in 1741 in Craven Co., SC. Note
Benjamin F. Carney III
Photo
Nora Eden
GALLOWAY, Susanna Jane (CARNEY) Sept. 21, 1834 April 18, 1880
Green Co., MO
Research Note: From the description given in the following information, this photo must be Susanna's stone. She was the daughter of Thomas Carney and Nancy Susan Warmoth. Wife of Major Charles Galloway. They were married on Mar. 8, 1849 in IL, according to Goodspeed's History. - A book titled "Grandma Galloway said it was so --" by Shirley Houser Galloway, 1984, 426 pages, indicates the following on pages 33 and 34: "Before 1870, the Galloway family moved from Flat Creek to Clay Township in Greene County, Missouri, just south of Springfield. Over the years Charles Galloway lived in three different houses in the vicinity of the small village of Galloway, Missouri (named in his honor). Of course, there was no Galloway, Missouri when the family first moved there, up the hill to the west of the future town site. At that home, a stream of water emerged from the mouth of a cave just below the hill and the barn was located so that the stream came out under it. Major Galloway operated a distillery in the barn and the water from the cave stream was used in the business of the distillery. At least one of the old mash vats from the distillery survived for several decades, into the 20th century and was used as a horse trough. The house was perhaps 150 to 200 yards back on the hill from the barn. When the basement for the house was being dug, a stream of water was exposed ... an underground stream. It was walled up and steps built down to the water so the house literally had running water, a real rarity in the 1870's. Periodically , in order to supply the house with water, someone had to take a bucket and go down to the basement to fill it. One time some of the children came racing back up, reporting they had seen a man down there. Some speculated he had come along the stream from the outside cave entrance. No one was ever found and perhaps the children imagined the whole episode. It was in that house that the family experienced a day of violent thunderstorms and tornadoes on April 18, 1880. The house was demolished by the Marshfield Cyclone and Susan Carney Galloway was killed. She was the only person in the house who died, though others were injured. Jack, the youngest child (Andrew Jackson Galloway), was almost six years old and he was fond of bread and molasses for between-meal snacks. The hired girl, Sarah Wilhite, then about 15 years old, had been fixing him a snack on the day of the tornado. His mother said he couldn't have any more and he became angry and said, "I just hate you ... and Sary, too!" Sarah remembered that when the storm struck, the hall carpeting, a long piece going down the middle of the house from front to back, rose up in the air and Susan Carney Galloway said, "Oh! .. we're gone!". The two little boys, Absalom and Jack, were deposited in a potato patch unharmed. In a day when it was customary to bury the dead near the place they died, usually on the family farm, the body of Susan Carney Galloway was taken all the way back to Barry County and buried on the old Carney homestead near the graves of her parents. Nathaniel (called Nath or Nick) rode ahead on horseback to tell the relatives down there that they were bringing his mother's body down by wagon and that the grave must be dug. It must have been 40 to 50 miles and by wagon it would have taken many hours. It would be interesting to know why such tremendous effort was made to return her (Susan's) body to the area where she had spent the greater part of her life. Hers is the only fenced grave, surround by an ornate wrought iron fence, and her tombstone reads, "Susan - wife of - Maj. C. Galloway - Dau of T. Carney - Born - Sept. 24, 1834 - Died - Apr. 18, 1880." - Charles Galloway is buried in Greene Co., MO. Goodspeed
Note
Phyllis Long
Photo
Nora Eden


Return to







Return to



You are web site visitor

Rootsweb Counter

since Sept. 23, 1996