Kansas History and Heritage Project--Trego County Census

Trego County Census
1887 Farm Census Substitute


The entries below were the result of a canvas done by the WaKeeney Western World reporter in the month of August, 1887. I'm sure it does not include all Trego Co. farmers, but the survey seemed to end with the last week of August--I could find no more similar lists in the paper, either before or after that time.

BIG CREEK VALLEY, AUG. 1, 1887

I arrived at O. A. Sperry's to-day. Mr. Mr. S. lives on the s 1/2 of sec. 22, t. 12, r. 25. He has been a settler in western Kansas for 9 years. Owing to his old age, and he serious accident which happened to him last fall, his crop this year has been cut down to about 5 acres of corn and some truck patches. He says he is too old to make a living at farming, and he intends to go back to Connecticut this fall on a visit, and will probably remain there for a time.

I next met Mr. Andrew Larson. His homestead is located on the ne 1/4 of sec. 26, t. 12, r. 25. He has in about 40 acres of corn, which looks tolerably well, considering the dry weather. He has several tons of hay left over from last year's crop. This reminds us of what he told us when he came here a year and a half ago, and had to buy his hay at $14 per ton. He said if he lived and kept his health he would not have to buy hay another spring. This would be a good resolution for all Kansas farmers to adopt, especially in the western part.

Mr. Lars Larson lives southeast of Collyer, on the n. 1/2 of sec. 22. t. 12, r. 25. He has in 6 acres of corn and 4 of sorghum. In addition to this, he has a tree claim, which undoubtedly accounts for his small crop. There is a scarcity of weeds in his timber. He has taken great care in cultivating his trees, and, judging from his ten acres, any one who tries can raise timber in western Kansas.

W. F. Stramahan lives on the s. 1/2 of the sw. 1/4 of sec. 32, t. 12, r. 25. He has 3 acres of corn, a few raspberries and 250 trees. He says this is only his third year here.

Mrs. Lorimer has a homestead and a timber claim on the s. 1/2 of sec. 26, t. 12, r. 25. She has 10 acres of corn and sorghum. Her timber is good, and will make more than half a stand, i. e., fill every other row 4 feet apart. Mrs. Lorimer is a widow, with 4 children, and she surely deserves praise for the way in which she is bringing up her boys, and making a living for them.

Jacob Tetzloff lives on the se 1/4 of sec. 35, t. 12, r. 25. He has been here but 18 months, and wants to sell out and leave. I know not why, for he has 35 acres of as nice corn as any one around here; his millet made about a ton and a half to the acre; he has some old corn left yet, and an acre of as good potatoes as he ever raised, he says.

Messrs. Zeman and Yonda have been visited this morning. Their corn is drying some, and they are cutting it up. Although there is not much corn on it, it is excellent fodder. Their crops are generally light, excepting potatoes. They are a good crop. The buffalo grass here has matured, and is in the proper stage to place the fat on cattle.

BIG CREEK VALLEY, AUG. 2.

Chas. Neff is located southwest of WaKeeney, and owns 520 acres of sec. 28, tp. 12, r. 24. He has 25 acres of corn, 10 acres of rye, which he thinks will make 15 bushels per acre, 6 acres of barley, 10 bushels per acre, his sorghum is good, and one half acre of extra potatoes. Mr. Neff also has a pasture fenced and a large stone house and other things which add greatly to the looks of a farm.

Chas. Jackson lives on sec. 34, t. 12, r. 24, has 35 acres under cultivation, a little corn, rye, millet and an acre and a half of potatoes, and is making hay.

Mr. Keraus lives on sec. 10, t. 13, r. 24. He says his oats are fair; his spring wheat is extra: corn not very good. Mr. Keraus says he thinks spring wheat is the best for western Kansas. His two sons are in partnership on the sw. 1/4 of the same section. They have 25 acres of corn. Their rye and oats are good, and they have one acre of fine potatoes.

A. Spena, north 1/2 sec 12, 1. 13, r. 25, has 60 acres of corn, which will probably make an average of 5 bushels per acre. This is as good a crop of corn as we have heard of so far. His millet about crop. He has 37,744 trees on his tree claim, on which he made final proof last fall. He has 160 head of nice cattle. He waters his cattle from his well. They look the best of any we have seen.

BANNER, TREGO COUNTY.
Wednesday, Aug 3.

J. J. Hrabak lives on nw. 1/4 sec. 18, t. 12, r. 24. He has 30 acres under cultivation. He moved to Kansas 8 years ago, and remained here five years. He then went to Colorado, and returned after an absence of three years. His corn is yielding better than any we have seen. He is cutting it up, on account of its drying up so. The corn which is already too hard for roasting ears will, of course, make pretty fair corn.

W. A Hunt is on ne 1/4 sec. 30, 1. 13, r. 24. He has 30 acres under cultivation, 22 of which are in corn. He came here, from Tuscola, Ill., about a year ago. Jasper Hideout is on sw. 1/4 sec. 34, t. 13, r. 24. He has 25 acres of corn, which will make about half a crop. He has been here about one year, and is from Tuscola, Ill. J. A. Frease lives on n. 1/2 sec 6, t. 14, r. 24. Mr. Frease has a homestead and timber claim, and is a settler here of two summers. He has 20 acres under cultivation on his tree claim, and 10 on his homestead. He has the nicest truck patch we have yet found, a large cabbage garden, and sweet and Irish potatoes, both of which are extra good.

John W. Reynolds has three eighties in sec 6, t. 14, r. 24. Mr. Reynolds is a settler of nine years in western Trego, and is an old soldier. He has 100 acres under cultivation. He also has a tree claim on the ne. 1/4 of sec 12, t. 14, r25. He says he has over one-third of all the trees he put out, and would have had more but for the dry weather.

Mr. A. W. Purinton lives northeast of Castle Rock, on sec 28, t. 14, r. 25. Mr. Purinton has not raised any grain of any kind, but has quite an amount of rough feed. He has a grocery and provision store, and also the Banner post-office. Mr. P. feels somewhat discouraged, but there is many a man in a worse fix than he is.

Mr. T. H. Courtney lives on the ne 1/4 of section 34-13-25. Upon visiting his farm we find a good garden of potatoes, tomatoes, cabbage, melons, strawberries, raspberries and so forth. Mr. Courtney has a small patch of red clover which, he sowed last spring, some of which, upon measuring, was found to be 30 inches in length, and has a good crop of seed on it. He has a patch of corn about ten acres in size which is in roasting ears, and looks as though it would make thirty bushels per acre without a doubt his place looks likens back-east place set down in the west. He has trees which have made a growth of 5 feet in height and are an inch in diameter.

C. F. Hawkes has the w. 1/2 sec. 29-13-25 and n. 1/2 sec 30-13-25. Mr. Hawkes has 1 3/4 acres of peanuts, a mulberry-grove two years old, from which he picked one bushel of berries this year. He has black and honey locust, catalpa, box-elder and ailanthus trees all in nursery rows, which be intends to replant on his tree claim in the spring. He has sixty three acres in corn, which will make excellent fodder, but not much corn. He has an acre and a half of nice potatoes; also five acres of oats, which he thinks will go 30 bushels per acre, and 10 acres of rye which will go about 13 bushels per acre. Mr. Hawkes has sixty head of cattle which are in good order.

Several of the farmers around here have been trying a new kind of corn Kaffair corn. This corn seems to be the thing for this country. While the other corn is drying up some around here, the Kaffair corn has a fresh bright appear ance. Samuel Bingaman has a splendid crop of rice corn.

Co. Supt A. B. Baker lives on the Hackberry, on the s. 1/2 sec 32-14-25. He has 10 acres of good corn and a splendid garden. He has 5 acres of timber on his tree claim, most of which are ash, 150 fruit trees, quite a number of seedling trees. The general appearance of his place is good. Mr. Baker is repairing his house and painting it inside.

OGALLAH, Aug. 5, 1887.

W. F. Brabb is located on the ne 1/4 of sec. 28, t. 11, r. 21. Mr. Brabb has 30 acres of corn, which he thinks will average 40 bushels per acre; 11 acres of oats, estimated at 25 bushels per acre, and 1 acre of extra-good potatoes. His truck patch generally is very good. Mr. Brabb has turned almost his whole attention to corn growing, and, from his crop last year and the looks of the present one, he has surely made it a grand success. He came here three years ago, in the horse business, and has made up his mind that farming is about as sure as any thing in western Kansas.

J. B. Ruppee has a part of sec. 28, t. 11, r. 21. He has 50 acres of corn, which he estimates at 85 bushels to the acre; 10 acres of wheat, which he has guessed at 6 bus. per acre; 3 acres of potatoes, which are hard to beat, and 2 acres of melons, which can not be beaten. He has 800 cabbages, which are good. Mr. Ruppee has locust trees which have grown 5 feet this summer from the broken roots of other trees.

Joshua Musgrave, sr., lives on the se 1/4 of sec. 32, t. 11, r. 21. He has 125 acres of corn, which, to the best of his judgment, will make about 35 bus. to the acre; 2 acres of good sorghum; 7 acres of millet, put at 2 tons to the acre; 1 acres of potatoes, which are good; lr acres of rye, which will yield about 7 bus. per acre; a good sized bed of beets, which he thinks will averege a pound a piece; yearling trees 1 ft. high: seedlings 2 ft; trees from 3 to 7 years, 15 to 20ft. high. His cattle are in good condition, and he has 56 head of hogs. Mr. Musgrave says he feels as much encouraged in Trego county farming as he ever felt, if not more so.

E. S. Coffey has the e 1/2 of sec. 18, t. 12 r. 21. He has about 35 acres of corn, estimated at 50 bus. per acre; 22 acres of wheat, which he has threshed, securing a yield of 17 bus. to the acre; 12 acres of oats, guessed at 50 bus. per acre; 2 acres of potatoes, guessed at 150 bus. per acre. Mr. Coffey has a small patch of alfalfa and one of timothy, both of which are doing extra well. He has some peaches. The trees on his timber claim look well. He says his cattle are in as good order as he has ever had them at this season.

Eli McCollum is on the nw 1/4 of sec. 18, t. 12, r. 21. He has 30 acres of corn, which he thinks will average 30 bus. per acre; 23 acres of wheat, which went 18 bus. per acre; a good garden; of an acre of potatoes, fair; 10 acres of oats, which will make 50 bus. per acre. He intends to put in a fair-sized crop this year. His cattle are fat. The trees around his house gives the place the appearance of some Eastern home.

L. Warne, of sec. 24, t. 11, r. 22, has 30 acres of corn, which will yield 30 bus. to the acre; 7 acres of millet, 3 tons to the acre; 1 acre of good potatoes; 1/2 an acre of trees in nursery row, which are good, and 52 head of cattle in good living order.

John S. Kelly is situated on the nw 1/4 of sec. 12, t. 11, r. 22. Mr. Kelly has 20 acres of corn, which will probably make 20 bus. to the acre; 30 acres of oats, 30 bus. to the acre; 9 acres of sorghum, extra good; 1 acre of fair potatoes; 1 acre of pretty good melons. His hogs are do ing nicely. He has 48 fruit trees set into an orchard. Mr. Kelly says he wants it understood that he never gets the blues. He thinks this is a good farming country.

A. V. Hixson lives 4 miles ne of Ogallah, on the ne 1/4 of sec. 8, t. 12, r. 22. He has 100 acres of corn, which he thinks will average 35 bus. to the acre. He has 25 acres of wheat, guessed at 5 bus.; 15 acres of rye, about 8 bus.; 20 acres of oats, at 50 bus. per acre; 1/2 an acre of good potatoes; 6 acres of millet, 1 ton to the acre; some cane, which will make 3 tons per acre. He also has a nice lot of strawberries and raspberries. He has 28 head of registered Poland China hogs. He has a pair of bronze turkeys, the gobbler of which weighs 36 pounds and the hen 18. He also has full-blooded Plymouth Rock chickens. Mr. H. has been here a little over a year, and his place looks like that of some old settler.

Saturday, Aug. 6.

Jons Eklund lives on the sw 1/4 of sec. 12, 1. 12, r. 22. He has 25 acres of corn, which he guesses at 30 bus. per acre; 10 aores of millet and sorghum, which will make about 2 tons to the acre; and 2 acres of good potatoes. His cattle are in good order.

Foster Palmer lives on the sw 1/4 of sec 34, t. 11, r. 22. He expects to have about 1,200 bus. of corn off SO acres; 1/2 an acre of fair potatoes; 6 acres of oats, about 50 bus. per aore; 6 acres of millet, 13 tons to the aore.

Chas. P. Chase, on the sw 1/4 of sec 11, t. 12, r. 22, has 45 acres of corn, which he thinks will average about 10 bus. to the acre; 10 acres of millet, 3 tons per acre; 2 acres of oats, about 40 bus per acre, and a acre of good potatoes.

Geo. McKinley, ne 1/4 of sec 10, t. 12, r. 22, has 23 acres of corn, put at 20 bus. per acre: 2 acres of millet, which will make 1 ton per acre; 1 acre of potatoes as good as the best; about 600 head of cabbages and an extra garden.

A. E. Mickel, on sec 32, t. 11, r. 22, has 15 acres of fair corn and 25 of fodder; 1 acre of fair potatoes. His cattle are in good order. Mr. Mickel is putting up about 35 tons of wild hay,

Geo. Carter is on the nw 1/4 of see 10, t. 12, r. 22. Mr. Carter has 30 acres of late corn, which looks fresh and green, and, should it rain frequently through the present month, it will make heavy corn; otherwise, it can not. His oats and garden are fair and potatoes good. He has set out a small grove around his house, which is doing nicely. One thing we have seen here that we have not seen elsewhere a large pumpkin patch, which looks well and is in full bloom. This is another crop that would pay in western Kansas. Pumpkins make good cattle feed.

S. P. Bartlett lives ne of Wa-Keeney, on the north 1/2 of sec. 2, t. 12 r. 28. He has 7 acres of fodder, 30 acres of sorghum, put at 4 tons per acre; 18 acres of millet, at3 tons to the acre; 25 acres of oats, at 30 bus. per acre. Mr. B. has 58 head of cattle. They are in extra condition.

W. H. Dome, on the se 1/4 of sec. 2, t. 12, r. 23, has 100 acres of corn, which will go 10 bus. to the acre; 6 acres of wheat, 6 bus. per acre; 15 acres of rye, 10 bus. per acre; 15 acres of millet, which will make 2 tons to the acre; 10 acres of oats, 20 bus. to the acre. Mrs. Dorns has a beautiful flower bed north of the house.

I visited F. O. Ellsworth's Thursday morning. He has nothing but corn to speak of, except his beautiful place. He has 60 acres of corn, which his brother-in law thinks will average about 10 bus. per acre.

Leaving Ellsworth's to the southwest, I next came to W. P. Shaw's, on the sw 1/4 of sec. 34, t. 11 r. 23. Mr. Shaw has in a fair crop of corn, sorghum, oats and millet, all of which are in fair condition for this year.

Just east of Mr. Shaw's, on the se 1/4 of sec 34, t. 11, r. 23, lives S. T. Bartlett. Mr. Bartlett is an old settler in Kansas, and has had experience enough to know that one kind of crop alone will not do to depend on here. He has three kinds of early corn, which are extra good, and a piece of common corn, which is not so good. He also has 8 acres of millet, and calls it 50 tons of hay. His potatoes are good, as are his oats and cane. He wishes it stated that the dry weather has not hurt him, but the chinch bugs have.

J. M. Ostrander lives ne of Wa-Keeney, on sec. 36, t. 11, r. 23. He has 10 acres of fair corn. He says his millet prospect is good. His sheep are doing better than he has ever seen them do before. He has two colts which he calls extra good for their age. Mr. Ostrander says he does not expect to winter his sheep in Norton county on 18-cent corn the coming season. He thinks corn will be as cheap in Trego as in Norton county this year.

Thos. Powell, living on the sw 1/4 of sec. 28, t. 11, r. 22, has 30 acres of corn, which he thought would make 40 bus. per acre if he had rain soon. The rain came last night, and I hope the gentleman will not be disappointed. He has 2 acres of potatoes, which he calls extra. He has an acre of watermelons in partnership with Mr. Harrower, which are as good as have been seen so far.

Mr. C. W. Sweet has 1/2 of sec. 18, t. 11, r. 22. He says he is farming 100 acres. Mr. Sweet has an excellent crop of sorghum. He thinks his cattle are as fat as he has ever seen them.

Dan'l Countryman, the owner of the se 1/4 of sec. 28, t. 11, r. 22, has 8 acres of corn, some parts of which are much better than others, but he feels sure it will average 35 bus. to the acre He has an acre of nice potatoes. Mr. Countryman received a back pension some time ago, which will help him out some. He has bought some cattle, and is putting up all the hay he can.

Jas. Snelling, on the nw 1/4 of sec. 20, t. 11, r. 22, has 8 acres of good corn and some good sorghum and potatoes.

B. Shank lives on C. H. Gibbs's place. Mr. Shank has 120 acres of corn, a part of which is extra good. He says he has 50 acres which will make 50 bus. per acre. His millet crop is good, and his melons are fair. Mr. Shank has been here a year. He likes this country very much. He says any man who will put his corn in with a lister, and keep it clean, can raise it every time. Mr. Gibbs's sheep are at the ranch and are doing uncommonly well.

Wm. LaRue lives on sec 14, t. 11, r. 22. He has 40 acres of fair corn. He thinks it will average 25 bus. per acre. He has 12 acres of good sorghum; 15 acres of millet, which will make 2 tons, to the acre; of an acre of potatoes. His cattle are doing nicely.

Hiram Shaw is located on sec 26, t. 11, r. 22. He says he has as good a prospect for corn as he ever had. He has 5 acres of good sorghum, a good truck patch, a nice sage bed, 100 bus. of potatoes, nice peas and beans, four acres of fairly-good red clover, and 55 acres of corn and sorghum which he will mow for feed. His cattle are in splendid condition.

Monday, Aug. 8.

T. C. Roberts lives on the sw 1/4 of sec 18, t. 12, r. 21. Thomas has 25 acres of nice corn, which he thinks will make 25 bus. per acre, and 10 acres of good mil let. The whole amount of his ground under cultivation is in the neighborhood of 60 acres.

W. S. Knapp, on the sw 1/4 of sec. 24, t. 12, r. 22, has 9 acres of corn, estimated at 5 bus. per acre; 12 acres of millet, 1 1/2 tons per acre; 5 acres of oats, 45 bus. per acre. His garden is extra good. Mr. Knapp has as fine, a grove on his tree claim as there is in this end of Trego county. His cattle are fat. He has 2 good colts.

W. H. Palmer, on the w 1/2 of the sw 1/4 of sec 26, t. 12, r. 22, has 15 acres of fair corn, 12 acres of millet, which will go 3 tons to the acre; 1/2 of an acre of potatoes and 1 acre of extra good timber.

Messrs. J. P. Marquand and sons are farming the w 1/2 of sec 80, t. 12 r. 21 They have in 85 acres of corn, which they think will average 35 bus. per acre; 60 acres of wheat, 18 bus. to the acre; 4 of rye, 20 bus.; 10 of flax, 10 bus.; 20 aores of sorghum,, about 3 tons to the acre, and an excellent garden. Their cattle are in extra good condition.

Ben Mapes, on the nw 1/2 of sec 8, t. 14, r. 22, says he has 25 acres of fodder, 1 acre of sorghum, a good garden, and trees doing as nicely as could be expected considering the dry weather.

C. C. Ridgway has the w 1/2 of sec 28 t. 12, r. 21. His corn field of 30 acres he thinks will go 40 bus. to the acre. He has 3 acres of potatoes, and 1 acre of extra-good melons. Mr. Ridgway has rented out 200 acres of ground this year, which was planted to corn. He says has as good an opinion of Kansas as ever, and that it was always good.

Frances Ridgway rented the Barnes place last spring, and planted 40 acres of corn there which he tells us is very fair, but he would not like to guess as to what it would make, as it is late. It is not damaged yet by the dry weather, but he does not know that it will not be.

H. Cutler has the e 1/2 of sec 20 and the w 1/2 of sec. 21, t. 12, r. 21. He has 110 acres of corn, which he places at 40 bus. per acre; 16 acres of wheat, 8 bus. to the acre; 10 acres of oats, 22 bus. per acre; 20 acres of sorghum, about 4 tons to the acre. Mr. Cutler planted 10 acres to trees in the spring. They are extra good. His cattle are in excellent order.

W. M. Goble, on the ne 1/4 of sec 28, t. 12, r. 21, has 32 acres of 25-bu. corn and 1 acre of good potatoes.

W. D. Lombard, on se 1/4 of sec 2, t. 12, r. 21, has 40 acres of corn put at 25 bus. to the acre; 2 acres of sorghum, estimated at all of 4 tons to the acre, and 1 acre of pretty good potatoes. He has 16 head of fat cattle.

Ed. Phillips lives on the ne 1/4 of sec 8, t. 12, r. 21. He has 46 acres of corn, estimated at 30 bus. per acre; 3 acres of extra sorghum, which will make 4 or 5 tons to the acre; 3 acres of good, large potatoes; about 100 cabbages; 1 acre of sweet corn; 3 bus. of sweet potatoes and a good garden. Miss Ida has raised about 2 bus. of peanuts.

C. O. Yetter's place joins the Ogallah town site on the west. He has 65 acres of good corn; about 4 acres of oats, which yielded in the aggregate 130 bus,; some millet, about 3 acres of potatoes. Mr. Yetter has an excellent stand of timber on his claim, which shows that he under stands his business.

Ed. Allen, on the ne 1/4 of sec. 20, t. 12, r. 22, has 15 acres of nice corn, which he thinks will make 50 bus. per acre; 5 acres of millet, which will go about 2 tons to the acre; of an acre of potatoes; 1 acre of good sorghum.

Chas. Warner lives on the ne 1/4 of sec. 18, t. 12, r. 22, in Wa-Keeney township. He has 25 acres of corn, put at 35 bus. per acre; 5 acres of millet, which will make 2 tons to the acre; an acre of good potatoes; half an acre of splendid melons.

C. H. Benson is not a farmer. He keeps the Ogallah store, and does not want to be missed in the great write-up of Trego county. So, read the following: You can buy your goods of Benson Bros., at Ogallah, as cheaply for cash as you can anywhere in the county. They keep everything that is to be found in a first class store. What you can't see, call for. They have it, and don't you forget it. Don't forget the place, at the Ogallah Store, Ogallah, Kansas.

Capt J. M. Welch, of the sw 1/4 of sec 30, t. 11, r. 23, was visited Tuesday evening, Aug. 9. He has 25 acres of sorghum, which, he thinks will make 2 tons to the acre; 30 acres of millet, which may be called a fair crop. The captain has 104 head of cattle, which he claims to be the nicest bunch in Trego county. He backs us in this expression.

J. B. Walker has the w 1/2 sec 7, t. 11, r. 23. He has 75 acres of extra-good sorghum; 35 acres of fair millet; 10 acres of oats; an acre and a half of good potatoes and an extra melon patch of half an acre. Mr. Walker has 1,950 sheep in first-class order.

Rev. T. W. Miller has about 3,000 sheep in good order. He will have enough rough feed to last him if the winter is not too rough. He also has a nice bunch of horses.

Mrs. Lyddie Richardson has all of sec 8, t. 12, r 22. She has 25 acres of corn; 60 acres of wheat and rye; 20 acres of oats; 30 acres of millet. All of these will make a fair crop. She also has 6 acres of sorghum, 240 cabbages and 1 acre of good potatoes.

A. S. Hughes has the se 1/4 of sec 34, t. 11, r. 21. He has 35 acres of corn, which he thinks will make 20 bus. per acre; 2 acres of millet, 2 tons to the acre; 2 acres of potatoes, which are a fair crop.

A. S. Barnes has the nw 1/4 of sec 26, t. 11, r. 21. He has 60 acres of corn, which he thinks will average 15 bushels per acre; 3 acres of Irish potatoes; about 600 sweet potato vines; 12 head of cattle in good order.

G. A. Douglas, on the se 1/4 of sec 14, t. 11, r. 21, has 10 acres of corn, estimated at 20 bushels to the acre; 3 acres of sorghum; 5 acres of rice corn, which he thinks will make 50 bushels per acre. Some of the old settlers will remember when they planted rice corn almost exclusively, because it stood the drouth better than maize.

H. M. Hallock has the w 1/2 sec 24, t. 11, r. 21, and has 20 acres of corn, estimated at 20 bushels per acre; 10 acres of millet, 2 tons to the acre; 1 acre of potatoes; 24 head of fat cattle. Judging from what he said, he intends to keep his cattle so. He said he was going to put up 100 tons of prairie hay.

T. S. Howe lives on the e 1/2 of sec 26, t. 11, r. 21. He has 25 acres of corn, which he thinks will make 40 bushels per acre; 40 acres of good late corn, which yet remains unmolested, but he can not say how much it will make. He also has 10 acres of sorghum, which will make about 5 tons to the acre; 6 acres of oats, which will make about 35 bushels per acre; 3 acres of potatoes, which he guesses at 450 bushels; his garden is extra. Mr. Howe has 37 head of cattle, which are in good order, and 23 head of hogs. He has planted an orchard of 115 trees.

A. A. Cockrell has the nw 1/4 of sec 35, t. 11, r. 21. He has 45 acres of corn; 5 acres of sorghum; 8 acres of oats; 30 aores of wheat. He has 85 acres of his 160 broken. His crops are all on sod, and he thinks they have done as well as could have been expected. He also states that he is well pleased with the country.

J. E. Cockrell, father of A. A. Cockrell, has the sw 1/4 of sec 35, t. 11, r. 21. He says he has 25 acres of corn, which will make 50 bushels per acre without a doubt; 4 acres of sorghum, 5 tons to the acre; 5 acres of oats, 45 bushels per acre; 14 acres of potatoes.

S. T. H. Baird lives on the se 1/4 of sec 35, t. 11, r. 21. He has 80 acres of corn, which will average 25 bushels per acre; 9 acres of sorghum; 4 acres of millet, 3 tons per acre; 40 acres of wheat, 10 bushels per aore; 16 acres of oats, 30 bushels per acre; 3 acres of Irish potatoes; acre of sweet potatoes; a good garden a better one that he has had in Illinois for 6 years. Mr. Baird says that it beats Illinois to death, from his way of thinking.

Edward Griffith has the s 1/2 of sec 26, t 11, r 21, and the nw 1/4 of sec 2, t. 12, r. 21. He came here in the latter part of May, so his 10 acres of corn was planted late, but it is very good, and will make a good crop in time. He has 50 acres of sod broken, has built a large house and a barn, has bought 5 head of cattle, and is well pleased with his prospects and the country.

David Griffith has a homestead on the se 1/4 of sec 2, t. 12 r. 21. He has a little corn; an apple orchard of 50 trees; about a quarter of an acre of extra melons, and a few castor beans planted around his house. This kind of beans seem to do well in western Kansas.

Mrs. J. M. Cook has the se 1/4 of sec 11, t. 12, r. 21. She has 1 acre of potatoes; a good garden, including 150 cabbages. Mrs. Cook is a widow, and rents most of her ground.

Captain Joseph Runyon has the e 1/2 of sec 10, t. 12, r. 21. Mr. B. has 30 acres of corn, whioh he places at 50 bushels per jtcre, and 5 acres of corn, at 15 bushels per acre, making in all 85 acres; 10 acres of oats, 35 bushels per acre; 10 acres of millet, fair for sod; 1 acres of sorghum, 5 tons per acre; 2 acres of good potatoes. His timber grove is doing nicely. Mr. Runyon thinks he will have enough peaches for his own use this year. He also has apple trees in bearing. His cattle, 51 in all, are in good condition.

Wm. Webster has the sw 1/4 of sec 12, t. 12, r. 21. He has 50 acres of corn, which will average 30 bushels per acre; 1 acre of fair potatoes and 150 cabbages.

John Cotton has the nw 1/4 of sec 14, t. 12, r. 21. He has 40 acres of corn, which will average 30 bushels per acre, and 2 acres of good sorghum.

W. J. Glasby, on the nw 1/4 of sec 10, t. 12, r. 21, has 40 acres of corn, which will make about 15 bushels per acre, and 3 acres of potatoes. He is putting up considerable hay.

Hngh Caskey is on sec. 14, t. 13, r. 22. He has 8 acres of corn, estimated at 15 bus. per acre; 11 acres of oats, at 50 bus. per acre; 10 acres of wheat, at 8 bus. per acre; 24 acres of potatoes, at 160 per acre; Mr. Caskey also has lots of timber around his homestead. He has apple, peach and cherry trees, grape vines, and various kinds of berries growing nicely, and bearing this year. His garden is extra, there being, among other things, 500 cabbages.

Thos. Tarpy has some nice corn and good potatoes and a good garden, the most of which he has sold in the market.

Chas. Cludas has the se 1/4 of sec. 8, t. 12, r. 21. He has 20 acres of corn, which he guesses at 35 bus. to the acre; 221 bus. of extra oats; an acre of potatoes which are up to the average, one acre of extra watermelons; 11 acres of timber, which is doing well, half of which is nursery stock. Mr. Cludas has a young orchard started. He also has strawberries, blackberries, grapes, etc.

Ex-County Commissioner Glick owns the s of sec. 20, t. 12, r. 20. Mr. Fidler is farming Mr. Glick's land. He has 60 acres of good corn, his rye is a fair crop, and his garden is good. Mr. Glick's timber on his tree claim is looking nice, considering the dry weather.

Geo. W. Houseman has the w 1/2 of sec 26, t. 12, r. 21. He has 55 acres of corn, which will be a fair crop; 10 acres of volunteer millet, which will make about 1 ton to the acre; 9 acres of potatoes averaging about 60 bus. to the acre. His cattle are in good condition. He aims to put up about 100 tons of hay.

C. F. McLean is on the se of sec. 34, t. 12, r. 21. He has 120 acres of corn, which he estimates at 30 bus. per acre; 6 acres of wheat, at 10 bus. per acre; 5 acres of oats, at 50 bus. per acre; 8 acres of millet, which will average 4 tons to the acre; 1 acre of potatoes, which he thinks will make 200 bushels. He presented to me a potato 12x19 inches in circumference. He wants to put up about 75 tons of prairie hay.

J. Madsen, on the nw 1/4 of sec. 2, t. 13, r. 21, has 40 acres of corn, which will make about 25 bus. per acre; 4 acres of fair oats; 4 acres of millet, about 2 tons to the acre; 2 acres of potatoes, about 60 bus. to the acre, and a good garden. Mr. Madsen expects to put up about 75 tons of prairie hay.

M. T. Morgan and son live on the w 1/2 of sec. 34, t. 12, r. 21. They have 60 acres of corn; 12 acres of oats, 40 bus. per acre; 20 acres of sorghum, 4 tons to the acre, and a good garden.

K. W. Phelps lives on the Pat Hickey place, 4 miles west of Ellis. He has 40 acres of corn, which will make 20 bus. per acre; 5 acres of millet, which he thinks will make 3 tons per acre. He has lived here 6 months, and finds that the place suits him as well as he had expected, if not better.

Fred Hemisegger has the ne 1/4 of sec. 12, t. 13, r. 21. He has 60 acres of corn, put at 25 bus. per acre; 30 acres of oats, at 50 bus. per aore; 10 acres of sorghum, at 3 tons per acre; acres of extra po tatoes. He expects to put up 80 tons of prairie hay. He has lived here a year, and likes the place.

Geo. W. Cross, on the sw 1/4 of sec. 10 t. 23, r. 21, has 21 acres of corn, which he thinks will make 25 bushels per acre on an average; 9 acres of wheat, 15 bus. per acre; 6 acres of oats, 30 bus. per acre, and about 1,000 cabbages. Mr. Cross has 39 head of cattle, looking as well as he ever saw them. He has 6,000 black locust trees in nursery rows, which have grown 2 1/2 feet in height from the seeds this year.

W. F. King lives on sec 8, t. 14, r. 21. He has 10 acres of late corn, which has not been damaged by the hot wind or dry weather, and will make heavy corn if it holds out; 15 acres of sorghum, 5 tons per acre; 4 acres of fair oats; 1,200 sheep doing nicely; 90 head of cattle in good condition. He has 11 acres of timber, some of which has made a growth of 7 feet this summer. Mr. King says he wants to put up 200 tons of hay this year if he can.

Mr. King, father of W. R., has 10 acres of millet, whieh he thinks will go 2 tons per acre; 20 acres of corn, 15 bus. per acre; 10 acres of late corn, which, with frequent rains, will make a good crop.

John Locker has 1/4 of sec 12, t. 14, r. 22. He has 67 acres of good corn and 1 acre of potatoes.

Gus. Sundell, on sec. 12, t. 14 r. 22, has 20 acres of corn, which he says will make 40 bus. per acre. He also has 2 extra colts.

Ben. C. Rich has the w 1/2 of sec 22, t. 13, r. 22. He has 10 acres of extra sorghum, which will make about 6 tons per acre, And 10 acres which will make 2 tons per acre; 460 bushels of small grain; 65 fat cattle. Mr. Rich has 8 varieties of trees on his timber claim; Some of his walnut trees are bearing nuts this season. He has 13 acres of timber on his

John Allman lives on sec 30, t. 14, r. 21. He has 300 head of cattle in good order, 100 of which are steers in excellent condition. 100 acres, fenced, constitutes his farming land. He has 35 acres in corn, looking nice; 20 acres of millet, uninjured by bugs; 10 acres of trees, looking nice, all of which are from 8 to 10 feet high. The most of his trees are black locust. He has 35 acres of sorghum and a nice young orchard.

H. P. Nelsen, on sec. 34, t. 13, r. 22, has 4 acres of early corn, which will make 25 bus. per acre. He also has 183 bus. of wheat.



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