Kansas History and Heritage Project-Jewell County

Jewell County Schools
Burr Oak High School Class of 1914

Below are newspaper articles about the Burr Oak High School class of 1914. The second article has been abstracted to avoid copyright violations.

Burr Oak Herald of June 4th, 1914:
The 1914 Commencement:
There was never a finer Commencement program given, in our opinion by graduates of the Burr Oak School, than that at the opera house last Friday evening by the class of 1914. The class of twelve members, one of the largest ever produced by this school, consisted of six boys and six girls. They are Pearl Kern, Blanche Powell, Clifford Wellman, Rial Oglevie, Lela Smith, Homier Grubbs, Ethel Cole, Harold Shores, Floye Fisher, Alvin Haworth, Myrtle Pixler and Clifford Buckles. Led by the superintendent of the city school, Prof. Fred Eaton, they marched on to the stiage; this had been tastefully arranged with a rustic effect, with branches of trees, feme and foliage plants set upon stumps with grass in the foreground. School pennants in the class colors of gold and white, hung about, while across the stage appeared the motto "Impossible is Un-American". A swing hung in the center of the stage and before this the graduates stood as they delivered their orations.

Jewell County Record, June 3, 1964:
The 50th reunion of the Burr Oak High School class of 1914 was held at the annual alumni reception May 29th, 1964 with all surviving members present. Two of them, Myrtle Pixler and Rial Oglevie, are deceased. Members attending from the greatest distance were Floye (Fisher) Calahan from Lebanon, Oregon and Alvin Haworth from Yucaipa, California. Pearl Kern came from Denver, Harold Shares from Neligh, Nebr., Clifton Buckles from Manhattan, Kans., and Blanche (Powell) Noble from Superior, Nebr. Ethel (Cole) Powell, Clifford Wellman, Lela (Smith) Decker and Homer Grubbs have spent their entire lives in and around Burr Oak, Kans.



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This website created Oct. 24, 2011 by Sheryl McClure.
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