Tec4 Robert Hough, US Army, DOW, April 17, 1945 Hosted by RootsWeb, 
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"No man was ever honored for what he received. Honor has been the reward for what he gave." -- Calvin Coolidge

Robert L. Hough

Robert L. Hough, Tec4, U.S. Army, 37237704, Died Of Wounds.

Son of Harry Thomas and Elsie (Elliot) Hough, who came in Comanche County From Ford County, Kansas, in 1928. They settled on a farm southeast of Coldwater near old Duckworth, a former stage stop. "Robert Leo was called into service in World War II and gave his life on the island of Cebu. He was a Staff Sergeant in the Medical Corps. He was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart." -- Edna May (Hough) Webster, CCH, p. 455.


The Western Star, May 11, 1945.
T4 ROBERT L. HOUGH KILLED IN PHILIPPINES
Had Never Had a Furlough Home In 29 Months of Service.

Last Saturday morning Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hough of Coldwater were notified by the War Department of the death of their son, T4 Robert L. Hough, when they received the following telegram: "The Secretary of War desires to express his deep regret that your son, Tech. 4th Robert L. Hough, died of wounds on Cebu Island 17 April, 1945. Confirming letter follows. J. A. Ulio, Adjutant General."

Bob, as he was known to his many friends in this county, was born September 13, 1922, at Ford, Kansas, and died in the service of his country on April 17, 1945, at the age of 22 years, 7 months and 4 days. When he was six years of age he and his parents moved to the Bethel community southeast of Coldwater. There Bob attended grade school and later the Dodge City High School.

Before being inducted into the Army, November 12, 1942, he was engaged in farming in Comanche county. He took his basic training at Camp Wolters, Tex., where he received medals in marksmanship and bayonet practice. He was then transferred to Shenango Valley, Penn. for further training and left the States for overseas service in April 1943.

He was shipped directly to New Caledonia, thence to the Fiji Islands where he took an intensive medical course. Sgt. Hough was made First Aid man for his company and was not only fitted to aid wounded soldiers but was a skilled infantryman in the front lines, as well. As a member of Co. A, 132nd Infantry in the American Division, he began fighting at Guadalcanal and was in the front lines through the invasion of Guam and other islands, as well as the long battle at Bougainvillea, with only five days relief.

From Bougainvillea his division moved to the Philippines and took part in the invasion of Luzon Island, where Manila is located. In this engagement he was wounded in one shoulder, it was later learned by his parents through friends. after recovering in a hospital from the wound, he was back in line with the infantrymen when they invaded Cebu Island, Sgt. Hough was among the first four Americans to hit the sandy beach there. A later wave of forces was nearly wiped out by the Japs. In this invasion which eventually cost his life, Bob wrote in a letter dated April 8 that the fighting had been fierce and that he had gone 14 days without even shaving. In his last letter dated April 13, four days before his death, he wrote he was O.K. but had been very busy and had little time to write, also that he had gotten the promised Jap helmet for David (a nephew.)

While he is on Bougainvillea he managed to see Junior York of Wilmore and Harvey Zane and Sonny Harden of Protection. In a letter written February 18 Bob wrote that there were indications that he might get a furlough home but that he might have to serve in the Army of Occupation. But the swift moving events in the Pacific warfare kept all of his outfit engaged in bitter fighting.

Last summer Bob was awarded the Good Conduct Medal and in every way he was a stalwart and brave soldier who never flinched, even under the most adverse conditions. As a First Aid man in his company his first thought was for the comfort and safety of his buddies. "Greater love hath no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends."

During all of his months of service he was thoughtful of the welfare of his loved ones and he spared them, whenever possible, the anxiety of knowing when he was in hospitals in the States and overseas. He was a young man of sterling character and one of the county's finest youths.

Surviving him are his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hough of Coldwater, three brothers, Arthur Hough of Coldwater, James Hough of Tehama, Calif., and Cpl. Harry W. (Bill) Hough of the Muroc, Calif., Army Air Base; three sisters, Mrs. Clara Hisken of Tehama, Calif., Mrs. Edna MacWebster of Protection, Kans., and Miss Joyce Hough of the home also by many other relatives and a host of friends.


The Western Star, December 21, 1945.
BRONZE STAR AWARD GIVEN POSTHUMOUSLY
Presentation Made Sunday to Parents of T 4 Robt. L. Hough.

Last Sunday afternoon, December 16, by direction of the President, the Bronze Star Medal was posthumously awarded Technician Fourth Grade Robert L. Hough, Medical Department.

The award was presented to Robert's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry T. Hough of Coldwater at the Hough home by Lieut. Linus A. Dinges, R. O. T. C. instructor at St. Joseph's College & Military Academy at Hays, Kansas. Only the immediate members of T 4 Hough's family, a representative of the American Legion and of the press were present at the presentation.

Lieut. Dinges wore the same shoulder patch that Robert did and was at Guadalcanal and other Pacific bases a few months ahead of Robert.

Following is the citation accompanying the medal from the War Department:
      "For heroic achievement in military operations against the enemy at Cebu, Philippines Islands on 17 April, 1945, upon the call of a wounded rifleman, Technician Hough, aid man attached to a rifle company moved to the forward slope of a hill under tense enemy fire and administered medical aid. While he was evacuating the man. Technician Hough was mortally wounded. By his devotion to duty at the cost of his life, Technician Hough acted in the highest traditions of the military service."
      My deepest sympathy is extended to your bereavement.
Sincerely Yours,
Edward F. Witsell, Major General, Acting The Adjutant General

The sorrowing relatives have the heartfelt sympathy of all our people.


The Western Star, September 10, 1948.

Final Rites for Sgt. Robert Leo Hough

Coldwater Soldier Killed On Cebu Island April 17, 1945

The last rites for Sgt. Robert Leo Hough, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hough of Coldwater, were held at Crown Hill cemetery near Coldwater immediately following the arrival of the west bound train, Saturday morning, September 4, and were in charge of the Coldwater V. F. W. and American Legion. The graveside service was in charge of George Brown, pastor of the Christian church in this city. Marvin Plank, accompanied by Mrs. Mitchell Profitt, sang "God Bless America" preceding the military honors accorded the fallen soldier.

The pallbearers were Raymond Mills, W. N. Parsons, Harry Canfield Jr., Vernie White, Jack White and Martin McIntyre. The honorary pallbearers were five Gold Star fathers - Roy Oller, Harvey Thompson, Harry White, Bert Griffith and Claude Sims.

Robert Leo Hough, son of Harry and Elsie Hough, was born September 13, 1922, and died on Cebu Island in the Philippines, while administering First Aid to a fallen comrade in his country's service April 17, 1945, at the age of 22 years, 7 months and 4 days.

Bob, as he was known in this county, was born at Ford, Kans., and moved at the age of 6 years with his parents to the Bethel community southeast of Coldwater. There Bob attended grade school and later the Dodge City high school.

Before being inducted into the army November 12, 1942, he was engaged in farming in Comanche county. He took his basic train (type set error) he received medals in marksmanship and bayonet practice. He was then transferred to Shenango Valley, Penn., for further training and left the States for overseas service in April, 1943.

He was shipped directly to new Caledonia, thence to the Fiji Islands, where he took an intensive medical course. Sgt. Hough was made first aid man for his company and was not only fitted to aid wounded soldiers but was a skilled infantryman in the front lines as well. As a member of Co. A. 132nd Infantry in the American Division, he began fighting at Gualacanal and was in the front lines through the invasion of Guam and other islands, as well as the long battle at Bougainvillea, with only five days relief.

From Bougainvillea his division moved to the Philippines and took part in the invasion of Luzon Island, where Manila is located. In this engagement he was wounded in one shoulder, it was later learned by his parents through friends. After recovering in a hospital from the wound, he was back in line with the infantrymen when they invaded Cebu Island.

Sgt. Hough was among the first four Americans to hit the sandy beach there. A later wave of our forces was nearly wiped out by the Japs. In this invasion which eventually cost his life, Bob wrote in a letter dated April 8 that the fighting had been fierce. In his last latter dated April 13, four days before his death he wrote he was O. K. but had been very busy and had little time to write; also that he had gotten the promised Jap helmet for David, a nephew.

During his service Bob was awarded the Good Conduct Medal, followed posthumously by the Purple Heart and Bronze Star. In every way he was a stalwart and brave soldier who never flinched, even under the most adverse conditions. As a first aid man in his company his first thought was for the comfort and safety of his buddies, "greater love hath no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends."

During all of his months in service he was thoughtful of the welfare of his loved ones and he sparred them, whenever possible, the anxiety of knowing when he was in hospitals in the States and overseas. He was a young man of sterling character and one of the county's finest youths.

Surviving him are his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hough of Coldwater; three brothers, Arthur Hough of Medicine Lodge, James Hough of Tehama, Calif., and Bill Hough of Coldwater; three sisters, Mrs. Clara Hisken of Tehama, Calif., Mrs. Edna May Webster of Protection, Kans., and Miss Joyce Hough of the home; six nephews and four nieces; also by many other relatives and a host of friends.


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Thanks to Shirley Brier for transcribing and contributing the above news articles!

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