George Herbert SPARLING / Beatrice Iva HORNER

George Herbert SPARLING / Beatrice Iva HORNER


Husband : George Herbert SPARLING

Male Born : 24 APR 1891at : Quebec
Married : 16 FEB 1916at :
Died : 26 SEP 1934at : Ferris, Ontario
Buried : at : Terrace Lawn Cemetery, North Bay, Nippissing, Ontario
Father : John Farrah SPARLING
Mother : Catherine SPARLING
Spouses : Beatrice Iva HORNER

  • REFERENCE: Sh 2 c v
Notes : [35]

Wife : Beatrice Iva HORNER

Female Born : 1894at : Quebec
Died : at :
Buried : at : Terrace Lawn Cemetery, North Bay, Nippissing, Ontario
Father :
Mother :
Spouses : George Herbert SPARLING

Family :
  • CENSUS: 1921, Caledonia, Weyburn, Saskatchewan

CHILDREN

Name : John George Mervyn SPARLING [1638]
Male Born : 03 JUN 1917at : Ogema, Saskatchewan
Married : at :
Died : 17 JAN 1944at : England
Spouses : Gladys Patricia Barbara ANDERSON

  • REFERENCE: Sh 2 c v (a)

Name : Clarence Wesley Albert SPARLING [1639]
Male Born : abt 1920at : Saskatchewan
Died : at :
Spouses :

  • REFERENCE: Sh 2 c v (b)

Name : Thomas SPARLING
Male Born : at :
Died : at :
Spouses :

  • REFERENCE: Sh 2 c v (c)

INDEX

[35] It Apperas that Herbert and Beatrice had at least one son:

SPARLING, JOHN GEORGE MERVYN

Rank: Sapper
Service No: B/11852
Date of Death: 17/01/1944
Age: 26
Regiment/Service: Royal Canadian Engineers
2 Rly. Operating Coy.
Grave Reference 44. B. 6.
Cemetery BROOKWOOD MILITARY CEMETERY

Additional Information: Son of Herbert and Beatrice Iva Sparling; husband of Gladys Patricia Barbara Sparling (nee Anderson), of Nipissing Junction, Ontario, Canada.

[1638] SPARLING, JOHN GEORGE MERVYN

Rank: Sapper
Service No: B/11852
Date of Death: 17/01/1944
Age: 26
Regiment/Service: Royal Canadian Engineers
2 Rly. Operating Coy.
Grave Reference 44. B. 6.
Cemetery BROOKWOOD MILITARY CEMETERY

Additional Information: Son of Herbert and Beatrice Iva Sparling; husband of Gladys Patricia Barbara Sparling (nee Anderson), of Nipissing Junction, Ontario, Canada.

[1639] Posted 15 March 2011 - 12:14 PM
Sgt Clarence Wesley Albert Sparling. Rear Gnr. RCAF Lancaster I ED357 PH-S, POW - Stalag Luft IV Sagan 12sqd

Shot down on Saturday, 12th June 1943. Only he and the mid upper gunner survived from a Lancaster crew of seven.

Airborne from Wickenby 2240hrs 11Jun43. Shot down by a night- fighter, crashing 2301hrs (suspect time) into the IJsselmeer in an area now known as the Oosteljik-Flevoland polder, near Dronten. Of those who died, four are buried in the New Eastern Cemetery at Amsterdam, but Sgt Bowes, who was killed during the combat, has no known grave. A propellor from this bomber now stands in front of the Town Hall at Dronten where an Air Gunners Parade is held each year. Sgt D.McN Thomson RAAF KIA Sgt J.L.Osborne KIA Sgt K.Bowes KIA Sgt W.M.Ward KIA Sgt D.N.Campbell KIA Sgt W.T.Pingle RCAF PoW Sgt C.W.A.Sparling RCAF PoW Sgt W.T.Pingle was interned in Camps L6/357, PoW No.227. Promoted to WO2 during captivity. Sgt C.W.A.Sparling in Camps L6/L4, Pow No.254.


http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTD63bQtKdMvCvxLCyoafdEU5rWWQtu5vb0T438z10a3wFEEL4jGw

ED357 Crash site. Oost-Flevorland.
Lat.52.33N
Long.05.405

Narrative by Sgt W.T. Pingle Mid-Upper Gunner of 12/S.
This was a night full of incredible luck for myself and the Rear Gunner, another Canadian, Sgt Clarence Sparling. My first piece of luck was one of the ground crew telling me that my parachute harness was loose, and giving me a hand to tighten it up. I would have had quite a shock when I jumped.
We took off from Wickenby, had no problems en route to the target, and delivered our load. Leaving the target, a Starboard engine caught fire. This was successfully extinguished and we proceeded on our way home. After some time the pilot Danny Thomson found that he could not maintain height and decided to return at a lower level.
As we reduced height all hell let loose. A night fighter raked us from in front of my turret to the front of the aircraft. The front of the aircraft was in flames and someone said, "Get the hell out". I climbed down from my turret and opened the rear door.
I then went to check on Sparling in the rear turret and found that he was jammed in. I got the doors open, and as I pulled and he pushed, he came free and out of the turret. We stood putting our chutes on when someone came running from the front of the aircraft, past us and out of the open door. We talked it over later and don't remember seeing a chute on him. We then went to the door and jumped. The side of the aircraft was on fire, and I could see the burning aircraft going away from me after my chute had opened.
I floated down to what I thought was a sandy beach. What a shock when the sand turned out to be water, and not having released my harness the shroud lines wrapped around my legs. I inflated my Mae West and tried to reach my knife to cut the lines. It was out of reach. I don't know how long I was in the water. I was concentrating all my energy on staying afloat and keeping my head above water. Just when I was having a hard time keeping afloat I heard someone calling. As the voices got closer I could see a tug with barges on the back of it. They threw me a line and hauled me on board. They must have seen the aircraft coming down.
They were Dutch, and they took me down to the cabin and gave me a couple of good shots of schnapps to warm me up. There were two women, two children, an old man, and a younger man who seemed to be in charge. None of them could speak English and I could not speak Dutch. I can't understand to this day how I made them understand that there might be more of us in the water.
When daylight came they unhooked the barges and took the tug to make a sweep of the area. After quite a long time they were ready to give up and return to the barges. We saw gulls diving on something in the water and as we got closer saw Sparling in the water. As we pulled him out of the water his first words were "God am I glad to see you, I was just about ready to give up". For some time he had had to blow the Mae West up by mouth. They then went back, hooked the tug to the barges and took us to Amsterdam harbour and handed us over to the Germans.
For the next two years I was in East Prussia, Poland and Germany
The propeller from ED357 was recovered from a farmers field when they were draining the Zuider Zee. It was erected by the town of Dronten Holland as a monument to all Allied Air Crew. A service is held there every year on May 5th, the anniversary date of the end of the war in Holland. The Air Gunners Association have three bus loads every year to attend the ceremony, and I always send flowers to be placed on the monument at the service. I have returned to Dronten twice. Once in 1980 and for a month last year. Danny Thomson, Campbell Ward, and Osborne are buried at the Nuo Cemetary in Amsterdam. Ken Bowes was never found.
Clarence Sparling died of cancer in 1974 at North Bay Ontario. The crew have all had streets named after them in Dronten. LANCASTERDREEF, THOMSONSTRAAT, BOWESHOF, WARDHOF, OSBORNEHOF, CAMPBELLHOF, SPARLINGHOF, PINGLESTRAAT.
Bill Pingle. March 1991

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