bio_jkl
Muscatine County and Vicinity
Biographical Sketches
Surnames J-K-L
JACKSON, Alexander,  retired; is a native of Scotland, and  was born May 9, 1818; when 17 years of age, he came to America, in 1835, and went to Albany and learned the trade of harness-maker; he came to Iowa in 1839, but did not remain; he came to Muscatine and settled permanently in the spring of 1843, and began working at his trade; he continued in the harness business for fifteen years; since then he has held the position of Secretary and Treasurer of the Gas Company, and had the active management of the business until within the past
eighteen months; he has held town and school offices, and is the only survivor of the original Directors of the Muscatine National Bank; Mr. Jackson built the house where he now lives, on the corner of Spruce and Second streets, over thirty years ago; people then wondered why he went so far in the country to build his house. He married Lucy Ann Daily, from Chillicothe, Ohio, Jan. 8, 1845; they have had five children; three survive--Mary, Lucy and Frank.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879


JACKSON, Peter,  retired; one of the oldest settlers in Muscatine, and the senior bank officer in the city; he is a native of Scotland, and was born April 30, 1816; he grew up to manhood there, and emigrated to America in 1837; after spending the summer in New York. he came to Muscatine, Iowa, in the summer of 1838, bought a lot and arranged to locate here; in March, 1839, he came here and settled permanently, and entered the store of Adam Ogilvie, as a clerk, in the winter of 1840--41; he became interested with Mr. Ogilvie in the mercantile business; they also engaged in packing pork, and packed the first pork in this section of the state; in 1845, Mr. Ogilvie retired from the firm, and Mr. Jackson continued the business until the spring of 1856, when he retired from the mercantile business. In the spring of 1865, he with several others, organized the Merchants' Exchange Bank; in the following November, the bank was organized under the National system, and Mr. Jackson was elected the first President; he was elected Cashier, and held that position for fourteen years, until January, 1879, when he retired from the active management of the bank. He is Secretary of the Old Settlers' Association. Mr. Jackson married Miss C. Sinclair, a native of Canada, in 1857; they have three children--Douglas V., Charles P. and Anna M.  Mr. Jackson has one son, George B., by a former wife.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



JACOBS, J.P., (of J.P. Jacobs & Son), farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 29; P.O. Garrison; was born in Dover, N.H., Dec. 25, 1821; came to this county in March, 1865; has 160 acres of land, valued at  $5,000. Has held the office of Town Trustee for seven years. Belongs to the Friends' Church.

For the first wife, married Mariah W. Clow; she was born in Brunswick, Me., by her he had four  children-Mary S., I. Orland, Anna M. and Abbie S. For his second wife, married Naoma A. Elliott; she was born in Brunswick, Me., Nov. 5, 1828. Mrs. Jacobs was married to J. Smith, by whom she had three children-James W., Nellie M. and Katie A.

Emigrated from New Hampshire to Maine, where he spent the greater part of his life; thence to Muscatine Co., Iowa, in 1863; lived there until  he came to Benton Co., where he has followed farming and fine stock raising. Mr. Jacobs has on  hand fifteen head of full-blooded Jerseys; had an offer for the herd of $100 per head; has cows valued at $200; also has some full-blooded Poland-China pigs, which he has demand for all over the  Northwest. Any one wanting good stock, will do well to call on him. Can give pedigree of his whole herd, which consists of and can be found on A.J. Herd's book: Lady Annie, No. 1055; Jersey Bell, No. 1021; Lizzie, No. 1485; Rose of Sharon, No. 1483; Maud, No. 1484; Sylvia, No. 2385; Fawn, No. 2746; Lady Alice, No. 1054; Macon, No. 1043. Has some of the best Jerseys in the State for size and  blood.

Source:  History of Benton County, Iowa 1878



JACOBS,  Silas W. , farmer and stock-breeder, Sec. 7; P. O. West Liberty; born in Washington Co., Vt., in 1830; came to Iowa in 1857, and located in Cedar Co.; removed to his present farm in 1862. Married Martha Carpenter in 1851; she was born in Washington Co., Vt, in 1836; have three children--Edwin, Mary and Whitman. Are members of the Christian Church; Democrat.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



JAMES, Gad,  farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. West Liberty; was born in Carmarthenshire, Wales, in 1835; emigrated to the United States in 1852, settling first in New York, where he resided one year, removed thence to Illinois, and, in1853, to Iowa, where he has since resided with the exception of two years (from 1864 to 1866 ), when he was in Montana engaged in mining; he returned to Iowa the fall of 1866, and married Miss Harriet Kiles, a native of Allen Co., Ind.; they have six children--- George E., Curtis W., May, Edwin, Bertha, and Jessie. Mr. J. is engaged in the improvement of fine short-horn cattle, has some very fine registered stock. Is a stanch Republican.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



JAMISON, Thomas William county surveyor of Jackson County. Ark., and farmer of Bird Township, was born in Buckingham. Canada East, the youngest of six children born to Thomas and Clara (Hall)  Jamison. natives of Scotland and Ireland, respectively, who came with their parents to Canada, and there married. The father was a farmer, and, in 1859, when our subject was about seven years old, removed to Woodford County. Ill., and settled near Minonk, returning to Canada in 1876, where he died  in 1884. His wife died in Canada in 1852.

The subject of our sketch was raised on a farm near Minonk, receiving his education in the district schools of that county. and in Minonk. After leaving school he learned telegraphy at La Salle, Ill., and engaged in that business at Colona, Ill., Columbus Junction and West Liberty. Iowa. on the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway.

On May 11, 1882, he married Clara Lafferty. a native of Mercer County, Ill., and daughter of William Lafferty, of Ohio. an early settler of Mercer County. In September. 1879. he came to Jackson County. as agent and operator at Tuckerman. where he remained till last year. when he was elected county surveyor. He is not very active in polities. but votes with the Democratic party. He is a member of Trinity Lodge No. 561, A. F. & A. M., Monmouth. Ill. He has bought a tract of timber land. containing 120 acres, improved, and now has seventy-three acres under cultivation. He has been engaged in stock raising. He has imported a thoroughbred stallion. also a heavy-draft Clydesdale, which carried off the first prize at this and adjoining county fairs. He is public-spirited and liberal.

Source:  Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Northeast Arkansas-Jackson County



JARVIS, George F., farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Muscatine; was born in Ashtabula Co., Ohio, in 1836; he emigrated to Fulton Co., Ill.,  with his parents in 1837, thence to LaSalle Co., and, in the fall of 1865, Mr. J. settled in Muscatine Co., where he still remains. Mr. J. married Miss Adeline B. Holcomb in 1867; they have one child--Albert Nelson. Members of the M. E. Church of the Island.   Mr. J. has a fine farm of eighty acres. Democrat.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



JEAN, J. T. farmer, Sec. 8; P.O. Conesville; owns 255 acres of land, valued at $25 per acre; born Feb. 16, 1820. in Clermont Co., Ohio; in 1823, his parents moved to Union Co., Ind.; in the spring of 1838, emigrated with parents to this county, locating in Cedar Tp.; there were then no settlers in what is now Orono Tp.; in the spring of 1851, he crossed the plains to California; following December, started for home on a sailing vessel; when they were out about five hundred miles, were overtaken by a heavy gale, compelling the officers to cut away the masts, after which a leak sprung and the vessel was kept up by the pumps and buckets used by about seventy-five persons for forty-eight hours, when they made a port in Southern California; another vessel was chartered and again had to come to land, and traveled across the country in Central America to Lake Nicqragua River to the Gulf, where he again shipped for home; in the spring of 1852, came on to his present farm.  Married Melissa A. Shellabarger, of Ohio, Sept. 27, 1848; she was born May 12, 1830, in Montgomery Co., Ohio; have five children living--Thomas M., Laura M., Sarah S., Joseph E., Ulysses A. and Alta M.   Mr. Jean's father, Joseph Jean, died Dec. 3, 1870, and mother Nov. 8, 1853; wife's parents came to this county in 1846; her father died November, 1876, and mother Dec. 14, 1864.  Greenbacker.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879 page 642-643 Orono Twp.



JESTER, J.B., farmer, Sec. 35; P.O. Sweetland Center; born in Brooke Co., Va., June 26, 1833; went to Texas in 1859; remained eighteen months; returned to Virginia and enlisted in the 12th Regiment Va. V.I., Co. K; was elected First Lieutenant and afterward appointed Captain; was in the battles at WInchester, June 14-16, 1863; New Market, May 15, 1864; Piedmont, June 5, 1864; Lynchburg, June 18, 1864; Snicker's Gap, July 18, 1864; Winchester, July 24, 1864; Berryville, Sept. 19, 1864, Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864; Pittsburg, April 1,2,3, 18655, and Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865; came to Muscatine Co., 1865.  Married Miss Elizabeth Palmer March 16, 1864; born in Fayette Co., Penn; born Aug. 10, 1837; have two daughters--Carrie and Lucy B.  Members of the M.E. Church; Mr. Jester has held the Assessor's office five years. Republican.

Source: THE HISTORY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY IOWA Containing A History of the County, its Cities,  Towns, & etc. Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879 page 637



JEWETT, R. C.- Sheriff of Muscatine Co.; was born in the city of Buffalo, N. Y., Feb. 27, 1834; while very young, his parents removed to Portsmouth, Ohio, where both died in 1849; he came to Iowa in 1850, to Muscatine, when 16 tears of age; he learned the cooper's trade; after following the business for a time, he engaged in farming and continued from 1856 to 1876.   He was elected Sheriff of the county in the fall of 1875, and was re-elected in the fall of 1877; he has also held town and school offices. He married Miss Sarah H. Parry, of Delaware, May 5, 1859; they have four children---Ida, Viola, Adah and Milford.

Source: THE HISTORY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY IOWA Containing A History of the County, its Cities,  Towns, & etc. Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



JOHNSON, A., far., Sec 14; P.O. Wolcott, Scott Co.; born in Ireland April 1, 1829; emigrated to Delaware in 1845; thence to Mercer Co., Penn., in 1847; in 1851, came to Scott Co.;  to Muscatine in 1852; went to California in 1853; returned in 1855, to Fulton Tp., where he has remained ever since.  Sept. 26, 1856, married Miss Nancy A. Pursell, born in Indiana April 8, 1839; have ten children--James S., George T., Stephen, Mary Rosa, Ellery, Carrie, Catherine, Frank, Robert and Manda, deceased.  Mrs. Johnson is a member of the M. E. church; Mr. J. is a Democrat.

Source: THE HISTORY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY IOWA Containing A History of the County, its Cities,
                Towns, & etc. Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879 Fulton Twp.



JOHNSON, D.B., farmer, Sec. 18; P.O. Muscatine; born in Hillsborough Co., N.H., June 25, 1812; removed to Muscatine Co. in the spring of 1854, and settled where he now resides.  Married Miss Lydia F. Miller in 1839; she was born in Strafford Co., N.H.; they have five children--A., Phoebe E., Levi D., Lydia M., Rosina L., and two deceased; Mrs. J. died Feb. 25, 1876; married again Mrs. Judith Fry, 1877; she was born in Hillsborough Co, N.H., 1808.  Mr. and Mrs. J. are members of the Friends' Church.  Mr. J. is a Republican.

Source: THE HISTORY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY IOWA Containing A History of the County, its Cities,
                Towns, & etc. Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879 Sweetland Twp.



JONES, GEORGE W.
By undaunted perseverance George W. Jones overcame many obstacles and today is the owner of a farm in Cedar township, Muscatine county, that promises to make him independent for the remainder of his day. In attaining the fortunate condition he has now reached, Mr. Jones climbed from the bottom of the ladder. He was fearless and self-reliant, difficulties only serving to nerve him to renew the effort. He is a native of Montgomery county, Ohio, born November 29, 1867, and is a son of Henry and Theresa (Wagner) Jones. The father was a native of Pennsylvania, and the mother of Ohio. The former departed this life January 12, 1884, and the latter five years later, March 27, 1889. There were eight children in their family, five of whom are now living, our subject being the youngest. The others are Lottie, now living in Ohio; Clara, the wife of Daniel Bodeker, of Dayton, Ohio; Laura, now Mrs. Clay Crow, of Fullerton, California; and Edith, the wife of Charles Campbell, also of Fullerton.

George W. Jones received the rudiments of an education in the common schools of his native state, to which he has largely added by observation and experience. He remained at home until he was twenty-one years of age and then began working in a boiler shop, where he continued for six years. In 1892 he decided to seek his fortune in the west and accordingly came to Iowa, where he worked for several years as a farm hand. Having acquired a good knowledge of agriculture and stock-raising, he rented land for one year and in 1900 purchased the place on which he now lives. It comprises eighty-four acres, all of which is well improved, and the air of prosperity and order that prevails about the farm indicates that its owner gives close attention to his business.

On the 1st of December, 1897, Mr. Jones was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Verink, who was born in Cedar township, Muscatine county, September 11, 1862. She is the daughter of Maness and Clara (Narvis) Verink, both natives of Holland. They came to American in childhood with their respective parents who settled permanently in Muscatine county, Iowa. Here the young people grew up and were married, establishing their home in Cedar township. The mother passed away in 1899, but the father is still living on the home farm. Their family circle comprised ten children, four of whom are now living, namely: Mrs. William Freers, of Muscatine; J.A., also of Muscatine; Mrs. Seneca Finn, of Shenandoah, Iowa; and Sarah, now Mrs. Jones. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Jones, the eldest of whom, Clifford, died in infancy. Merrill A., the second in order of birth, was born August 7, 1901; and Floyd Vernon, was born July 13, 1905. Mrs. Jones is a woman of good education, having received her mental training not only in the public schools but in the business college at Muscatine.

Mr. Jones gives his adherence to the republican party and for two years served as a member of the school board. Fraternally he is identified with the camp of the Modern Woodmen of America at Letts, Iowa. He and his family are connected with the Christian church and are stanch upholders of its teachings. Throughout his career, Mr. Jones has been recognized as a man of unimpeachable integrity and one who was always to be depended upon to assist in any worthy enterprise aiming to advance the general welfare. Having made good use of his opportunities, he is a striking example of the application of industry to worthy ends, and it is scarcely necessary to add that he has the respect of a large circle of friends and acquaintances.

HISTORY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY
Posted by Rachelle Curtis


JONES, I.W., farmer and one of the proprietors of the Ricketts' Addition to the town called Orono; P.O. Conesville; son of Joshua and Mary J. Jones; born Dec. 7, 1843, in Coshocton Co., Ohio; in the fall of 1855, came to Pike Tp., of this county, and to Orono Tp, in the spring of 1871.  Married Martha J. Ricketts, daughter of Hezekiah W. and Cecelia Ricketts, April 16, 1868; she was born Nov. 1, 1849, in Coshocton Co., Ohio; her father came to this county in the fall of1852 and entered from the Government 320 acres of land, embracing the land on the west side of Main street; he subsequently sold eighty acres, now owned by Mr. Tipton;  Mr. Ricketts died July 28, 1857, leaving his wife and three children heirs to his estate---Mrs. Jones, Byron A. and Robinson F; Mr. A.L. Bliven was appointed guardian for the boys; Messrs. E. Younkin, John Haines and George Bomgardner were appointed as Commissioners to divide the estate, eighty acres being set off for the widow as hers during her life, after which, it is to revert to the heirs; sixteen acres were laid off in town lots in the fall of 1870 as an addition to the town and called Orono, the balance of 144 acres was divided between the children, Byron A., a dentist in Clinton, Iowa, and Robinson F., a telegraph operator.  The widow Ricketts was again married to John Barrett in 1864.  The children of Mr. and Mrs. Jones are: Eva, born Aug 2, 1870; Albert W., Nov. 2, 1874, and Nellie, Feb. 14, 1877.  Mr. J. is a member of the Reformed Church; Greenbacker.

Source: THE HISTORY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY IOWA Containing A History of the County, its Cities,
                Towns, & etc. Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879 page 643, Orono Twp



JONES, Samuel M., painter, stencil-cutter, etc., Atalissa; son of William A. and Rachel Jones; born Sept. 4, 1844, in Jackson Co., Ind.; parents moved to Fulton Co., Ill., in 1845, and to Henry Co in 1849, and in the spring of 1852, came to Muscatine Co., Iowa, locating in Goshen Tp., where his father died Sept. 11, 1859, and mother May 6, 1866; is the second son of a family of eight children, four of whom are deceased. Mr. Jones has no family, consequently travels some, which he has done to some extent through Illinois, Iowa and Missouri, still making his home at Atalissa. Politics, Republican.

Source: THE HISTORY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY IOWA Containing A History of the County, its Cities,
                Towns, & etc. Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



JONES, William T., farmer and Township Assessor, Sec. 24; P. O. Atalissa; son of Abner and Caroline Jones; born in this township May 1, 1850; parents came from Highland Co., Ohio, in the fall of 1847; mother died May 2, 1869; and father Oct. 17, 1876; his father commenced the mercantile business in Atalissa the fall of 1855, which he continued till 1873. Married Amanda Lamb January 8, 1873; she was born July 23, 1850, in Harrison Co., Ohio; have three children---Abner T., Leonard E. and Charles H; Mr. J. has served his township as Township Clerk, Trustee and Assessor, of which office he is the present incumbent. Republican.

Source: THE HISTORY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY IOWA Containing A History of the County, its Cities,
                Towns, & etc. Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879


K
KEISLER, Josiah, retired farmer, West Liberty; born in Westmoreland Co., Penn., on the 15th of April, 1802; He            married Mary Register in 1826; she also was a native of Pennsylvania; she died in 1867; they had twelve children, six are now living---Hannah, Thomas, Mary, Ruth, Sarah and Elvira. Mr. K. married again in 1867, to Alvira Andrews; she was born in Indiana.

Source: THE HISTORY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY IOWA Containing A History of the County, its Cities,
                Towns, & etc. Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



KELLEY, WILLIAM, far., Sec 17; P.O. Stockton; born in Baltimore Co., Md., Aug. 12, 1808; in 1830, removed to Holmes Co., Ohio; thence to Muscatine Co. in 1867, and settled where he now resides; has seven children--Ruth A. (now Mrs. Aultman), Elizabeth (now Mrs. McGarvey), Prudence (now Mrs. Coyle), Sarah E. (now Mrs. McGarvey), Samuel G., James B., Amanda J., and five dead--Lovelace W., died in the army; William S., wounded at the battle of Stone River, and died from the effects; Thomas A., wounded at the battle of Vicksburg and died of his wounds; Columbus and John G.  Members of the U.B. Church.  Mr. K. was on survey of the first railroad in the United States.

Source: THE HISTORY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY IOWA Containing A History of the County, its Cities,
                Towns, & etc. Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879 Fulton Twp



KELLY, John Charles, the well-known editor of the Sioux City Daily Tribune, is a native of the “Empire State.” He was born in Cortland, N. Y., on the 26th of February, 1852. His mother's maiden name was Mary Kelly, and his father's name was Thomas C. Kelly, but they were of different families and types,  although both were natives of Ireland, and well educated in youth. His grandfather on his father's side, was a business man, and on the mother's side a farmer. John C.'s grandmother, on his mother's side,  was a Scotch woman. His father's education was completed at the University of Edinburgh, after which  he spent some years in travel. Two of his father's brothers held commissions in the British army, but  Thomas was educated for civil life, and came to the United States in December, 1849. His wife's people were farmers, in the state of New York, and he engaged in the same occupation soon after he reached America. Upon the opening of the civil war, and in response to President Lincoln's first call for volunteers, Thomas C. tendered his services to his adopted country, and, raising a segment of a company, received a lieutenant's commission. He had become a citizen of the republic as soon as its laws permitted, and took a deep interest in public affairs, allying himself with the Douglas wing  of the democratic party. When his father entered the union army, John C. was not 10 years old, and, although a mere schoolboy, he undertook to manage his father's large farm, but soon found it too formidable an undertaking for a youth of his years. His education, up to this time, had been such only as the country district schools afforded. But the instruction given by his father at home was found in after life to be of more practical value than that imparted at school. John had a strong desire to get into the union army in some capacity, and went on to Washington in 1862, arriving in the city in time to witness “McClellan's Grand Review,” but his youth thwarted this desire. During the war he had but two  short terms at school, and after its close he had three months' instruction in a grammar school in Washington. His father was disabled during the war, and the boy found himself the chief support of the family, whose fortunes had been wrecked. He secured employment in stores at the national capital,  and spent the late evenings, generally up till midnight, in study. Under this strain he finally broke down.

In December, 1869, his father died, and soon after John secured a position in the government printing  office, where it was thought his health might be recruited. He made such progress in acquiring a knowledge of the art of printing, stereotyping and electrotyping that, while he had yet a year of the  prescribed apprenticeship unserved, he was chosen by Mills & Company, then state printers, at Des Moines, Iowa, to purchase a plant for them, and to come on to the state capital and superintend it. On the 23d of May, 1873, John C. Kelly, then 21 years of age, crossed the Mississippi river, came to Des Moines and entered upon the responsible duties of his new position at a salary of $30 a week. He served more than three years with Mills & Company, and has ever since reckoned the surviving  members of the firm among his best friends. While in their employ he divided and numbered the  streets of Des Moines on the “Philadelphia plan,” it being the first city in Iowa so divided. Mr. Kelly was the pioneer in organizing the first Building association in Iowa. It was established by him at Des  Moines, and he became its secretary. Associated with him in the directory were such men as T. S.  Wright, Adam Howell and L. Harbach.

In Des Moines Mr. Kelly first met Miss Martha A. Hill, daughter of Col. S. G. Hill, of the Thirty-fifth Iowa infantry, who was killed while leading his regiment at the battle of Nashville. Miss Hill and Mr. Kelly were married at the home of her mother in Muscatine, May 1,  1878. It was a very happy union, and seven children came to make the home an ideal one. Of these,  Martha died, while Rose, Mabel, Rachel, John H., Eugene and Gardner are living. Mr. Kelly read law, while living in Des Moines, with Judge William Connor, and also engaged in merchandising, but eventually purchased an interest in the Daily State Leader, of which he became one of the editors. Three years later he disposed of his interest in that paper, and, removing to Sioux City, he purchased the weekly Tribune of that place. In 1884 he established the Sioux City Daily Tribune, of which he is editor and proprietor. During the same year he established the Sioux City Printing company, which has grown into a large manufacturing establishment, dealing in printers' supplies, and doing auxiliary publishing, of which enterprise he is the principal owner and general manager.

In 1893 he was appointed collector of internal revenue by President Cleveland, and also disbursing agent of the    treasury department. Mr. Kelly was always a “hard-money” man,  and is an advocate of the single gold standard. He was a member of the first free trade or tariff reform club organized after the war. He has for many years been a member of the Reform club, of New York, and a warm advocate of civil service reform. He was a delegate at large to the democratic national convention of 1888, which nominated Cleveland and Thurman. In 1892 Mr. Kelly supported Governor Boies, in the national democratic convention, as a candidate for president. In 1896 he refused to support Bryan for president on the “free coinage” platform, and was a delegate to the national democratic convention which nominated Palmer and Buckner. He has served on the committee on resolutions in ten democratic state conventions.

He is not a member of any fraternity or church, but since his marriage has, with his wife, attended the Congregational church. He was for many years president of the Humane society, of Sioux City.

Source:  Biographies and Portraits of the Progressive Men of Iowa. Gue, B.F. Des Moines: Conaway & Shaw Publishers, 1899.  page 465-466



KEMPER, Bernhard - farmer and gardener, South Muscatine; was born in Prussia in 1830; emigrated to Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1848; thence to Muscatine in 1854. He married in this city Miss Elizabeth Loreaux, a native of Jefferson Co., Ohio, born in 1837; they were married April 29, 1856; their children are Clara A., George H., Edward B., William, Frederick, Benjamin F., Audley, John, Frank, Oliver, Clinton, Cora Ella, Daisy May.  Mr. Kemper       owns a valuable property in South Muscatine; his garden is one of the finest in the vicinity of Muscatine.



KEMPER, Henry, farmer, Sec. 16, P.O. Fairport; was born in Lippe-Detmold, Prussia, in 1821; emigrated to this country in 1847; located in Cincinnati, Ohio; remained for eight years and married Miss Charlotte Vinyard, of that city; in 1855, they removed thence to Iowa, locating on the farm upon which they now reside, consisting of 365 acres, upon which he has put in the principal improvements.  They have seven children--John, Henry, Charley, George, Eddie, August and Louisa.  Mrs. K. is a native of Prussia and the same city as her husband.  Members of the M.E. Church.  Mr. K. is a stone mason by trade, which he followed prior to coming West; since he has followed farming;  Republican.

Source: The History of Muscatine County, Iowa;  Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
              Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



KERN, FRED

One by one the soldiers of the Civil war have answered the last roll call. They have bivouaced on the other side of the river when their last march was completed, but history remains to tell the story of their bravery and their loyalty. Among those that Iowa sent to the country's defense when rebellion threatened the destruction of the Union Fred Kern was numbered. He was equally faithful to his duties of citizenship in days of peace and Cedar Rapids numbered him among her representative and valued residents.  He was a native of Switzerland, born on the 22d of May, 1849, but was only two  years of age when his parents left the land of the Alps and crossed the Atlantic to  the new world, settling at Muscatine, Iowa. There he was educated in the public  schools and spent his youthful days. When a young man he entered the steamship  service on the lower Mississippi river and devoted several years thereto, but after the outbreak of the Civil war he returned to the north to enlist with the Iowa  troops, who were marching to the front in defense of the old flag. He joined Company E, of the Sixteenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, one of the regiments  composing the famous Crocker Iowa Brigade, participating in many hotly contested  battles and in all of the marches and movements in which his regiment took part.  When the country no longer needed his aid, victory having crowned the Union arms, he returned to the north and established his home in Sigourney, Iowa, where he engaged in business for a few years.

In 1886 Mr. Kern removed to Cedar Rapids, where he established a bakery. His  place on Second street was one of the best known in the city and he prospered in  his undertakings, securing an extensive and gratifying trade. He held to a high standard of excellence in his output and his reasonable prices and thoroughly reliable dealing were also elements in his success. As he prospered with the passing of the years he made investment in real estate until he became one of the  large property owners of the city.

Mr. Kern was married in Mount Pleasant, Iowa, in 1877, to Miss Katherine Nevin, whose brother, John Nevin, was for a number of years associated in business with  Mr. Kern in Cedar Rapids. Her father, Edward Nevin, was a native of Ireland. Unto  Mr. and Mrs. Kern were born two sons, George H. and Fred E., who still survive the  father, whose death occurred on the 6th of February, 1899, at San Diego,  California, where he had spent the winters for several years.

In his political views Mr. Kern was ever a stalwart republican, espousing the cause of the party which was formed to prevent the further extension of slavery and  which proved the defense of the Union during the dark days of the Civil war. He  was a very prominent and popular member of the Knights of Pythias fraternity and maintained pleasant relations with his old army comrades through his membership in the Grand Army of the Republic. During the thirteen years of his residence in  Cedar Rapids he made for himself a leading and creditable position in business  circles, and his social qualities, too, won him many friends. In his life he manifested  many of the sterling traits of his Swiss ancestry -- a people whose bravery, courage  and determination seems to partake of the ruggedness and of the strength of the  mountains among which they were reared.

History of Linn County Iowa from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time: 1911,  Volume II.



KERR, I.A. carpenter and builder, corner Second and Mulberry streets; was born in Venango Co., Penn., March 29, 1840; he was brought up there and began learning the trade of carpenter and joiner; after completing his trade, he worked in different places until coming to Muscatine in 1875; since then, he has been engaged in building here. He married Miss Barbara Montreal, of this city, Oct. 11, 1877.

Source: The History of Muscatine County, Iowa;  Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
              Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



KESSLER, C. F. , dealer in groceries and produce, corner of Fifth and Mulberry streets; Mr. Kessler was born in the Province of Westphalia, Prussia, in 1833; emigrated to Philadelphia, Penn., in 1850; thence to Washington, D. C., in 1851. In 1853, he came to Muscatine; in 1858, engaged in his present business. He married Miss A. N. Gehring in this city in 1854; they have two children--Daniel and Frank P. In 1865, Mr. Kessler was elected a member of the City Council and held the office two years; was Township Clerk two years. He belongs to the Masonic Order; is a Democrat. As a business man and financier, Mr. Kessler is eminently successful; he has acquired a good name in the community and is a public spirited citizen, active in all progress,  and esteemed as a business man, citizen and neighbor.

Source: The History of Muscatine County, Iowa;  Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
              Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



KIEF, Mathias; far., sec. 13; P. O. Muscatine; born in Baden, Germany, March 2, 1830; came to Muscatine Co. in 1855.  Enlisted in 1st Regiment I. V. I., and served time out; then enlisted in 11th I. V. I., Co. I, and served till the close of the war;  was in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth and Atlanta, where he was wounded; and was in all the battles of that regiment. Married Mrs. Amarintha Huber in 1865; born in Baden, Germany, Jan. 22, 1821; she has two children by former husband Joseph, born Dec. 8, 1851; John, born May 30, 1861. Mr. Kief owns 120 acres of land, and is a member of the Catholic Church; Republican.

Source: The History of Muscatine County, Iowa;  Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
              Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879 Lake Twp



KIMBALL, JOHN FREDERICK of the banking firm of Kimball & Champ, was born at Muscatine, Iowa, Dec 13, 1856, son of Alvin and Susan A. (Patrick) Kimball and the youngest of their four children, the others being George A., Emma J. and J. Frank. His father was born in 1813, near Windsor, Vermont. In 1840 he emigrated  to Ohio with his family and engaged in the wholesale grocery trade at Cleveland. In 1853 he moved to Muscatine, Iowa and engaged in the grain business, erecting an elevator and having a large trade; but the financial crisis of 1857 caused him great loss. He persevered in his business, however, and did well to the time of his death, April 17, 1865. Politically he was a prominent Abolitionist, devoting both time and money to the relief of oppressed and fugitive slaves. He took an active interest in all that pertained to the moral welfare and    material development of the community, and was respected by all parties. The mother of the subject of this sketch was born at Brownsville, Jefferson Co, NY, in 1822. She was a devoted wife and mother, is a useful member of the Baptist Church and of good society generally, now living in Minneapolis.

Mr. Kimball, our subject, was but 8 years of age when his father died, and he was trained by his mother, who gave him all the advantages at her command, which however, were limited. He completed his school education at Brown's Academy. In 1879 while on a tour through the West looking for a business location, he became acquainted with his present partner, George H. Champ, and in company with him bought out the abstract business of J.P. and J.N. Casady. To this they afterward added the business of money lending, which under their equitable, conservative and skillful management, at length grew to large proportions, and in 1888 they added banking; and in this line too their operations have become extensive. Their bank has taken rank among the leading financial institutions of the city and even of western Iowa, eastern Nebraska, etc. Mr. Kimball is also a member of the firm of Kimball, Champ & Ryan, bond brokers in Omaha, and he owns a half interest in the Bank of Minden at Minden, Iowa. He also owns considerable land in Council Bluffs and elsewhere in the State.

Politically he is a Republican, but has no aspirations for official position, preferring the seclusion of private life to  public honor. He is a gentleman of modest and retiring manner, a shrewd businessman and financier, being    deservedly a favorite among all classes. He is public spirited and genial in disposition. The people of the city
point with pride to the elegant structures erected by Messrs. Kimball & Champ. One of these, the Grand  Central Hotel, is acknowledged to be the finest building of the kind in the state.

November 30, 1884, he married  Miss Louise Greene, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and a daughter of William and Louisa (Higley) Greene. She was educated at Faribault, Minnesota, in a ladies' seminary under the auspices of the Protestant Episcopal Church and also at St. Mary's Seminary, another Episcopal institution.

Source :  Biographical History of Pottawattamie County, Iowa, The Lewis Publishing Company, 1891, p 416



KINCAID, Col. George W. deceased. The subject of this brief sketch was born in West Union, Adams Co., Ohio, April 24, 1812; at an early age, was apprenticed to learn the trade of tanner, and thus, from the very beginning, was thrown on his own resources. He married in Ohio Miss Lovisa Steinbergen; they removed to Muscatine Co., in 1836, thus becoming pioneer settlers of Iowa, though it is not as a pioneer Col. Kincaid was most distinguished and deserved most honor, but as a patriot, and at the breaking-out of the war of the rebellion, he was fired with sentiment which Walter Scott must have felt when he wrote those beautiful words;

"Breathes there a man with soul so dead,
 Who never to himself hath said
 This is my own my native land ?
 If such there breathes, go mark him well,
 For him no minstrel raptures swell;
 High though his titles, proud his name,
 Boundless his wealth as wish can claim,
 Despite those titles, power and pelf,
 This wretch concentered all in self,
 Living, shall forfeit fair renown,
 And doubly dying shall go down
 To the vile dust from which he sprung,
 Unwept, unhonored and unsung."

 At the beginning of the war of the rebellion, though past the legal age for military duty, Col. Kincaid's spirit could not be idle, and he spoke on every occasion with fervor and devotion of the Union. In 1862, he organized the 37th Regt. I. V. I. (generally Known as the Gray-Beards) of which regiment he was made Colonel, and served in that capacity until muster-out of the regiment at the expiration of three years' service. Though Col. Kincaid was never an aspirant for office, he exhibited a deep interest in politics; he was originally a Whig, but became a  Republican at the organization of that part, and remained a firm supporter of the same until his death, Oct. 19, 1876. He was a
consistent member of the M. E. Church.

Source: THE HISTORY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY IOWA Containing A History of the County, its Cities,
                Towns, & etc. Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879 



KINCAID, Mrs. Lavisa S (nee Steenbergen), farmer, Sec. 5; daughter of Charles Steenbergen; born in Pike Co, Ohio in 1819; niece of Hon. Robert Lucas, ex-Governor of Ohio, subsequently Governor of Iowa and Brigadier General in the War of 1812.  Both of her grandfathers fought through the Revolutionary war.  On the 16th of January, 1838, she married Mr. George W. Kincaid, a native of Ohio; born at West Union, Adams Co., April 24, 1811; son of Thomas Kincaid and Margaret (nee Hanna), natives of Pennsylvania and Martinsville, Va., and descendants of Revolutionary stock; both of his grandfathers fought through the war of Independence; his father, Thomas Kincaid, was aide-de-camp to Gen. Ludwick in the war of 1812-1815, and took part in the battle of the Thames about the date of the birth of his son.  George W. spent most of his boyhood in West Union; his father having been Sheriff of the county for twelve years, where he attended the public schools, and at the age of 14, was apprenticed to learn the tanning business at Piketon, Ohio, where, after serving his time, he engaged in business for some years;  in 1838, shortly after his marriage, he moved to La Fayette, Ind., where he was engaged as a contractor on the public works for a year; in 1839, removed to Iowa, settling in Muscatine Co., which was his home during the rest of his life; here he engaged in farming.  Notwithstanding the educational disadvantages under which he labored, he was a man of great intelligence and sound judgment, and soon took a leading position in the community.  He was a member of the first Constitutional Convention of Iowa, and also the first Commissioner of the State school fund, and was one of the Trustees, having charge of the erection of the Iowa Insane Asylum at Mount Pleasant during 1860-1862, and held many other offices of trust and responsibility during his long and eventful career.  He was not only a pioneer citizen of Muscatine, to whose interest he was always devoted, but he was emphatically a patriot, and loved his whole country; in politics, he had been a Whig; was a radical Republican, and ever an uncompromising foe to human slavery; he espoused the Union cause with all his heart,  and on every suitable occasion, spoke out with the fervor of a deep devotion to the cause of his country.  An incident published in the local papers at the tim, shows how he seized every opportunity to inspire enthusiasm and good humor in his patriotic work.  A public meeting was held at which a number of speeches were made, expressing the strongest allegiance to the "old flag."  One polished orator, with glowing and rounded periods, said he "was born under the "stars and stripes" and expected to die under them."  Col. Kincaid followed this speaker and said, "I, too, was born under the stars and stripes; I was born in a little log cabin in Ohio; the stars shone on me through the chinks between the logs and there was a striped quilt over me."  This speech brought down the house in uproarious applause, and tended to add to his popularity and influence.  But he was not satisfied with speaking; he wanted to do as well as say, and he conceived the idea of raising a regiment of "Grey-Beards, " to be composed of men, who, like himself, were past the legal age of military duty.  Accordingly, in 1862, he recruited what was afterward known as the 37th Iowa, or "Gray-Beard" Regiment, the recruits for which were  mainly drawn from the Hawkeye State, but many of them were citizens of Illinois and other adjacent States, which he commanded till the close of the war, in 1865.  The regiment was mainly engaged on garrison or guard duty, and in this capacity, rendered important service in taking the place of able-bodied troops, who were thereby placed at the front.  The regiment was first ordered to St. Louis; thence to the line of the Pacific Railroad, where they did guard duty for several months; from thence, it was transferred to Alton, Ill., and placed on guard over the rebel prisoners incarcerated at that place, where they remained for about a year; from thence, the command was transferred to Rock Island; in the spring of 1864, the Colonel, with his "Gray-Beards" was transferred to Memphis, Tenn., where, in command of the second brigade, district of West Tennessee, he took part in the battle on the 23d of August, 1864; from Memphis, the regiment was transferred to Indianapolis,  and thence to Cincinnati, where they were mustered out May 22, 1865.  As a soldier, Col. Kincaid was a stranger to fear; no braver man ever wore the uniform of his country.  As a commander, he was kind and indulgent to men whom he saw willing to do their duty, but stern and severe to refractory subordinates.  He was a man of rather striking appearance, being over six feet high, and of remarkable physical strength and endurance; was one of the pioneers of Iowa, and, like most men of that period, he began life low down, and by his own energy and industry accumulated a competency;  leaving his wife and family of three sonnies and two daughters, Joanna (now the wife of Mr. George Magoon, of Muscatine), Margaret Lavisa, Charles S, William M. and Warren E., a fine home and farm consisting of 500 acres, upon which Mrs. K., and that part of the family remaining at home reside, and which Col. K. improved  from a rough and crude state.  Mr. K. was for many years, a member of the M.E. Church, and was, through his life, a total abstainer and an indefatigable advocate of the cause of temperance.  As a husband and father, he was affectionate and indulgent, and was beloved and revered by his family.  He died at Muscatine, on the 19th of October, 1876, of typhoid pneumonia, in his 65th year.  Mrs. K. is a member of the M.E. Church, and beloved by all who know her.  She was one of a committee of three appointed by the Governor to visit and inspect the State Insane Asylum at Mout Pleasant and Independence, which office she has held for a number of years.

Source: THE HISTORY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY IOWA Containing A History of the County, its Cities,
                Towns, & etc. Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879 page 628-629



KINCAID, William, proprietor of meat market on Mulberry street, Muscatine; Mr. Kincaid was born in this county in 1846.  He married Miss Agnes Gordon, of Muscatine Co., in 1872; they have one child--Eliza G. Mr. Kincaid and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church; politically, he acts with the Republican party. Mr. Kincaid's father, George W. Kincaid, was  a native of Adams Co., Ohio; he married Miss Lovisa  Steinbergen, a native of the same State; they removed to this county in 1839; he organized and was made Colonel of the 37th I. V. I. (Gray-Beards) in 1862; he was mustered out at  Davenport, at the expiration of three years service. He died in 1876. She is a resident of this county.

Source: THE HISTORY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY IOWA Containing A History of the County, its Cities,
                Towns, & etc. Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879


KINSEY, William Medcalf, a Representative from Missouri; born in Mount Pleasant, Jefferson County, Ohio, October 28, 1846; attended Hopedale Academy, Harrison County, Ohio, and Monmouth College, Illinois; became a resident of Muscatine County, Iowa, in 1863; studied law in the University of Iowa at Iowa City in 1871; was admitted to the bar in 1872 and commenced practice in Muscatine County, Iowa, the same year; moved to St. Louis, Mo., in 1875 and engaged in the practice of law; elected as a Republican to the Fifty-first Congress (March 4, 1889-March 3, 1891); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1890 to the Fifty-second Congress; resumed the practice of law in St. Louis, Mo.; judge of the circuit court of the city of St. Louis 1904-1917; during the First World War was chairman of the draft examining board in Arondelet; voluntarily retired and resumed the practice of his profession; died in St. Louis, Mo., June 20, 1931; interment in Sunset Hill Burial Park, St. Louis County, Mo.

Source: Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1949, p. 1416


KIRCHNER, BERNARD
For fifty years Bernard Kirchner, deceased was a citizen of Muscatine County, assisting in an important degree in the development of its agricultural interests. At the the time of his death, November 27, 1906, he was the owner of five hundred acres of well improved land, which he had acquired through perseverance and energy. He won his way to success by the sterling characteristics of courage thrift, and industry, which are so prominent in the Teutonic race, of which he was a representative.

Born in Weimar, Saxony, Germany, Dec. 2, 1833, he was the son of Christian and Dorothy (Gepford) Kirchner, both of whom passed their entire lives in the fatherland. Mr. Kirchner came to America as a young man in 1852, and, after spending two years in New York, lived in Rock Island, Illinois, for a short time, and in 1855, began his career as a farmer in Muscatine County by renting land. Subsequently, he purchased one hundred and sixty acres in Pike Township, which he cultivated until 1873, when he came to Nichols and opened a mercantile establishment. He was highly successful both as a farmer and as a merchant, but in 1894 he retired to enjoy a well earned rest, his sons taking charge of the business. In addition to being the owner of a valuable farm and of a good business house, he was a stockholder of the Lone Tree Savings Bank, and as a man of high financial standing his advice was much sought after in matters of business by persons who desired to be guided aright. He had two brothers, both of whom are now deceased.

On December 23, 1863, Mr. Kirchner was united in marriage to Miss Charlotte Lenz, who was also a native of Germany, a daughter of Valentine and Barbara (GEIS) Lenz. The family came to America in 1856, and settled upon a farm in Muscatine County, which Mr. Lenz cultivated until the death of his wife, which occurred in 1874.

To Mr. and Mrs. Kirchner eight children were born, namely: Frederick H. of Lone Tree, Johnson County, Iowa who is married to and has one child; Elizabeth, the widow of William Bowen, who lived in What Cheer, Iowa, and of Nichols, and was called away October 20, 1910; Margaret, who is now the wife of Dr. Carl of Nichols, and has two children; Henry and Bernard A., both of whom are in the mercantile business at Nichols; Anna who is the wife of Louis Mapes, Lone Tree, and has two children; John of Portland, Oregon, who still owns land in Muscatine county, and is married and has two children; and Gertrude, at home. The mother of these children in now living at Nichols and is sixty-five years of age.

Bernard Kirchner, whose name introduces this review, was a supporter of the candidates and principles of the democratic party. He was a sincere friend of education and served on the school board for many years. Religiously, he was identified with the Lutheran Church, while his widow was a member of the Evangelical church. He was greatly interested in the growth of Muscatine county and lived to see marvelous changes in this section, which now contains many of the most productive farms of the state. He was recognized as a man thoroughly trustworthy, who loved the country of his adoption, having here established a home where he enjoyed what he came to America to find--peace, happiness and prosperity.

 History of Muscatine County, pg. 268 (1911)
Posted by Mike Bartelt



KIRK, Robert; farmer, Sec.24; P. O. Muscatine; born in Ireland Nov. 11, 1815; came to Muscatine Co. in 1852, and settled on his present farm of 242 acres. Married Miss Martha Hopper April 11, 1842; born in Ireland June 25, 1825; they have eight children--Eliza J. (now Mrs. Battin), born March 3, 1842; Matilda, born Jan. 9, 1844 (now Mrs. Millhall) Thomas, born June 5, 1847; Sarah, born Jan. 21, 1849 (now Mrs. Bunker); Robert C., born March 10, 1852; Emma, born May 3, 1854 (now Mrs. Wiggins); Martha E., born Sept. 8, 1857; William J., born July 9, 1860. Mrs. K. is a member of the Congregational Church.

Source: THE HISTORY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY IOWA Containing A History of the County, its Cities,
                Towns, & etc. Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879 Lake Twp
Note: If you are researching Andrew Bunker, son of Sarah Kirk Bunker, please email Susie Martin-Rott



KIRKPATRICK, T.F.,  farmer, Sec. 16; was born in this county in 1860. Married Miss Flora Countryman of Muscatine, Jan. 1, 1879. They are members of the M. E. Church; Mr. K.'s parents, Mark and Synthia Kirkpatrick, nee Mofford, were pioneer settlers of Muscatine Co. and were highly esteemed for the many good qualities they possessed; they lived a sincere Christian life; they have some time since been gathered to the home of their fathers in the great beyond, "Where friends meet to part no more".

Source: THE HISTORY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY IOWA Containing A History of the County, its Cities,
                Towns, & etc. Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



KLEPPER, E.,  dealer in books and stationery, with wall-paper, window-shades, brackets and furniture on the upper floor, Cedar street; residence, Sixth street, Wilton; son of Christian Klepper, a native of Pennsylvania; came to Muscatine Co. in 1857; his son, E. Klepper, was born in Cumberland Co., Penn., in 1844; had a good common-school education; at the age of 18, engaged as clerk with S. A. Foulke, at Muscatine, and remained for two years there; enlisted in the 35th I. V. I., Co. B, Capt. Steward; participated at Tupelo, Miss., Tallahatchie River, Nashville, Tenn., Mobile, Ala., and others; July, 1865, was transferred to the 12th I. V. I.; mustered out, January, 1866; clerked for his former employer for two years. In September, 1868 he married Erie, daughter of Lewis Burdett, who was one of the first settlers of this county, she was born in Muscatine Co., in 1848. After his marriage, he purchased a farm in Sweetland Tp., where he remained until 1874, and August of that year, engaged as clerk at the grange co-operative store at Wilton; after eighteen months was made manager of the same for two years, and January, 1878, purchased his present business.  They have two children--Alfred B., born April 2, 1871, and Bennie C., born May 24, 1874. Members of M. E. Church. Republican. Member of the A. O. U. W., Security Lodge, No.  100, in which he is Overseer; is also Alderman.

Source: THE HISTORY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY IOWA Containing A History of the County, its Cities,
                Towns, & etc. Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879 Wilton Twp


KLEPPINGER, W. C., farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. Durant; was born in Northampton Co., Penn., Dec. 28, 1828, the birthplace of both his parents; his grandparents settled in that county at an early day; he lost his father when 13 years of age, and went to Bloomsbury, N. J., where he learned the coachmaker's trade, and remained for several years; returned to his native county and dealt in live-stock for three years. Jan. 16, 1854, he married Elizabeth, daughter of Conrad Seem and Catharine Swarts, natives of Northumberland Co., Penn., where her father died in 1877 at the extreme age of 93 years; her mother died in 1859, having raised a family of fourteen children; Mrs. K. was the youngest of the family, and born in that county, Penn., August, 1831; they resided in their native county, first following his trade for seven years; then farming until April, 1867; with his family, then consisting of wife and seven children, came to Muscatine Co., and settled where he now resides, and owns 160 acres of land, valued at $65 per acre; they have had nine children, seven of whom are living--Alice (the wife of J. C. Newel of this county); Adelaide C. (the wife J. C. Kelley of this county), Preston C., Lizzie, Rosa, Robert and James. Mr. and Mrs. K. with their children are members of the U. B. Church, at Center Grove; Mr. K. Trustee and Superintendent of Sabbath school.

Source: THE HISTORY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY IOWA Containing A History of the County, its Cities,
                Towns, & etc. Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879 Wilton Twp


KNAPP, JOHN W., farmer, section 10, P. O. Red Oak; born in Indianapolis, Indiana, May 10, 1827; his parents
moved to Muscatine, Iowa, when he was three years old; move to Moscow in 1846, remained there a number of years.  In 1848 he learned the milling trade, worked three years for Burrows & Prettyman; then farmed for about four years, and in the fall of 1855 came to Red Oak. In the spring of 1856 he commenced to work for Mr. Kerrihard in the Keys mill, afterward in the Silkett mill, then worked in the steam mill at Red Oak; he worked for Mr. Kerrihard in all perhaps about twelve years or more. In 1868 he moved on the farm where he now resides; owns forty acres of land.
Mr. Knapp was married November 1, 1860, to Phoebe Ann Burris, a native of Indiana. They are both members of the Methodist Protestant church; Mr. K. is also a member of the Masonic order. They have one son: Andy B.

Source: History of Montgomery County, Iowa, Des Moines: Iowa Hist. and Biographical Co., 1881.



KNOWLES, A. S., manufacturer of carriages, buggies, spring and farm wagons; factory on Iowa avenue. Mr. Knowles was born in New Haven, Conn., in 1844; in 1855, he removed to this county with his parents. During the war, he enlisted in Co. B, 35th I. V. I.; was enrolled in August, 1862; served until August, 1865, when he was honorably discharged; participated in every battle, siege and skirmish that his command was in; was severely wounded at Spanish Fort. The war being ever, he returned to this city, and in 1868, married Miss Matilda Groshell, of this city; she was born in Massachusetts; they have two children--Mollie and Harry.  Mr. Kowles is a stanch and earnest Republican. Religiously, he and his wife are members of the Baptist Church, in which Church he has been Treasurer two years. In his carriage factory, Mr. Knowles employs skilled mechanics, and his work cannot be excelled in durability and finish.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



KOEHLER, George, of the firm of Koehler Brothers, confectioners and bakers, corner of Chestnut and Second streets, Muscatine, Iowa; was born in Germany in 1848; in 1849, his parents emigrated to Muscatine. He married Miss Carrie Bickey, of this city. He is a Democrat. Member of A. O. U. W.   Koehler Brothers keep a large stock of confectionery, tobaccos  and cigars.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



KOEHLER, John, of the firm of Koehler Brothers, confectioners, bakers and dealers in candies, toys, fruit, nuts,cigars and tobaccos, corner Chestnut and Second streets; John Koehler was born in Germany in 1848; in 1849, his parents emigrated to this country. He married Miss Mary Buner, of this  city; they have four children--Charlie, William, Stella and  Frederick. Mr. K. served in Co. B, 44th I. V. I., and was honorably discharged at the expiration of his term of enlistment.  He is a Democrat. Member of the I. O. O. F. and also a member of the Champion Hose Company.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



KREHE, J.T., druggist and dealer in paints, oils, toilet articles  and perfumery; 233 Second street; was born in Bavaria,  Germany, Feb. 28, 1828, where he was brought up and learned the drug business; he emigrated to this country in 1849 and lived in Cincinnati; came to Iowa in 1854 and settled in  Muscatine and began clerking in Dougherty's drug store; in April 1867, he bought out Mr. Speer and engaged in the drug business for himself and is doing a good business. He married Barbara Schneider, from Germany, in 1861; they attend the German Protestant Church.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



KULP, W. C. dental surgeon, Hare's Block, Second street, opposite post office; is a native of Summit Co., Ohio, and was born Jan 5, 1841; he was brought up and received his education there; he came to Iowa and located in Muscatine and studied dentistry with his brother, who came here in 1859; he afterward associated with his brother in the practice of his profession and has continued since then; he is a member of the Board of Education.  Dr. Kulp married Miss Adaline R. Stuver, a native of Summit Co., Ohio, Oct. 22, 1867;  they have three children--Nellie, Bertha and Maggie.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



LA TOURRETTE, John;  farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Muscatine; born in Montgomery Co., Ohio, Feb. 16, 1819; came with his parents to Indiana in 1829; where they were among the early settlers.  Married Miss Eliza Bogart in 1840; born in Pennsylvania in 1815; came to Muscatine Co. in 1847; have one son--Wilbert, born in Fountain Co., Ind., May 25, 1841. Married Miss Mary J. Fortune Dec. 9, 1868; she was born in Essex Co., N. Y., Dec. 6, 1841; they have three children--John D., Arthur J., Willette J., and one deceased--Anna E.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879 Lake Twp



LAMB, LEONARD ATALISSA Superintendent of fence-building for C.R. & P. R.R. from Davenport to Brooklyn; born Dec. 25, 1825 in Harrison Co., Ohio; worked at threshing machine and reaper building in Martinsville, Ohio, several years; in 1857, came to Atalissa, and engaged in carpenter and joiner work till 1863; since which time he has followed his present business.  Married Rebecca J. Stewart July 23, 1849; she was born June 25, 1827, in Williamsport, Va; have four children living--Emerson S., Amanda L., Mary H. and Charles H.; lost one--Hattie B.  Is a member of Ionic Lodge, No. 122, A.F & A.M., at Atalissa.  Republican.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



LANGE, Henry C.T.,  proprietor of Moscow ferry; P. O. Moscow; owns about forty acres of land near Moscow, also 174 acres in Cedar Co., of the value of $25 per acre; born Feb. 28, 1825, in Holstein, Germany; emigrated to Ohio in 1847; soon after arriving here, enlisted in Co. L of 2d Ohio Volunteers, to serve in the Mexican war; was in the service until July, 1848; mustered out at Cincinnati, after which he went to Indianapolis, Ind., remaining until the fall of 1850; came to Iowa, locating on west side of Cedar River, about two miles from where he still lives; in 1852, he purchased the ferry-boat, which he has run ever since. He enlisted Aug. 9, 1862, in Co. C of the 35th Iowa Inf.; participated in the battle of Jackson and siege of Vicksburg, Miss; was also with A. J. Smith, in the Red River expedition, also Henderson Hill, Pleasant Hill, Clothierville, Marksville, Yellow Bayou, Checut Lake, La., Tupelo, Nashville, Tenn, and Spanish Fort, Ala.; was discharged at Davenport Aug. 10, 1865. Married Caroline Grosce, of Indianapolis, Ind., Sept. 4, 1850; she was born Sept. 4, 1832, in Germany; have five children living---Grant, William, T. S., Melinda, Anna and Eleanora; lost six--- Peter M., Henry A., Edward H., Charles L., Henry and Dora L. Mr. L. is present Township Clerk, which office he has filled for eight years; has also served as President of School Board. Lutheran; Republican.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879 Moscow Twp



LAMBERT, Samuel V.,  dealer in boot and shoes, hardware, etc, Atalissa; besides his town property his wife owns       thirty-eight acres of land, valued at $30 per acre; born March 30, 1833, in Sussex Co., N. J.; in 1835, his parents moved to  Orange Co., N. Y.; in early life learned the mason's trade; in the fall of 1854, came to Rock Island, Ill., and worked at his trade; in    the spring of 1856, came to Atalissa. April 19, 1861, he enlisted in Co. C of the 1st Iowa Inf.--three-months service; in the fall of 1861, assisted in raising and organizing Co. G, of the 2d Iowa Cav.; was elected 1st Lieutenant, which he declined to accept; Aug. 10, 1862, he again enlisted in Co. G, of the 35th Iowa Inf., participated in the following battles; Wilson's Creek, Va., siege of Vicksburg, Jackson, Miss., Pleasant Hill, La., Tupelo, Miss., Nashville, Tenn., Blue River, Mo., Spanish Fort and Mobile, Ala.;  was discharged at Davenport, Iowa, Aug. 10, 1865, and returned home. In 1870, commenced learning the shoemaker's trade; soon after engaged in his present business. Married Miss N. J. Darland in December, 1857; she was born in Ohio, and died in the fall of 1859; second marriage, to Miss A. M.Cornwell, September, 1862; she was born in 1841, in New York, and died Nov. 13, 1872; third marriage, Miss Emily Robbins, July 3, 1876; she was born in 1843 in Pennsylvania; he has two children by second wife--Lu E. and Ernest Q., and lost two--Dora C. and George O.; and by last wife, one---Lizzie R. Religion, Liberal. Republican.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879


LARDER, JOHN C.  M.D., is one of the leading physicians and surgeons of Fort Scott, has been a resident of Kansas since 1879, and represents a prominent family of Bourbon County. His parents were highly respected people and reared a family of educated men. Doctor Lardner's brother Hubert is a prominent member of the Fort Scott bar and two other brothers have also become well known in Kansas.

Doctor Lardner was born in Muscatine, Iowa, April 1, 1869, of Irish parents. His parents were John and Mary (Butler) Lardner, both natives of County Galway. They came to Kansas in 1879, settled on a farm in Bourbon County, and the father followed farming until his retirement. He died at Bronson, Kansas, in 1903, at the age of seventy-four. The mother passed away at Manhattan December 24, 1915, at the age of eighty-three.

Doctor Lardner from the age of ten years lived on a Kansas farm, acquired his higher literary training in the Kansas Normal College at Fort Scott, where he was graduated Bachelor of Science in June, 1891.  From 1888 to 1899 he followed chiefly the vocation of school teacher, and taught in country, village and city schools. He then entered the Kansas Medical College, from which he received his degree Doctor of Medicine in 1902. Since then he has been in active practice at Fort Scott. Doctor Lardner is a democrat, but has had no aspirations for political service. He is a member of the Catholic Church. On September 6, 1899, at Cherokee, Kansas, he married Miss Marie W. Germain.  Mrs. Lardner was born at Girard, Kansas, daughter of Henry and Amanda (Wallace) Germain. Her father was a prominent coal operator owning coal lands in the Pittsburg district and was also connected with the smelters. Doctor and Mrs. Lardner have one child, John Germain Lardner, born at Chanute, Kansas, July 23, 1908.

Source:  Kansas and Kansans: Volume 4



LATHROP, Ezra,  president of the Bank of Tulare and a pioneer of the town, was born in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, in 1839. Not being blessed by the riches of this world as computed by dollars and cents, the education of young Lathrop was very limited, and at  the age of sixteen years he left home and began his own support on the farm. His father having moved to Iowa and settled at Oakland, Ezra found employment in that vicinity.

He was married at Muscatine in January, 1862, to Miss Virginia Blake, and resided upon a farm in that locality until 1864, when they crossed the plains to Nevada, fortunately having  a very safe passage, although the Indians were troublesome during that year. Mr. Lathrop stopped at East Walker river and began farming. The nearest town was forty miles away,  flour was $16 per barrel, and the hardships of frontier life were too great for them to endure; so a year later they moved to Dayton, and soon afterward, on account of his wife's  health, came to California

Mr. Lathrop engaged in farming in Solano County until October, 1873, when he sought a more salubrious climate and located in Tulare County. He then  purchased his present resident property, and was among the first to build in the new town  of Tulare; engaged in teaming across the mountains to Kernville, which for several years  was very profitable. In 1882 Mr. Lathrop, with I. H. Ham as a silent partner, started a  lumber yard in Tulare, meeting with very great opposition from established companies,   which combined against them; but with bull-dog persistence they continued, and after  about one year secured the trade of the valley. Eighteen months later the opposition sold  out to Moore & Smith, a strong lumber company with a large capital, and Mr. Lathrop, not  having the funds to combat with such a force, sold his business, in May 1884, to the Puget Sound Lumber Company, they retaining Mr. Lathrop as agent. The competition then became hot and heavy and continued until November 1, 1886, when the firms consolidated, under  the name of the San Joaquin Lumber Company, our subject still remaining as agent and  local manager.

Not forgetting the interests and advancement of the town, in 1885 Mr. Lathrop invested  capital and was instrumental in the organization of the Bank of Tulare, of which he was elected president. He owns a one-third interest in the Round Valley ranch of 3,800 acres, of  which he is manager, and which he devotes chiefly to grain farming; also, 160 acres northwest of town, which he uses for grain and stock purposes. Mr. Lathrop was school    trustee for three years and fire commission two terms. He was one of the incoporators of  the Gas Company in January, 1884, and in May 1885, he was elected president of the company, which office he still retains.

He and his wife are the parents of two children (twins), Martha Adeline and Matilda Eveline.   He is a member of the Tulare Lodge, No. 76, A. O. U. W. It remains only to add that Mr. Lathrop is an esteemed citizen of Tulare and rejoices in the confidence of the community.

Source: A Memorial and Biographical History of the Counties of Fresno, Tulare and Kern California,  1892, Lewis Publishing, Chicago, Illinois.



LAUB, Henry Clay, the well-known pioneer of Denison, is a native of the Keystone state, born in York, Pa., April 18, 1824. His father, William Laub, was born at Reading, Pa., and was at one time county treasurer of Adams county, of which the famous town of Gettysburg is the county seat. Henry Laub, a brother of William, was a midshipman in the navy under the command of the gallant Commodore Perry, and was killed in one of the naval battles on Lake Erie. When young Henry was less than a year old his parents moved to Gettysburg and he lived in that town for about twelve years, attending school for about three months of each year when he became old enough. When about 12 years old his father died and Henry was from that time obliged to work very hard to assist in supporting the family. For several years he worked in the country and had very little chance to attend school. At the age of 19 he became a shoemaker and traveled from house to house working at his trade. All this time the young man was eagerly grasping every opportunity for the development of his mind, and often the cold gray of  early morning, before time for commencing work, would find him busily engaged with book and pencil.    His evenings were always thus employed, indeed sometimes the active mind would be engaged in the pursuit of knowledge by the uncertain light of a tallow dip, until far into the night, when others, less eager to learn, were calm in the enjoyment of “nature's sweet restorer.” This same habit of perseverance has characterized Mr. Laub's whole existence.

He was married February 14, 1848, to Miss Lydia Baer, of Frederick county, Md. In 1851 Mr. Laub and  his wife came west and stopped at Muscatine, Iowa, where he secured a position as teacher in the public schools and also held the position of city clerk. After leaving Muscatine he spent a year in Cedar Rapids, and in 1855 went to Crawford county and settled on a farm near Denison and began breaking up virgin sod preparatory to tilling the soil. In about 1856 he became interested in the city of Denison, then in the embryo, and, desiring to widen the scope of his activity, erected, on the corner of what is now Main and Broadway streets, the first store building of Crawford county, and the first building of any kind in Denison,–a miniature affair 14×18, well stocked with goods hauled overland from Cedar Rapids. Mr. Laub is, in very truth, justly entitled to be designated “the father of the town.” All went well in the new enterprise until the stock was exhausted and then an unexpected difficulty presented itself. The country was wild and sparsely settled, consequently the few customers who patronized Mr. Laub were as short of money as they were desperately in need of provisions. Mr. Laub was too kind hearted to let them suffer, and with that magnanimity predominant in his nature, dealt out provisions with a generous hand until all were gone. Then, lacking the wherewith to purchase more, and finding it impossible to make collections, there was no alternative but to shut up shop; so, locking  the door behind him, the proprietor passed out and returned to the farm, concluding for the time his career as a merchant.

In 1858 he returned to Denison, having traded his farm for a store and hotel. Mr.Laub was a member of the first board of supervisors for the county, and by reason of special  qualifications, served twelve successive years as county superintendent. He was also the second sheriff of that county; and for one term was county surveyor. To show their appreciation of this gentieman's services, the people of Crawford county elected him to the honorable position of representative, where he, for a term, rendered very satisfactory service. Later he made the senatorial
canvass, but it was at a time when the liquor traffic influenced the issue, and, owing to his pronounced prohibitory proclivities, he suffered defeat.

During the war he served as government recruiting officer for this district, and also erected a stockade and fortress at Cherokee to protect the citizens from Indian ravages. He organized Company D,  celebrated in history as the Northwestern Iowa brigade, of which he was first lieutenant and  quartermaster.

Mr. Laub was for many years the leading merchant of Denison, and in 1874 he took his clerks into partnership and himself retired from active management of the business. The new management was not satisfactory and in 1876 the firm had become insolvent, in debt to the amount of $78,000. With this great burden resting upon him Mr. Laub resumed management of the business and, having the confidence of the creditors, secured an extension of three years, at the end of which time he had paid every cent of the debt.

Politically, Mr. Laub has always acted with the republican party. He is a member of the Masonic order, Odd Fellows and Good Templar fraternities, and for the past forty two years has been connected with the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he has been one of the mostactive members and liberal  supporters. Mr. and Mrs. Laub have eight children: William H., born June 24, 1855, who is engaged in  the livery business at Denison; Eli C., born November 30, 1859, who is a merchant at Correctionville; Alice M., born August 25, 1849, now the wife of J. D. Ainsworth, and is editing Mr. Ainsworth's paper, The Onawa Gazette; Mettie E., born April 9, 1851, who is the wife of Hon. J. B. Romans, one of the leading merchants of Denison; Julia Catherine, born January 20, 1857, now the wife of W. T. Perkins, a  lawyer of Bismarck, S. D.; Anna L., born March 31, 1862, now the wife of George Bartholomew, Chicago, Ill.; Lydia Bell, born November 27, 1864, who died at the age of 20 years, and Lillie M., born November 2, 1866, wife of C. F. Kuehnle, lawyer and banker of Denison.

Source:  Biographies and Portraits of the Progressive Men of Iowa. Gue, B.F. Des Moines:
Conaway & Shaw Publishers, 1899. page 547



LAUDER, Herman J., attorney at law; is a native of Montgomery Co., N. Y.; was born May 3, 1849; when 9 years of age, his parents removed to Michigan, and, the following year, to Galesburg, Ill., where they lived one year; then came to Iowa and settled in Henry Co.; he entered the University at Mt. Pleasant and remained there six years, but graduated at Simpson College, Indianola, Iowa; he entered the Law Department of the State University and graduated in 1873;  since then he has practiced his profession here. He holds the  office of City Alderman; is a member of the military and fire companies. He married Miss Laura M. Cleaver, a native of    Iowa, Oct. 13, 1874; she is a daughter of Dr. Cleaver, of  Keokuk; they have two children--Frank and Albert.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



LAURENT, REV. P; Pastor of St. Matthias Church; was born in France in 1828; ordained in Dubuque, Iowa, in 1851; came to Muscatine the same year, and has had pastoral charge of St. Matthias Church since.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



LAWRANCE, Wm. D.,  farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Muscatine; was born in Lincolnshire, England, April 14, 1818; in 1832, he emigrated to the United States, stopping first in Albany, N. Y.;  removed thence to Canada; in 1836 returned to New York, stopped in Buffalo; thence to several of the Southern States; thence to North Bend, Hamilton Co., Ohio, he married Miss Sarah Ann Disbrow, when he was 21 years of age; They had nine children, five still living----William L., John, Mary, Martha and Sarah Ann. He came westward, stopping in several parts of Illinois, and finally landing in Muscatine Co. in 1848, where he has since remained; he improved the farm on which he resides, consisting of 102 acres. He enlisted in the 2d I. V. C; was 3d Sergeant or color bearer, and served during the war. Losing his first wife, he again married in 1875, Emily Gage, nee Eakins; they have had three children, none now living. Mr. L. is a democrat.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



LEE, FRANK THEODOSIUS, clergyman, author, was born March 23, 1847, in Kenosha, Wis. For some time he was on the editorial staff of the Congregationalist of Boston, Mass. He has filled pastorates at Sparta and Whitewater, Wis.; at Salt Lake City, Utah; at Muscatine, Iowa; and at Douglas Park Congregational Church of Chicago in 1894-99. He is the author of Popular Misconceptions as to Christian Faith and Life; and Popularizing the Bible.

 Source:  Herringshaw's Encyclopedia of American Biography of the Nineteenth Century,  Addenda, page lxiii



LEE, ROBERT now living partly retired in an elegant home in Muscatine, is a native of Ireland but was brought to Muscatine county by his parents in his infancy. He was born in County Tyrone, April 5, 1847, and is a son of Isaac and Mary (Beatty) Lee. The father, who was also a native of County Tyrone, came to the United States in 1847 in an old sailing vessel which reached the port of New Orleans after a voyage of sixteen weeks. In the course of the voyage the old records of the family were water-soaked and the names written in the family Bible were made almost illegible. Coming up the Mississippi River the travelers located in Seventy-six township, Muscatine county, Iowa, the father entering school land, upon which he built a log house and began to make a home in the wilderness. He was called away about nine years later and his remains were interred in a small country cemetery in that township. Later the body was removed to Greenwood cemetery, Muscatine, where it now reposes. In Ireland he was a farmer and a horseman, buying horses and putting them in good condition to be sold. In politics he was a whig. The grandparents on the paternal side were born and reared in Ireland, but the earlier generations of the family in the same line came from Scotland. The mother of our subject was born in County Armagh, Ireland and was there married. She departed this life in Muscatine county in 1877. There were six children in the family, four of whom grew to maturity: Jane, now deceased; Isaac, of Muscatine; Margie, also deceased; and Robert, our subject.

Reared upon the home farm Robert Lee received his early education in a small building which his father was instrumental in erecting, to be used as a Catholic church, but as educational facilities were few in early days this structure was rented for school purposes. He subsequently came to Muscatine and finished his education in Brown's select school, the head of which is now an attorney of Muscatine. The family continued together until after the death of the elder sister and the marriage of the younger. Robert and his brother conducted the farm together for eighteen or twenty years, becoming large live-stock buyers, and at the present time they are the owners of nearly two thousand acres of land in Seventy-six and Cedar townships, although not as closely identified with business interests as in earlier years. Since January, 1908, Mr. Lee has lived in Muscatine and is gradually retiring from active work, having by industry and good management attained a competence.

On April 1, 1885, Mr. Lee was united in marriage in Jones county, Iowa, to Miss Agnes Beatty. She is a daughter of Alexander and Mary (South) Beatty, the former of whom was born in Ireland and emigrated to this country, locating in Jones county, where he continued until his death in 1902. He was quite successful as a farmer. Mrs. Beatty was a native of Jones county and was called from earthly scenes in 1894. She is buried in a cemetery at Cascade, Iowa. Mrs. Lee was educated in the public schools and also became a student in the high school at Cascade but did not complete the course. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Lee were born three children: Mary Leola, now at home, is a graduate of the high school of Muscatine and also pursued a course in music at Monmouth College. Ira H., who married Florence Zigler, resides on the home farm and is engaged in farming and stock-raising in partnership with his father. Robert E. is attending the high school of Muscatine, being still at home with his parents.

Mr. and Mrs. Lee are members of the Presbyterian church, though on his farm is a United Brethren church, of which he has been a supporter for many years. Politically he is in sympathy with the republican party. A prominent Mason, he holds membership in Iowa Lodge, No. 2, A. F. & A. M.; Washingon Chapter, No. 4, R. A. M.; Webb Council, No. 18, R. & S. M.; and De Molay Commandery, No. 1, K. T., all of Muscatine; and Kaaba Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Davenport. He and his wife and daughters are all members of the Eastern Star and he is connected with the Commercial Club of Muscatine. He is possessed of many fine social characteristics but his friends are not all confined to fraternal organizations as they are to be found throughout Muscatine county or wherever he is known as he is a generous, upright and honorable man, who easily wins the confidence of those with whom he is brought in contact.

Source: HISTORY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY, IOWA - 1911
Posted by Donna VanZandt



LEIBIS, John;  farmer, Sec. 22; Mr. Leibis is a native of Pittsburgh, Penn., born March 4, 1836; while he was a child, his parents moved to Ohio, where he remained until he was 18 years of age; then came to Iowa City, where he married Miss A. Caspar; she was born in Iowa City, her parents having settled there in the pioneer days. Mr. Leibis enlisted in Co. I, 22d I. V. I.;  was honorably discharged at the close of the war. Removed shortly after his return from the army to Muscatine; came on his present farm in the fall of 1877. Members of the United Brethren Church; he is a Republican. Owns forty acres of land well  improved and containing several acres of fruit located on the Moscow road, two and a half miles from Muscatine.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



LEIENDECKER, CHARLES farming and dairy, Sec. 28, two miles from city of Muscatine; Mr. Leiendecker is a native of Bavaria, Germany, born in 1834; emigrated to the United States in 1850; came to Dubuque, Iowa , in 1856, and to Muscatine the following year.  He entered the 8th Michigan Battery, in which he served until after the siege of Vicksburg, then returned home, remained a short time, then entered the 77th Ohio V. I. as Sutler and served in that capacity until the close of the war.  He married in Muscatine Miss Ella Heidman, of Scott Co.; they were married Oct. 5, 1872; have four children--Carroll, Henry, Otto and Katie.  Mr. Leiendecker owns a well-improved farm of 160 acres.  He is a man of much energy and is ever willing to aid any enterprise that gives promise of general good.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



LEITH, Dr. Alexander R., of Wilton Junction, is a native of Iowa, although of Scotch descent. His father, John P. Leith, left Leith, Scotland, in 1839 and settled in Cedar county, Iowa, when our state was an almost trackless prairie. He was a plain, outspoken and honest Scotchman, who soon won the respect and confidence of his neighbors. To other sterling qualities he added the thrift of a typical Scot, and soon secured a comfortable pioneer home, and married Maria Boydston, daughter of John Boydston, who was also a pioneer of Cedar county. They had ten children, five of whom died in childhood; the others were Mary M., John P., Margaret, George E., and Alexander R., the subject of  this sketch, who was born in Sugar Creek township, Cedar county, on June 28, 1856.

After studying in the public schools until 14 years old, he attended Wilton college for three years, taught school for several years, and attended Eastern Iowa Normal school. He then went to the State university and took a medical course, graduating in March, 1882. Soon after graduation, Dr. Leith located at Wilton Junction, where he has practiced since. He is a member of the Iowa State Medical society, Muscatine County Medical society, and local surgeon for the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific railway.

In politics he is a republican, and is president of the school board, mayor of Wilton, elected April 28, 1898, and  president of Union bank.

In 1880 he married Louisa J. Parks. They have had two children: George G., aged 13 years, and Walter, who died at the age of 6 years.

 Source:  Biographies and Portraits of the Progressive Men of Iowa. Gue, B.F. Des Moines:
Conaway & Shaw Publishers, 1899.



LEONARD, Oliver H.
The vigorous and thriving City of Tulsa is favored in having gained the interposition of Mr. Leonard in connection with business and civic affairs, and he is prominent and influential in banking circles in the state, besides which he stands forth as a representative citizen also in his progressiveness and public spirit. He has been vice president of the Exchange National Bank of Tulsa since 1910, is president of the Tulsa Clearing House Association, and was the first president of the Carnegie Library Association of this city.

Mr. Leonard was born in Muscatine County, Iowa, on the 26th of July, 1863, and is a representative of a sterling pioneer family of the Hawkeye State. He is a son of Joshua and Ellen H. (Ady) Leonard, both natives of the State of Ohio, the father having passed away in 1899, at the age of sixty-five years, and the mother being still a resident of Iowa, at the venerable age of eighty years, in 1915. Of the seven children the subject of this review was the third in order of birth and all of them survive the honored father.

Joshua Leonard was born in Delaware County, Ohio, where he was reared and educated, and where he continued to be identified with agricultural pursuits until 1854, when he removed to Springfield, the capital of Illinois. In 1856 he removed thence to Iowa and became one of the pioneer settlers of Muscatine County, where he reclaimed a productive farm from the virgin prairie and where he continued to reside until 1864, when he removed to Poweshiek County, that state. There he repeated his strenuous pioneer experiences by developing a valuable farm, and he became one of the prominent and influential citizens of that section of the state, his well directed efforts as a farmer and stock-grower having brought to him a large and substantial measure of prosperity. He served nine consecutive years as a member of the board of county commissioners and he passed the closing period of his life in the attractive little city of Brooklyn, that county, where his widow still resides. In politics he was originally an old-line whig, but he gave his allegiance to the republican party from the time of its organization until his death, his religious faith having been that of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which his widow also has long been a devoted member.

After negotiating with proper facility the curriculum of the public schools of his native state, Oliver H. Leonard pursued a higher course of academic study by attending the University of Iowa, from which he retired prior to the completing of a full course. At the age of twenty years, in 1883, he initiated his active association with the banking business, by assuming the position of assistant cashier of the Poweshiek County Bank, at Brooklyn. In 1885 he was advanced to the office of cashier of this institution, and of this office he continued the incumbent until 1898, when he resigned and disposed of his stock in the bank. Now an able executive of proved experience in this field of business enterprise, Mr. Leonard then removed to Pipestone, Minnesota, where he effected the organization of the Farmers & Merchants Bank. He later disposed of his interest in this institution and became a stockholder in the Citizens Savings Bank in the City of Cedar Falls, Iowa. He served with characteristic ability as cashier of this bank until 1910, when he sold his stock in the institution and came to Tulsa, Oklahoma, where he has since served as vice president of the Exchange National Bank, in which he is one of the principal stockholders and in the administration of the affairs of which his long experience and marked financial acumen have made him a resourceful and influential factor in the expanding of the large and substantial business controlled by this representative financial institution. Mr. Leonard is giving also most effective service as president of the Tulsa Clearing House Association. He is a director of the Tulsa Commercial Club, of which he served one year as president, and he was one of the organizers of the Carnegie Library Association of Tulsa, of which he was the first president. He is distinctively liberal and progressive in his civic relations and always ready to lend his aid in the furtherance of measures and enterprises tending to advance the best interests of his home city, county and state. Though never imbued with ambition for political office or other preferment, Mr. Leonard is aligned as a stalwart supporter of the cause of the republican party, which he believes is destined to come again to its own in national affairs.

September 22, 1885, recorded the marriage of Mr. Leonard to Miss Nellie B. Bennett, who was born at Brooklyn, Poweshiek County, Iowa, and the three children of this union are Lucille A., Virginia C. and Howard B.

 Source: History of Fayette County, Iowa 1910



LEVERICH, R.W., Superintendent of Schools of Muscatine Co., was born in Muscatine Co. May 1, 1838; his parents were among the earliest settlers of this county, coming here in 1836; he attended school here and entered Cornell College at Mt. Vernon, where he completed his education and engaged in teaching; he has had a long experience as a teacher, having taught over twenty years; he was elected Superintendent of Schools of Muscatine Co. in the fall of 1875, and was again elected to the same office. He married Miss O. C. Garlock, a native of New York, Dec. 29, 1869; they have had four children,  of whom only one daughter, Maude, survives.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



LILLIBRIDGE, CHESTER, of the firm of Lillibridge & St. John, grocers, of Muscatine, was born in Muscatine County, on the 7th of October, 1844, and is a son of Amos and Amanda (Beardsley ) Lillibridge. His father was a native of Rhode Island, and emigrated from that State to Muscatine County, in 1839. He was married in that county to Miss Amanda Beardsley, a daughter of Aaron Beardsley, who was born in Massachusetts. Four of their children are living at this writing; Caroline, who is the wife of Thomas Moore; Chester, the subject of this sketch; Emma L, who is the widow of James Mahin; Clara, who resides in California.

Amos Lillibridge was a farmer by occupation, and resided in the township of Bloomington, Muscatine County, until his death, which occurred in 1854. Politically, he was a Whig, and held various local official positions. Both he and his wife were consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and were highly respected worthy people. Mrs. Lillibridge survived her husband, and soon after his death removed to Muscatine, where she died in April, 1882.

Chester Lillibridge was educated in the city schools, and was graduated from the Muscatine High School in the
class of ' 60.   He then engaged with J.A. Bishop as merchants' clerk, and shortly afterward was admitted to partnership with his employer. That connection continued until 1866, when Mr.Lillibridge retired, and formed a partnership with W. Beardsley in the grocery business. A year later he sold out and renewed his connection with Mr. Bishop in the same line, the partnership continuing until 1871, when he sold out, and in the fall of that year bought into the grocery business with James Jackson.  That connection was continued until 1884, when he bought out Mr. Jackson's interest, and in September of that year sold an interest to James H. St. John, since which time the business has been conducted under the firm name of Lillibridge & St. John. These gentleman have a large and fully stocked store in their line of staple and and fancy groceries, fruits, flour and provisions, and are doing a business of upward of $35,000 annually, being recognized as the leading grocers of the city.

Mr. Lillibridge was married at Muscatine, Oct. 16, 1872, to Miss Mary C. Jackson, a native of Cincinnati, Ohio, and a      daughter of James Jackson. Four children have been born of their union---Cora V., Ralph, Albert and Harvey. Mr. Lillibridge owns the store occupied by himself and partner, and one of the handsomest residences in the city, and is a proprietor of an 80-acre farm on Muscatine Island, in Louisa County. In politics he is a Republican, and has been School Director for five years. He is a member of Muscatine Lodge No. 99, A.O.U.W., and is classed as one of Muscatine's most enterprising and reliable business men.

1889 "Portrait and Biographical Album, Muscatine County, Iowa" p 273



LINDNER, Dr. H., physician and surgeon; was born in Breslau, Germany, March 5, 1827; he received his education there. In 1841, he volunteered to drive the Jews out of the city; in 1846, he took charge of a regiment of Poles to fight against the Prussian Government for liberty; on the 16th of March, 1848, when the new call for liberty came, he went to Berlin and brought powder, ball and arms to the Liberty party; he was afterward sent to Baden to fight against the Liberty party; he received from King Frederick William IV three medals for bravery; after the war was over, he remained in the military service four and a half years. In 1853, he came to the United States and lived in the city of New York and also at Newburg, N. Y., where he lost everything by fire. In 1854, he married Miss Johanna Pfannsbecker, a native of Germany; they removed to Illinois, and remained there some years; again removed to Iowa and lived in Marshalltown for twelve years; came to Muscatine in 1874, and since then has practiced his profession here; they have one adopted daughter.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879


LITTLE, Dr F. H., physician and surgeon; is a native of Muscatine, and was born Dec. 3, 1855; he was brought up and received his education here; in March, 1876, he commenced reading medicine under Dr. Robertson, and graduated in the medical department of the State University in March, 1876, was  valedictorian of his class. After graduating, he located here and commenced the practice of medicine. He is Secretary and Treasurer of Muscatine County Medical Society.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



LONG, ABRAHAM, far., Sec. 13; P.O. Wolcott, Scott Co.; born in Blair Co., Penn., Nov. 3, 1832; came to Cedar Co., in 1854; remained one year thence to Scott Co.; remained four years; came to Muscatine Co. in 1859.  Married, in 1862, Miss Nancy Pursell, born in Washington Co., Ind., in 1832; has three children--John A., Ettie E. and Frank A.  Mr. Long owns 240 acres; has made most of the improvements.  Members of the M.E. Church; Republican.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879 Fulton Twp.



LONG, Samuel Craig,  Pastor of Grace Reformed Church; boards with James Ours, Fourth st., corner Elm, Wilton; was born at Huntingdon, Huntingdon Co., Penn., July 27, 1846; lived there until in his 12th year, when his father, George Long, with his family, removed to Neff's Mills, in Stone Valley, his native county, where he continued to work at his trade of blacksmithing, Samuel engaging as a farm hand about two miles from home. In the spring of 1861, the family removed to McConnellstown, that county, where S. C. worked in the shop with his father, and at farming. In the spring of 1862, moved to Markleysburgh, same county, where he assisted his father at his business until February, 1864, when he enlisted in the 22d Regt. Cav., Co. K, Capt. J. H. Berring, then lying at Chambersburg, Franklin Co., Penn., and not having quarters or rations furnished them, he, with another party, returned home, but afterward joined the regiment at Martinsburg, Va., but was with the regiment soon removed to Cumberland, Md. Previous to Gen. Sigel's movement up Shenandoah Valley, Va., a battery of two mountain howitzers was manned from the 20th and 22d Regts.  Mr. Long went as Bugler of Battery, which soon followed Gen. Sigel up the valley. In Pleasant Valley, Md., the whole regiment drew horses, and started with Gen. Sheridan on his famous raid through the valley of Virginia. In the spring of 1865, the 22d and 14th Penn. V. C., were consolidated with the 3d Provisional Cavalry, companies being thrown together to fill out by forming number, our subject joining Co. G, Capt. Spear, were stationed at Morefield to intercept guerrillas and horse-thieves. They were afterward quartered at Winchester, Va., from which place Mr. Long, with others, accompanied two artists up the valley to sketch the battle-ground. In the fall of 1865, the regiment returned to Cumberland, Md., where Mr. Long assisted in making out the muster-rolls; the went with company to Harper's Ferry, Va., and turned their horses over to the Government;  thence to Harrisburg, Penn., where he was mustered out Oct. 31, 1865. In the spring of 1866, his father returned to Huntingdon, Penn., where they kept a hotel until 1868, and then removed twelve miles into the country, and engaged in farming.  S. C. went to Titusville, Penn., and engaged as clerk and book-keeper in a wholesale grocery store. In the fall of 1869, he entered the academic department of Mercersburg College, and, in the fall of 1871, entered the college, graduating in the summer of 1875. In the fall of that year he entered the theological course, and graduated in the spring of 1878. In June, 1878, came to Jackson Co., Iowa, where he acted as Assistant Pastor at Maquoketa, taking a part of a field lying in Clinton Co., and remained until October, 1878, when he came to Wilton.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879 Wilton Twp



LORD, Richard, apiarian: was born in East Haddam, Middlesex Co., Conn., Jan. 10, 1808; he was brought up and
lived there until 20 years of age; then went to Pennsylvania, and lived there and in Ohio until coming to Iowa; he and Supervisor  came together, and arrived in this county in July, 1837, and were among the earliest settlers; he settled in Cedar Tp., and made a claim and engaged in farming. Mr. Lord wrote the Claim Laws for Cedar Tp., and also was the bidder for the land in that township at the land sales. Mr. Lord engaged in farming and continued for many years; then removed to Muscatine, where he has lived since; he has given much attention to bee-raising, and is one of the largest bee-keepers in the State. When Mr. Lord began life, he had nothing, and to his own industry and good management he owes his success in life. He married Miss Jane Smalley, from Ohio, in 1839; she died in 1858, leaving six children---three sons, Byron, Richard and Herman, and three daughters, Catharine (now Mrs. W. D. Cone), Emma (now  teaching in the high school), and Manza M. (book-keeper in business house).

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



LOVELL, SOLOMON, far., Sec. 28; P.O. Pleasant Prairie; born in Maryland Aug. 16, 1818; when quite young went with his parents to Huntingdon Co., Penn., where he remained until about 18 years of age; thence to Cambria Co.; remained until 1838, when he married Miss Margaret Arbel March 19, 1838; born in Bedford Co., Penn., March 24, 1818, and April 1, 1838, came to Muscatine Co., and settled in Montpelier Tp; moved where they now reside in 1865; have five sons and five daughters---William, John T., Sarah J. (now Mrs. Hamilton), Mary A. (now Mrs. Burr), Rebecca Louisa, James E., Charles L., Margaret E., Daniel B.; one died--Harriet A.  Mr. L. owns 800 acres; has improved 440.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879 Fulton Twp.



LOWE, Ralph Phillips, governor of Iowa, was born in Warren county, Ohio, Nov. 27, 1805; sorter Jacob D. and Martha (Perlee) Lowe; grandson of Derick and Rebecca (Emmons) Low; great-grandson of Cornelius and Judith (Middagh) Low; and a descendant of the Middaghs, Bergens, Rapaeljes, Hansens, Tricos and Van Nests, early Dutch settlers of New Amsterdam, 1607-1664. He was graduated from Miami university, A.B., 1829, A.M., 1832; studied law, and was admitted to the bar at Ashville, Ala. He removed to Dayton, Ohio, in 1834, and to Muscatine, Iowa, in 1840. He was appointed prosecuting attorney for the second judicial district of the territory of Iowa in 1841; was appointed general of the 2d division of Iowa militia by Governor Chambers in 1842; was district judge of the first judicial district of Iowa, 1852-57; governor of the state, 1858-60; judge of the supreme court, 1860-68; U.S. district attorney, 1868-71, and was appointed agent for the state to press claim against the United States for $800,000 for which purpose he removed to Washington, D.C., in 1874. He died in Washington, D.C., Dec. 22, 1883.

Source:  The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume VII



LOWRY, WM. F., farmer, Sec. 22; P.O. Buffalo, Scott Co.; was born in St. Louis, Mo., May 5, 1827; in 1840, with his parents, came to Iowa, locating  in Muscatine Co., on the farm where he now resides, consisting of 400 acres.  In 1862, Mr. L. married Miss Virginia Wagoner, a native of Cincinnati, Ohio, born in 1837; she and her parents came to Iowa in an early day settling in Scott Co.; they have six children living --Sarah, Katie, May, Frederick, Charles and William.  Mr. L. Enlisted in the 35th I.V.I., Co. B, and served three years.  David Lowry, his father, died of cholera in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1832.  His mother again married Mr. S. H. Merry, a native of Virginia; he died in 1860, and his mother in 1874.  His father was a native of Ohio; his mother of Pennsylvania.  Mr. L. is a Democrat.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879



LUCAS, Samuel;  P. O. Muscatine; born in Scioto Co., Ohio, Jan. 10, 1807. Married Miss Nancy H. Hitchcock Oct. 17, 1833; she was born in Scioto Co, Ohio, Sept. 26, 1813; they removed to Muscatine Co. in October, 1838, and settled on the farm where Mrs. Lucas now resides; Mr. Lucas died Aug. 5, 1878,  leaving six children--George W. H., who served as Second Lieutenant in Co. K, 35th I. V. I.; Jesse H. served in the 3d Mo. I. V. I (sic).; re-enlisted in 16th I. V. I. as First Lieutenant; was promoted to Captain; William served in 2d Iowa Cav.; Joseph in 16th I. V. I., Co. C; Eudora and Samuel B., and two deceased---Sarah and Hannah. Mr. Lucas was a faithful worker in the cause of religion; organized the first Congregational Church. in Muscatine, of which denomination he was a Deacon until his death. Mrs. Lucas is a member of the same Church. The estate owns 300 acres of land, on which Mr. Lucas made all the improvements. He acts with the Republican party.

Source: The History of Muscatine County Iowa Containing A History of the County, its Cities, Towns, & etc.
Western Historical Company Chicago Illinois 1879 Lake Twp



LUCAS, WILLIAM farmer, Section 12, P.O. Monmouth, was born in Muscatine, Iowa, in 1839. He was raised to agricultural pursuits and received a common school education. He farmed in Iowa until 1866; in the meantime was in the army two years. He went to Montana in 1866, and remained one season. He came to Kansas in the winter of 1866, and located on his present, which he has run as a grain and stock farm to the present time. He built a mill in 1867  which he operated for five years. He owns three farms--one of 160 acres, another of 90 acres, and one of 160 acres. He owns 60 acres of coal land on Brush Creek, Cherokee County; owns 160 acres of land in Woodson County, and town property in Cherokee and Columbus. He was County commissioner three years, and is a member of the Presbyterian Church; an Elder. He belongs to the A. O. U. W., G. A. R. and Good Templars. He was married to  Miss Abbie M. Dickinson, of Ohio, in 1865. They have six children living--Laura E., Arthur S., Samuel O., Abbie F., Emma V. and Nancy G.; deceased--George A., and Charles. Mrs. Lucas is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Lucas has interests in gold, silver and lead mines in Colorado.

Source: William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, Crawford Co. 



LUNDY, CYRUS C. dealer in groceries, boots and shoes, P. O. Villisca; Mr. Lundy was born April 3, 1844, in Highland County, Ohio. He moved with his parents to Muscatine, Iowa, in 1847, and there grew to manhood. August 7, 1862, he enlisted in company B, Thirty-fifth Iowa infantry volunteers, and served until August 7, 1865, having served three years to a day. This regiment took part in the battles of Jackson, Mississippi; siege of Vicksburg under Grant; and Red River, under A. J. Smith as far as Alexander. At Henderson Hill, twenty miles from Alexander, they took a four-gun battery and three hundred prisoners without firing a gun. Then in the battle at Pleasant Hill, Marksville, also in the Briar Patch fight near the mouth of Red River. They went north from there and took another battery between Vicksburg and Memphis Then to Tupelo, Mississippi, where they burnt a bridge and fought Forrest for two days. Then to Arkansas and followed Price on his last raid through Missouri, leaving him below Kansas City, and returned to Nashville, remaining there during the siege of that city. Then camped on the Tennessee river, living there six weeks on shelled corn; then to Fort Blakely. They were musterd out August 7, 1865. Mr. Lundy was never absent from his regiment when it moved except once. He was never wounded or taken prisoner. He was married to Emma Waterman, of Ashtabula County, Ohio. They have two children living: Frank W., born November 25, 1869; Luther T., January 22, 1878.

Source:  History of Montgomery County, Iowa; 1881, Douglas Township



LUNDY, JAMES WILLIAM
James William Lundy, popularly known is "Bill," a business man of Sargent, is a native of Iowa, born at Atalissa, in Muscatine county, October 30, 1872, one of the younger men of Custer county, whose energy and business acumen makes him the prime mover in the affairs of his community.  He is the son of Ira J. and Maria G. (Ady) Lundy, both parents deceased, and is the eldest of a family of five children. Following in order after the first born is Benjamin W., married, and the father of five children, who resides on the old homestead; James, who died at the age of six years; Vinton A., resides in Atalissa, Iowa, and Ady M., the wife of George Frederick Collins, who resides at Flushing, New York.

Mr. Lundy, with his parents, who were influenced by the spirit of "Westward Ho!" moved to the then rapidly developing state of Nebraska in the fall of 1872, while he was an infant, and homesteaded a claim of one  hundred and sixty acres about eleven miles northwest of the city of Sargent, during its frontier period. The son of a farmer, his boyhood days were spent in the country, and, being endowed with a rugged constitution and of an  inquisitive turn of mind, he soon developed traits that, as he grew to manhood, matured with him until today his varied business interests and the success which attends his enterprises makes him the foremost man of affairs in  that, part of the Middle Loup valley.

When he reached his majority in 1893, he homesteaded on a claim of one hundred and sixty acres of land in   section six, township twenty, range eighteen, and remained in farming operations until the year 1904, when he moved to Sargent, and there began promoting the business of telephone construction for an exchange known as the Central Telephone Company, of which he was general manager. Disposing of this, he opened a restaurant,
and made it a profitable business, which he later disposed of, and again built and successfully operated a farmers' telephone line, known as the Independent Telephone Company.

In partnership with A. B. Hartley for two years, the real estate interests of the community received an impetus that brought many homeseekers to the locality. This partnership was known as Hartley & Lundy. He then organized the Lundy Realty Company. As secretary and manager, he is the active head, and is ably assisted by    Mr. C. R. Ilgenfritz. That this company is one of the things to create business, can be appreciated when it    becomes known that in the first three years of its transactions twenty-two thousand six hundred and twenty    acres of land have been sold, thus stimulating the circulation of six hundred and seventy-nine thousand eight  hundred and thirty-one dollars and fifty cents, the price in money paid to them. In connection with this he is in the furniture and undertaking business, having bought out E. W. Davis, and holds a certificate as licensed    embalmer from the secretary of state.

Notably among the recent real estate acquirements that have come to Mr. Lundy by put-chase is the beautiful Doris lake resort, a picture of which is presented on another page. Doris lake is situated on the middle Loup river, in Custer county, and the water is taken from the middle Loup river, which is made from Mineral Springs, Victory Creek, which is made from the famous New Helena Springs, and also the Dismal and other running water that is very fine and soft and noted for its mineral ingredients. The water in this lake runs a one hundred barrel flouring mill, and is constantly moving, and therefore makes a very healthy resort. With a large quantity of  shade trees, with bath houses and bathing suits, a modern hotel, and with dancing pavilion, it offers special low rates to visitors, and is surrounded with summer resort novelties; a half mile circle race track, a merry-go-round run by water power and a shooting gallery, and many other attractions, such as motor boats, one of which carries twenty-five passengers. There are eight hundred and fifty acres in this tract and the valuable water power  is to develop electric current, not only for the cities of Sargent and Broken Bow and the various features of the  resort itself, with its flour mill, but it is to generate power for an electric road, which, as it is proposed, will soon be under construction, connecting those cities. Two thousand horse-power is available from the water fall.

Mr. Lundy was united in marriage to Miss Laura Anderson, daughter of Frank Anderson, an early settler of  Nebraska. Three girls and one boy have blessed this union: Sadie, Alpha D., Lelia M. and Albro H.

Source: Compendium of History, Reminiscence and Biography of Nebraska, Alden Publishing Co, Chicago IL 1912



LUPTON, Edwin H
Ever since its arrival in America, some 250 years ago, the Lupton family has been  identified with the opening up of new sections of this country. The earliest American progenitor was a pioneer of New England; later members were early settlers of Ohio, Michigan and Iowa, and the present representative of the family, Edwin H. Lupton, has been one of the foremost factors in encouraging settlement and development in certain parts of Kansas, particularly in Sheridan County,  where he has large interests. In addition to being an extensive property owner, Mr. Lupton is president of the Bank Savings Life Insurance Company of Topeka, Kansas, is one of the leading real estate dealers of Hoxie and has been the medium through which some large transactions have been consumated.

Edwin H. Lupton was born in Muscatine County, Iowa, in 1858, and came to Kansas in 1886 from Nebraska, where he had located in 1880. He is a son of William C. Lupton, a native of Ohio, and a   grandson of Gideon Lupton, who was born in Virginia. The family is of Quaker descent, and its members have always conformed to the beliefs of that creed. Gideon Lupton was one of the very early settlers of Ohio, and subsequently became a pioneer of Michigan, where he spent the last years of his life in agricultural pursuits and died.

His son, William Carr Lupton, was born in Ohio, and in 1854  located in Muscatine County, Iowa, when that part of the country was still new. Later he bought considerable property in Benton County, in the same state, and moved to this land in 1859, there  passing the rest of his life in farming ventures. As an illustration of the increase in land values, it may  be noted that this property was bought by Mr. Lupton at $1.25 per acre, and is now worth $200 an acre.   Mr. Lupton was a man of high moral character, whose word could always be relied upon, and who, in his daily life, exemplified the teachings of the Society of Friends. He was a good citizen, supporting all public-spirited movements, and was held in the highest esteem in his community. He  married Miss Emma Walker, daughter of John Walker, an Englishman, and they became the parents of eight children, of whom three are now living: Gideon, who is a ranchman near Sheridan, Wyoming; May, who is Mrs. C. H. Brown, and also lives near Sheridan, Wyoming; and Edwin H.

Edwin H. Lupton was educated in the public schools of Iowa, and was twenty-two years of age when  he went to Western Nebraska. There he was employed at various occupations, seeking one in which  he could get a real start in life, his principal vocation being that of freighter between the most important  towns of the locality at that time, viz.: St. Paul, Kearney, Grand Island and Loup City. When he gave up freighting, Mr. Lupton entered the employ of C. J. Burke, a hardware dealer of Kearney, and after spending several years as a clerk was admitted to partnership when he bought a half interest on credit.  He remained in this line for two years and three months, and in 1886 disposed of his interests and came to Kansas, locating at Hoxie, the county seat of Sheridan County. With his small capital, laboriously accumulated during his years as clerk and hardware merchant, he began business as a banker and loan agent, but soon disposed of that business to enter in the more promising, and, as it  turned out, more profitable one of real estate and insurance, for which Mr. Lupton seemed to have a  veritable genius. During a period of thirty years in which he has been engaged in this business he has accumulated 7,000 acres of fine Western Kansas land, but it is his well taken contention that he is not  only an accumulator, but a producer and developer as well. He is one of the most extensive farmers in  Western Kansas, where he had 1,200 acres in wheat, 800 acres in grain, and other large tracts devoted to produce, and has the greatest faith in his part of the state, believing that any man with good  health and the spirit of industry can make a success. That he is a skilled farmer is shown in the fact  that on his special farm of forty acres, located at Hoxie, he sowed wheat in 1914, 1915 and 1916, and secured a yield of ninety-seven bushels per acre, or above thirty-two bushels per acre per year. He has had some remarkable earnings from some of his Sheridan County lands, an illustration of which statement is found in the fact that he has received 6 per cent on a value of $250 per acre on land that  cost him $4.07 per acre. One of the things that he has the greatest faith in is the value of irrigation, and recently he negotiated a loan of $40,000 for an irrigation plant at Scott City. Mr. Lupton inherits many of the sterling qualities of his Quaker forebears, comes of a strictly temperance family, and is himself a total abstainer, having never touched a drink of alcoholic beverage in his life. His reputation in  business circles of both Sheridan County and Topeka is an excellent one, and as a citizen he has done much to aid in the development, material and civic, of the state of his adoption.

Mr. Lupton was married in 1895 to Miss Clara B. Lytle, of Wadsworth, Ohio, a member of a family well and favorably known at that place. To this union there have been born two sons and two daughters: Margaret, Edwin H., Jr., and Claribel, who are graduates of the State University; and Elmer, who entered high school in 1916 at Topeka.

Source:  Kansas and Kansans: Volume 4



LUTHERAN, MRS. HATTIE L. HORNER, author, poet, was born Feb. 5, 1864, in Muscatine, Iowa. She  is the author of a book of travels entitled Not at Home; and a volume of poems.

Source:  Herringshaw's Encyclopedia of American Biography of the Nineteenth Century  page 604


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