Notes

Notes

[NI000016] Memorial Record County of Cuyahoga City of Cleveland Ohio 1894

P. J. COONEY, the efficient secretary of the Director of Public Works, was born in Cleveland in 1865. The days of his youth were spent within the walls of public end private schools. When he had attained a certain advancement his brother, John Cooney, placed him in an educational institution of Dayton, Ohio, where he spent two years. On leaving this school he entered Notre Dame University at South Bend, Indiana, and pursued his studies until it was decided that a more suitable place for year's study just at this stage of his preparations, would be in a European institution. In accordance with these plans he sailed for Ireland and entered St. Patrick's College in county Cavan. He returned to the United States in 1877 and reentered Notre Dame University, graduating there in 1878 from a classical course.

For many years Mr. Cooney filled responsible positions with leading firms in this city. He was bookkeeper for the Mc Gillin Dry Goods Company for three years; served in the same capacity for the Excelsior Clothing Company for three years; served in the same capacity for the Excelsior Clothing Company an equal period, and flattering offers have been tendered him from leading business houses to accept responsible places, but it was not convenient for him to do so.

In politics Mr. Cooney is very strongly Democratic. From his first ballot the cause of his Party has been one of much moment to him. He has been twice a candidate for Justice of the Peace and twice a candidate for Representative to the Legislature, but was unsuccessful because the Republican strength could not be overcome. He made a successful race for alderman and served one term, under the old regime.

In 1893 Mr. Cooney was appointed by Director Farley to his present office.

John Cooney was, born in Ireland in county Cavan. He left there about fifty years ago, coming to Cleveland, and for the greater part has been a retail liquor dealer here. He married in Cleveland Jane Clark, born also in Ireland. Their children are: P. J.; Rose; Jennie; J. E., in railway mail service; Bessie and Kittie, One other is deceased. Mrs. Cooney died January 11, 1886.

The family all make their home under the paternal roof, all being in Cleveland and all unmarried.

[NI000022] per Dorothy Hibbs: John sold gasoline powered irons door to door when he was in high school

[NI000090] Richard Wright, Jr. Will

In the name of God Amen - I Richard Wright of the Co. of Davidson and State of North Carolina, being of Sound mind though weak do ordain & make this my last will & testament, that is to say I will & bequeath to my beloved wife Cary after my just debt are paid, all of my property to be hers during her life or widowhood, and if she marries then to be equally between her and my lawful begotten children by her namely: Nelson, Silas, Burges, Mary, Micajah, and Milas, I also will & bequeath to my Lawfully begotten children by my first wife, namely Sarah, Amos, Jane, Susannah, Delila, Reuban, Isaiah, Elijah, Nancy, Isom and Gilly, one dollar each, I do will & bequeath to Nelson & Silas, the two young colts that the mare now has sucking, I do constitute and appoint my worthy friend Spencer Clark Executor to this my last will & testament in witness whereof I hereunto set my hand & Seal in the presence of us May 12th AD. 1833.

His His
John X Cashatt Richard X Wright
mark mark

Burgess Wright



The forgoing is a true copy of the will of Richard Wright. This 24th day of April 1929.

(signed) John E. Raper

Deputy Clerk, Superior Court

Davidson County, North Carolina

[NI000092] I am trying to find out parents of Richard Wright (b 1730) ended up in Rowan County, North Carolina married Abigail Wigerly had 8 sons and fought in the Revolution.

"JP Dick" by V. Stewart-Novak says that he was the second son of Daniel Wright (b 1674) of Glastonbury, CT and Eleanor Benton (b 1674) who, shortly after marriage, moved to Virginia, then to North Carolina and then settled in Rowan County, North Carolina. Richard was one of 9 brothers. On the other hand, Curtis Wright states that Daniel Wright had only one daughter, Ruth and stayed in CT. This also seems unlikely since Richard's parents would have been 56 years old at his birth.

Grant Wright of Salem, Indiana states that "Tradition has it that Richard Wright, Sr. was born in England, emigrated to Wales, came back to England, an he, with four brothers immigrated to America probably sometime about 1746. They came to the Eastern shores of Maryland. Here they separated. Two went into New England, one to NY and Richard and one brother came into Virginia and then to Randolph County, North Carolina where he spent the remainder of his life".

The Washington-Wright line and Memorial Record of Rowan County states that Richard Wright is descended from Captain William Wright of Westmoreland County, Virginia and two generations back from Major Francis Wright and Ann Washington.

Will of Richard Wright, Sr.

From the office of Clerk Superior Court, Rowan County, Salisbury, North Carolina, in Will Book C, page 207:

"In the name of God Amen. I Richard WRIGHT Senr. of the County of Roan & State of North Carolina being through the abundant goodness and mercy of God tho weak in body Yet of a sound and perfect understanding & Memory do constitute this my last Will and Testament, and desire it to be Received by all as such. As for my burial I desire it to be decent without pomp or State at the discretion of my dear Wife and as to my worldly Estate I will and positively order that all my debts be paid. I give and bequeath to my son Benjamin [Wright] Two hundred Acres of land lying on the Waters of Deep River in Randolph County, Including the plantation whereon he used to live & I give to my son Peter [WRIGHT] Twenty Shillings & I give to my Sons Richard [WRIGHT] & William [WRIGHT] an Entry of land containing 226 Acres lying in Randolph County on the Waters of Uary to be divided equally at their own discretion. I give to my son Amus [WRIGHT] One hundred Acres of land including the house wherein he now lives & the price of a new Saddle and Bridle & I likewise give to my son William [WRIGHT] a feather Bed and furniture & and I give to my son Evins a milch cow a feather bed and furniture and the price of a good saddle and Bridle. I give to my son John [WRIGHT] a cow and Calf or the Value thereof in Gold or Silver & I give to my son Philburd [WRIGHT] a Horse Bridle and Saddle and a Cow and feather Bed and furniture at the age of Twenty One — or at his Mothers discretion and this plantation where I now live at his Mothers decease or Marriage and I give to my dear and loving Wife Two hundred Acres of land lying on deep River where I formerly used to live in Randolph County to sell at her discretion and likewise all my moveable property that I possess and if she marries, two thirds of the Estate is to be divided equal amongst the Children and if she dies without marrying, the principle Estate is to be divided equal amongst the all my children. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this third day of September; Anno Dom: 1784

Witness present Bis

His

Richard R WRIGHT (Seal)

Wm X Wright

Mark

His

Evins X WRIGHT

Mark

Richard Wright, Jr.

James MORGAN Junr."

The will was probated Feb 8, 1785 by Evans Wright and James Morgan Junr. His widow, Ann, and William Wright qualified giving bond of 200 pounds with James Morgan as security.

[NI000118] Mrs. Minnie Wright O'Neill
DAR ID 45747

William Wright enlisted as Private 1780 from Rowan County, North Carolina under Capt James Robinson, Col. Luthral, North Carolina State troops. Engaged in the battle of Island Ford. He removed to Kentucky in 1800 and 9 years later to Indiana, where in 1832 he applied for a pension in Washington County. He was born in 1761.

National Archive Files: His pension was stopped Sep 4 1838

WILLIAM WRIGHT
By Grant Wright

WILLIAM WRIGHT, son of Richard and Ann or Nancy Jane Wright was born Mar. 15, 1761. (Authority) Pension claim 1601 16301 in Washington, D.C. he was of English descent. William Wright and his wife lie buried in the Philburt Wright cemetery, located on State Highway 135 about 3 miles south of Salem, Ind. on the Philburt Wright farm. I placed a marker on his wife's grave a few years ago. I had the name Elizabeth put on the marker. My father remembered William Wright. He wore a little red cap and I think he died at his son Arvin's on the farm where I own. And there is a D.A.R. marker at his grave. William m. Martha Morgan who was called Patsy, she was b. in N.C., Aug. 8, 1868, and d. in Ind. Sept, 17, 1834. Until recently we thought her name was Betsey, and it is put this into records of D.A.R. and S.A.R. The Bible of her son West Lee Wright gave her name Martha. Mrs Harvey Morris of Salem, Ind. searched records to determine her name, she found a deed from William Wright and Marthew his wife to Wiley Johnson dated Nov. 18, 1832. Wright sold N 1/2 S.W. 1/4 Sec.32.- 2 N. 4E for $600, the name should have been spelled Martha. Martha was the daughter of James and Mary Morgan. Martha was sometimes called Patsey, she was buried by her husband. William Wright enlisted in Randolph Co. N.C., sometime in Dec. 1780 and served three months as private in Capt. James Robinson's Co. Col John Litteral's N.C. Regiment. He served a few weeks later as substitute for Philburt Wright 3 months in Rowan Co., N.C. and served 3 mo. in Capt. William Grey's Co. Col. Thomas Dugans regiment. This last service being about the time of the surrender of Cornwallis.

William moved to Ky. in 1800, lived there 9 years, then moved to Washington Co. Ind. He applied for a pension Sept. 26, 1832, and it began with March 4, 1831, amounting to $30 per annum. The information in this paragraph came from letters from the Veteran's Adm. and from the Gen. Ace. office both in Washington, D.C. the first letter states that his brother Amos was living in Washington Co. Ind. in 1832. William's granddaughter Phoebe Wright Hill of Medora, Ind. has the silver buckles he wore in the Revolution. Patra Goss says he furnished everything he used in the war, arms, money, and horse.

William was a farmer, and owned land adjourning that now belongs to Grant F. Wright. Children of William and Martha or Nancey Morgan Wright, birth dates from West Lee Wright Bible:

3-1 Elijah Wright, b.Jan. 11, 1788
3-2 Selah Wright, b. July 20, 1793
3-3 Samuel Wright, b. Jan. 10,1796
3-4 Sarah Wright, b. Sept. 1, 1797
3-5 Arvin Wright, b. Feb. 10, 1799
3-6 Morgan Wright, b. Nov. 20, 1801
3-7 West Lee Wright, b. Feb. 12, 1803
3-8 Betsey Wright, b. Au. 29, 1804

[NI000120] family resided in Powell's Valley Virginia for a few years, prior to moving to Wayne Co KY where Elizabeth (Lowe) WRIGHT died at age 41; Amos and 2nd wife Margaret moved to Clark's Grant in Indiana Territory in 1807, and in 1809 settled just east of Beck's Mills in what became Washington County Indiana. Amos Sr's brother Philbert and eldest son John and families joined Amos in settling this region of Indiana about 1808-09. During the War of 1812, fear of Indian raids caused the Wright families to temporarily live within Fort Hill (which they built with other nearby families), where Rev. John Wright's eldest daughter, Lavina was born in 1813. (Source: LDS Microfilm #1036598, "Pioneers in Area" by Helen Burgess, extracted by Ellie Stites Swanger)

[NI000121] Will of Philbert Wright: Dated June 30,1834, probated August 2,1855 in Wash. Co., IN. (Will Book A, p. 457-459).

"I, Philbert Wright, of Washington County, do hereby make my last will and testament in the manner and form following to-wit:

1st. I give and bequeath unto my beloved wife, Elizabeth Wright, one hundred dollars in cash, for the use of herself, her heirs & C. forever. Also at the time of our intermarriage, she was possessed of a half quarter section of land, 3 beds and bedding, 1 bureau, 1 corner cupboard, 1 clock, 2 cows and 1 yearling heifer, 10 head of sheep, 2 sows and 9 shoats, cupboard ware and small articles in amount say of $15., one loom, 1 ten gallon kettle, 1 pot, 1 tea kettle, 1 oven and 1 skillet, all of which said half quarter section of land and other articles above enumerated, I give and bequeath to her my said wife, Elizabeth Wright forever, and also the sum of $200. I wish placed in the hands of my Executor to be loaned by him on interest and the interest therefor to be paid over annually to her the said Elizabeth Wright, during her natural life. But should she again marry to be paid annually during her widowhood, and at her decease or intermarriage, the said sum of $200 to be equally distributed amonst my heirs and legal representatives - 1 side saddle, which she the said Elizabeth Wright now uses, I also give and bequeath to her forever, and all other property real or person, which she had at the time of her marriage, I bequeath to her forever.

2nd. I give and bequeath to my son John Wright, a horse to be worth $70. To make the term equal to the amount I have given my other sons.

3nd. It is to be understood that I have given and delivered to my daughters: Nancy Perlee, Sally Zink, Barbara Johnson, Betsy Hinds, Caty Hinds, Delilah Zink, and Selah Ratts, each 1 horse beast, worth $70., 1 cow worth $14, 1 flax wheel worth $4, 1 set knives and forks, worth $2.50; 1 pot worth $2. 1 set plates worth $1.25; 1 set spoons worth 75cents; 1 pail worth 50cents; 2 sheep worth $3.; 1 sow worth $2.; and the sum of $40. cas

4th. I give to and bequeath to my daughter Polly Wright, the same as I have given to my other daughters above named, excepting the side saddle worth $18, which has been delivered to the said Polly Wright, and if a sufficiency of said articles therein named should not be in my possession at the time of my decease, my executor is hereby directed to pay to my said daughter, Polly Wright, her equivalent in cash out of my estate.

5th. It is to be understood that I have conveyed by deeds to my sons, Eli Wright, Evins Wright, Absalom Wright and John Wright, certain lands (by reference to their deeds will more fully show) making the amounts as nearly equal as my judgement could determine and also I have given and delivered to Eli Wright, Evans Wright and Absalom Wright, 1 horse each worth $70. or in lieu thereof, $70. cash, as before stated my son John a horse to be worth $70. or in lieu thereof, $70. cash, as before stated in 2nd Item of this will.

6th. I will that my Executor pay all the above named legacies, not already paid out of my estate and that he make sale of the residue of my estate both real and personal in such manner as the law prescribed and after paying thereout the expense of his trust, then the proceeds of such sale be equally divided amongst all my sons and daughters above mentioned or their legal representatives.

7th. I constitute and appoint my son, Evans Wright, Executor of this my last will and testament.


Witnesses: Hugh McPheeters and s/ Philbert x Wright
Eli W. Malott (his mark)

An Abstract of this will can be found in "Abstracts of Wills of Washington County, Indiana 1808-1902" by Miss Lulie Davis, sec. of the Washington Co. Historical Society, Salem, IN 1971, retyped and indexed 1994.

From Complete Record, Greene County, Indiana, January term of court, l856: The settlement of a complaint for partition filed by Francis M. Wright, Sarah Jane Wright, Elijah Wright, Milia M. Wright, and Lucy Wright, minor heirs of Philbert Wright, deceased, by their next friend Peter Wright in the court of common pleas Oct. 27, l853 against Philbert Wright senior, Joseph Wright, James Love and Nancy Love, wife of the said James Love. Petitioners and defendants are named as heirs at law of Peter Wright Jr., deceased. Nancy H. Love is named as "also a sister of Philbert Wright Jr." The real estate being partitioned was in Greeme county, Section 5, Township 8 North, Range 7 West.

Submitted by Dixie Kline Richardson, Indianapolis and Spencer, Indiana

[NI000122] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code B22: " . . . of Shelby Co., Iowa, Family
#4-014" ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled
and published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824
S. Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 33: " . . . believed
that she was the dau. of Richard Wright, Jr. . . " p. 34 " . .
. believed to be the dau. of richard Wright, Jr. and 1st wife,
Nancy Morgan. . . " !From: "Roseanna Zahner"
4/6/00

[NI000128] ISAIAH WRIGHT: Champaign Co. Gazette July 11, 1877, page 4. Obituary: Mr. Isaiah Wright,one of the oldest citizsens of St. Joseph,died this morning at 8 o'clock. Mr. Wright was a native of North Carolina. He moved to Indiana in an early day and built the first log house in what is now the city of Greencastle, in that state. He has lived in this part of Champaign Co for thirty years or more. He filled the office of Justice of the peace for a long time after the organization of St. joseph township. He was respected by all. We don't think there was a more honest man in the township than father Wright. He was in his 86th year at the time of his death. July 9, 1877.

From the Estate 10522 of Isaiah Wright DECEASED State of Illinois, Champaign County Estate of Isaiah Wright; To the HON. J.W.Langley, Judge of the County Court of said County. Your Petitioner V.J. GALLION, Administrator of the Estate of ISAIAH WRIGHT late of said County, deceased, respectfully represents. That the said Isaiah Wright departed this life at St. Joseph on or about the ninth day of July 1877. That your Petitioner was on the 18th day of February 1878, duly appointed by the County Court of said CHAMPAIGN County ADMINISTRATOR of the goods and chattels, rithst and credits of Isaiah Wright aforesaid, as will appear by letters of administration ready her in court to be shown.. That the Inventory, Appraisement, Bill, in said Estate, have been duly filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, as required by law, and that the undersigned, as such Administrator, has rendered to said Court a just and true account of the personal estate and debts of said deceased, a certified coopy of which account is hereto attached, and made part of this petition, for reference and evidence, and marked "Exhibit" That the personal estate of said intestate is insufficient to pay the just claims against the said estate, as will appear by reference to said account and exhibit, and amounts to ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY NINE and .50/100 Dollars. Besides doubtful and desperate claims in t he hands of your petitioner, amounting to 758.04 Dollars, of which he will probably collect or receive the sum of 59.18 Dollars. The debts and demands allowed against and the liabilities of the said estate amount to 950. 49 Dollars. That there is the further sum of 355.?? Dollars of just claims to be presented and allowed against said estate, as will more particularly appear from said account, marked "Exhibit A" of which he has paid 155.50 Dollars. That your petitioner has applied all the proceeds of said personal estate which have come to his possession towards the payment of said debts, as by his account and vouchers on file in this Court will more particularly appear, and that there is a deficiency of personal property to pay the debts of the said deceased. And your petitioner further represent that the said ISAIAH WRIGHT died seized in fee of certain Real Estate in the County of CHAMPAIGN, AND State of Illinois, described as follows, to-wit:
The S E ¼ of NE ¼ and NE ¼ of S E ¼ Section 20-19-1
East pt N ½ NE NE Section 27-19-10=10A
Lot 2, NW pt No13, SW ¼ Section 23-19-10 = ¼ A
Lot No 3 & 4 NW SW Section 23-19-10= 1/2A
That the said real estate is reasonably worth the sum of EIGHTEEN HUNDRED Dollars. That the said deceased left him surviving PHEBE WRIGHT, as his Widow, having a dower interest in his real estate, and the following named children JEMIMA MOSTELLER OF STAUNTON, CLAY Co. IND, ELIZABETH JONES WHOSE RESIDENCE YOUR PETITIONER, AFTER MAKING DELIEGENT INQUIRY IS UNABLE TO ASCERTAIN, AND THE FOLLOWING Grand children: M. J.Witt, Sarah Emphie, Nathan Wright, M. S. Wright, Wm. J. Tyler, John Tyler, Wm H. Elliott, ST Joseph, Champaign Co., Illinois, Elizabeth Baker, ST Joseph, Champaign Co., Illinois

That your petitioner believes there are others interested in the premises but whose names and residence your petitioner, after making diligent inquiry, cannot ascertain. Your petitioner further prays that your honor will cause to be assigned to said Widow, Phebe Wright, her dower in said premises. That said land is occupied by ANDREW BECK & GEORGE TOOL as tenants. All of whom, to-wit: Phebe Wright, Newton Wright, John R. Tyler, Mary Bartley, John E. Wright, M.J. Witt, Sarah Emphie, Nathan Wright, M.S. Wright, Wm J. Tyler, John Tyler, Wm. H. Elliott, Elizabeth Baker, Andrew Beck, George Tool and others "unknown owners" are hereby made parties hereto, and are interested herein. Wherefore, in consideration of the premises, your petitioner prays that the said PHEBE WRIGHT, NEWTON WRIGHT, JOHN R. TYLER, MARY BARTLEY, JOHN E. WRIGHT, M.J. WITT, SARAH EMPIE,NATHAN WRIGHT, M.S. WRIGHT, WM. J. TYLER, JOHN TYLER, WM. H. ELLIOTT, ELIZABETH BAKER, ANDREW BECK, GEORGE TOOL AND SAID 'UNKNOWN OWNERS' maybe summoned and required to answer all the matters herein stated and charged, but not under oath, the necessity for answer under oath being hereby expressly waived. And that this Court will order and direct your petitioner to sell the said real estate according to law, or so much thereof as may be necessary to pay the debts of said intestate, and to make such further order or decree in the premises as may be deemed necessary, pursuant to the statute in such case made and provided. And your petitioner will ever pray, & c. X V. J. Gallion, Admin. Of ESTATE ISAIAH WRIGHT
Deceased. STATE OF ILLINOIS. CHAMPAIGN county, V.J. Gallion Admin. As aforesaid, being duly sworn, depose the best of HIS knowledge and belief. Subscribed and sworn to before to me, this 22nd day of JULY 1878 J. S. McCullough County Clerk

[NI000153] History of Washington County, Indiana; "Churches & Religious History";by Stevens, 1916

The first church organized in the county, was called the "Blue River Separate (or Free-Will) Baptists," located about four miles south of where Salem now stands, and some years before the county seat was established. The organization was perfected in May, 1810, and the master spirit of the same was Elder John Wright.

He was born in Rowan county, North Carolina, in 1785. He came to Clark's Grant in 1807. In 1808 he and his wife were immersed in the Ohio river by William Summers, of Kentucky.

He found occasion to hear the gospel expounded.a few times by Alexander Campbell, and at once decided to become a preacher. In January, 1810, he located in what was then Harrison, but now Washington county, some five miles below Royce's Lick, the then capitol of this part of the country.

His father and others came into the neighborhood in March and April, and in May they organized the church. This was the beginning of the "Church of Christ," or "Christians." Having established a church Blue-River, Elder John Wright assisted by his father, Amos, and his brother, Peter, who were all good preachers, went out into different parts of the county and organized churches.

They were called "Free-Will Baptists," "New Lights or Independent Baptists," and it was only a few years before they had ten church organizations formed into what was termed the Blue River Association. From the very first Elder John Wright was of the opinion that the Bible alone was the only infallible and sufficient rule of faith and practice. He was the first man in Indiana who took this position. He labored to destroy division and promote union among all the children of God. Though at first he tolerated the term Baptist, or whatever term a congregation chose for a name, he afterwards came, to the conclusion that it would be better to wear some name authorized in scripture, to designate the entire body of his adherents.

In 1819 he presented to the church at Blue River a resolution to this end. As individuals he was willing that they should be called "Friends," "Disciples" or "Christians," but as a body he preferred the "Church of Christ." The resolution was adopted and the association has since been known as the "Church of Christ at Blue River." Most all the other congregations in the county adopted a similar resolution or styled themselves the "Christian Church." This church, through the efforts of the Wrights, took the lead in the county and has ever maintained it. Elder Jacob Wright, a son of John Wright, was also a preacher in the county for years, and lived until 1884. Another branch of the Free-Will Baptists was organized in 1820, about four miles northwest of Salem.

The place was called Sluder's meeting house. Henry Sluder and John Custer were. the leading members and the church was very prosperous for a number of years, but its adherents moved away and the place was abandoned, and the house, a log structure, was allowed to rot down.

At the present time there is a membership of about four thousand two hundred in the county, the largest church organization in the county. The church in Salem was organized in 1849, with Jacob Wright as pastor, and has always been in a flourishing condition. B.F. Taylor has charge of the church at the present time.

FROM: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE PIONEER PREACHERS OF INDIANA (Philadelphia: J. Challen, 1862), 29-41.

JOHN WRIGHT.


ELDER JOHN WRIGHT was born in Rowan county, North Carolina, December 12th, 1785. His mother was of German descent. His ancestors on his father's side came from England in very early times, and settled on the eastern shore of Maryland. From that place they were scattered abroad, some making their way to the Carolinas. His father was brought up among the Quakers or Friends; and, singularly enough, he turned away from that fraternity, who baptized none, to the Tunkers, who practiced trine immersion. He afterwards cast in his lot with the Dependent Baptists, among whom he became a preacher.

Elder Wright remained in North Carolina until he was about twelve years of age. His father then removed with him to Powel's Valley, Virginia, where he grew up to manhood.

The most of his education he received from an old English gentleman by the name of Hodge, under whose tuition he acquired a good knowledge of reading, writing, and arithmetic. He received from the schools no further preparation for either the business of the world or the work of the ministry; but, having obtained the key to all knowledge - namely, reading - he constantly increased his stock of ideas by his own unassisted efforts. He was tolerably well informed upon general subjects, and could write a very respectable article, as may be seen by reference to the Christian Record, to which he was an occasional contributor.

From Virginia the whole family emigrated to the West and settled in Wayne county, Kentucky, where, on the 5th of January, 1803, Elder Wright was married to Miss Peggy Wolfescale. She accompanied him but a short distance on the journey of life, dying on the 12th of December, 1805, and leaving him with an infant daughter, which he entrusted to the parents of its departed mother.

After this bereavement, he engaged for two years in teaching school. At the expiration of this time he was again joined in marriage to Miss Nancy Peleer, who, for many years, proved a most excellent helpmate, ever ready, with him, to make any sacrifice for the cause of Christianity. She also died, on the 29th of August, 1844; and the following extract is from her obituary notice, written by T.C. Johnson, and published in the Christian Record for November of that year:

"She diligently followed every good work. The servants of God were often refreshed at her house by her hospitality. Saints always found her house their home; and sinners were so kindly treated by her as to endear her to them all. In short, she was an affectionate wife, a tender-hearted mother, an obliging and kind neighbor, and a mother in Israel, whose death is felt, not only by her afflicted relatives, but also by the Church and the community in which she lived.

Late in the year 1807 - which was very soon after his second marriage - he removed from Kentucky to Clark's grant, Indiana Territory.

In August, 1808, he and his wife were immersed in the Ohio river, by William Summers, of Kentucky. He immediately united with the Baptist Church, and in the latter part of the same year he began to preach. Be it observed that this was fifty-four years ago - eight years previous to the admission of the Territory as a State, and long before the current Reformation was heard of by the inhabitants of the West. He must, therefore, have been among the very first to break the stillness of Indiana's forests with the glad tidings of salvation.

In January, 1810, he removed to Blue River, four miles south of Salem, in what was then Harrison, but now Washington county. There he entered a beautiful tract of land; and, by much hard labor, opened an excellent farm. In a short time his father moved into the same neighborhood; where, in 1810, they organized a congregation of Dependent or Free Will Baptists.

About this time they experienced serious trouble with the Indians; and, while the energies of the nation were directed against Great Britain, in the war of 1812, they were compelled to protect themselves by forts from the tomahawk and scalping-knife.

When peace and safety were restored, he entered again with increased zeal into the work of the ministry. He was assisted by his father, and a younger brother Peter, who was beginning to preach with considerable success. The three Wrights exerted quite an influence in favor of Christianity, and it was not long until they had organized ten Baptist churches, which they formed into what was called the Blue River Association.

From the very first, John Wright was of the opinion that all human creeds are heretical and schismatical. He was perhaps the first man in Indiana that took his position on the Bible alone; and there has not come after him a more persistent contender for the word of God as the only sufficient guide in religious matters. He labored to destroy divisions, and promote union among all the children of God; and in this difficult yet most important service he made his indelible mark. Though at first he tolerated the term "Baptist" - it being natural to condemn ourselves last - yet he afterwards waged a war of extermination against all party names. This war was declared //32// in the year 1819, when he offered, in the church at Blue River, a resolution in favor of discarding their party name, and calling themselves by some name authorized in the Scriptures. As individuals, he was willing that they should be called "Friends," "Disciples," or "Christians;" and, as a body, "the Church of Christ," or "the Church of God." He opposed the term "Christian," as applied to the Church, because it is not so applied in the writings of the apostles.

The resolution was adopted with more unanimity than was expected; and the Baptist church has since been known as the Church of Christ at Blue River. Having agreed, also, to lay aside, as far as possible, their speculative opinions and contradictory theories, they presumed that they were prepared to plead consistently for Christian union, and to invite others to stand with them upon the one broad and sure foundation. They then began in earnest the work of reformation, and with such success that by the year 1821 there was scarcely a Baptist church in all that region. They all took upon them "that worthy name," and converted their Association into an Annual Meeting.

About this time a spirited controversy on the subject of Trine Immersion, was going on among the Tunkers, of whom there were some fifteen congregations in that section of the country. The leading spirits in opposition to that doctrine were Abram Kern of Indiana, and Peter Hon of Kentucky. At first they contended against great odds, but so many of their opponents came over to their side that they finally gained a decisive victory in favor of one immersion.

At the close of the contest, while both parties were exhausted by the war, Elder Wright recommended to the Annual Meeting that they should send a letter to the Annual Conference of the Tunkers, proposing a union of //33// the two bodies on the Bible alone. The letter was written, and John Wright, his brother Peter, and several others, were appointed as messengers to convey it to the Conference and there advocate the measures it proposed. So successful was the expedition that at the first meeting the union was permanently formed, the Tunkers being persuaded to call themselves Christians.

At the same annual meeting Elder Wright proposed a correspondence with the Newlights, for the purpose of forming with them a more perfect union. He was appointed to conduct the correspondence on the part of his brethren, which he did with so much ability and discretion, that a joint convention was assembled near Edinburg, where the union was readily formed. Only one church in all the vicinity refused to enter into the coalition, and it soon died of chronic sectarianism.

A few years subsequent to this, the work of Reformation began to progress rapidly among the Regular Baptists of the Silver Creek Association. This was, remotely, through the influence of Alexander Campbell, but directly through that of Absalom and J.T. Littell, and Mordecai Cole, the leading spirits in that locality. Through their teaching hundreds of individuals and sometimes whole churches were renouncing all human creeds and coming out on the Bible alone; yet a shyness existed between them and those who had previously done the same thing under the labors of John Wright. The former, having held Calvinistic opinions, stood aloof through fear of being called Arians; while the latter feared to make any advances lest they should be stigmatized as Campbellites. Thus the two parties stood, when Elder Wright, braving the danger of being denounced as a Campbellite, established a connection between them by which the sentiments of each were communicated to the other. By this means it was soon ascertained that they were all endeavoring to preach and practice the same things. The only important difference between them was in regard to the design of Baptism, and on this point Elder Wright yielded as soon as he was convinced of his error. Through the influence of himself, his brother Peter, Abram Kern, and others, on the part of what was called the Annual Meeting of the Southern District, which was composed of those who had been Baptists, Tunkers and Newlights; and through the efforts of Mordecai Cole and the Littells, on the part of the Silver Creek Association, a permanent union was formed between those two large and influential bodies of believers. In consequence of this glorious movement, more than three thousand struck hands in one day - not in person, but through their legal representatives, all agreeing to stand together on the one foundation and to forget all minor differences in their devotion to the great interests of the Redeemer's kingdom. This was, perhaps, the greatest achievement of Elder Wright's long and eventual life; and he deserves to be held in everlasting remembrance for his love of truth rather than of party, for his moral courage in carrying out his convictions of right, and for the meek and affectionate spirit which gave him such power in uniting opposing sects and cementing them in love.

To the happy effects of this obliteration of party lines he testified a few years afterward. In a communication to the October number of the Christian Record for 1845, he wrote as follows:

"Beloved brethren in the Lord: - Through the permission of our kind heavenly Father I have travelled through many of the churches in the south part of the State, and have been abundantly comforted in the society of our good brethren in Christ. For many years we have seen many who, like the Jews and Samaritans, had no religious dealings: but when the gospel was preached by Peter to the Jews according to his broad commission, about three //35// thousand joyfully received and obeyed the truth. And when Philip, the evangelist, preached to the Samaritans, they 'believed and were baptized both men and women.' And when the same gospel was preached to the Gentiles by Peter, they also believed and obeyed from the heart of the same divine form of doctrine. Thus we see believers from all the sectarian parties of that age united in one body in Christ: having laid aside their former prejudices and hatred, together they put on Christ according to the constitution of his kingdom; there was no longer Jew, Gentile, or Samaritan as formerly, but they were now all partakers of the divine nature, were all made to drink into one spirit, in short they all became children of God - Christians.

"So it was in Southern Indiana: formerly we had Regular Baptists, separate baptists, German or Dunkard Baptists, free will Baptists, christian connexion, or Newlights. These societies in some respects were like the Jews and Samaritans of old; but the old gospel was preached among these warring sects with great power and success. Much of the partyism that existed was removed, and most of their party names were done away. * * * Formerly we all had in our respective churches much that was purely human; but now, in the church of God, we have no need of the 'mourning bench,' 'the anxious seat,' or any other institution of man's device; but in the church is the place where the solemn feast of the Lord's body is celebrated, and sincere worship is offered to the Father in spirit and truth."

It was not with the pen but with the tongue that his influence was chiefly exerted. The preceding extract is, perhaps, a fair specimen of his composition. The style, the capitals, and the punctuation, indicate that it is a genuine production of the unlettered pioneer.

At first it was prophesied that such a union could not //36// continue. This prediction grew out of the fact that the materials had been collected from many different denominations: - Baptists, Newlights, Tunkers, Methodists and Presbyterians. But a quarter of a century has passed away, and the prophecy is not yet fulfilled. On the contrary, those who were young when the union was formed, have, in their old age, almost forgotten that they ever were divided.

Alas for the interests of Christ's kingdom, that race of prophets is not yet extinct! There are still those who tell us that "men cannot all think alike, or belong to one Church;" and who give thanks to God that there is a variety of Churches, so that all may be accommodated. If, in the consequent confusion, thousands of our fellows should stumble over us into skepticism, and finally into destruction and perdition, it is no matter, if only we can all be "accommodated!" If Christ died for all, as the apostle affirms, then all can belong to one Church; otherwise he would have built two or more. The Lord, by the pen of his apostle, commands "all that in every place call upon the name of Jesus Christ," to "all speak the same thing, and to have no divisions among them." By this and every other positive commandment stands the Reformation, firm as the lone Elijah by the worship of the living God. As it fearlessly advances, sectarianism confronts it, saying, in the language of the wicked Ahab, "Art thou he that troubleth Israel?" It answers, in the bold words of Elijah, "I have not troubled Israel, but thou and thy father's house, in that ye have departed from the commandments of the Lord." All the day long, as did those of old, these latter-day prophets have called upon God to convert the world in their way, but he has been deaf to all their cries. Now, therefore, in the evening, the advocates of reform desire to call upon him according to his will, confident, as was Elijah, that he will hear their cry and accept their sacrifice.

Besides his efforts to effect a union of God's people, Elder Wright did much, in his lifetime, for the cause of the Redeemer. By means of his farm in Washington county he was able, without much labor, to make a comfortable living; and, as he sought to lay up no treasure on earth, he devoted the greater part of his time to the work of the ministry. Through lack of records it is impossible to follow him from year to year, giving a detailed account of his labors and successes in the gospel. Suffice it to say, that for more than forty years he preached much, and with good results, in Washington and several other counties of southeastern Indiana. The people had unbounded confidence in his piety and judgment, and wherever he went they were to a great extent under his influence.

On the death of his second wife, in 1844, he sold his farm to his son Ransom, reserving one room of the house for his occasional use during the remnant of his days. Afterwards he spent nearly all his time among the brethren, comforting, establishing, strengthening them.

In addition to his labors, he also sacrificed much for the support of the gospel. In the good providence of God, his father, step-mother, all of his brothers, sisters, and children were zealous members of the Church of Christ. His father and his four brothers - Peter, Levi, Joshua, and Amos - were all preachers of the "repentance and remission of sins" that began at Jerusalem. His youngest son died on the 19th of November, 1843; and Christianity had made bright his pathway to the tomb. He therefore felt that he could never give too much in support of that gospel which had given so much peace, and joy, and hope to his family. Often did he borrow money to defray his expenses to his appointments; and sometimes, through the illiberality of the brethren, he was compelled to resort to the same expedient in order to get home. He used to purchase wine at high rates, and carry it forty or fifty miles in his saddle-bags, in order that he might show forth the Lord's death with his brethren.

During the first years of his ministry, he never so much as expected any remuneration for his services; for it was a prominent article in the unwritten Baptist creed that the preacher should do nothing for filthy lucre. By this doctrine the generosity of the brethren was so stifled that it has not yet recovered the healthy action it possessed in apostolic times. Money was never the object for which he toiled; but he thankfully received, with an enlightened conscience, whatever was offered, believing that, as he loved to contribute, every other brother, who had the cause near his heart, should enjoy the same privilege. As heart and flesh failed him, the liberality of the churches increased; and, after his family had all begun life for themselves, or passed away to the spirit land, he received for his preaching what was amply sufficient to supply all his earthly wants.

He enjoyed excellent health until very near the close of his pilgrimage; and it was a saying with him that he "never had a pain as long as his little finger." But, though he lived many years, and rejoiced in them all, the days of darkness were in reservation for him. In the spring of 1850 he was seized with acute inflammation of the stomach. The disease readily yielded to medical treatment, and in a short time he resumed the Master's work. In the fall of the same year it returned upon him in a more violent and obstinate form, and he expressed the conviction that his race was almost run.

He passed the winter with his son Jacob, at Salem, and by the coming of spring he had so far recovered as to be able to return home to his son Ramson's. Immediately afterwards he grew worse, and began to sink rapidly. His brother in the gospel, Dr. H.T.N. Benedict, was called in; but he could do no more than to comfort him in his afflictions by pointing him to his eternal weight of glory.

His living children were all near him except his son Jacob, who was preaching at New Albany. He was summoned; and when he came his father said, "My son, I am just waiting for my discharge." He seemed more like one preparing to start on a long journey than one about to experience the agony of death. He first spoke to his family relative to some pecuniary matters. These being disposed of to his satisfaction, he requested Dr. Benedict to write his obituary notice, and also expressed his desire that J.M.Mathes should preach his "Christian farewell," from Rev. xiv.13. He observed that he had lived in Washington county over forty years; that if he had in it an enemy he did not know it; and that he thought he could make one more successful appeal to the citizens, through "little Jimmy," as he called Elder Mathes. In a few moments he said to J.L. Martin, "Brother Lem, you will see to making my little house" - meaning his coffin. He then remarked that he believed he was ready to go - that he did not think of any thing else. Presently he said to his son Jacob: "There is one thing I had forgotten. Abram Kern and I were appointed as messengers to write and convey a letter to the Annual Meeting of Silver Creek District. I want you to write the letter, and go with Brother Kern to introduce him, for he will be a stranger there."

As he approached his dissolution, he conversed more and more, exhorted those present to be faithful, and repeated several passages of Scripture - among them the fifth of Corinthians, commencing, "For we know that if our earthly house of this tabernacle were dissolved we //40// have a building of God, a house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens." After taking his final leave of family and friends, he placed his hands across his breast, closed his own eyes, and breathed softly and still more softly until he fell into his last long sleep, without the movement of a muscle, his lips remaining compressed, his eyes closed, and his hands just as he had placed them. Thus passed away from earth Elder John Wright, at eight o'clock in the evening of May 2d, 1851 - aged 67 years, 6 months, and 26 days.

"Had the skeptic," says an eye-witness, "been privileged to behold the triumphant exit of this man of God, his skepticism would have been blown away by the dying breath of this aged, this devoted servant of our Divine Redeemer."

Elder Wright was a tall, square-built man, of excellent constitution and great physical power. Many were the giant oaks that he felled to earth by the sturdy strokes of his axe.

His mental powers were as good by nature as his physical: the disparity in their development was a necessity of the times in which he lived. He possessed an iron will, tempered even to flexibility by the spirit that was in Christ.

His character was a most happy combination of "whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report." He was an uncompromising advocate, a bold and fearless defender of the truth; yet he usually employed the "soft answer" that turns away wrath, rather than the "grievous words" which stir up strife.

As a speaker he was unpolished, not logical, but very sympathetic. His own heart being full of love and fealty //41// to God, he induced the same feeling in the hearts of those who heard him; for, "as in water face answereth to face, so the heart of man to man."

Uneducated and untaught in the art of speaking, his useful career is a demonstration of the power of a holy life. May his brilliant success in the gospel stimulate all evangelists, of this more enlightened age, to combine with their intellectual acumen the godliness of this departed pioneer

[NI000183] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code B22: " . . . of Shelby Co., Iowa, Family
#4-014" !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- pp. 21, 33 : " . . . b.
25 Aug, 1785 on the Rich Ford of the Uwharrie . . . served in
the Clark Co. Militia . . ." pp. 34 - 40: " . . . (Family
records of Ronald J. Fouts, Ford Wayne, Ind.; gravestone;
History of Harrison Co., Iowa, 1891, p. 968). " . . . There is
no indication that Noah Fouts . . . owned land i Randolph Co.,
but his name appears in the Randolph County records . . . "With
the exception of Noah, all of the sons of Andrew, St., recieved
land from their father . . . Noah may have requested a cash
sttlement . . ." p. 40: " . . . 'Noel Fouts' is engraved on his
gravestone. However, his oldest grandson was named 'Noah
Brotherton' . . . " p. 46 -- 1850 Census, Pottawatomie Co.,
Iowa, Dist. 21 . . . Geo. McIntosh 14 b. Ia. (g.c. of Noah &
Jane -- Laurinda Mc Intosh 9 b. Ia. ch. of dau. Martha !From:
"Roseanna Zahner" 4/6/00

[NI000190] Shirley Varker Gragg
Fredericksburg, VA

Mary Ann Wright was my Great-grandmother. Irecently traced her back by information that she sold some 311 acres of landin Davidson County, NC in 1848. I wrote to the Register of Deeds and got a hard copy. On the land sale deed , she and brothers Nelson, Miles, Micajah(that's how it was spelled), Burges were specifically named. A specificsentence that made me realize that her maiden name was WRIGHT and not a Geddis (she may have been married before 1842 when she married Thomas - she was 24 then and kinda old for a first marriage) was "Thomas Varker and his wife, Mary Ann Varker'. It was not until then, that I realized she had brother and sisters!

Also, on the marriage bond, she gave her name as Mary Ann Geddis; however,in another document where my GGF's estate was contested, she gave a deposition and gave her name as Mary Ann Wright.

[NI000197] Obituaries:
Brother Goodwin: It becomes my duty to record the death of one of our most ancient sisters, Sister Nancy, widow of Richard Gilstrap. She was the daughter of Benjamin Wright, born in Roan County,North Carolina on the 24th day of May,
1779, was married in the same county on the 24th of May, 1797, was immersed by Elder William Summers in Wayne County, KY in the year 1806, and became a member of the Separate or Free Will Baptist. She was one of
the first to embrace the Reformation and continued a faithful member of the Church of Christ at Millcreek, Washington County, Indiana until the day of her death. She died on the 10th day of April, 1860, being 80 years, 11
months and 6 days old.

[NI000218] Will of Joshua Wright
Clark County, Mo., Decmbr the 8th, 1862. In the Name of God Amen I, Joshua Wright, I am sain in mind and sound in judgment I hereby make my Last Will and Testiment and deal to be disposed and to divide my Worley goods that god had pleased to Bless me with in the following manner that is first I give my soul to god Who gave it and my Body to the grave in the Name of God Who gave me all things..also I desire my body deasentley enterd. Second I want my Funarel exspences paid and all of my just Debts paid, third I will and Bequeath to Mary Ann Wright my Wife the following property as long as She lives. First the house and farme and fairmen uetential Stock of all kinds but with the prosseds fo the Same the two Boys to be Scholld and deasentley cloathed that is Hughe Greene and Jerimah Washingotn and also to pay the taxes that accurse and to give these two Boys a librel chance to make and cloth them selves for them Selves and for them to take good care of there dear old mother While She lives and if green Should marrey he Should have a chance and a write to build on the East part of the land or Washington either. I wish one of them to live in the house with there mother and at her Death my Will is that the Boys green and Washington Shall have one hundred and twenty acres of land With all that pertains to it including the buildings and the one hundred and (cross-out) twenty (cross-out) acres lying the South East quarter of the south East half of Section No. 51o in
township Sixty four Range eight West commencing at a Stone planted on the North East bank fo the South hunycreek and from thence East one half a mile to a Section corner stone planted thence North on the line one hundred and twenty Rods thence West one halfe of a mile thence South to the beginning corner containing one hundred and twenty acres of land also sixteen acres of limbrd land lying West of Washington Farrs Side by Side in section twelve township Sixty four range West green and Washington I want you to divide your timber and your land when your mother is dead or if after you become of age and She is yet alive you must take all in concideration everyway buildings are hed femen (cross-out) and if you cannot agree let my two executers divide for you or agree and sel all and divide your money eqaual. My Wil is that you Shall take good care of your old mother in her old age and at her Death my Will is that the beds and Bed Clothing and furniture in the house and the stock and chickens be equal divided between my heirs concidring of the items Im given to the old set of children also my Will is that Elisah Smith and Mary Elizabeth Smith Shall have twenty acres of land being the North end of the (cross-out) North West quarter Section No one township Sixty Four Range eight West to them and there heirs to hold the same. Also my Will is that Nelson W. Bishop and Tempy Bishop Shall have twenty acres of land being the North East part of the North East quarter Section No two (cross-out) township Sixty four Range eight West to them and there heirs to hold the same twenty acres. also my Will is that Rufus Ash and Susan Ash Shall have Sixteen acres of land being and lying in the north East part of the South East quarter Section No two township Sixty four Range eight West lying between John and the two that to the Boys to have and hold the Same. Also Rufus Ash, Nelson W. Bishop and Elisah Smith to have twelve acres of timberd and joining of green and Washington on the west in Section No twelve Township Sixty foure Range Eight West this they are to divide equal them Selves and to have and to hold the same. My Will is that my West eighty and this North of my house that is the peace joining to green and Washington and the Eighty in the bottom to be Sold when it is thought to bring a fair rpiace with the esseption of one half of a acre in the (cross-out) South West corner fo the West eighty that to be kept for a burying ground and the Same to be divided eaquael between my heirs and assignes this my last Will and testiment
Joshua Wright
Where I appoint my (cross-out) two name Executors Rufus Ash, Alexander Adams published acknowalleged signed in the presence of W.W. Wright
Witness
Henry (can’t read the last name)

[NI000234] Biographical & Historical Record of Putnam Co IN History. Chicago: Lewis Publishing, 1887, p. 352& 353

ELDER EZEKIEL WRIGHT resides on section 21, Madison Township, where he owns 120 acres of land. He was born in North Carolina, December 19, 1821, son of Amos and Elizabeth Wright, also natives of North Carolina, and of Welsh-Irish ancestry. His maternal grandfather was a soldier of the Revolutionary War.

The family settled in Madison Township in 1827, where the father died in 1876, aged eighty-eight years. The mother died in 1880, aged ninety years. Their twelve children lived to be grown, and six are now living--Linnie, Ezekiel and Rhoda of this county; Nathan, a minister of the Church of Christ, now of Douglas, Kansas; Dicey, also of Douglas, Kansas, and Turner, of Longmont, Colorado. Our subject was reared on a farm, his present farm being a part of the old homestead. He was ordained elder of the church in 1852, and commenced preaching, and since about 1857 has been preaching in Illinois, Kansas and Indiana. December 31, 1841, he married to Miss Celia Wright, daughter of Levi and Nancy Wright, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1818, and died February 22, 1884. Five of their six children are living--Henry C., of Kansas, married Minerva Simms, who died, and he afterward married her sister, Lucinda; Fanny, widow of Austin Simms, resides with her father; Barton S., of Beman, Kansas; Levi M. and Nancy E. at home. Martha is deceased. Mr. Wright has served as township treasurer three years, and as township trustee about nine years. He is a self-made man. His early education was limited to the common schools of his time. In politics he is a Democrat.

[NI000245] Genealogy of Richard Wright, Jr., son of Richard Wright, Sr. by Knouf: At the age of 20, Nathan became a Christian and at 22, began to preach. His first serman was in his father's home. He preached for 68 years. He could quote almost the entire New Testament, and was called the 'walking bible'. He was of large build and a powerful preacher. He lived and preached in Western Indiana, Eastern Illinois and Butler County Kansas.

[NI000282] The subject of this sketch, Hon. A.R. Wright, was born in Putnam County, Indiana, January 20, 1829, and died at his residence in Glenwood, Iowa, October 28, being near 62 years of age. The early years of his life were spent upon a farm, but in 1848, he engaged in the mercantile business, which he followed about six years. He was one of Mills County's pioneers, coming here in 1854, and locating on land in Lyons Township, some of which he still owned at the time of his demise. For twenty years he resided in Lyons Township, and by his industry and thrift accumulated a competence and established one of the first country homes in the county. While living here Mr. W. and wife were connected with the Christian Church, and through the activity and generosity of the former, a house of worship was erected and regular services maintained for a number of years. In 1847, he moved to Glenwood and engaged in the loan and brokerage business, to which he devoted more or less of his time during the remainder of his life. He owned a fine, well improved farm in Center Township, and many of his later years were spent in this pleasant home. However, having disposed of his Center Township farm during the past year, he again took up his abode in Glenwood, and at the time of his death had just completed and moved into one of the most cozy and commodious residences in the city. On December 24, 1849, Mr. Wright and Miss Sarah A. Webster were united in marriage, and four of six children born to them survive with their mother to mourn the loss of father and husband. The children are, Cannie, now wife of Robert Hale, Esq., Frank, Charlie and Fannie. During his long residence in Mills County, Mr. Wright was frequently called upon to serve the people in an official capacity, ranging all the way from township office to member of the Iowa Legislature, of which body, he was twice an honored and useful member. He was a man of strong, earnest conviction, intensely practical, and nothing could sever him from the line of duty which he conceived to be right; and he possessed the good sense and judgment that universally arrayed him on the right side of all questions that affected the well being of the people. As for instance, was not only a believer in, but was a fighter for the cause of prohibition, and at the time of his death was President of the County temperance organization. He has gone to claim his reward for a life of industry, uprightness and careful improvement of the talents that were given him, and for his many good qualities of head and heart, the memory of deceased will linger as a "fond recollection" in the minds of all who enjoyed his acquaintance.

[NI000283] Glenwood Opinion
Glenwood, Mills County, Iowa
January 16, 1924

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR MRS. WRIGHT

Funeral Service for Well Known Glenwood Lady, Mrs. Wright Who Died at Daughter's Home Held Here Thursday

As was briefly mentioned last week, Mrs. Sarah Wright, one of Glenwood's most highly respected and long time residents passed away Monday, January 7, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Elmer Burkett in Lincoln, Nebraska, where she had gone for a visit just about a week prior to her death. She was apparently in usual health, sitting in her chair conversing with her daughter when the spirit was summoned by the angel of death, and that which was mortal quietly sunk into the repose and sleep which known no wakening.
The body was brought to Glenwood, where services were held from the home of her son, Frank Wright, Thursday, January 10 at 10 a.m., conducted by Rev. D.S. Thompson. Music was furnished by Mesdames F.V. Kemp and Orley Alterkruse and Messrs J.W. Morgan and Tom White. Pallbearers were S.M. Estes, John Wolf, T.J. Wallace, Lafe Wolf, S.F. Vinton and Will Daniel.
Interment was made in the Glenwood cemetery. Relatives present from a distance were Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Burkett and family, the Misses Helen and Lenore Burkett and Mrs. Josephine Farouhar all of Lincoln and Charles Wright, of Genoa, Nebraska, and Mrs. Crendson of Hamburg, Iowa.
The floral offerings were beautiful and profuse, an eloquent tribute of the esteem in which this good lady was held by all of those who knew her.
The following life sketch was read at the service:
Sarah A. Webster was born in Detroit, Michigan, April 17, 1831, and died in Lincoln, Nebraska, January 7, 1924 at the age of 92 years, 8 months and 20 days, while on a visit with her daughter, Mrs. E.J. Burkett.
She was married December 24, 1849 to A.R. Wright at Manhattan, Indiana, and came to Glenwood, Iowa in 1854, which has since been her home.
Her husband died October 28, 1890. She is survived by four children: Mrs. Robert Hale, of Los Angeles, California, Frank Wright, of Glenwood, Iowa, C.R. Wright of Genoa, Nebraska; and Mrs. E.J. Burkett, of Lincoln, Nebraska.

[NI000284] Glenwood Opinion
Glenwood, Mills County, Iowa
March 20, 1902

Another Pioneer Passes Away

In the death of John Wright at his home in Glenwood early Tuesday morning, Mills County loses another one of her sturdy citizens and early day pioneers, who by their labors and the enduring of hardships have helped to lay the foundations of this great western civilization.
For several years, Mrs. Wright's health has been declining, his condition getting rapidly worse for the past few months. Death resulted from Laryngeal tuberculosis, a species of consumption affecting the throat and which extended downward.
The funeral took place from the home Wednesday afternoon, being attended largely by life long friends and business associates. The services were conducted by Rev. W.J. Howard.
John Wright at the time of his death was in his 67th year, having been born April 16th, 1835 in Manhattan, Putnam County, Indiana. In 1856, he came to Mills County, settling on land in Lyons Township, which he continued to own and add to throughout the 46 years of his residence in this locality. Some 27 years ago took up his residence in Glenwood, dividing, since then his time between his city and country home.
Just before coming to Mills County in 1856, he was married to Mary Ann Lewis, who survives him. To them were born four children, three of whom are living-Mrs. Ida Stillwagon of Nebraska City, Fay Wright of Lyons Township and Miss Kyle Wright of Glenwood. The first born died when about 5 years of age. Mr. Wright also leaves one aged sister, Mrs. Edward Gillilland of Pacific City.
Mr. Wright was a man of sterling integrity and business honor, enjoying throughout his long residence in this community the respect and esteem of his fellow men.

[NI000323] Denny Genealogy (Third Book) states the following:

(pg 195) David L Wright was born Apr 25 1836, in Martinsburg,Ind. He
enlisted in the Union Army in 1861, when Pres. Lincoln made his call for
volunteers to serve three month. He reenlisted in the 61st Regiment and
became Captain. Was captured in the Georgia campaign and confined in Libby
Prison in Richmond,Va. He was of the group who dug the tunnel out of the
prison - but the group was discovered before they could escape. He was night
guard at the Indiana state treasury and custodian of the Soldiers Monument
in Indianapolis. He died there suddenly and alone, Dec 12, 1907.Directions
for his funeral were found on a paper beside him. He is buried in Crown Hill
Cemetery, Salem, Indiana.

[NI000353] Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana. 1884,
Charles Blanchard, F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers

INDIAN CREEK TOWNSHIP, MONROE COUNTY, INDIANA PAGE 658


DAVID WRIGHT was born near Utica, Ind., November 16, 1806, and is the third of the family of James and Elizabeth (Sears) Wright, who moved to this State in 1816; located in the timber, which they cleared, and thereby made a home. September 14, 1829, he married Caroline M., daughter of John and Elizabeth Kutch, by which union were produced thirteen children--John, James, Alfred, Levi, Jane, Elizabeth, Euin, Jacob, Nancy, Clarinda, David D. and two infants, deceased. After marriage, Mr. Wright lived with his father about a year, when he bought land and lived thereon for six years, afterward purchasing his present home and farm, comprising seventy acres of excellent and well improved land, on which he has since resided. Mrs. Wright died January,1881, and January, 1882, Mr. Wright married a second wife; they are members of the Christian Church.

[NI000478] WILLIS WRIGHT, SR

Died. At his home in Jefferson, Thursday, Sept. 22, of cancer of the stomach, Willis Wright, in the 70th year of his age.

Willis Wright was born in Indiana, Feb. 22, 1829, where he grew to manhood, and was married to Mary Morelan Jan. 1, 1846. By this union he became the father of 7 children, four boys and three girls, all but 2 of them who survive him.

Bro. Wright has been a resident of Greene Co. about 15 years. Spending a large part of his life on the frontier, his school privileges were not the best, and yet the very hardships and privations of a frontier experience were important educational and character-forming factors in his life, developing those sturdy qualities so essential to the higher type of manhood. He was a man of good native sense, with an inquiring mind and retentive memory. His lack of school privileges was in some measure compensated for by reading, observation and experience, and aided by a remarkable memory, his mental equipment was beyond the average. He was not an extremist in any sense, but was well-balanced, having what may be termed the judicial type of mind. He served with credit to himself and satisfaction to the people several terms as Justice of the Peace. He also received a commission as Captain of Home Guards during the Civil War.

He gave his heart to Christ about 50 years ago, and was a faithful and consistent member of the Christian Church until the close of life. He was a great Bible reader and a good exegete. He could not only quote large portions of scripture, but had a very accurate understanding of the proper division and interpretation of God's word. He was the senior elder of the church, presiding at all the meetings of the official Board when able to be present, and his council was always wise and generally acceptable to the church. He was hospitable and generous to a fault. He had the respect and esteem of all who knew him, was a kind husband, indulgent father, a good neighbor and citizen, and above all a devoted Christian. He departed this life about noon on Thursday, Sept. 22, 1898, leaving to mourn his loss and cherish his memory a loving wife, 3 sons, Wm. Elijah, Lewis and Lemuel Paton, 2 daughters, Mrs Mary Bebe and Mrs. Olie Albee, and a large number of relatives and friends.

"He rests from his labors and his works do follow him," "Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord."

Jefferson Bee - September 22, 1898

[NI000479] "BIOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORIGAL RECORD OF GREEN AND CARROLL COUNTIES, Printed in 1887 by the Lewis Publishing Company.

Ervin Wright, A pioneer of Greene County,resides on section 3, Jackson Township. He was born in Putnam County,Indiana, June 27,1831. His parents names, ELIJAH and Susannah Wright,were among the earliest settlers of Putnam County, removing there from North Carolina, their native state in 1821. His youth was spent at farm labor and in attending the commsubscrption schools. August 26,1849
he was married to Miss. Deliah M. Beck, daughter of William And Susannah Beck, who was born in Washington County, Indiana, Oct. 30, 1827. He became a minister. He married and had 6 children.William S, John H, Louisa, Hester, Sara and Ervin

There is more about children who died, One was Julia, who died at 3 months

[NI000480] Mr. Joel H. Wright returned last Saturday from attending the funeral of his father, Mr. Elijah Wright, of Tabor, Iowa, who passed away on Wednesday of last week after an illness of a month's duration. The burial took place there on Friday, interment being made at Tabor. Mr. Wright Sr., was a former resident of Greene county, living in Jackson township since before the Civil war until about seventeen years ago. He was 79 years of age at death.

Jefferson Bee - March 19, 1913

[NI000482] LEM WRIGHT'S DEATH

Lemuel Wright, who has been at the hospital at Iowa City for several weeks, died there at noon Monday, and the body was brought here in the Slininger ambulance. Mr. Wright went there for an operation which was performed shortly after he went there. He was a resident all his life of Greene county, and well known in this locality. The funeral will occur at the Chrisian church Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, with Rev. Gans in charge. His surviving children are four sons, Oscar, Ira, Ralph and Henry, who reside in this county.

Jefferson Bee - December 2, 1931

- - - - - - - - - -

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR LEM WRIGHT

Death Claimed Local Man After Long Illness

Funeral services for Lem Wright, well known local resident of this community who died Monday at Iowa City, were held at the Church of Christ Wednesday afternoon in charge of the pastor, Rev. L. R. Gans. Burial was in the Wright cemetery, northwest of Jefferson.

Lemuel P. Wright son of Willis and Mary Wright, was born in Greene county, Iowa, on June 2, 1857, and passed away Nov. 30, 1931, in Iowa City at the age of 74 years 5 months and 28 days.

He united with the Christian church in young manhood and remained faithful to that belief. Except for two years spent in Marshalltown and Glidden Mr Wright had always made his home in Greene county.

In the year 1875 he was united in Marriage to Rhoda Taylor and to this union were born two sons, Oscar L. of Churdan and Ira M. of Jefferson. Later in 1886 while living in Marshalltown they adopted Henry R. who resides in Jefferson.

In 1896 he was married to Miss Gertrude Cooper of Glidden, Iowa, and to this union was born one son, Ralph F. of Boone, Iowa.

He leaves to mourn besides his four sons and one brother, Lewis, of Glidden, many other relatives and friends.

Jefferson Herald - December 3, 1931

[NI000568] GEORGE FULTZ is a native of Virginia, and was born in 1825, a son of John and Sarah Fultz. In 1826 he came with his parents to Salem, Ind., where his father worked at the mill rights' trade for a number of years, and also operated the " De Pauw mills," which he had built. Mrs. Fultz died in 1836, and Mr. Fultz about 1856. George Fultz has been engaged in various occupations through life, and at present is attending, his farm of 215 acres, east of Salem. He follower steam-boating and distilling for a time; ran the first dray in Salem, and for about thirteen years conducted the Salem Democrat with ability and success. He also operated a wagon and carriage manufactory and livery stable. For a number of years he served as Deputy County Sheriff, and so acceptably did he fill the position that be was twice elected as principal to that office. Since his retirement from public life he has been actively engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. Fultz is one of the enterprising and energetic men of the county; is a stanch Democrat in politics, and a member of the I. 0. 0. F. He was married in 1858 to Miss Mary Wright, dauahter of Levi Wright, of Washington County.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI000577] HON. GREENWOOD WRIGHT. of Wright Township, residing on section 3, was born in Washington County, Indiana, August 30, 1818,a son of Samuel and Jane (Brinton) Wright, the father born in North Carolina and reared in Wayne County, Kentucky, and the mother a native of Kentucky, born near Lexington., of Irish and English descent. The father is also of English descent. His father, William Wright, coming: from England to America when a young man, and served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war. Mr. and Mrs. Wright were parents of thirteen children, seven sons and six daughters, all of whom grew to maturity. Greenwood being the eldest child. When he was six years old his parents removed to Putnam County, Indiana, and there he was reared to manhood, his early life spent in assisting his father on their pioneer farm. His education was limited to a few months attendance at a subscription school, and study at home December 6, 1838, he was married to Susan May, a daughter of John and Nancy (Hight) May, of Mercer County, Kentucky. Five children were born to this union: John K. of Centerville, Iowa; Samuel W., of Melrose, Iowa; William H., deceased; T. R., residing in Wright Township, Wayne County, Iowa; Nancy Jane, who died aged three years. All of his sons received good educational advantages, and are good business

History of Wayne and Appanoose Counties, Iowa

[NI000580] History of Putnam County, Indiana

William Wright, a pioneer of Putnam County, was born in Lawrence County, Indiana, April 13. 1821, a son of Samuel and Jane Wright natives of Kentucky. His grandfather, William Wright, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and after the war settled in Wayne County, Kentucky. His paternal ancestors were Welsh, and his maternal, Irish, In 1824 he came to Putnam County with his parents, who located on the National Road, four miles south of Greenecastle where the father entered 160 acres of land and settled in the dense woods.. He first erected a round log cabin, and the first year cleared the ground and put in sufficient corn to last them a year. About 1847 he removed to Mill Creek Township, locating on a farm which he had previously entered from the government, and which had been leased for some time. He remained there until his decease, August 6, 1874. He was the father of thirteen childrent of whom nine are now livings 1. Hon. Greenwood Wright of Wayne County, Iowa; 2, Cynthia, who married Wiley Smith, of Fountain County, Indiana, now deceased; 3. Polly, widow of Josephus Gard of Wayne County, Iowa; 4. William 5- Brinton, of this county; 6. Melinda, wife of William Ryanof Morgan County; 7. Henderson, a resident of Kansas; 8. Milton, of Wayne County, Iowa; 9. Nelson, of Putnam County.

The deceased are:
10. Martha,
11. Sallie,
12. Lucinda,
13. Templeton.
When he settled in the county, wolves were in abundance and bridle paths were the only roads, He came here with five horses and money enongh to enter 160 acres of land. From this beginning he acquired a large estate. He gave his children a fair education and a good start in life. He was a minister in the Regular Baptist church, and in politics a Republican. William Wright, our subject, has been reared to manhood in this county, and he received a common- school education. He was married December 16, 1841, to Elizabeth Rude, and they had three children, two living: (1.) Nancy J., wife of John Finley, of Wayne County, Iowa; (2.) Cynthia C., wife of John Rakes, also of Wayne County, Iowa.

For his second wife he married Ann Jones and their one child is deceased. His third and present wife was Margaret Hill, and they have had eleven children, ten of whom are living:
(1.) Martha A., wife of Marion O'Neal, of Mill Creek Township
(2.) James N,, of Wayne County, Iowa,
(3.) Martesia A,, wife of L,L. Lucas, of this oounty,
(4.) Lucretia, wife Of J. M. Truesdale, also of this coounty,
(5.) Andrews of Mill Creek Township,
(6.) 0rlena,
(7.) Frankie
(8,) George,W,
(9.) Homer,
(10.) Elma.

Mr. Wright located on his present farm, section 17, in 1870, where he owns 396 acres of excellent land. He is a Republican in politics, and member of the Missionary Baptist Church. He served as justice of the peace eight years, and has also served as deputy sheriff of Putnam County. His wife is also a member of the Baptist Church. Her parents, George and Nellie Hill, were among the first settlers of Putnam County. Her father is deceased.

[NI000605] [purlee.FTW]

!"Genealogy of the Wright Family", Lillie Elizabeth Wright Lane White , F# 1313191 #4 SLFHL.

[NI000610] Another Pioneer Gone

The Democrat Sun, 9-21-1894

Sarah Zink nee Wright was born 9-13-1799 and died 9-13- 1894. Her parents came from North Carolina and settled in Washington County in 1808. She was of a large family of children, one of whom survives, Evins Wright who is still older then her.

At the age of 16 she married Peter Zink, from which union 12 children were born. 5 of whom still survive her---Isaac and Joseph Zink, Pop Wiseman, Nancy Roberts, and Delila Lee. Nine married and raised families. She had 59 grandchildren and between 1 and 2 hundred great grandchildren and 2 great great grandchildren. Her husband Peter Zink died some 10 years ago on the old Zink farm, 1-1/4 miles west of Salem. She and her husband settled on this farm at an early day, when most of it was in heavy timber. They toiled together, felled the forest and made for themselves one among the best farms in Washington County. By honest toil and economy they accumulated quite a handsome fortune.

A few thoughts may not be out of order in reference to the life which has been finished here. She was born 3 months before George Washington's death, 12-14- 1799, hence she lived during the lives of every president of the United States. She saw the U.S. grow from 13 states to 44. She was 16 when Jackson fought the Battle of New Orleans, 1-8-1815. She saw this country through here when it was covered over with forests and inhabited by wild animals. The inhabitants were largely Indians. She saw the Indians and wild ferocious animals give way to civilization, the forests were felled and fields were made to blossom and wave with golden grain. She saw communities grow into villages, villages into towns, and towns into cities. She saw and worked at the trundle-wheel which has given way to the steam loom and spinning- jenny. During her life the sickle has given way to the self binder, the flail to the steam thresher. In her girlhood days it took from 1 to 2 months to make the journey from Washington County to her old home in North Carolina and now by rail the journey can be made in 24 hours. She saw the full development of the splendid road system, the telegraphic and telephone systems. When we begin to study one's life such as that of Sarah Zink, it brings to our minds the burdens and hardships which the pioneers endured. These hardships and burdens have resulted in blessings to the younger generations, many of which are disregarded and for which those pioneers are not thanked. It can be said of her personal character that she was truthful, kind, generous and charitable, as a wife she was a true helpmate to her husband, as a mother she was sympathetic, affable and loving, as a neighbor she was obliging and esteemed by all. She lived the last few years of her life with her son-in-law Burrill Roberts, where she died. Her funeral was conducted by S.H. Mitchell at his residence, where a large concourse of relatives, friends and neighbors followed her remains to Crown Hill cemetery, where her body was placed beside her husband.

[NI000633] From J. P. Disk: He taught singing by note at West Lee Wright's in Jackson County, Indiana. When West Lee Wright laid out the town of Medora, he named it ME-DO-RA, the notes that Alfred Wright his nephew had taught them in singing school.

Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana. 1884,
Charles Blanchard, F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers

INDIAN CREEK TOWNSHIP, MONROE COUNTY, INDIANA PAGE 658


ALFRED WRIGHT was born in this township February 11, 1833, and is the third son of David and Caroline Wright. He received the rudiments of a good education; and March 7, 1850, married Eliza Rebecca Boyd. After his marriage, he lived with his father for some years, when he moved to Illinois, remained a few months, returned and at the division of his father's land received forty-one acres. Mr. and Mrs. Wright are leading members of the Christian Church, of which Mr. Wright is an Elder; they are parents of eleven children--William E. (deceased), John W., Minerva J., Laura A., Mary C. (deceased), Jefferson M., Alfred Perry, Isaac S., David Grant, James M. and Eliza A. F.

[NI000772] Josiah Tillison Johnson is a native of Washington county, having been born in Jackson (now Howard) township, on the 5th of November, 1828. He is the son of Jordan Johnson and Levina (Wright) Johnson whose genealogical history is interesting from the prominence gained by the members of the Johnson family in this country. The Johnson family traces its lineage back to England to Scotch-Irish ancestry. The founder of the American branch of the family who came to this country and settled in Virginia was Jordan Johnson, the father of the following sons, Josiah, Jesse, Jacob and Jordan. It is interesting to record at this point that Jacob Johnson, who immigrated to Tennessee, became the father of Andrew Johnson, President of the United States. Jesse went to Mississippi and Jordan, who was a large slaveholder, died in Virginia, where he also owned vast possessions of land. Josiah Johnson is the member of the family who has the greatest part to play in the history of establishing the family in this section of the country. It might be said before touching upon his endeavors in Indiana, that he married Sally Wright of North Carolina, who was the daughter of Richard Wright (of Welsh descent), native of England and the parent of eight children. Josiah Johnson and his wife.came to Clark's Grant where they lived for a year. In 1808, in company with two brothers-in-law, James Allen and Noah Fouts, he entered a homestead claim on the land southwest of Salem which is now the farm of Walter Colglazier. Josiah Johnson followed the occupation of a farmer and lived until 1813, his wife, who lived to an advanced age, died in Vigo county where she had gone with her second husband. Josiah Johnson was the father of the following children: Richard, Ransom, Wiley, Jordan, Josiah, Henry, Isaiah, Nancy and Clarissa. Jordan Johnson, whose life has a direct bearing upon the subject of this sketch, married Levina Wright, of whom the following information can be given. She was born in the old block house that stood on Fort Hill in 1813, an was the daughter of John and Nancy (Purlee) Wright, the former of whom was born in Rowan county, South Carolina, a son of Amos and Elizabeth (Low) Wright. After the death of his first wife, Peggy Wolfscale, who left a daughter, Elizabeth, John Wright married Nancy Purlee who has just been mentioned as the mother of Levina Johnson. John Wright was one of the-most interesting of the pioneers who helped lay the foundations of community life in Washington county. He came here in 1810 and settled four miles south of Salem on the Press Hinds place. After selling this farm he moved two miles south of Salem where he lived until taking up his home on Bear creek. In 1810 the Free Will Baptists established a church in his house and later Mr. Wright donated the ground for the church whose name was soon changed to the Church of Christ and which is at the present time known as the Blue River church, four miles southeast of Salem. John Wright was the first preacher of the church and with the assistance of Adam Kearns, ministered to three thousand souls. He was a power in the community where his influence was, evident long after he had passed away. Jordan Johnson, the father of the subject of this sketch, began his life as a farmer on a farm four and one-half miles from Salem on the Beck's Mill road. He lived on this place until his death which occurred on February 22, 1874. His wife, who passed away on the 22nd of September, 1884, became the mother of four children, one of whom died in infancy. The other children were, Josiah, the subject of this sketch; Nancy and Rebecca. Josiah T. Johnson followed the occupation of a farmer for sixty-eight years until the time when he went to live with his children. He married Maria A. Denny, the daughter of Thomas Goff and Jane (Hobbs) Denny, and a native of Washington county. Thomas Denny, who was the son of Samuel and Dorothy (Goff) Denny, came to this county in the early pioneer days and put up a log cabin where the Odin Parker farm is now. In. those days the pioneers had no method of cutting the lumber except with a whip,saw. To Mr. and Mrs. Josiah Johnson, the. following children were born: Sarah Dorothy, who married R. Benton Colglazier; Harry B., deceased, who was survived bv his wife and three children: Jacob, who died of tetanus at the age of nineteen; Morton, who is in California; Walter, who is teaching school in Chicago; Thomas, who disappeared in Kansas, is believe, have been drowned in the flood of that state; Levina Jane is the wife Alonzo Roberts; Nora Odell became the wife of S. H. Hall, and Alberta, who married G. O. Child, resides in Camphellsburg. Two children, a boy and a girl, died in infancy.

CENTENNIAL HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, INDIANA ITS PEOPLE, INDUSTRIES AND INSTITUTIONS, By Warder W. Stevens. With Biographical Sketches of Representative Citizens and Genealogical Records of Many of the Old Families. Illustrated 1916 B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc. Indianapolis, Indiana

[NI000801] COUNTIES OF WHITE AND PULASKI, INDIANA, HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL, Published by F.A. Battey & Co, Chicago, 1883, pg 302

JAMES P. WRIGHT was born in Washington County, Ind., December 4, 1830, and is the son of West Lee and Nancy (Wright) Wright. The former was born in Wayne County, Ky., in 1803, and the latter in Oldham County, same State, in 1808. Mrs. Nancy Wright's father, James Wright, came to Monroe County, Ind., about 1810, and there died in his one hundred and second year; her grandfather, Jacob Sears died in Oldham County, Ky., in his one hundred and fifteenth year. William Wright, grandfather of James P., was a native of Guilford County, N. C., of English parentage; was a soldier in the war of the Revolution, and was noted in his day as a writer of hymns, I.O.O.F. odes and of temperance songs. In the spring of 1832, West Lee Wright moved with his family to Jackson County, Ind., and entered land one mile south of the present site of Medora, and developed a farm on which he resided until his death, in 1876. At a log schoolhouse in this wilderness, James P. Wright received the rudiments of his education, and underwent all the hardships of pioneer life, giving his cheerful services to his parents until 1852, when he married Miss Martha Louden, a daughter of Samuel C. Louden, of Lawrence County, Ind. Two children are the fruit of this union-Theodore J., and Lorenna, now the wife of J. J. Tales, architect.

In 1857, Mr. Wright began the study of law at Medora; in July, 1861, he enlisted in Company G, Twenty-fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in which regiment John W. Foster, late Minister to Mexico, was a Major. Mr. Wright served until August, 1864, and when with Fremont, on the memorable march from Otterville to Springfield, was taken ill with fever, and was left at the house of a planter, whose family and a Confederate surgeon carried him through his sickness in safety. He then was in hospital at St. Louis until the spring of 1862, when he rejoined his regiment just after the battle of Shiloh ; be took part in the siege of Corinth, the battles of Iuka, Corinth, Hatchee River and Decatur, and just after the last named was again taken sick, from the effects of which he has never entirely recovered. Soon after the battle of Corinth, he was promoted for meritorious conduct in the field, preferring a Sergeant's chevron in his own company to a commission in some other regiment.

In 1866, he opened a law office in Medora, and practiced until 1872, and then moved to Indianapolis and opened an office; in the spring of 1873, he was burned out and lost his valuable library, which was uninsured; he soon opened another office, however, and had a fair practice until the spring of 1876, when he came to Reynolds and entered upon his profession, and has already secured a lucrative business. Criminal and litigated cases are with him specialties, and he has a fine reputation as an advocate and also as a lecturer. In politics, he is a stanch and active Republican. He is a member of Washington Lodge, No. 13, A., F. & A. M., and, although a member of no church, is a zealous advocate of the cause of temperance and an earnest pleader for woman suffrage. He has also inherited somewhat of the poetical genius of his ancestor, and, during the war, composed many patriotic songs and other poems.

[NI000824] From "Biographical Record of Bartholomew and Jackson Counties Indiana, Including Biographies of the Governors and Other Representative Citizens of Indiana", Illustrated, Published by B. F Bowen in 1904.
Headline "Christian J. Brannaman"

Among the men who were identified with Jackson county during its formation period and bore their full share in bringing about the contrast between the distant past and the practical present, the searcher of the local records will find frequent mention of the ancestors of the gentleman whose name heads this paragraph. When his paternal grandfather came here there was little in the prospect to forecast the pleasing scenes now familiar to every resident and visitor. This whole section was still but little removed from the primeval wilderness. Scarcely a beginning had been made in that arduous work which was to precede and make possible the Indiana of the twentieth century. Most of the land was still covered with those famous forests, whose felling and removal constituted the chief labor of the earliest arrivals. The founder of the Brannaman family, who was included in this heroic band, took hold manfully with the characteristic pioneer spirit, secured his share of the wild government land and by dint of many a hard blow eventually found himself in possession of a comfortable homestead. Among his children was a son named Christian, who was born about 1820, and in early manhood married Mary S., daughter of Jacob Wells, another fine specimen of the class of men to whom we owe the present splendor of the great Hoosier state. He was a Kentuckian, born during the troublous era which gave to the commonwealth across the Ohio the title of “dark and bloody ground,” and educated in a school that inured him to privation and hardship. The government land which he entered soon after his arrival grew under his management into the splendid estate which later, as the result of the marriage of his daughter, passed into the possession of the Brannaman heirs. He was a man of great strength of character, resolute of purpose and shrewd in business which gave him influence among his fellows and made him a feature in public affairs. Christian Brannaman learned the tanner’s trade in youth and to this occupation devoted many years of his subsequent life. Eventually he engaged in agriculture, making a specialty of raising cattle and horses, and so great was his success that in due course of time he became one of the wealthiest farmers of Owen township. Including the tract inherited from his wife’s father, he owned about eight hundred acres of land at the time of his death, which occurred in August, 1902, at his son’s home in Seymour. Though a man of popularity and influence, due to his integrity of character and moral habits, he avoided office-seeking and the only political honor he ever consented to accept was that of township trustee. All of his twelve children have had successful careers in the various vocations to which the addressed themselves and all with one exception are still living. Frank Brannaman, the fifth in order of birth, is one of the stat’s distinguished lawyer and politicians, having practiced with success many years at Brownstown and served in the senate during the sessions of 1886-7 and 1889-90. William T. Brannaman, another of the sons, is also a lawyer of prominence, who served Jackson county ten years as prosecuting attorney and is regarded as especially well equipped in knowledge of criminal jurisprudence.

Christian J. Brannaman, who ranks as number eight in this interesting family group, was born at the old homestead in Jackson county, Indiana, June 29, 1854. His education and rearing differed little from that of thousands of farmers’ boys, its chief feature consisting in irregular attendance at the neighborhood subscription school and learning the routine connected with farming operations. In 1879 he took charge of a saw and grist mill at Clear Springs and devoted the next three years to prosecution of that business for the benefit of his father. When about thirty years old he went to eighty acres of government land in Kansas and purchased four hundred and eighty acres of government land in Ford and Finney counties, which he occupied and was engaged in improving until 1896, when he returned to Indiana. Before leaving Kansas, however, he sold the one hundred and sixty acres of his land lying in Ford county, but still retains the three hundred and twenty acres in Finney county. Since coming back to his native state, Mr. Brannaman has been engaged in looking after matters on the old home place, having full charge of the entire six hundred and twenty acres of which it as present consists. He has exhibited excellent judgment in his management of this large estate, and is ranked among the successful farmers of Owen township.

June 7, 1887, Mr. Brannaman was united in marriage with Miss Alice, daughter of David and Mary Jane Wright, a native of this county, where her parents have always been regarded with high esteem. Her paternal grandfather, Wesley Wright, was a native of Tennessee, who came to Jackson county long before the war and established himself as a successful business man. For many years he was postmaster at Medora, had a very extensive acquaintance all over the county and few men enjoyed greater popularity. Mr. and Mrs. Brannaman have six children: Jesse Clay; Beach Mearl died in Kansas, aged sixteen months; Guy St. Clair, Noble W., George McClellen, Mary Ocie, all of those living being still in school except the youngest. Mrs. Brannaman is a member of the Christian church and her husband votes the Democratic ticket, though he has never asked or been given any office of importance. The exacting cares connected with the management of a large landed estate so absorb his time as to leave no leisure for participation in politics.

[NI000851] James and Elizabeth Wright deeded Basil Hill 80 acres of land in 1842 in Monroe County, Indiana.

[NI001107] LDS 1315796 [Item 2] Putnam County Indiana Will Records, Volume 3
(23 Sep 1889-9 Jun 1902)
Transcribed from the original clerk’s record.
Page 105-07
Robert B. Denny’s Will
I Robert B. Denny of sound mind and disposing mind and memory, desiring to direct in what manner
my worldly estate shall be disposed of after my decease, do make and publish this my last will and testament revoking hereby, all former wills by me at any time made.
Item 1st ­It is my will and I direct that all my Just debts and the liabilities of my estate be paid as soon as convenient after my decease and out of the first moneys realized from my estate.
Item II I give devise and bequeath unto my daughter Sarah F. Denny, the following real Estate now owned by me, and described as follows: The north east quarter of the north west quarter of section fifteen(15) in township fourteen 14 north of range three (3) West, and all that part of the south
east quarter of said northwest quarter which is situated west of Deer Creek: all in Putnam
County Indiana, the whole land bequeathed to her being Fifty (50) acres more or less to her and her heirs forever.
Item III All the residue of my estate real and Personal wheresoever situate and of whatsoever nature I give devise and bequeath unto my beloved wife Cynthia W. Denny and to her heirs forever.
This bequest is to be in lieu of her statutory rights, I nominate and appoint my esteemed friend Isaac M. Day as my Executor; and if from my cause he be unable, or shall fail to serve, then I request my Esteemed friend
John W Dunlavy to act as my Executor.
In testimony whereof I hereto set my hand and seal this 6th day of April 1891 in presence of the subscribing witnesses hereto. Robert B.[hisXmark] Denny.
In testimony whereof we hereto subscribe our names as witnesses at the request of the testator
in his presence and in the presence of each other April 6th 1891. Isaac M. Day
John W. Dunlavy M.A. Moore Alice Christy
(Proof) State of Indiana Putnam County} ss.PAGE 106
Be it remembered that on the 20th day of April 1891, Isaac M. Day, one of the subscribing witnesses to the within and foregoing last will and testament of Robert B. Denny late of said County, deceased, personally appeared before the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Putnam County in the state of Indiana; and being duly sworn by the clerk of said Court upon this oath declared and testified as follows, that is to say, that on the 6th day of April 1891 he saw the said Robert B. Denny Sign his name to said instrument in writing as and for his last Will and testament, and that this deponent at the same time heard the said Robert B. Denny declare the said instrument in writing to be his last will and testament, and that the said instrument in writing was at the same time, at the request of the said Robert B. Denny, and with his consent, attested and subscribed by the same affiant and others in the presence of said testator and in the presence of each other as subscribing witnesses thereto, and that the said Robert B. Denny was, at the time of signing and subscribing of said instrument in writing as aforesaid of full age (that is more than twenty one years of age) and of sound and disposing mind and memory, and not under any coercion or restraint as the said deponent verily believes, and further deponent says not: Isaac M. Day Sworn to and Subscribed by the said Isaac M. Day before me David T. Darnall clerk of said Court at Greencastle the 20th day of April 1891
Daniel T. Darnall Clerk.
In attestation whereof I have hereinto subscribed my name, and affixed the seal of said Court.
Daniel T. Darnall
Page 107
State of Indiana Putnam County} ss.
I Daniel T. Darnall, clerk of the Circuit Court of Putnam County Indiana do hereby certify that the within annexed will and testament of Robert B. Denny, has been duly admitted to probate, and duly proved by the testimony of Isaac M. Day, One of the subscribing witnesses thereto, that a complete record of said will and on
testimony of the said witnesses in proof thereof, has been by me duly made and recorded in Book (3)
at pages (106 & 107) of the record of wills of said county In attestation whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed the seal of said Court at Greencastle this 20th day of April 1891
Daniel T. Darnall
Clerk Circuit Court Putnam County

[NI001177] ADAM H. and PHILBERT M. WRIGHT Are the grandsons of that old pioneer, Philbert Wright, who immigrated from North Carolina in about 1809 and came to what is now Washington Township, Washington Co., Ind., where he passed the remainder of his days. Eli and Elizabeth (Bower) Wright, parents of those whose names form the subject for this sketch, were among the old and time-honored citizens of the county. They fully participated in all the hardships and inconveniences of pioneer life and died June 14, 1833, and 1847, respectively. Adam H. Wright was born October 12, 1823, on the farm where he now resides, and which his grandfather entered from the Government. His father having built the first or one of the first mills in the township, he assisted in its operation during his early years, but for many years subsequently has been engaged in agricultural pursuits. He belongs to the Christian Church, is Democrats and owns a first-class farm of 475 acres. August 31, 1848, he married Elizabeth, daughter of James and Sally (Lockhart) Collier, by whom he is the father of three children: Eli M., born July 7, 1849; William B., October 18, 1855, and Mary C., May 26, 1860. Mrs. Wright was born in this county December 20, 1826. James Collier, her father, was born in Kentucky, January 24, 1798; married March 12, 1818, Sally Lockhart, who was born in Virginia, February 13, 1802. Their respective deaths occurred November 15, 1873, and September 9, 1876.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI001180] ADAM H. and PHILBERT M. WRIGHT Are the grandsons of that old pioneer, Philbert Wright, who immigrated from North Carolina in about 1809 and came to what is now Washington Township, Washington Co., Ind., where he passed the remainder of his days. Eli and Elizabeth (Bower) Wright, parents of those whose names form the subject for this sketch, were among the old and time-honored citizens of the county. They fully participated in all the hardships and inconveniences of pioneer life and died June 14, 1833, and 1847, respectively... Philbert M. Wright, fifth child born to Eli and Elizabeth (Bowen) Wright, was born September 17, 1832. He has made farming his principal occupation through life, and by industry and economy has earned his present excellent farm of 320 acres. May 28, 1863, he married Miss Elizabeth Wiseman, who was born in this county August 21, 1831, daughter of Jacob and Polly (Ratts) Wiseman. Two children have crowned their union, named Grant F., born July 3, 1868, and Cora, September 22, 1872. In politics Mr. Wright is a Democrat.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

Philbird Marion Wright was born in September 17, 1832, and is the youngest of three children born to Eli and Elizabeth (Bower) Wright. Eli Wright was born on Septem- ber 5, 1795, and was the son of Philbird and Molly (Sears) Wright. Philbird Wright was born on March 29, 1768, and was the son of Richard Wright, who came to America from England in the early days. He had five sons: William, Philbird, Amos, Richard, Jr., and Hugh. Amos had five sons also, who were all ministers and noted for their ability. Their names were John, Peter, Joshua, Levi and Amos, Jr. John Wright was one for the forters at Ft. Hill, and one of his children, Elvira, was born in the fort in 1813, and lived her entire life within sight of the fort. She had three brothers and one sister; David, Ransom, Jacob and Nancy. Jacob Wright preached the dedication sermon at Ft. Hill on October 1, 1860. Philbird Wright, son of Richard Wright, who was the first of his family to settle in America, married Molly Sears and they located on the farm once owned by Harry Denny but now in the possession of Henry Roberts. Molly (Sears) Wright was born on February 13, 1776. They were the parents of eleven children: Nancy, born on February 13, 1794; Eli, September 5, 1795; Evans, July 18, 1797; Sarah, September 14, 1799; Barbara, November, 1801; Elizabeth, November, 1803; Katherine, January 5, 1805; Delilah, born on February 10, 1809; John, Absalom, Celia (Ratts) and Polly. The mother of these children died on September 10, 1830 and her husband married Elizabeth Beck on November 15, 1832. Philbird Wright immigrated to Indiana from North Carolina about 1809. Eli Wright and his wife, Elizabeth (Bower) Wright were the parents of three children: Adam H., who died in 1901; Caroline, wife of James Brewer, who died in 1898, and Philbird Marion. Eli Wright built and operated one of the first grist-mills in the township. He died of cholera on June 14, 1833, and his wife, in 1847. Philbird Marion Wright received his education in a log school house, located about two miles south of Salem, Indiana, and later became a school teacher. The school which he attended had a large fireplace and the seats were split logs. His first teacher was Prof. James G. May. Philbird Marion married Elizabeth Wiseman in 1863 and they became the parents of two children, Cora, who died in 1903 and Grant, who now resides with his father. The mother died in 1905. Philbird Marion Wright has lived on his present farm for more than sixty years. His wife was born on August 21, 1831, in Washington county, Indiana, and was the daughter of Jacob and Polly (Ratts) Wiseman. Her marriage was solemnized on May 28, 1863. Jacob Wiseman was a native of North Carolina and it was there that he was married to Mary Magdalene Ratts. He was a music teacher. They became the parents of these children; James, Henry, Newton, Mary, Elizabeth, Sarah, Amanda, Margaret, Malinda and several more who died in infancy. Grant Wright was reared on the farm where he now lives with his father, Philbird M. Wright, and was educated in the township schools. Also in the graded school at Salem, Indiana, and in May's academy. He is an active Democrat and a member of the Church of Christ at Ft. Hill Chapel. The farm which he cultivates consists of two hundred and sixty- seven acres, fifty acres of which are in timber. This farm is known as "Riverside Farm" and is situated in an excellent location. Cora, the sister of Grant Wright, who was born on September 22, 1872, and who died on July 2, 1903. During her lifetime she was recognized as a writer of attainment and contributed to many newspapers and magazines. She was a cultured writer and her death interrupted what promised to be a career in field of literature.

CENTENNIAL HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, INDIANA ITS PEOPLE, INDUSTRIES AND INSTITUTIONS, By Warder W. Stevens. With Biographical Sketches of Representative Citizens and Genealogical Records of Many of the Old Families. Illustrated 1916 B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc. Indianapolis, Indiana

[NI001182] Eli M. Wright, farmer, of Washington county, Indiana, was born on the farm where he has since lived in Washington township, three miles southwest of Salem, July 7, 1849. He is a son of Adam H. and Elizabeth (Collier) Wright, the former also born on the same farm in 1824. Adam H. Wright was a brother of Philbird Marion Wright, and included in the sketch of the latter's life is a record of the earlier Wright families. The property on which Eli M. Wright makes his home, containing some one hundred and fifty-seven acres, has never been out of the possession of the Wright family. His grandfather entered it from the government and passed his remaining days on it, while his father's entire life was passed there, and Eli M. Wright bids fair to number out his days on the old home place, dear to the memory of the entire family. Adam H. Wright gave most of the active years of his life to farming the home place and also engaged in saw-milling. During the latter forties he had a sash saw-mill operated by water power from Blue river and continued there until 1857, when he rented the mill and he and his brother, Marion, operated a portable saw-mill for two or three years. Elizabeth Collier, wife of Adam H. Wright, was born about eight miles west of Salem, in Vernon township, on the place where Lewis Carter resides at present. She was a daughter of James and Sarah (Lockwood) Collier, the former coming with his parents to this section from the present site of Lexington, Kentucky. The family settled in the western part of Washington county and Indians were numerous about them. There were also many wild animals and when the mother of the family milked the cows, James had to stand over her with a rifle to drive away the panthers and other prowling beasts. There were no schools which the lad might attend and he got his education by studying at night in company with his mother while she operated her spinning wheel, all in the flickering light of the candle or tallow dip. He chose as his wife Sarah, or "Sally" Lockwood, who came here with her people from North Carolina. Eli M. Wright is the eldest of a family of four children, the others being W. B., Mary C., widow of George Hageman, and a child who died in infancy. Adam Wright died in 1901 and his wife preceded him a few years, passing away in 1890. Eli M. Wright has been engaged in farming the home place all the active years of his life, and assisted his father until the time of his death. In 1902 Mr. Wright built the house in which he lives on the southern part of the farm. This is a comfortable dwelling and both it and the land testify to the care and thriftiness of the owner. In the summer of 1892 Mr. Wright suffered a sunstroke and for four years he was compelled to give up his farm work. During those years he traded in live stock, but so far recovered as to be albe to resume his duties as agriculturist. On February 28, 1908, Eli M. Wright married Stella Spaulding, born about two miles south of her present home, a daughter of Silas and Celia (Simpson) Spaulding. Silas Spaulding was born on March 27, 1838, in Washington township, south of Salem. He is a son of Landrum and Elizabeth (Jackson) Spaulding, the former of whom came to this section from Kentucky when a young man, while Elizabeth Jackson was brought here from Virginia by her parents. Landrum Spaulding was a farmer most of his life, but he was a shoemaker by trade and in those days all shoes were made to order. Silas Spaulding has lived all his life in Washington county, engaged in farming for many years. He retired from the active duties of life some time ago and now resides on a small farm of twenty-five and one-half acres in the northern part of Pierce township. Silas Spaulding was married on May 10, 1861, to Celia Simpson, born in Washington county, a daughter of Obadiah and Cynthia (Nolan) Simpson, both of whom were born in North Carolina, where they married and soon afterwards came to this county, locating in the western part of Pierce township, where they passed their remaining days and both lie buried in the Wilson graveyard near their old home. Silas Spaulding and wife are the parents of two sons and two daughters, the eldest of the family being Stella Florence, wife of the subject of this sketch; George B. McClellan, of Salem; Henry F. Franklin, also of Salem, and Melissa Aldora, wife of Frank Wingler, living near her father's home. Silas Spaulding was a member of Company C, Fifty-eighth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served throughout the Civil War. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, at Salem. Mr. Spaulding is a Democrat, but never aspired to office.

CENTENNIAL HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, INDIANA ITS PEOPLE, INDUSTRIES AND INSTITUTIONS, By Warder W. Stevens. With Biographical Sketches of Representative Citizens and Genealogical Records of Many of the Old Families. Illustrated 1916 B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc. Indianapolis, Indiana

[NI001187] JAMES BREWER A native of the county in which he yet resides, was born October 28, 1822, a son of John and Elizabeth Brewer. He was raised a farmer, and farming in his native county has been his occupation through life. March 5, 1846, he married Elizabeth C. Wright, who was born in Washington County, Ind., January 14, 1828, daughter of Eli and Elizabeth (Bower) Wright. To this union the following family of children have been born: John M., born March 1, 1847; William F., September 29, 1848; George W., June 15, 1851, died September 18, 1852; James E., September 18, 1853; Amanda E., April 12, 1856; Annie E., August 29, 1858; Martha F., September 9, 1860, died May 17, 1875, and Minnie M., December 25, 1860. Mr. Brewer began life for himself poor, and realizing that he was the architect of his own future has worked hard and economized, so that at one time he owned a tract of land containing 800 acres. At present he has an excellent farm of 240 acres. In politics he is a Republican, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI001189] GRANT F. WRIGHT Of Washington township, Washington county, Indiana, is of pioneer stock and is one of the excellent farmer of this section. He was born on July 3, 1868, on the farm where he now resides with his father, Philbird Marion Wright. Philbird Marion Wright was born in September 17, 1832, and is the youngest of three children born to Eli and Elizabeth (Bower) Wright. Eli Wright was born on Septem- ber 5, 1795, and was the son of Philbird and Molly (Sears) Wright. Philbird Wright was born on March 29, 1768, and was the son of Richard Wright, who came to America from England in the early days. He had five sons: William, Philbird, Amos, Richard, Jr., and Hugh. Amos had five sons also, who were all ministers and noted for their ability. Their names were John, Peter, Joshua, Levi and Amos, Jr. John Wright was one for the forters at Ft. Hill, and one of his children, Elvira, was born in the fort in 1813, and lived her entire life within sight of the fort. She had three brothers and one sister; David, Ransom, Jacob and Nancy. Jacob Wright preached the dedication sermon at Ft. Hill on October 1, 1860. Philbird Wright, son of Richard Wright, who was the first of his family to settle in America, married Molly Sears and they located on the farm once owned by Harry Denny but now in the possession of Henry Roberts. Molly (Sears) Wright was born on February 13, 1776. They were the parents of eleven children: Nancy, born on February 13, 1794; Eli, September 5, 1795; Evans, July 18, 1797; Sarah, September 14, 1799; Barbara, November, 1801; Elizabeth, November, 1803; Katherine, January 5, 1805; Delilah, born on February 10, 1809; John, Absalom, Celia (Ratts) and Polly. The mother of these children died on September 10, 1830 and her husband married Elizabeth Beck on November 15, 1832. Philbird Wright immigrated to Indiana from North Carolina about 1809. Eli Wright and his wife, Elizabeth (Bower) Wright were the parents of three children: Adam H., who died in 1901; Caroline, wife of James Brewer, who died in 1898, and Philbird Marion. Eli Wright built and operated one of the first grist-mills in the township. He died of cholera on June 14, 1833, and his wife, in 1847. Philbird Marion Wright received his education in a log school house, located about two miles south of Salem, Indiana, and later became a school teacher. The school which he attended had a large fireplace and the seats were split logs. His first teacher was Prof. James G. May. Philbird Marion married Elizabeth Wiseman in 1863 and they became the parents of two children, Cora, who died in 1903 and Grant, who now resides with his father. The mother died in 1905. Philbird Marion Wright has lived on his present farm for more than sixty years. His wife was born on August 21, 1831, in Washington county, Indiana, and was the daughter of Jacob and Polly (Ratts) Wiseman. Her marriage was solemnized on May 28, 1863. Jacob Wiseman was a native of North Carolina and it was there that he was married to Mary Magdalene Ratts. He was a music teacher. They became the parents of these children; James, Henry, Newton, Mary, Elizabeth, Sarah, Amanda, Margaret, Malinda and several more who died in infancy. Grant Wright was reared on the farm where he now lives with his father, Philbird M. Wright, and was educated in the township schools. Also in the graded school at Salem, Indiana, and in May's academy. He is an active Democrat and a member of the Church of Christ at Ft. Hill Chapel. The farm which he cultivates consists of two hundred and sixty- seven acres, fifty acres of which are in timber. This farm is known as "Riverside Farm" and is situated in an excellent location. Cora, the sister of Grant Wright, who was born on September 22, 1872, and who died on July 2, 1903. During her lifetime she was recognized as a writer of attainment and contributed to many newspapers and magazines. She was a cultured writer and her death interrupted what promised to be a career in field of literature.

CENTENNIAL HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, INDIANA ITS PEOPLE, INDUSTRIES AND INSTITUTIONS, By Warder W. Stevens. With Biographical Sketches of Representative Citizens and Genealogical Records of Many of the Old Families. Illustrated 1916 B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc. Indianapolis, Indiana

[NI001690] On Zenus' death certificate, his date of birth is listed as September 21, 1844. Family tradition holds that his people were from Germany or Holland, and the name was originally spelled Brach. Family tradition also holds that the Brocks, after moving to the US, lived among the Amish or Menonites for a time.

Zenus first worked as a farmer, then as a carpenter and contractor. His last job before he died was in Winter Garden, FL in 1917.

We have documentation of a cemetary plot paid for in Hobart, Kiowa County, Oklahoma Territory in 1902. Family tradition holds that he and Cynthia lived in Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas at various points in time.

A biography of Zenus was included under the Coffey County section of Cutler's History of Kansas:

"ZENUS H. BROCK, clerk, was born in Scioto County, Ohio, in 1846 and lived in his native state about nine years. He moved with his parents to Illinois, and located in Edward County for four years, and then to Clay County for four years, and then to Fayette County for two years, and then to Effingham County for ten years, and to Shelby County for three years. In 1878, he came to Kansas and located in Rock Creek Township, Coffey County. He has lived in Waverly for about three years. He was engaged in farming and carpentering business until 1880, and has since been clerk in Hammond's dry goods store. He was married in Effingham County, Ill. in 1867, to Miss Cynthia Ann Wright, a native of Indiana. They have one child - Schuyler C. Mr. Brock is a member of the Masonic Order, and of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and enlisted in 1864, in the One Hundred and Forty-third Illinois Regiment, and served 100 days, then he enlisted in the Seventh Illinois Cavalry, and served with that Regiment until the close of the war."

[NI001722] C. H. DENNY Born in this county, December 9, 1818, a son of Samuel and Dorothy D. (Groff) Denny, is a grandson of Robert Denny, who immigrated from Ireland to Virginia in 1765, and there married a Miss Thomas. In 1789 Robert and wife moved to Mercer County, Ky., where Mrs. Denny died in about 1800, the mother of five children born in Kentucky, and four in Virginia. When land was first put upon the market in Indiana, Robert came to what is now Washington County; served in the war of 1812, and died April 17, 1826. Samuel Denny was born in Virginia, August 14, 1786; married Miss Groff, April 5, 18l0, who was born in Kentucky, September 8, 1790, and in 1812 came to Indiana Territory. In 1813 they removed to what is now Section 35, Washington Township, Washington County, and settled on the farm now owned by Joel S. Denny. They were honest and industrious people, and their respective deaths occurred September 27, 1844, and October 21, 1860, both members of the Christian Church. Robert Denny and Rachel Thomas had the following children: David. Elisha, Samuel, Joseph, John, Polly, William, Sarah and James. The children born to the union of Samuel and Miss Groff are: Thomas J., Reuben R., Rachel T., Margaret P., Elizabeth G., Christopher H., Polly A., Parmelia W., Joel S., John M. and Lewis W. Christopher H. Denny is a member of the Christian Church, a successful farmer, owning 425 acres of land, and has been twice married, first to Phebe Wright, February 25, 1841, who was born in this county August 16, 1822, daughter of John and Nancy Wright. This lady died January 21, 1859, the mother of seven children: Ransom W., Jonas B., Jordan J., Edward A., John S., Dawson and Jacob M. The first named was a soldier of the late war in Company G, Eighteenth Regiment. Mr.Denny married,October l6,1859, Mary, daughter of Macomb and Margaret (Smith) Leach, by whom he is the father of Dorothy M. and Laura F. Mrs.Denny was born in this county January 8, 1835.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI001731] History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana From the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with Interesting Biographical Sketches, Reminiscences, Notes, Etc. Chicago, Goodspeed Bros., & Co., Publishers, 1884. Weston A. Goodspeed, Leroy C. Goodspeed, Charles L. Goodspeed. Nicholas County.[Indian Creek Township, Lawrence County, Indiana]

ADAM SEARS was born in Nicholas County, Ky, in 1818, son of David and Anna (Kern) Sears, and is of German extraction. The father of Mr. Sears was born in North Carolina in 1792, and when ten years of age removed to Kentucky, and there remained until 1818, when he with his family immigrated to Indiana, and effected a settlement in Lawrence County. Here the father of Mr. resided until his demise. The subject of this mention settled where he now and since has resided in 1839, and this same year was united in marriage to Miss Rebecca Wright, a native of Washington County, Ind. To this marriage were born thirteen children, the following of whom are living: Melissa J., Tabitha E., Peter W., David L., Ambrose K., Nancy E., Arley R., and Ulysses G. Mr. Sears now has 320 acres of well improved land. He is a Republican, but cast his first residential vote for the Democratic nominee. Mr. Sears is one of the pioneers of Lawrence County. Mr. and Mrs. Sears are members of the Christian Church. He has been a successful farmer, and is one of the well-to-do citizens of his township.

[NI001846] Putnam Co. INDIANA, newspaper of April 1892....
Death of an Old Settler...
Delilah Wells died on April 3, 1892 of pneumonia, at her home in Madison township, after a sickness of 11 days. Deceased was born in Nelson County, KY., Sept. 12, 1816, making her 75 years, 7 months and 9 days old. She came to this State with her parents when a child and settled on the Ohio River; afterward they moved to Owen County, when it was a wilderness and wild beasts abounded; from thence they moved to North Putnam county. At the age of 16 she was married to Ransom Moss--to them were born 5 sons and 4 daughters , one dying
in infancy. Death called her husband, leaving her a widow with 5 children, the oldest only 10 or 11 years old; she toiled and struggled for 11 year, caring for the family. Her second husband was Joseph Wells--to them were born 3 daughters, one dying in infancy, the other two mourn her demise. Her second husband preceded her to the grave some 8 years ago. She was making her home with her youngest daughter, Mrs. Lucy Boswell, at the old homestead. She joined the M. E. Church when 16 years old and lived a Christian life; she was always ready to help those in need and bore her afflictions with patience; ready to submit to the will of God, who doeth all things well. Her last husband helped to build the first jail built in Greencastle and guarded the first prisoner ever placed in it. A Friend

[NI001959] JOHN M. HINDS Was born in Washington County, Ind., on the 24th of July, 1839, being the seventh child of a family of eight born to Samuel and Catharine (Wright) Hinds. His ancestors were natives of Maryland and North Carolina respectively. They both immigrated to Indiana about 1828, and settled in Washington County. The subject of this sketch had limited means for schooling, but by his energy succeeded in securing a good practical education, enough so to enable him to teach in the common schools of his county. He has taught twenty-five terms all together. He remained at home with his parents until he attained this twenty-third year. On the twenty-fifth of December, 1863, his marriage with Lauretta Fulp was solemnized, and to this union have been born five children, all living: Indiana B., Noble M., Christopher P., Daniel S. and Mabel D. He is a member of the Christian Church,and contributes to its support liberally. In politics he is a Democrat, and takes a lively interest in the political questions of the day. By occupation he is a music teacher and a farmer.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI002038] *

! Missouri. ??

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[NI002057] JACOB RATTS Was born October 1, 1827, in Washington County, Ind., and is a son of Rinehart and Susannah (Yarborough) Ratts, the former being born in North Carolina, May 9, 1800, and the latter, March 16, 1800. His grandparents, Henry and Barbara (Wingler) Ratts, came with their family to this county in 1823, and participated in many of the hardships of frontier life. They died in 1832 and 1849, respectively, both members of the Lutheran Church. Rinehart Ratts farmed in this county until his death, in 1876, followed by his widow in 1884. Jacob Ratts was raised on his father's farm, receiving a common school education. In 1848 he married Mary A., daughter of Ransom and Barbara (Wright) Johnson, and by her is the father of four living children Jacob L., Nancy J., Sarah E. and Susan A. The mother is a native of this county, her birth occurring in 1830, and her death in 1879. Mr. Ratts is a prosperous merchant of Salem, a Republican, an Elder in the Christian Church, and a member of the G. A. R. He was a soldier of the late war, serving his country faithfully in Company E, Fifth Indiana Cavalry.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI002059] THOMAS RATTS He was born on an adjoining farm to the one he now owns in Pierce Township, this county, December 14, 1825, a son of Rinehart and Susanna (Yarborough) Ratts, both of whom were natives of North Carolina and of German descent paternally. In about 1823 the father of Thomas, together with his family came by wagon from his native State and settled in northern Pierce Township, but a year later moved to the place where Thomas was born and where Mr. Ratts died in 1873. His widow died at the home of a son in Illinois, in May, 1884. These old pioneers were among the honest and industrious citizens of the county, and after living a long life of usefulness and passing through many of the hardships and inconveniences of pioneer life they died after seeing the many blessing that resulted from their labors of many years. Thomas is the third born in a family of fifteen children, only nine of whom are yet living. He was raised, as were the majority of the pioneer boys of his day, to hard work at clearing, planting and reaping, and a few months' attendance at the old-fashioned log schools. He married Sarah J. Johnson, December 31, 1846, who died in 1860, after bearing four children, only two--Rinehart J. and John N.--yet living. In February, 1863, Mr. Ratts married Susan Leach, his present wife, by whom he is the father of three children, these two yet living: Hester C. and George V. Mr. Ratts has passed his entire life at farming and hard work. With the exception of about $500 which was given him by his father at different times, he has made what he now owns--a fairly improved farm of 288 acres--by the greater part of his own exertions. He has endeavored to share with his neighbors the support of all laudable public enterprises; is a member of the Christian Church, as is also his wife, and is a Republican in politics.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI002162] *

! Submitted by Karen Meares (JMGT78A)

*

[NI002164] !Data taken from family records and from personal knowledge. Submitted by Virginia Pearson Schettino.

[NI002165] !Data taken from family records. Submitted by Virginia Pearson Schettino.

[NI002166] !RESIDENCE: Aurora, Dearborn Cty. Indiana

[NI002214] "Descendants of Norman L Wright and Betsey Wisner", by Dr F. N. Wright Born 11 mar 1843, Newfane, Niagara County, NY; (was 11 when his mother died according to a memoir written in his own hand); his father remarried and he and his stepmother didn't get along very well, so at the age of 15 he went to live with an uncle. At 17, he enlisted in the Union Army, was wounded, and almost lost a leg. He married (1st) in 1865 at Utica, Missouri to Letha Ann Allen and had two girls. Laura B Wright, born 1866 Lulu B Wright, born 1868 Albert married (2nd) 24 Jun 1888, Adrian, MI, to Caroline (Carrie) Lucinda Armstrong, the daughter of Almarin King Armstrong and Lucinda Jerrells. Carrie was b. at Rome Center, MI, 18 Mar 1859, and was a sister of Henrietta's husband, James Armstrong. They lived in MI, Missouri, and AR before settling in Woodward, Oklahoma, where Albert died 1 Oct 1927. His widow m. 5 Sep 1929, to J. H. Merriman and d. 15 Sep 1941. Both Albert and Carrie are buried in Elmwood Cemetery, at Woodward. Albert Norman Wright Daniel Almarin Wright Edgar Lawrence Wright Lorena Annette Wright Edna Viola Wright James Henry Wright Queen Victoria Wright

[NI002215] *

! "Descendants of Norman L Wright and Betsey Wisner", by Dr F.N. Wright

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[NI002216] *

! "Descendants of Norman L Wright and Betsey Wisner", by Dr F.N. Wright Born 10 Sep 1891, Chilacothe, Missouri, m. 14 Jul 1913, Woodward, Oklahoma, to Bertha Jessie (Grnat) Fulp. Bertha b. 21 mar 1889, Scranton, IA, she had a dau Lula Marjorie Fulp. Edgar and Bertha had three children. Later they separated and the date of his death is not known. Bertha d. at Woodward on 19 Dec 1983, age 94.

*

[NI002217] *

! "Descendants of Norman L Wright and Betsey Wisner", by Dr F.N. Wright Born 3 Mar 1894, Ludlow, Missouri. m. (1st) 21 Nov 1911, Joseph Buczinski (born in Germany 30 Sep 1884). They had six children. She m. (2nd) Ernest Beck (7 Nov 1894-9 Jan 1966).

*

[NI002338] Atlas of Putnam County, Indiana. Chicago: J. H. Beers, 1879.
Washington Twp.

ALLEN, Hiram P., P.O. Reelsville, Physician; residence in Pleasant Garden; was born in Lawrence Co., IN, Aug. 15, 1827; son of James and Delilah ALLEN, who settled in this county in 1828. Married Mary Ellen KNETZER in 1850, in
Marion Township, and by this union has six children, namely, Charles, Martha, Milford, Marilda, Catherine and Oscar. Dr. ALLEN is a graduate of Rush Medical College, Chicago, and has been practicing medicine for twenty year, in his present place of residence. For the first eight or ten years his practice extended over a large area, but since the laying of the Terre Haute Railroad, and the springing up of towns thereon, many physicians have located in them. Thereby curtailing his practice. The Doctor's standing in the medical profession, and his long residence in the community have given him a large circle of acquaintances, his courteous manners and upright conduct winning a host of person friends.

[NI002654] From "Biographical Record of Bartholomew and Jackson Counties Indiana, Including Biographies of the Governors and Other Representative Citizens of Indiana", Illustrated, Published by B. F Bowen in 1904.
Headline " William H. Bower"
William H Bower, the son of Daniel W. and Clarissa (Wright) Bower, the former of whom was born in Clark county, this state, and the latter in Washington county, so that it is evident that both families were founded in the Hoosier state in the early pioneer epoch. Joseph and Rachel Bower, the grandparents of the subject, were born in North Carolina, and the former was a son of Adam Bower, a minister in the Dunkard church, and a native of Switzerland. His father was George Bower, who emigrated with his family to America about 1740, locating in North Carolina, where he became a prominent and successful planter. Joseph Bower was a patriot soldier in the war of 1812, having gone forth with an Indiana regiment. He removed with his family to Clark county, this state, in 1806, and was numbered among the earliest settlers in this section, where he took up government land and developed a farm in the primeval forest. He was honored by his fellow citizens and held official positions in Clark county for sixty years. He was a Universalist in his religious faith. He reclaimed a large amount of land, was a man of signal integrity and honor and gained the esteem and confidence of all who knew him. His children were nine in number, namely: Nancy T., Elizabeth, Henry, Daniel W., Joseph E., Wesley, Jesse, Mary and Adeline, and of the number the only survivor is Daniel W., the honored father of the subject of this sketch.

Daniel W. Bower removed from Clark county to Salem, Washington county, when a youth of seventeen years, and in 1839 came to Jackson county and took up a tract of government land near the present village of Clear Spring, reclaiming the same from the dense forest and developing a good farm. In 1850 he removed to the northern part of the county and took up more land from the government, the same being located in Owen township, while he also purchased an adjoining tract, thus becoming the owner of about four hundred acres. Here he has developed one of the fine farms of the county, having made the best of permanent improvements and still continuing to reside on the old homestead, of which the subject now has the management and control. Daniel W Bower was born on the 13th of March, 1818, so that he has now passed the age of four score years, while his life has been one of signal usefulness and honor and he is held in the highest regard in the community which has been his home for so many years. He is a stanch Democrat in his political proclivities and for many years he served as justice of the peace, while he has also been called upon to serve in other offices of local order, including that of township trustee. His cherished and devoted wife was summoned into eternal rest on the 7th of December, 1885, at the age of sixty-nine years. Of their children we incorporate the following brief record: Eli W., who married Miss Belle Scott, is a successful farmer of Salt Creek township; Joseph E. is deceased; Philbert M. died in infancy; Thomas J. H., who married Miss Carrie Prather, resides in Alva, Oklahoma; he was sheriff of Jackson county, Indiana, for four years, and is now serving his third term as judge of the courts of Woods county, Oklahoma; Wiley J. died in infancy; John E. R. was killed by a runaway horse, his death occurring at the age of twenty-six years; Rachel A. died at six years of age; William H. is the immediate subject of this sketch; Lewis died in infancy and Adeline died at the age of twenty-six years. It is noteworthy that all of these children who grew to manhood and womanhood were teachers for a number of years in the public schools of the state, but none are now so engaged.

William H. Bower received his rudimentary educational discipline in the district schools, after which he entered the high school in Clear Spring, where he was graduated, and later he continued his studies in the normal school at Mitchell, Indiana. After leaving school he was successfully engaged in teaching for a period of thirteen years, gaining marked prestige and popularity in the pedagogic profession. At the expiration of the period noted, in 1884, he effected the purchase of the old homestead farm, to which he has since added until he has a fine landed estate of more than five hundred acres, all being available for cultivation and yielding good returns for the labor expended in the tilling of the excellent soil. He also makes a specialty of raising shorthorn cattle, draft horses and Poland China swine and is known as one of the progressive and successful farmers and business men of his native county, where he commands unqualified confidence and esteem. He has fine registered live stock and as a breeder has gained a high reputation, stock from his farm being sold for breeding purposes throughout the state. He is also engaged in the buying and selling of timber and lumber upon an extensive scale.
In politics Mr. Bower has ever accorded a stanch allegiance to the Democratic party, in whose cause he has been an active worker while he has served as township trustee and assessor and held other offices of local trust and responsibility, being essentially loyal and public spirited. He is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and the Knights of Pythias, and both he and his wife hold membership in the Christian church.

On the 17th of December, 1885, Mr. Bower united in marriage to Miss America Goss, who was born in Washington county, this state, being a daughter of Samuel Goss, a successful and honored farmer and a representative of one of the sterling pioneer families of the county mentioned. Mr. and Mrs. Bower have no children.

[NI003254] She was a descendant of Philbert and Richard Wright, brothers of her grandfather Wiliam Wright. J.P Dick

[NI003724] seven children

[NI004109] A NATIONAL REGISTER OF THE SOCIETY SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION PRINCIPAL EVENTS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION.

CASSIUS MORTON CARTER, Lafayette, Ind. (1700). Son of Sanford and Lorinda (Wright)Carter; grandson of Levi and Sarah Elizabeth Wright; grand-grandson of William Wright, private North Carolina Militia, pensioned.

[NI004199] [nathan hibbs.FTW]

Gainesville Sun - June 23, 1968 (4A:7)

William E. Powell, 69, of Orange Heights died Friday at his residence.
A native of Madisonville, KY, he had lived here for 15 years. He was a
retired plumber and member of the Babtist Church.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs Ona A. Powell of Orange Heights; and three
sons, Dennis W. Powell of Orange Heights, Edgar T. Powell of Gainesville and Jim Powell of Waldo

Funeral Service will be Monday, June 24, 1968 at Orange Heights Babtist Church, Orange Heights. Buriel will be in Orange Heights Cemetery under the direction of Williams-Thomas Funeral Home. Mr. Powell, who lived in Orange Heights, died June 21, 1968 at his home. He had lived here for 15 years.

[NI004206] Built hangers for first space flight in Cape Canaveral Florida. Also built missle igloo disposals in Lake Charles, LA for the Air Force. Built the gold vaults in Fort Knox, KY. Worked on Tennessee Valley Authority and Old Hickory Dam.

[NI004212] [nathan hibbs.FTW]

Member of Lower Muscogee Indian Tribe.

[NI004228] A second DOB for Barbara Gilstrap is shown to be, December 21, 1799. Unknown which is correct.

[NI004322] J. P. Dick: In later years she was employed at the Sakes 5th Ave. store in Chicago, under her maiden name and lived at the Knickerbocker Hotel.

[NI004650] 1850 Census Macon Co Mo.
Name age Pob
Peter 53 KY
Amey 36 KY
Mary 14 MO
Tyre 12 MO
Bright 10 "
Lewis 8 "
Daniel 6 "
William 4 "
James M 2 "
Rebecca A 512 "

[NI004737] LDS input

[NI004772] Raised wife's younger sister Selma Weatherford.

[NI004773] Address (1954)
457 Page St
Wheaton, IL
Info. on lineage extracted from letter to G.W. Gilstrap Dtd May 15t h 1954
from E. R. Gilstrap at the above address.

[NI004802] Married 1835 in Randolph County, Missouri

[NI004808] Macon County Historical Society, 1987.

[NI004809] Macon Co Historical Society. 1987

[NI004810] Lewis Gilstrap.
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS EXTRACTED FROM THE HISTORY OF MACON CO . Missouri.
Sesqyuicentennial Edition 1987
As related by W.D. Gilstrap.

In the latter part of the century "common people" like our folks , began to
think about acquiring a few things beyond the basic necessities. Pete r's son
Lewis, who was my great-grandfather, decided that to round out his wo rldy
wealth, he needed a pair of shoes.
....Uncle Lewis, as everyone called him, had never in his life wor n a pair of
shoes in the summer time. Now, actually, Lewis already had a pair o f shoes.
He had taken them on trade for some tobacco: but Lewis was six feet s ix inches
tall, and Rice Cook, his father-in-law, who had owned the shoes in th e first
place, was very short. As Grandpap told the story:

"Pap made up his mind he was going to try to wear those shoes, but h e had to
cut his toenails first. He couldn't cut them with his pocket knife , so me and
Bright tried with a corn knife on the edge of a board. That worked p retty well
except for the corners. Pap had ruin around with shoes fopr so so lo ng his
toenails were as hard as cow horn. We finally got him trimmed up, bu t the
shoes still wouldn't go on. There wasn't anything for him to do bu t buy a
pair; Mama and the girls wouldn't go to Church with him anymore baref ooted."
A picture of Lewis in the 1958 Bevier Centennial book has him shod, b ut I'll
bet those shoes came off as soon as the photographer left.

Sesquicentennial Ed., 1987
Macon Co Historical Societiy
120 Bennett Ave, Macon County, Missouri 63552

[NI004811] Macon Co Historical Society, 1987

[NI004812] Macon Co Historical Scoiety, 1987

[NI004813] Macon Co Historical Society, 1987

[NI004814] Macon Co Historical Society, 1987

[NI004816] Peter Gilstrap
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS EXTRACTED FROM THE HISTORY OF MACON CO . Missouri
Sesquicentannial Edition, 1987
As related by William D. Gilstrap, Grandson of Peter Gilstrap.

The Gilstrap's have always had a sense of humor; like the time grandp ap was
trapped in the mine by high water. Peter and his brother, Bright, wer e working
in the old 66 mine while a big rain storm was going on. The water go t high and
the creek broke through into the mine and trapped Grandpap in a roo m away from
the other men. When they realized he was cut off, and possibly drowne d, there
was great excitement among them.
Bright decided that he would go under the water and try to get his br other.
He tied a long rope around his waist , and with one of the other me n ready to
pull him back if need be, Bright went under the water. He kept goin g until he
had used almost all of his rope before he stopped. The fellow holdin g the other
end of the rope gave it a yank and eventually, an answering tug was f elt from
the other end, and somewhere under the dark water.
After a few more minutes had elapsed. they tugged on the rope agai n and
again an answering tug was felt. The men didn't know what to do. The y could
only wait in somber and worried silence.
After about fifteen minutes, there was a tug on the rope and the me n anxiously
started pulling it out of the watery grave into which it had dissapea red.
When the rope came out at last, it had a dinner pail tied to it. R ight
behind the bucket came Bright and Pete, both in fin shape.
They explained that when Bright had reached the other side he ha d found
Grandpap sitting peacefully eating his dinner. They waited until he f inished,
of course, befor swimming back under the water to where the men wer e waiting.

[NI004817] Macon Co Historical Scoiety, 1987

[NI004818] Macon Co Historical Society, 1987

[NI004845] Macon Co Historical Society, 1987

[NI004877] Macon
Co historical Society, 1987,
Descendants--Donna Casey , Costa Mesa Ca.. Nov 1994

[NI005341] Biographical Sketch On The Life Of Allen Wright

The preacher to whom reference has been made, and who founded the church at Antioch, was Allan Wright, of blessed memory. He was born in Wayne County, Kentucky, November 19th, 1809, was the son of Evan and Rebecca Wright. On the 3rd of July, 1828, he was married to Elizabeth Summers. Shortly after this he removed to Alabama, where he remained a short time. He then removed to Vermillion county, Illinois, near Danville, where his oldest son, James N., was born. In 1850, he came to Missouri and settled on a farm in the western part of Randolph county.

He was above six feet in height, perfectly erect, and weighed probably one hundred and seventy-five pounds. He was broad-shouldered and somewhat angular. His hair was brown, but from early manhood he had been quite bald. His eyes were blue, bordering on grey. His complexion fair, and his expression earnest, cheerful and benevolent. His voice was strong and clear, yet soft as a lute. He sung well. Many a time have I seen a large audience moved to tears while he sang alone some favorite hymn at the beginning of the service and before he had spoken a word.

He was not a scholarly man, but spoke and wrote his vernacular correctly. I do not know what educational advantages he enjoyed, but he was an educated man only in the sense that he was trained to think accurately and investigate earnestly. He read much and thought profoundly. As a preacher he was argumentative and logical, as an exhorter he was not excelled, even in those days of splendid exhorters.

In more recent times preachers have greatly improved in their ability to reach the heads of their audiences, but many most successful in this direction are greatly wanting in " heart power," and while they convince they do not always move.

Allen Wright convinced the judgment and moved the heart. He was at the time of which I have spoken still a young man, and quite poor, with a growing family around him. He toiled in the field during the week, and preached on Saturday night and Sunday, at such points as were accessible, and returned to his labor on Monday morning. He often yielded, however, to the entreaties of the people and preached the unsearchable riches of Christ to them while the plow stood still in the field. He preached without salary, and for the most part in those days without compensation. I recall one scene which deeply touched my heart, young as I then was. He had preached for several days and was about to take leave of us. We had followed him out to the style-blocks to bid him good-bye. My father drew out his pocket-book and divided the scanty purse with the dear preacher, whom we all loved devotedly. The great tears came into the preacher's eyes. His voice was husky with emotion, as he said: "I thank you, Brother Ben; this will be a great comfort to my dear wife." Then, somewhat recovered, he said almost gleefully, "I think if anybody on this earth deserves to go to heaven, it is my wife, who remains at home and cares for the children, while I am away preaching, and Bally (pointing to his horse) who carries me to my appointments."

He continued to preach quite extensively over Randolph, Macon and Howard counties, making occasional visits into the counties on the south side of the Missouri river. During these years he was remarkably successful, baptizing many and establishing churches.

In 1841 he removed to Green county and located not far from Springfield, on a farm, where he remained until the death of his wife, on the 23d day of March, 1843. During, the years he resided there he preached as he had opportunity, and planted many congregations in southwest Missouri. After the death of his wife he spent three years as an evangelist under the direction of the State Meeting, as it was then styled.

By his first wife he had three sons that reached manhood, James N., Joseph B. and Spencer P., the eldest and youngest of whom are still living, and actively engaged in the gospel ministry.

In 1846 he located in Georgetown, in Pettis county, where, on December 22d, same year, he married Miss Lydia Virginia Fristoe. In all these years he was quite successful. In Southwest Missouri he cooperated extensively with that prince among men, Joel H. Hayden. Large congregations greeted him wherever he went. In almost every meeting persons confessed the Savior, and congregations were built up. While laboring in this region an incident occurred which illustrates the character of the times and the courage of the preacher.

At a meeting held perhaps in a grove, two young ladies made themselves quite conspicuous and greatly disturbed the congregation, in much to the annoyance of the preacher. He therefore reproved them sharply in very plain language. The next morning he started on his way to a neighboring town. While passing through a dense wood, a young man dashed up behind him and announced that he was the brother of the young ladies whom he had so severely reproved, and that he had come to punish him for the offence, that he must get down from his horse and fight him. The preacher remonstrated, argued, entreated and almost begged. He told him that he was a man of peace and did not want the disgrace of a fight. The young man was incorrigible, so the preacher alighted, tied his horse by the wayside, removed his coat and announced himself ready. The young man rushed upon him, was in an instant knocked sprawling on the ground. In another instant the preacher was upon him and administered to him a severe chastisement. At length the young man cried enough, and was released. The preacher then said "Young man, I bear you no malice; you forced this battle on me; you have been badly worsted. Now if you will never tell it I will not," and he did not, till just before his death, and then he would give no name. He always felt, he said, that he returned good for evil, for he made a decent man out of that young fellow.

Shortly after his second marriage he removed to Lexington, and became the pastor of the church there. This was perhaps the first church in the state to employ all a preacher's time. Here he remained for more than ten years. Though the pastor of the church, he was permitted to spend much of his time evangelizing. Here he had more time for reading and better opportunities to secure good books than he had before enjoyed. He had already become a fine speaker and a man of great influence among the churches. He soon became a recognized leader, and one of the ablest men in the state in his church.

His ministry in Lexington was much of the time under circumstances "that tried men's souls," and under which a weaker man would have failed utterly, but he secured the affection of his brethren and commanded the respect of the entire community. His influence was felt for good throughout all that region of country, having preached for all the churches more or less, and having secured a strong personal influence in all of them. It was here he lost his second wife, (who died May 24th, 1857,) by whom he had two children, Allen Wright, Jr., and Ella V., the last named having crossed "over the dark river."

After the death of his second wife he again became an evangelist. He visited his son James N., who was then devoting his whole time to the church in Barry, Pike county, Illinois. On his return he held a meeting in Hannibal, which resulted in forty-five accessions to the church, including the mayor of the city and his family.

In the fall of 1858, or early in 1859, he married Lizzie R. De Jarnett, of Pettis county. He then bought a farm in the county and began to preach in the region round about. During the summer of 1859 his health began to fail. He, with his wife, made a visit to Republican Church, in LaFayette county in the summer of 1860. While there he was taken sick at the house of his old friend and brother, Anderson Warren. He could not have fallen into kinder hands, nor among a people who loved him better, but notwithstanding all that loving hands and skillful physicians could do, his sickness proved to be "unto death." He passed away on the 19th day of July, 1860, mourned by thousands who had come into the kingdom of God through his influence. Brother McGarvey, then of Dover, Missouri, and the writer, were called to attend his funeral. A large. audience was present at the old Republican Church, and all wept and mourned him as if he had been a member of their own household. His devoted brethren there claimed his body, as he had organized their church. They laid it away to rest only a few feet from the pulpit where he had so often preached the gospel. They also erected a neat monument to his memory and there his dust sleeps.

Rest, my dear brother, the first man whom I remember as a preacher of the gospel, and whom I shall hope to see first among the redeemed of the Lord, if he shall count me righteous for Christ's sake, and permit me to enter in through the gates into the city.

--Historical And Biographical Sketches Of The Early Churches And Pioneer Preachers Of The Christian Church In Missouri, by T.P. Haley, Christian Publishing Co. St. Louis, MO c.1888 p. 101-107 - Reprinted Hester Publications, Henderson, TN.

Location Of The Grave Of Allen Wright

The city of Higginsville, Missouri lies just east of Kansas City in the northwestern part of the state. Traveling east on I-70 from Kansas City, go to Exit 49, Hwy. 13 and head north six miles to Higginsville. In town turn right on Hwy. 213. Go to Hwy. T (Aullville Rd.) and turn right. Heading out of town the road will turn to the south. Just a couple miles out of town you will pass County Rd. 209. Just past CO209 look to your right. The Old Republican Cemetery will be on your right. The church building where Wright preached his last sermon no longer stands, but was on the property adjacent to the cemetery. Wright's grave will be in the cemetery.

GPS Coordinates
N 39º 516' x W 93º 41 738'

[NI005344] ISAAC ZINK A prominent citizen of Howard Township, was born in Washington County, May 2, 1821, being the second child of a family of ten children born to Peter and Sarah (Wright) Zink. His ancestors were natives of Virginia and North Carolina, respectively. The father came to Indiana in about 1817, and the mother near the same year. The subject of this sketch had very limited facilities for schooling, but by his energy succeeded in securing a tolerable education. He remained home with his parents until he attained this twentieth year. In August of 1841, his marriage with Nancy Monical was solemnized, and to this union have been born twelve children, ten of whom are now living: Daniel W., Peter H., George E., John Marion, Mary J., Eli C., Jospeh F., Isaac W., Moses W. (deceased), Lily B. (deceased), Jeremiah L. and Viola C. He is not a member of any church organization, but contributes liberally to the support of the church and charitable causes. In politics he is a stanch Democrat. By occupation he is a farmer and has made a decided success, having now in his possession over 290 acres of well improved land well stocked. His family are among the most intelligent people of the county.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI005413] Nov.. 25, 1903 newspaper Obituary:

At his home one mile of Martinstown at 3 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 17, Mr. William Vestal passed away after an illness of several months. Deceased was a member of the Missouri Home Guard, and was a devoted Christian. He was 79 years of age at the time of this demise. His first wife was Miss Charlotta Branscomb, to this union 11 children were born, of whom 3 are deceased. Those living are Lige Vestal, Noah Vestal, Peter Vestal, Mrs. Albert Newman, of near Martinstown, Mrs. Peter Sparks of Graysville, Buck Vestal of Unionville, Mrs. Warren Haynes, and Mrs. Green of Unionville. He was a member of the Christian Church and will long be remembered as a devoted upright Christian. His remains was laid to rest at 3 p.m. Nov. 18, with devotional exercises by Rev. Labe McFarland at the cemetery. About 18 years ago his wife died and later he married Mrs. Martha Cain who survives him. He was buried by his first wife. He was ready and willing to die, often telling his relatives he was waiting the Lord's Call. He with his family moved from Macon County to Putnam Co. over 40 years ago, the family coming from Kentucky to Macon.
The children and wife tender there sincere thanks to friends who so kindly assisted during the illness and burial of their beloved father.

[NI005464] Marie White taught at Stephens College in Columbia Mo most of her
adult life and there is a buliding on the campus that is named after her.

[NI005478] [Broderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1 A-L, Ed. 5, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Date of Import: Dec 28, 1997, Internal Ref. #1.111.5.122737.185]
Individual: Jones, Blanche
Social Security #: 486-30-0215
SS# issued in: Missouri
Birth date: Aug 5, 1886
Death date: May 1973
Residence code: Missouri
ZIP Code of last known residence: 64438
Primary location associated with this ZIP Code:
Darlington, Missouri
!DEATH; Death certificate State of Missouri, Registration District 120, Primary Registration District 4194, registrars number 66.

[NI005855] Had farm in Linton Township, Vigo County Indiana in 1850, 60, and 70 censuses.
Catherine Heggar (Hauger?), age 25, and William Heggar, age 12 living with
family in 1870 census. Catherine must be Jacob and Catherine Hubbard Copple's daughter, but do not yet have a brother William Hauger in family. His farm is said to have been 4 miles from brother Levi, but in Vigo County Committed to the Indiana Hospital for the Insane at age 66. Is described as being 6 feet one and having auburn hair. 1880 census, Phillip is 60, widowed. Living in the same household are daughters Ellen and Minnie, and Bettie Julia 18, servant, and Franklin Hauger, 18, servant.

[NI005856] Had farm in Sullivan County Indiana, four miles from brother Phillip.
Buried in Liberty Cemetery, Sullivan County Indiana.
Wm. Gaskins appointed as administrator of his estate Oct. 1898
Wm. Gaskins assigned as guardian to Levi. May have been 'insane'. Brother Phillip committed to hospital for insane. Sister Rachel also declared insane.

[NI005857] " Zhanna Kimball" Mary Jane Porter was born in Greene County, Indiana in 1822. According to the 1880 Census (Nebraska) both her parents were born in Virginia, and her father is listed as J. Porter. John Copple is descended from the Nicholas Copple line of North Carolina. This is a very prominent family lineage. They were married in Washington County, Indiana in Sept 1841. Then they moved to Barry County, Missouri and along the way they had 5 children. Sarah, Nan, John, George and Eliza (not positive about all the names--but there were 5). The story goes that they owned a store in Missouri and were raided in the middle of the night by Confederate soldiers, accusing them of being Yankee sympathizers, which they were. Mary Jane hid the children under the bed while the soldiers stormed their house. The next night, in the middle of the night, they packed up everything and moved to Iowa, and then a few months later on to Weeping Water, Nebraska. They lived with Sarah Ann Copple Swindle Rector (my great grandmother) and helped her raise her 10 children. After Mary Jane died, John went to live with his oldest daughter, Eliza Copple Coleman and her husband Asa. Most of the family has stayed in Weeping Water, NE, which is in Cass County, on the Nebraska/Iowa border.

This family spoke Pennsylvania Dutch at home. I have Sarah's obiturary, which was written by her pastor of the Mennonite Brethern in Christ church. She burned to death. Sad.

[NI006023] Mooney, Vol. P. History of Butler County, Kansas.
Lawrence, Kan.: Standard Pub. Co., 1916, p864 -- James Isaac PLUMMER, a prominent farmer of Rock Creek Twp, is a Kansas pioneer. Mr. Plummer was born near Greencastle, Putnam County, Indiana Feb 12, 1848 and is a son of John Wilson and Nettie Stewart Plummer, the former a native of NC and latter of Putnam County, Indiana. In 1860 the plummer family left their Indiana home and started West, with Kansas as their destination, and finally located in Pottawatomie County where the father bought 120 acres of land. They drove the entire distance from Indiana to their new home in KS and brought with them about 30 head of cattle. At first they were much pleased with their new home in Kansas but later in the season of that year an unusal drought developed, no rain of any amount falling between april and the following winter. In 1870 the Plummer family came to Butler Co and settled in Rock Creek Twp, filing on the NE 1/4 of Sec 5 on what was known as the Indian trust lands. The father also filed on a claim 3 miles SW a few months later. Mr. Plummer's first home in Butler Co was a stone structure built without mortar, which was succeeded about 5years later by a more pretentious residence which is a very substantial stone building and which is still the family home. Mr. Plummer was united in marriage in 1869 with Miss Bertha A. Fuller, a native of Iowa and to this union was born one child, who died in infancy. Mrs. Plummer died in 1871 and 10 years later, Mr. Plummer ws married to Emma F. Dugan, a native of MO and one child was born to this union, Hugh L, who resides on the home place with his parents. Mr. Plummer is one of the substantial men of Butler Co and has been identified with the development of this county almost since its beginning. He is a member of the Knights and Ladies of Security, and for a bnumber of years was actively identified with the Grange Lodge. He and his wife are members of the Christian Church and Mrs. Plummer is a profound student of the Bible. Politically, Mr. Plummer is a Republican, although inclined to be independent and liberal in matters of politics.

[NI006178] The Darter claim at Stillwater, Oklahoma was where the great Oklahoma State A & M University now stands.

[NI007055] died from injuries suffered in helping fight a schoolhouse fire in Leon, Kansas. He saved the life of a friend whose father, the local physician, paid all expenses of his burial and gravestone.

[NI008148] pioneers of the Indiana Territory and from old Roan County, North Carolina

[NI008152] BLUFORD HALL A citizen of Howard Township, was born in Kentucky on the 22day of April, 1811, being the third of a family of eight children born to William and Polly (Thixton) Hall. His parents were natives of Virginia, from which State they moved to Kentucky in a very early day, and from thence to Indiana in about 1818, settling in Washington County. Here they became prominently connected with the settlement of the county, and worthy and honored citizens. The subject of this sketch had very limited means of securing an education, but by his energy succeeded in obtaining enough for the business of life. He remained with his parents until he attained his twenty-second year, and November 28, 1833, his marriage with Rachel Gilstrap was celebrated, and to this union were born nine children, four of whom are now living: Maria (deceased), Sarah J., John W., David J., Lewis L. (who died in Andersonville Prison), Samantha E. (deceased), Nelson F. (deceased) and Mary E. He is a member of the Christian Church, and in politics is a Republican, but is not radical in his views. He is one of the successful farmers of the county, an upright citizen, and his people are among the best in the county.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI008189] JAMES WRIGHT. Among the pioneers of what is now the State of Indiana, and among the first white settlers of Greene County, was Rev. Richard Wright, father of he whose name heads this sketch, and, figuratively speaking, the father of Wright Township. He was born June 15, 1783, in Randolph County, N. C., where his wife (Elizabeth Hughes) was also born June 15, 1783. They emigrated to Clarke County, Ind., as early as 1807, and engaged in farming. During the war of 1812, Mr. Wright enlisted, and was out during the entire service, being slighly wounded while working on Fort Harrison, and being under the command of Col. Thompson when the renowned Indian Chief, Tecumseh, was killed. After the war a few years, he moved to Washington County, but two years later removed to Monroe County, where he was engaged in blacksmithing a short time. In March, 1826, he settled in old Smith Township, Greene County, and in 1838 wrote the petition for the organization of Wright Township; secured signers for this petition, and carried it before the March term of the court, where it was granted. This same year he was made Justice of the Peace, also acting as Trustee for the Sixteenth Section, which he surveyed and put upon the market. In November,1843, he was accidentally killed by a gunshot. James Wright was born in Monroe County, this State, May 5, 1825, but when an infant was brought by his parents to Greene County, which has always been his home. He received only such education in youth as the common schools of that early day afforded, and in early years learned the blacksmith trade, which he still follows in conjunction with farming. He owns eighty acres of land south of Jasonville, is a member of the Christian Church, and a Democrat in politics. In 1858, he was elected Trustee of the township, serving as such three years, and in 1862 was re-elected, continuing until 1866. While serving in this capacity, Mr. Wright organized the popular Congressional road and school districts. For he past fourteen years, he has acted as agent for various machine companies, both as local and traveling salesman. He was married, October 29, 1845 to Delia J. Ellixson, who was born July 24, 1829, a daughter of Jeremiah and Wineford (Gilstrap) Ellixson, both of whom were natives of Washington County, Ind. Mr.and Mrs. Wright are parents of six living children--James W., Zelpha E., Mary E., Nancy E., Alice E. and John M.; and six deceased--Francis M., Wineford J, George W., Ezekial H., Delila M. and one unnamed.


"HISTORY OF GREENE AND SULLIVAN COUNTIES, STATE OF INDIANA, FROM THE EARLIEST TIME TO THE PRESENT; TOGETHER WITH INTERESTING BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, REMINISCENCES, NOTES, ETC." CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & County, PUBLISHERS. 1884.
WRIGHT TWP.
PAGE 433

[NI008279] NELSON JOHNSON A native of the township and county in which he now resides, was born October 9, 1824, the third in a family of seven children, born to Ransom and Barbara (Wright) Johnson, also natives of this county, whose parents were among the very earliest settlers of this locality. The parents of Mr. Johnson died in his early youth, in consequence of which he was raised a bound boy, by his uncle, John H. Johnson. The educational advantages of that early day were very limited, but by strict industry and devotion to study, he was enabled to qualify himself for a teacher. December 20, 1845, his marriage with Sarah Souder was solemnized, and to their union were born the following children: Ransom, George W., Mary J. and Adelia A. The occupation of Mr. Johnson has been principally farming, in which pursuit he has been very successful, now owning 214 acres of mostly well improved land. He is a Democrat and has served the people of his township as Justice of the Peace for the past twenty-four years; is the present incumbent for the ensuing four years, and was Township Trustee under the old statute. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI008292] George. M Johnson, one of the leading business men of Pekin, Washington county, Indiana, is a native of that town, born on January 17, 1849, son of Nelson and Sarah (Souder) Johnson. Nelson Johnson was a son of Ransom Johnson, and he, in turn, was a son of Josiah and Sally (Wright) Johnson, who were among the earliest pioneers of this section, coming here in 1808 and locating southwest of where Salem now is. The Johnson family history, therefore, is closely connected with the history of Washington county and is set out in the sketch of the life of Josiah T. Johnson, found elsewhere in this volume. Nelson Johnson gave the active years of his life to farming, being located just north of Pekin, on the grade road. He was one of the older school teachers of this section, being engaged in that calling for many years and continuing therein until after fifty years of age. For twenty-four years he was justice of the peace and was a man widely known and respected. Sarah Souder, his wife, was also born near Pekin. daughter of Joseph and Catherine (Tash) Souder. Joseph Souder was a son of Fred and Mary (Kesner) Souder, and the latter's father, Solomon Kesner, came to this country from Germany. Fred Souder and his wife came to this section from Tennessee in 1816 and located first where the town of Pekin now stands. The next vear they entered land about a mile and a half north of their original location and made their permanent home there. Fred Souder died there on November 18, 1844, and his widow afterwards went to Illnois, where she closed her life. George M. Johnson was one of a family of four children, namely: Ransom, living in Pekin; Mary J., wife of P. J. Purlee, residing north of Pekin, and Adelia, widow of William Baker, of Fountain county, this state. George M. is the second child of the family in order of birth, and lived on the homestead north of Pekin until married. During his boyhood days he attended the grade and high schools of Pekin and assisted his father in the work of the farm. After marriage, he bought a stock of general merchandise in Pekin Station. which he continued to run for seven years. He then moved his store to Old Pekin and continued in that business until about 1910. For about thirty-five vears he operated the business himself, and then disposed of it to his son, Charles C., and since has been giving his attention to the retail automobile business. In 19I3 Mr. Johnson became connected with the Pekin Hardwood Lumber Company, in the capacity of president. That company operates a large saw and band-mill, doing a large business. Mr. Johnson is also connected with the Borden State Bank, in the capacity of vice-president and director, and he is also a stock- holder and director in the Citizens Bank of Pekin. Mr. Johnson is a public-spirited man and gives his support to the Democratic party. In 1908 he was elected county commissioner and re-elected to succeed himself, occupying the office for six years, up to the close of 1913. In I873 Mr. Johnson was united in marriage with Sarah A. Elrod, born in Polk township, a daughter of Cornelius and Mahala (Rickard) Elrod, the former a son of Stephen and Elizabeth Wyman Elrod. Stephen was a native of North Carolina and came to this section about the vear 1815. He entered land from the government in Jackson township, but within a few years went to Polk township, where his wife owned a half section. Stephen prospered in his farming and gradually added other acres to his wife's original holdings, until he was a considerable landowner. His wife was Elizabeth Wvman, daughter of Frederick Wyman, who was a native of Hesse, Germany, and reached this country during the war with England in 1812. The English brought over a number of Hessian soldiers to aid their cause, and inasmuch as young Wvman did not relish the task before him, he escaped from the British and wandered into Tennessee. There he remained for a short time, and then came to this county, where he made his permanent home. He was a sturdy man in every respect and possessed the fine physique for which many Hessians were noted. This characteristic he passed on to his sons, and it can still be distinguished in several of his descendants today. All of his sons weighed over two hundred pounds and were an excellent set of men, becoming some of the leading citizens of this section. To George M. Johnson and wife have been born three children, of whom Alfred N. is the eldest, born, on January 22, 1874, and his early days were passed in assisting his father in his store. He remained in that connection until 1911, when he purchased the largest business block in Pekin, having a floor space of sixty-four hundred square feet, and installed therein a full line of hardware implements, wagons, buggies, etc. On October 13, 1895, Alfred married Bertha E., daughter of David and Julia S. (Lapping) Bierly, and to them have been born two sons, Edward B., aged eighteen years, and Frank L., eleven years old. Charles C., the second son, was born near Pekin and grew up at work about the store, being also employed some about the saw and grist-mill in the town. For a time he assisted Alfred in the store, and in 1915 Charles C. became sole owner of the store, still located at Old Pekin. Charles C. married Elva Martin. Delia F., the youngest of the Johnson family, is the wife of Thomas Fisher, a farmer near Old Pekin, and is the mother of six children, Ruth, Ruby, Hugh, Carl, George and Merle. Both Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are devout members of the Church of Christ and are among the most highly respected citizens of this community. Personally, Mr. Johnson is quiet and modest in manner, but forceful and influential for the best.

CENTENNIAL HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, INDIANA ITS PEOPLE, INDUSTRIES AND INSTITUTIONS, By Warder W. Stevens. With Biographical Sketches of Representative Citizens and Genealogical Records of Many of the Old Families. Illustrated 1916 B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc. Indianapolis, Indiana

[NI008522] [alexander henry.FTW]

Alias: Aurlene /Moulton/

[NI008609] Glenwood Opinion
Glenwood, Mills County, Iowa
September 30, 1943

WRIGHT SERVICES WERE HELD HERE ON LAST FRIDAY

Funeral for Frank Wright, pioneer Mills County man, who died at an advanced age held last Friday. Burial in Glenwood Cemetery.

Funeral services were held in Raynors Chapel Friday afternoon for Frank Wright, 88, pioneer citizen of this community who died in Omaha on September 22nd from ailments due to his advanced age. Rev. H.G. Parker of the Glenwood Methodist Church was in charge of the service with music being furnished by Mary Evelyn Logan, who was assisted at the piano by Mrs. Warren Adams. Mrs. Leonard Seeger and Mrs. Parl Mickelwait were in charge of the floral tributes. Acting as pallbearers were R.M. Scott, Len Sell, Glen Sell, Parl Mickelwait, Clyde Rhoads, Carl Morgan, Will Daniel and Paul Roenfeldt. Interment was made in the Glenwood Cemetery.
Frank Wright was born October 7, 1855, and died September 22, 1943, nearly completing the 88th year of his life.
He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Appler R. Wright, who came from Putnam County, Indiana, to Mills County, Iowa in 1854, and bought the farm now owned by Clair Dashner in Lyons Township some nine miles southwest of Glenwood. There, they built a log house with a fireplace, and there the children grew to maturity-Candace, (Mrs. Robert Hale) of Los Angeles, California; Frank, (subject of this sketch); Charles R. of Genoa, Nebraska, and Fannie (Mrs. E.J. Burkett) of Lincoln, Nebraska. Later, they acquired considerable more land in this neighborhood, including the farm south of the upper part of Hanie Slough, now occupied by Mrs. Roy Wright, and the farm three miles east of Glenwood, where they moved and lived until they finally abandoned farming and moved into Glenwood. Thus, the Wrights were prominently identified with the early development of this community, and A.R. Wright for a time represented Mills County in the State Legislature. His ancestors----- before the American Revolution, and his wife (Sarah Ann Webster) was descended from the early New England family of that name.
Frank Wright had grown to young manhood when his parents left the farm where he was born and moved to Glenwood, and in 1879, was united in marriage with Nancy Linville, daughter of Geo. and Sarah Linville. Their first home was on the farm west of the county farm, and here were born their three children, Earl, Ray, and Jay. When his parents abandoned farming, they acquired the farm thus vacated, now known as the Frank Wright farm, three miles east of Glenwood. His wife died there some ten years ago, but Frank continued living there until his death.
From early life, Frank Wright was a close observer of things around him, and especially of vegetable and animal life. He had acquired a wide knowledge of the various grasses, weeds, shrubs and trees of this section, and was always interested in noting their qualities and development. He was also greatly interested in the absorbing realm of all animal life, domesticated, wild or insect. Perhaps his greatest pleasure came from the raising of cattle and horses. He took delight in establishing friendly relations with young stock, and was repaid for his kindly care by the later evidence of confidence, and the ready response of the grown animals to his management.
He is survived by his sons, Earl and Jay, five grandchildren, Fern McClain, Roy, Willard and John of Glenwood, and Marjorie McFarland of Omaha. There are also eight great grandchildren.

[NI008656] Malvern Leader
Malvern, Mills County, Iowa
October 25, 1934

MANY ATTEND LAST SAD RITES FOR PIONEER RESIDENT OCTOBER 17, 1934

Funeral services for Mrs. Frank Wright, mention of whose death was made in last week's Leader, were held in the late home east of Glenwood, Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev. W.B. Crewdson of the Christian Church in Logan, a life long friend of the family, who paid high tribute to the sterling qualities and character of the deceased.
Music was furnished by W.H.T. Wellons, Clarence B. Day, Mrs. F.V. Kemp, and Mrs. Alterkruse.
A large concourse of sorrowing friends and relatives gathered at the home to pay tribute to this woman whom all had known so long and held in such high respect.
Burial was made in the Glenwood Cemetery. The pall bearers were J.R. Graves, L.H. Sell, Paul Roenfeldt, Frank Hammond, George Howard, and Albert Asmussen.
Nancy Catherine Wright was born in Missouri, January 20, 1857, and died at her home east of Glenwood, October 15, 1934. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Linville. They moved to this county when she was about two years old, and this has been her home ever since, some 75 years.
She was married to Frank Wright, member of another prominent pioneer family, January 29, 1880, and four years ago last winter they celebrated their golden wedding anniversary.
Three sons were born to them: Roy and Earl of this county, and Jay of Omaha. They, with the husband, five grandchildren, and one great grandchild survive her. She is also survived by one brother, Louis Linville, of Emmett, Nebraska, and one sister, Mrs. Sallie Hobart of Chicago.
When a child, she united with the Christian Church in Glenwood of which she has ever since been a member, and lived a consistent Christian life.
She was devoted to her home and found her greatest pleasure in ministering to those nearest and dearest to her.

[NI008887] Mrs. Willis Wright died of pneumonia, at her late home, 405 North Oak street, Jefferson, Iowa, February 13, 1907, her age 78 years, 5 months and 15 days. She was born in Tennessee, August 29, 1828, her parents moving from that state to Putnam county, Indiana, when she was at an early age, where she grew to womanhood and became a member of the Christian church. She was united in marriage to Willis Wright, whose death she has mourned since Sept. 22, 1898. Together they came to Greene county, Iowa, in the year 1853, she being a resident here for 54 years, and has lived on North Oak street for the past twenty years. The surviving children are Mrs. Henry Beebe, William E. Wright, L O. Wright, L. P. Wright and Mrs. C R. Albee. Mrs. Erasmus Hanson, deceased, was her daughter. The funeral services were held at the church by Rev. Wilkinson of Drake University; the interment at the Pleasant Hill cemetery.

Jefferson Bee - February 21, 1907

[NI008909] FORMER JEFFERSON RESIDENT IS DEAD

During later part of his years here was manager of Hotel Jefferson

Many local friends mourn the death of Joel H. Wright, of Cedar Falls, who passed away at his home there last week. Mr. Wright was a resident of Jefferson for more than 20 years, and, for some time prior to his leaving here was proprietor of Hotel Jefferson. Concerning his death we clip the following from one of the Cedar Falls papers:

"At the early hour of 2 o'clock the long and eventful life of Joel H. Wright came to a close, the end coming at the family residence in the Smith apartments, corner of Ninth and Main streets, after a brief illness due to pneumonia, which followed and attack of influenza about ten days ago. From the very first of the illness it was evident that his condition was serious and as a result everything known to medical science coupled with the tender and devoted care of his faithful wife and daughters was done in hopes of staying the inevitable, but to no avail. The condition of the stricken man gradually grew worse until death came as a sweet relief to his sufferings. During the three years of his residence in this city Mr. Wright gained a wide acquaintance in the business district. For many months he assisted at the Cedar Falls drug and paint shop and later was employed at the Hughes dry goods store. In all of his business dealings he was the soul of honor and leaves for his relatives a heritage of memory of life filled with good deeds. Before removing to Cedar Falls he was engaged for many years in the hotel business at Jefferson and was widely known by the traveling public. As yet the complete arrangements have not been made for the funeral, but in all probability the services will be held Wednesday afternoon at the Christian church, conducted by the pastor, Rev. Scott, assisted by Rev. Morris. Interment will be made in Greenwood cemetery.

Joel H. Wright was born October 18, 1855, being in his sixty-fourth year of life. He spent his boyhood days in Greene county. On September 4, 1874, he was united in marriage to Miss Lucinda Tyler, the important event taking place at Jefferson, Iowa. To this happy union three daughters were born: Mrs. Royal Metzgar of this city; Mrs. R. D. Hayden, Lake City, Minn., and Mrs. A. E. Irvin of Broken Bow, Nebr., all of whom were present when the angel of death summoned their loved ones."

Jefferson Bee - January 15, 1919

Note: Greene County Marriage Records 1854-1880 show the marriage September 4, 1878.

[NI008939] MRS. JAMES C. WRIGHT LAID TO REST SUNDAY

Funeral services for Mrs. James C. Wright were held at the Scranton Church of Christ Sunday afternoon, Sept. 2, at 2:30 under the direction of the Rev. Wm. Kramer. A quartette composed of Roberta Brown, Lucille Rutan, Mrs. Lenore Peterson and Mrs. Will Ferry was accompanied by Mrs. Wm. Kramer. Pallbearers were Alva Madison, Russell and Vernon Henning, Chas.Cleveland, Fred Hatch and Jess Loomis. Burial was in the Scranton cemetery.

Mary Belle Wright, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John McClurg, was born Nov. 17, 1865, in Greene County, Iowa and passed away Aug. 30, 1945 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Carlton Henning, at the age of 79 years, nine months, and 12 days.

At an early age she united with the Highland Church of Christ. In 1882 she married James C. Wright and to this union three children, Luther, Elsie and Leona were born.

The Wright family lived on a farm southeast of Scranton for several years. In 1892 the family moved to Des Moines, where she and her husband entered Drake University College of the Bible to prepare for the ministry. She assisted her husband in the various phases of church work in the following Iowa Christian church pastorates: Knoxville, Hartford, Guthrie Center, Bayard, Pierson, Scranton, and Farlin.

In 1913 Mr. and Mrs. Wright moved back to their farm home near Scranton. Mr. Wright died in 1922. After 1937 Mrs. Wright made her home with her daughter, who lives south of Scranton.

Mrs. Wright will be remembered for her devotion to her family and to the church and for the unselfish sharing of her time and talents wherever she has made her home. For the last few years she has been confined to her home because of failing health.

The surviving childred are Luther Wright, Des Moines; Mrs. LeonaToler, Peoria, Ill., and Mrs. Elsie Henning, Scranton. There are seven grandchildren and 19 great-grandchildren, also two sisters, Mrs. Nan Waters, Renville, Minn., Mrs Jenny Irons, Berryville, Ark., and one brother, Henry McClurg, Spirit Lake.

The Jefferson Herald, Jefferson, Iowa Sep. 6, 1945

(Note: Greene County, Iowa, Marriage Records gives the date of marriage as May 20, 1883.)

[NI008954] LEONARD LAWRENCE WRIGHT (Jan 7, 1915)
(Scranton Journal, Scranton, IA)
Leonard Lawrence Wright was born in Indiana July 15, 1840, and passed away at his home in Scranton, Iowa, Jan. 7, 1915, at 4:45 p.m., after a lingering illness with Bright's disease. Mr. Wright came to Greene county with his parents in 1845, and has resided here continuously since. He was one of the county's oldest pioneers, very few remaining who came to the county in its earliest days. During all his years among us he has lived a upright life and has enjoyed friendship and esteem of a wide acquaintance. He has been married twice. His first companion was Miss Dollie Morlan, who died over forty years ago. To their union two daughters were born, one of whom passed away after her marriage, the remaining one being Mrs. John Lewis. He was married to Miss Lavina Kennett, the widow who survives him, in May, 1878. To their union one daughter, Mrs. Ed. Hammer, of Paton, and one son Scottie Wright, of Trinidad, Colorado, were born. Funeral services were conducted from the Church of Christ on Saturday at 10:30 a.m. by Eld. D. E. Millard, of Jefferson, and the remains were laid to rest near the old home in the Highland cemetery by the following pallbearers chosen from among his friends; W. H. Garland, D. E. Henning, Scott Barber, S. G. Kious, W. S. Crosier and E. Hall. A large gathering of old friends and neighbors attended his funeral, some having known the deceased for more that half a century.
L. L. Wright was a good citizen, a kind parent and a faithful husband. He was a man who attended well to his own affairs and gave offense to none. His life among us has been valuable and his death is sincerely mourned by a large circle of friends. To the grief-stricken wife and the surviving children the community tenders its most profound sympathy.

[NI010723] JOHN B. MARKLAND One of Pierce Township's most prosperous farmers, was born May 10, 1834, the oldest of ten children born to Nelson and Elizabeth (Bush) Markland, natives respectively of North Carolina and Indiana, the former a resident of this township since 1830. He left home at the age of twenty-five to engage in business pursuits for himself and was, shortly after, married to Delilah J. Hinds, by whom he is the father of six children, of whom these five are living: Laura M., Frank H., Stephen N., Mary E. and Lulu E. His occupation has always been principally farming, and now owns 320 acres of good land, also being engaged in stock-raising to a considerable extent. In politics he is an adherent to the principles of Democracy. He and his wife are members of the Christian Church of which organization Mr. Markland is now an Elder.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI011550] 1) Normantown, small community outside of Vidalia. Grandmother Clarke's house went to another family after her death and was later burned. We have a picture of the house.

[NI011558] Was a reverend. Gave up the church to marry Grannie.

Served in World War I as Chaplain in 116th Field Artillery; 1st Lieutenant, Camp Wheeler, Macon, GA

[NI011559] Worthy Matron - Eastern Star (OES)

[NI012260] [james morgan.FTW]

This was taken from "5 Generations of the Pfoutz-Fouts Family" compiled and published by Audr ey L. Woodruff, Independence, Missouri, 64052

[NI012266] Early History of Washington Co., Indiana - By Forrest W. Faria 1931. Some brief notes taken from the Biographical Sketches:

Arthur Parr was b. in Guilford Co., N.C. July 5, 1758 [My note: This is likely in error because Guilford County was not created until 1770 from Rowan and Orange counties, so Arthur Parr could not have been born there, although he could have been born in that part of Rowan County that later became Guilford.] He lived there till he was 10 or 12 years of age. Moved with mother and step-father to S. Carolina. Remained there until he entered Rev. War March 1, 1776.

After the War, he settled in N. Carolina near the home of James Morgan and later married his daughter Mary on Feb. 22, 1782. They lived together for over 50 years and had 9 children.

He and his wife came to Indiana Territory and settled in Washington County in 1809. He died on the place where he lived and first settled. His wife died a few years later at the home of her son Morgan Parr in Clark Co., Indiana.

[NI012273] Joel Wright, one of the first settlers of Washington Township. [Marion County, Indiana] was born in Stokes County, North Carolina on 5 Feb 1793, and was married to Sarah Byerby on 10 Sept 1812 in North Carolina. They moved from there to Indiana in May 12, 1813, settling temporarily in what is now Wayne county, on the west fork of the White Water. From there they moved to Washington Township on the 22 Dec 1821. Joel Wright was appointed one of the first justices of the peace for Washington Township. When his term expired he was run again and received the largest vote, being elected over Hiram Bacon, Esq., in 1826. On 1 April 1828, Mr. Wright cut the artery in his left leg. On the 6th, the limb was amputated about four inches above the knee, and three days afterwards Mr. Wright died, leaving Sarah Wright, his wife, with seven children - Alfred, Mary, Jincy, Emsley, Phebe, Elisabeth, and Lucinda. On 25 Aug 1828 another child, Joel Wright, was born. Mrs. Wright lived a widow all the rest of her life, and raised the eight children. She died at the age of seventy-six years.

[from Berry Robinson Sulgrove's "History of Indianapolis and Marion County, Indiana" (L. H. Everts & Co. : Philadelphia. 1884), p. 628]

[NI013391]

Records Of Deeds: 1800 Record Books; Wayne County, Kentucky Page
Volume Amount Acres Date Lewis Gilstrap 25
E $338.00 75 1829 Lewis Gilstrap 199
E $ 50.00 25 1829 Lewis Gilstrap 102
F $150.00 100 1832 Lewis Gilstrap 103 F
$ 50.00 50 1832 Lewis Gilstrap 104 F $
75.00 25 1832
1850 - - - - - - Macon County, Missouri Census Lewis Gilstrap 51
Male Real Estate $1,200. Born: NC Rhoda '
51 Female ' VA Mary ' 20 ' ' KY
Cassy A. ' 16 ' ' MO John Shoemaker 8
Male ' MO

State of Kansas Linn County In The Probate Court In And For Said County In the matter of the Estate of Lewis Gilstrap, late of said County, deceased. On this fifth day of February; AD 1864, personally appeared before me, the undersigned, Judge of the said court; Willis M. Sutton, who being by me duly sworn according to law, doth upon his oath depose and say, that Lewis Gilstrap died on the 9 day of January AD 1866, at Linn County and State aforesaid, that to the best of his knowledge and belief the names and places of residence of the heirs of the said deceased, are as follows, to-wit: Bright Gilstrap, Shelby Gilstrap, Angeletta Dunnington, Mary Frost and Martha White residing in Macon County, in the State of Missouri, Nancy Locke, Schuler County, Missouri, and Willis M. Sutton and that the deceased died without a will, as affiant verily believes. Subscribed and sworn to before me on the day and year first above written. C.C. Lampkins; Probate Judge Linnville October 9, 1865 Received from Willie M. Sutton, Administrator of the Estate of Lewis Gilstrap, deceased Three Hundred and Fifty Dollars to Each of us heirs of the Estate of the above named Lewis Gilstrap deceased. Palatine Dunnington; Samuel Lockett; Thomas White; John Frost; Bright Gilstrap; Shelby Gilstrap History of Macon County Bevier, Missouri Bevier was laid out in 1858, by John Duff, and named after Col. Robert Bevier, from Kentucky. The land upon which the town was started was originally the property of Lewis Gilstrap, who entered 160 acres. The plat embraces the north-east quarter and the east half of the north-west quarter, of section 15, township 57, range 15, and was filed for record June 29, 1858.
A family story is that during the winter of 1832, Indians would come to the cabin and beg 'handouts', but Rhoda and the children were never harmed. Lewis is supposed to have kept a 'tame' wolf chained to a log which in order to feed, Rhoda would have one of the children let the wolf chase them to the end of the chain while she placed the animal's food at the opposite end of the run. After the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad was laid out Lewis sold his land in Macon County, Missouri to a railroad man named Bevier, who's son, Richard Seymore Bevier, the town was named after.
Husband: Lewis Gilstrap Wife: Julia Powell Linn County,

Kansas Census July 13, 1860 House Name
Sex Age Born 397 Lewis Gilstrap M 61
NC Julia Gilstrap Fe 46 NC
A. Gilstrap ? 16 MO
Martha Fe 14 MO
James M 13 MO Martha and James,
Julia's children from her first marriage. Linn County, Kansas
Census 1865 House Name
Sex Age Born 129 Julia Gilstrap
Fe 57 NC James W. M
18 MO Linn County, Kansas Census June 29, 1870 Name
Sex Age Born Julia Gilstrap
Fe 62 NC Martha Cartwright Fe 25
MO

[NI013655] Descendant of Lt. David Colglazier Revolutionary War Soldier buried in Old Mill Creek burial ground, Washington County, Indiana

[NI014128] Family records. Grandfather of Wayne J. Spence. Supplemental data from
1880, 1900, 1910 and 1920 Missouri Census, Jasper County. Myrta and
John are buried at Center Point Cemetery in Jasper County.

[NI014131] Family records. Grandfather of Wayne J. Spence. Supplemental data from
1880, 1900, 1910 and 1920 Missouri Census, Jasper County. Marie Knorpp
indicates that John Spence bought his first car a 1914 Ford, from Jake
Grubb in 1917. John and Myrta are buried at Center Point Cemetery in
Jasper County.

[NI014160] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 48

[NI015316] Henry T. Ratts Family by Hendrickson 1979: "Joseph C. Bush deserted his family and left Salem and was never heard from again, i think about 1912 or 1914"

[NI015612] [Broderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1 A-L, Ed. 5, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Date of Import: Dec 28, 1997, Internal Ref. #1.111.5.9489.35]
Individual: Ashlock, Marvin
Social Security #: 486-10-0087
SS# issued in: Missouri
Birth date: Feb 11, 1911
Death date: Jan 9, 1993
ZIP Code of last known residence: 65779
Primary location associated with this ZIP Code:
Wheatland, Missouri
Birth Certificate Missouri file number 8148 Gentry County, township of Miller, primary registration district 5432. Also gives fathers age as 39, mother's as 24 at his birth.
Death Certificate Missouri State file number 124-93-000429 for Polk County.

[NI015614] [Broderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1 A-L, Ed. 5, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Date of Import: Dec 28, 1997, Internal Ref. #1.111.5.27391.163]
Individual: Brashear, Thelma
Social Security #: 402-32-8764
SS# issued in: Kentucky
Birth date: Aug 21, 1915
Death date: Nov 1977
Residence code: Missouri
ZIP Code of last known residence: 65613
Primary location associated with this ZIP Code:
Bolivar, Missouri
Birth Certificate Missouri State file number 44530, primary registration district number 4422. Also gives parents age at birth, father as 25, mother as 24.
Death Certificate on hand. Missouri State file number 124-77-023201. District 128, primary registration district 2000, registars number 2263. County of death given is Greene county.

[NI015627] The Dispatch, Lexington, North Carolina; Monday Feb. 22, 1932:

Mrs. Prim, Noted Woman Lived Almost A Century
(By C. B. Wall)

On the morning of November the 11, 1831, the sun slowly wended its way up the eastern skies, bedecking the earth with millions of diamonds, as it shed beautiful rays upon the dew-laden grasses which surrounded Slash Cottage, a home in which the bright smiles of a cooing baby girl were to soon be mingled with this golden sunshine for almost a century hence.

This home was near Silver Hill, which at that time was far famed as a mineral center. The wee one first to enter into life’s journey on this bleak November day more than a century n the past, was Miss Celia A. Gallimore, daughter of the late Esquire Jesse Gallimore and Ruth Wright Gallimore.

Methinks I can see a smiling face, a dimpled cheek and hear a cooing voice in attempt at lisping the sweetest earthly name tongue ever uttered – Mother. Just a few short months and one can hear the patter of little feet as they trip lightly from early morning till the evening shades begin to lengthen, when sweet sleep begins to enshroud wee ones with a robe of restful slumber.

Educated in Lexington
This winsome lassie soon arrived at the age when an education was to be considered. While a girl in her teens she attended school in Lexington, which was then only a village (1849) where she was under the tutorship of Rev. Jesse Rankin, a Presbyterian minister and principal of a school. At that time Rev. Rankin was serving the church as pastor at Silver Hill and was very often accompanied on his way to and from his appointment by Miss Gallimore, who at an early age was much interested in the work of the Master, and enjoyed discoursing with the minister, who often spent the night in the home of her parents. While in the home of this highly cultured minister-educator, this young lady was priviledged to meet a brother of his, who with his wife, was then a missionary to India.

Marries Captain Prim
In a few years later after completing her education, she wed in 1854, married to Capt. John M. Prim of Wytheville, Virginia, a graduate of Emory and Henry college of that state. After their marriage, the resided in Captain Prim’s native state for two years, after which they returned to the native home of the young bride at Silver Hill, where for sixty-two happy, blissful years they lived together at Contentna, their beautiful home, where Capt. Prim passed away seventeen years ago.

What can be more like entering the pearly gates than to enjoy the atmosphere of a Christian home where God is at all times preeminant, where the sweet spirit of harmony reigns supreme, yea, where Jesus dwells?

Mrs. Prim, who passed on to her blissful reward June the twenty-eighth, 1931, should she have been spared just four months and thirteen days, would have reached her one hundredth milestone in life’s journey, the anniversary of her birthday being November the eleventh. Can we not say of her passing as the Master said on one occasion, "She is not dead, but sleepeth."

Beside the dead I knelt for prayer,
And felt a presence as I prayed,
Lo! It was Jesus standing there
He smiled: "Be not afraid."

"Lord, thou hast conquered death, we know;
Restore again to life," I said,
"this one who died an hour ago,"
He smiled: "She is not dead!"

"Asleep then, as thyself didst say;
Yet thou canst lift the lids that keep
Her prisoned eyes from ours away!"
He smiled: "She doth not sleep!"

"Nay then, tho’ haply she do wake,
And look upon some fair dawn,
Restore her to our hearts that ache!"
He smiled: "She is not gone!"

"Alas! Too well we know our loss,
Nor hope again our joy to touch,
Until that stream of death we cross!"
He smiled: "there is no such!"

Yet, our beloved seem so far,
The while we yearn to feel them near,
Albeit with thee we trust they are,
He smiled: "And I am here.

"Dear Lord, how shall we know that they
Still walk unseen with us and thee,
Nor sleep, nor wander far away?"
He smiled: "Abide in me!"

There were born to this union six children: Miss Maggie Prim, Mrs. Myrtle B. Davis and Mr. Estelle Stoner, who preceded their sainted mother to the holy city a number of years ago. Albert Prim, High Point, N.C., John M. Prim, and Mrs. Will Johnson, Lexington, N.C., Rt. 6 who survive.

Mrs. Prim was the oldest member of Holloway’s church and an active member of the Woman’s Missionary society for a number of years. During the last few months of her sojourn on earth, as she appeared to become more and more submissive to His will, her beaming countenance reminded one very much of what we feel must be that possessed by the angelic host of heaven, so happy, so calm, so serene – a beautiful life.

We have in our possession an ancient book, which was once the property of this sainted lady, and prized very highly by her during her active Christian life. This antique volume entitled, “A Guide For Young Disciples,” bears date of July 16, 1832, as the time of writing prefactory address to same. On the flyleaf is inscribed the following words, Celia A. Gallimore, Slash Cottage, Silver Hill. The book is in a good state of preservation, showing that it was much prized and carefully handled by its owner during her many years of study of this and many other ancient Christian volumes.

Also we have a copy of Jacob’s Greek Grammar, which was once a text book in the late Esquire Jesse Gallimore, father of Mrs. Celia A. Gallimore Prim. This volume is in good condition and much prized.

The Saviour said, “By their works ye shall know them.” Also the literature possessed and read by the sainted lady is an index to her Christian career during her sojourn here on earth.

How thankful we are for the exemplary life of the one gone before, as we feel it was as “A city set upon a hill, cannot be hid.”

[NI015748] Miss Armelia Gilstrap died at her home here, Callao, Missouri, on Sunday afternoon at 3:00 o'clock after a three day illness at the age of 64 years. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Gilstrap and had spent her entire life in and near Callao. She was a faithful member of the Christian Church. She leaves to mourn her passing, her twin sister Mrs. Willetta Huffman. Mrs. Laura Sission, Mrs. Walter McGregor of Texas, J. D. Gilstrap of Macon, John Gilstrap and Daymon Gilstrap of Callao. Funeral services were held at Concord Christian Church Tuesday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock conducted by Rev. Munyon. Interment in adjoining cemetery.

[NI015763] Harry Gilstrap was working as a mechanic in Callao, Missouri when he enlisted in the Army November 6, 1918 and was honorably discharged December 17, 1918 as the war had ceased. Harry farmed and worked in the Callao community as an automobile mechanic until 1930 when he accepted a position in Macon as an automobile salesman for Nisbeth Motor Co. He was drafted in the Army in 1942 and served five months before he was discharged because of his age. He died from cancer in 1962.

[NI017154] WILLIAM RUDDER The junior member of the firm of Rudder & Son, was born December 12, 1845, being the oldest of a family of six children born to James and Elizabeth (Barnett) Rudder. His father was a native of Kentucky, from which State he removed to Indiana in 1842, settling about one and one-half miles east of what is now Campbellsburg. Prior to the year 1862 he was engaged in farming, and since that time has been connected with the mill. He has also been a minister of the Gospel of the Christian Church. William, the subject of this sketch, had good facilities for securing a practical education, enough to enable him to teach in the common schools. October 26, 1865, his marriage with Nancy E. Purlee was solemnized, and this union has been blessed with seven children, all living: James L., Cora E., Stella M., William H., Lawrence E., Lulu D. and an infant daughter unnamed. He is not a member of any church, but contributes liberally to the support of churches and morals in general. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, and in politics is a stanch Democrat, and has been elected Trustee in this township by that party five times, serving in all twelve years. A flour and saw-mill, located on Blue River, seven miles south of Salem, and owned by James Rudder & Son, was erected about 1820. In the first few years after its erection there was no saw-mill attached. The probable capacity at that time was: corn, forty-five bushels; wheat, fifty bushels. The saw-mill was added about 1875, which was also run by water-power, as was the flouring-mill. In 1878 a boiler and engine were purchase, which can be applied to either. It has a good and paying custom at present, with capacity: corn, 150 bushels; wheat, 100 bushels; lumber, 6,000 feet per day.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI018040] Information from the family files of Joy Spry, Santa Fe, Texas.

[NI018048] Information from the family files of Joy Spry, Santa Fe, Texas.

[NI018075] Data from family records of Frankie Fieker of Carthage, Missouri.
Additional information from Clyde Hood, Overton, Kansas and Lillian
Spence, Galena, Kansas.

[NI018084] Data from family records of Frankie Fieker of Carthage, Missouri.
Additional information from Clyde Hood, Overton, Kansas and Lillian
Spence, Galena, Kansas.

[NI018085] Data from family records of Frankie Fieker of Carthage, Missouri.
Additional information from Clyde Hood, Overton, Kansas and Lillian
Spence, Galena, Kansas.

[NI018089] Data from family records of Frankie Fieker of Carthage, Missouri.
Additional information from Clyde Hood, Overton, Kansas and Lillian
Spence, Galena, Kansas.

[NI018106] Data from family records of Frankie Fieker of Carthage, Missouri.
Additional information from Clyde Hood, Overton, Kansas and Lillian
Spence, Galena, Kansas.
Randy was killed in an head on auto accident in Kansas.

[NI018118] Data from family records of Frankie Fieker of Carthage, Missouri.
Additional information from Clyde Hood, Overton, Kansas and Lillian
Spence, Galena, Kansas.

[NI018121] Data from family records of Frankie Fieker of Carthage, Missouri.
Additional information from Clyde Hood, Overton, Kansas and Lillian
Spence, Galena, Kansas.

[NI018132] Data from family records of Frankie Fieker of Carthage, Missouri.
Additional information from Clyde Hood, Overton, Kansas and Lillian
Spence, Galena, Kansas.

[NI018139] Data from family records of Frankie Fieker of Carthage, Missouri.
Additional information from Clyde Hood, Overton, Kansas and Lillian
Spence, Galena, Kansas.

[NI018140] Family records. Grandfather of Wayne J. Spence. Supplemental data from
1880, 1900, 1910 and 1920 Missouri Census, Jasper County.

[NI018144] From family records of Wayne Spence, Redding, California.

[NI018146] Information from the family records of Wayne Spence, Redding,
California. Additional information from Clyde Hood of Overland Park,
Kansas and Lillian Spence of Galena, Kansas.

[NI018148] From the family records of Wayne Spence, Redding, California.

[NI018149] Information from the family records of Wayne Spence, Redding,
California. Additional information from Clyde Hood of Overland Park,
Kansas and Lillian Spence of Galena, Kansas.

[NI018150] Information from the family records of Wayne Spence, Redding,
California. Additional information from Clyde Hood of Overland Park,
Kansas and Lillian Spence of Galena, Kansas.

[NI018155] Information from the family records of Wayne Spence, Redding,
California. Additional information from Clyde Hood of Overland Park,
Kansas and Lillian Spence of Galena, Kansas.

[NI018157] Information from the family records of Wayne Spence, Redding,
California. Additional information from Clyde Hood of Overland Park,
Kansas and Lillian Spence of Galena, Kansas.

[NI018168] Information from the family records of Wayne Spence, Redding,
California. Additional information from Clyde Hood of Overland Park,
Kansas and Lillian Spence of Galena, Kansas.

[NI019538] -Among the early settlers of the Territory of Indiana was a large family of Wrights, who emigrated from Randolph county, North Carolina, and settled in Union county in 1813. From Union county a portion of them went to Wayne, and some to Washington counties; later four of the sons came to Marion county.....Joel, Jesse, Noah and Aaron came to Marion early in the history of the county.....Jesse was a leading man of this county, and while county commissioner, purchased the present Poor Farm; he afterwards removed to Iowa and there died....Nowland, John H. B. Sketches of Prominent Citizens of 1876. Indianapolis: Tilford & Caron, Printers, 1877. p 149.-1825 Marion Co., IN "a cabin was built for school purposes on the land of Jesse Wright, near its north line, and near the present crossing of the Martin Seerly gravel road and the Vincennes Railroad" Barry Sulgrove's History of Indianapolis, p. 516.

-"He was a positive and an energetic man, but a very contentious one, and this latter characteristic made him an Ishmael among the people of the community in which he lived, as was shown by the course he took at the death of his first wife (he was twice married), who was a most estimatible woman. Although there was a public burial ground within half a mile of his home, he buried her in the woods on the bluff overlooking the swampy lands southwest of his residence. He was a man in good circumstances, yet after selling his farm to Jacob Hanch, about the year 1838, he left the country and removed to Iowa without erecting even the rudest or simplest stone to mark her resting place...." Barry Sulgrove's History
of Indianapolis, p. 516.

-"Carter was a single man, and for several years made his home with Jesse Wright, with whom he had a disagreement which grew into a lawsuit, which resulted adversely to Carter and compelled him to sell his land to pay the expenses of litigation". Barry Sulgrove History of Indianapolis, p. 511.-1838

[NI019967] Joseph Coombs, one of Greene County's worthy pioneers, came to this county with his family in April, 1855, making his first home on section 34, Bristol Township. He made the trip from Champaign County, Illinois, in a covered wagon, camping by the wayside every night for five nights. They lived a camp life until August after reaching the county, then occupied a log house erect on Mr. Coombs' land on October, 1856. Mr Coombs settled in his present home on section 32, same township. The lumber with which he built his first small house he hauled across the prairie forty miles. His farm contains 326 aces, part upland meadow and part timber. It is watered by the North Coon River, making it one of the best stock farms in the county.

He has erected large, substantial farm building of all kinds. A remarkable discovery of human remains, supposed to be those of Indians, occurred in excavation for the cellar of his residence. Nine skeletons, or parts of skeletons, were unearthed, and all were of unusually large proportions. Scientists believed the remains to belong to a race of giants about nine feet in height.

Mr. Coombs was born in Clark County, Indiana, March 20, 1820, son of Joseph and Rachel Coombs, the former a native of Pennsylvania, and the latter of Kentucky. They were married in Kentucky, and removed to Indiana in the pioneer days with their family of ten children. Two were born in Indiana. The parents died in Indiana many years ago.

Our subject was reared a farmer, and has made that occupation his life work. For his first wife he married Delilah Wright and to this union four children were born - Mrs. Emily J. Gray, of this county; Willliam M., of Cherokee County; Mrs. Netty Tyler, of Mills County, this state; Mrs. Marth Flicks, who died in this county. Mrs. Coombs died in September, 1847, and after her death Mr. Coombs returned to Indiana and lived in Putnam County until he came to Greene County. In 1849 he was married to Miss Amand Wright, daughter of Isham Wright, and a cousin of his first wife. She was born in that county January 16, 1827. To this union nine children were born -- Delilah died at the age of seven years; David H. resides in Jackson Township; Mrs. Malinda Allstot, of Bristol, Township; Joseph A. died young; Sarah Frances; Oliver H.; Willis S are also deceased; Clifton W. and George E. are at home. Mr. Coombs was formerly a Democrat but is now identified with the Greenback Party.

From: History of Greene County - page 436

EARLY SETTLER GONE

Most Conspicuous Pioneer

Joseph Coombs' Career Closely Linked With the History of Greene County For the Past Fifty-one Years

Perhaps no citizen of Greene county of the early pioneers was better known throughout the entire county during his lifetime than Joseph Coombs, whose death occurred at the home of his son David, northeast of Scranton, Monday morning at 7 o'clock, March 19, 1906. His life had been filled with intense activity. His energy knew no limit. In the early struggles and hardships that came so often to the hardy farmers who developed and improved the farms of Greene county, his experiences seemed almost the limit of human endurance. Yet through it all he toiled away, patiently accumulating each year, always met with a hearty good cheer and an open handed hospitality, each visitor at his home, that made their hearth-stone the watchword of good cheer to the population of the entire county. Their home was always the headquarters for the entertainments of the entire neighborhood.

We give below the complete biography of his life as published and authorized by him several years ago in the "History of Greene and Carroll Counties," although of course there have been many changes since it was published.

"In 1849 he was married to Miss Amanda Wright, daughter of Isham Wright, and a cousin of his first wife. She was born in that county, January 16, 1827. To this union nine children were born: Delilah died at the age of seven years; David H. resides in Jackson township; Mrs. Malinda Allstott, of Bristol township; Joseph A. died young; Sarah Frances, Oliver H, Willis S. are also deceased; Cliinton W. and George E. are at home. Mr. Coombs was formerly a Democrat, but is now identified with the Greenback party."

Several years ago, Mr. Coombs sold his farm in Bristol township and has since made his home with his children. He and his aged wife were living with their son, David, a few miles northeast of Scranton at the time of his death and all that loving care could do was gladly given to ease the declining years of this good husband and father. He left at the time of his death his beloved companion, five children, fifty-six grandchildren, sixty great-grandchildren and three great-great-grandchildren to honor his memory.

The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon, March 20, at his late home, the services being conducted by his late pastor, Rev. J. C. Jacobs, of the Farlin Christian church, of which Mr. Coombs was charter member and had been an active Christian worker for several years. A large gathering of relatives, friends and old time neighbors, attended the funeral and followed the remains to the Tolliver cemetery in Bristol township, where all that was mortal of our old-friend was laid to rest.

Many stories are told of the early trials and the struggles of the hardy pioneers, and at the Old Settlers reunions each year, "Uncle Joe" could always be counted on to give his share of these "yarns." His memory was ever clear and the hearing of these early experiences as so often given by Mr. Coombs and others, has tended to teach the younger and rising generations the debt of love and gratitude they owe their forefathers for blazing the path that for many is now so much freer of the thorns and pitfalls of adversity.

Thus we close the chronicling of the life and the passing of another of Greene county's pioneers. How few there are left and how long until their summons shall come!

Peace to the memory of Uncle Joe.

Jefferson Bee - March 29, 1906

[NI020262] JOHN A. BECK, SR. A prominent citizen of Howard Township, was born March 28, 1838, being the next to the youngest in a family of thirteen children born to George and Elizabeth (Masters) Beck. The subject of this sketch had limited means for procuring an education, but by his energy procured a fair practical education. On the 2d of May, 1861, his marriage with Lucinda E. Miller was solemnized, and to this union have been born ten children, all living: George W., Henry F., Thomas S., Mahala J., John J., Emma E., Perlina A., Nancy C., Clarence A. and Riley O. Mr. Beck is not a member of any church, but contributes to the support of charity. In politics he is a stanch Democrat, and by occupation is a farmer and stock-raiser, in which pursuits he has made fair success. The Beck families are among the oldest and most respected of the county. They came here when the country was yet in the possession of the Indians and wild animals, and have helped to prepare it for their descendants, and render it better than they found it.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI020305] Taught school for a time in Ind.

[NI020306] Company H, 85 th Indiana - Civil War Union Army. Listed as Jacob Hanger in
some records. Wounded in Civil War, had a hole in forehead from wound. Farmed in Linton Township, Vigo County, Indiana in 1870 and 1880 censuses.
Celebrated 63 years of married life on Sunday, Aug. 19, 1928. We have article from paper. Also have his obituary from paper. He united with the Church of Christ at Liberty in 1865 and remained there until he helped found the church in Farmersburg. He was the last survivor of his siblings. Mustered into service Sept. 2, 1862 at Farmersburg, Ind.

[NI020313] Served in Korean War. Never married.

[NI020315] Dau. Audrey died of tuberculosis

[NI020317] Died of tuberculosis

[NI020318] May be named Mary Grace.

[NI020319] Used the name of Blanche. Was a school teacher

[NI020322] committed suicide. Shot himself.

[NI020323] Died at age of 82.

[NI020327] Was a blacksmith, later became a coal miner.

[NI020338] Lived to age of 86.

[NI020342] Had no children.

[NI020346] From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

[NI020361] died of blood poisoning. Was a school teacher.

[NI020363] died at age of 88

[NI020365] Brought to Sullivan County at age of 4 years by his parents.

[NI020366] Was a school teacher. Died of tuberculosis

[NI020370] Killed in WW1

[NI020388] [william frakes2.FTW]

If you find a relationship, please share your family information with me.

[NI020395] Is said to have committed suicide. On June 08, 1909 he fired a bullet to his head. Left a wife and 2 children, ages 10 nad 4. Had served two terms as township assessor.

[NI020396] At one time was committed to the Indiana State Sanitorium. Probably not married, no children. No survivors listed in obit.

[NI020398] Died at his home, 6 miles west of Farmersburg, Ind.

[NI020408] Buried Liberty Cem. Farmersburg, Ind.

[NI020419] Buried Liberty Cem. Farmersburg, Ind.

[NI020435] Died at age of 68.

[NI020728] CAUBLE FAMILY Among those old pioneers who braved the perils and privations of frontier life in Washington County, and who felled the forests and laid the foundation for the inestimable blessings which the present generation now enjoy, was Adam Cauble. This old pioneer came from the far East to Washington Township, Washington Co., Ind., when it was yet in its infancv. He was born in North Carolina, March 14, 1798; married Mary (sometimes called " Polly ") Hubbard, who was born in the Old Dominion December 1, 1803, and both he and his wife lived to advanced ages and were looked upon as among the best citizens Washington County ever know. Fifteen children were born to their union, and are as follows: George W., born June 28, 1823; James M., April 29, 1825; Sarah J., August 20, 1826; Alexander, December 5, 1827; Adam W., January 17, 1829; John, October 3, 1831; Charles, October 8, 1832; Eliza, November 17, 1833; Andrew J., January 7, 1835; Barbara, March 14, 1837; Peter, November 6, 1838; Herman M., August 26, 1839; William R., December 30, 1841, died October 4, 1842; Benjamin, May 28, 1843, and Mary C., January 11, 1848, and died in about 1878. Of the above Andrew J., Alexander, Peter and Herman M. took an active part in the suppression of the Rebellion, the former suffering five months in Libby Prison. George W. Cauble was married May 22, 1851, to Maria, daughter of George and Jaue Barnett, who was born in Washington County., Ind., February 6, 1832. One son, George W., born June 20,1857, is the result of their union. George W., Sr., is a Democrat, and he and wife belong to the Christian Church. Alexander Cauble was raised a farmer, was moderately educated, and for a number of years worked at carpentering. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, Fifth Indiana Cavalry, served through numerous hard campaigns and hotly contested engagements, and was honorably discharged, June 18, 1865. Since the war he has farmed, and is now the owner of 118 acres of good land. In politics he is a Republican. January 5, 1854, he married Susanna T. Morris, who was born in this county, September 20, 1832, a daughter of Thomas Morris. These children have been born to them: Addison G., born October 2, 1854; Martha E., July 14, 1857; Margaret E., February 23, 1860; Mary E., May 7, 1862; Annie B., April 21, 1866; Alexander G., January 24, 1869, and Emery E., December 1, 1872. Adam W. Cauble was raised on the old home farm, and farming has always been his occupation. With him industry has brought its legitimate fruit, success, and he owns 285 acres of land. In 1855 he married Sarah E. King, who was born in Washington County, Ind., March 6, 1837, and by her is the father of this family: Elwood G., born December 15, 1856; Walter J., October 15, 1858; Harvev W., January 27, 1862; Harriet A., May 4, 1864; Addis E., September 23, 1866; Benton M., July 3, 1869; Helen S., July 25, 1872; Claudius W., February 2,1875; Ellis D., August 8, 1877; Jesse and Jason twins, May 30, 1880. Charles Cauble is a member of the Christian Church, a farmer by occupation, and a self -made man. He began life's battle a poor boy, and by hard work has secured a valuable farm of 150 acres. Miss Nancy Gee, who was born in this county, October 10, 1837, a daughter of Isaiah and Mary A. (Collier) Gee, became his wife January 28, 1858, and nine children have been born to them, named: Sophia E., born June 18, 1859; Dora E., July 18, 1861; Malora J., December 3, 1862; Emma E., August 12, 1864; George F., July 17, 1866, died August 6. 1878; Maria A., July 10, 1868; Cora A., October 9, 1870-, Mary I., 'October 23, 1872, and L. E., October 12, 1880. Besides being descended from one of the oldest families of the county, the present generation of Caubles have retained the reputation for honesty and intelligence justly earned by their forefathers.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI020770] [John Beard.FTW]

[101429 grubb.FTW]

[NI020792] WILLIAM B. CAUBLE A native of the county in which he now resides, and a well-to-do farmer of Pierce Township, was born September 12, 1830, the second child of Peter and Margaret (Brown) Cauble. Peter Cauble was a native of the Old North State, where his birth occurred in about the year 1797. He came to Washington County when it was yet a new and wild country, and during the war of 1812 served as a teamster. He acted as Justice of the Peace for many years, was a member of the Christian Church, and his wife, to whom he was married in 1826, belonged to the Presbyterian Church. With the exception of two years spent in Nebraska, William B. has always resided in his native county. His early life was passed on this father's farm and attending the district schools; and when man grown, learned the carpenter's trade. He has worked hard, and by diligence and economy has secured a good farm of 425 acres. In 1869 he was united in matrimony with Miss Margaret E. Souder, daughter of Frederick and Polly (Click) Souder, and by her is the father of three children, named, Franklin P., Thomas T. and Peter F. Mr. Cauble is a Democrat, and is one of Pierce Township's best citizens.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI020883] GEORGE C. CRIM Is a native of Washington County, Ind., born in Jackson Township, November 20, 1827. He is the third in a family of eleven children born to Jesse and Lucinda (Churchill) Crim, who were natives of the Blue Grass State, the former coming to Indiana first in 1818, but returning to his native State two years later, where he married, and again came to this county, locating near Martinsburg. In 1859 he immigrated to Illinois, where he died the year following. George C. Crim received a liberal education in youth, and until twenty-seven years old assisted his parents on the farm. April 2, 1855, his marriage with Miss Sallie Martin was solemnized, and to their union have been born the following family of children: Mary A., Lucinda C., Lizzie A., Edmund T., William W. and John L. Mr. Crim is justly recognized as one of the leading farmers and stock-raisers of his township, and the fruit of his life's labor is revealed in a well improved farm containing 280 acres of good land. As a Republican in politics he takes an active interest in the leading issues of the day, and twice has been called upon to administer to the office of Township Trustee. He and wife are members of the Christian Church, and are well known and highly respected people.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI020914] L. G. DAVIS Miller at Harristown, was born in Washington County, Ind., in 1841, and is, a son of Henry and Lydia (Tash) Davis, both of whom are also natives of this county, the former dying May 9, 1845, and the latter yet living. Our subject's paternal grandparents were natives of North Carolina, from whence they emigrated to Washington County, Ind., in 1816. L. G. Davis was raised on a farm, and securing a good practical education began teaching when eighteen years old, and this he continued winters, farming summers, for a number of years. He is a Democrat in politics, and in 1864 was elected Township Trustee, a position be creditably filled. In 1870 be was elected County Recorder, and after serving one term of four years was re-elected, serving in all eight years. In 1879 he began the operation of a grist and saw-mill and dealing, in lumber, and this he has since continued with profit. He is one of the foremost men of the county, is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and June 13, 1876, was united in marriage with Mary E., daughter of George Paynter, of Salem, Ind.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI021938] Miles Adolphus Munson was born in Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio (confirm) on October 2, 1859. His parents were Augustus Young Munson and Martha Tatham. A.Y. was 21 years old when Miles was born and Martha was 17 years old.

He attended college Decauter Illinois Millican Universtiy approximately 1878-1885???
Cannot find any information on Millican University.

Find out what his profession was.

He married Viola Smith about 1900 in Newton County, Missouri (confirm).

Their first child, Harry A. was born in Welch, Oklahoma in 1904.

Howard Calvin Munson was born in Spring City, Missouri in 1905.

Edith was born in Spring City in 1909.

Helen was born ?

Delua was born in 1915 she died at age 12, about 1927.

Miles died September 15, 1919 at age 60 in Jasper County, Missouri. He is buried in Hornet Cemetery, Newton County, Missouri.

[NI024854] THOMAS J. VOYLES An old and prominent citizen of Howard Township, was born in Washington County, Ind., on November 23, 1823, being next to the youngest child in a family of nine born to Thomas and Esther (Headley) Voyles. Here they became prominent and highly respected. His parents were natives of North Carolina, from which State they immigrated to Indiana in a very early day, settling on the farm now owned by his son. The subject of this sketch had no advantage of schooling, but by his energy he succeeded in securing a practical education. He remained at home with his parents until he attained his twenty-eighth year. In January, 1852, his marriage with Anna C. Williams was solemnized, and to this union were born seven children, three of whom are now living: Rebecca, Esther E. and Mary E (twins--deceased), Sarah A. (deceased), Bohese M., Curtis G. (deceased), Joanna F. He is a member of the Christian Church in good standing. He contributes liberally to the support of the church and charitable causes. In politics he is a stanch Republican and takes a good live interest in the political questions of the day. By occupation he is a farmer and stock-raiser. He is prosperous and happy in his home and one of the county's best citizens.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI024858] L. D. VOYLES An influential citizen of Howard Township, was born in Washington County, Ind., on January 16, 1822, being the third from the youngest of a family of nine children born to Thomas and Esther (Headley) Voyles. His ancestors were natives of North Carolina, from which State they removed to Kentucky in 1810, and in the year 1811, they settled in Washington County, Ind. The father was of Welsh and the mother of Irish descent. The subject of this sketch had very limited facilities for education, but succeeded in securing the rudiments. He remained at home with his parents until he attained his twenty-eighth year. On November 25, 1849, his marriage with Clarissa Bishop was solemnized, and to this union was born a large family, some of whom are deceased: John (deceased), Lucinda J., Thomas B., George W., Lindsey H., Mary E., William P., David F., Sarah E., Edward M., Darthuley, Peter D. and an infant son Joseph, who died in 1851. In politics he is a Democrat and takes very little interest in the politics of the day. He is a farmer and has made fair success in life.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI025350] Asa Elliott Was born in this (Washington County) in 1852, and is a son of Asa and Mary (Maudlin) Elliott, also natives of this county. The father of the former, Henry Elliott, was a native of Russell county, Va., came to this State in 1815, settling in this (Washington) county, where he engaged in farming. His wife, Lutisha Reese, was from Tennessee. The maternal grandfather of the subject, Nathan Maudlin, was from North Carolina, came to Indiana in 1814, and settled in this county. He was a farmer, and for many years before his death served as a justice of the peace. His wife was Rachel Brown, of Randolph county, N. C.. Asa Elliott, the subject, was educated in the common schools of the county, and at Prof. May's select school of Salem. After quitting school he taught for eight years and in 1877 began to read law during his vacation from school work. After proper reading he took a course at Central Law School of Indiana, at Indianapolis, and was admitted to the bar in 1879, the year before he came to Salem and commenced practicing, which he continued until 1882 when he took a post graduate course at the same school and read in the office of Henry N. Spann, of Indianapolis, Ind.. He then came back and has been practicing here ever since. He is a young man, well versed in the law and is rapidly growing into prominence as a lawyer. In 1880 he married Miss Emma Rudder, a daughter of Elder James Rudder, a minister of the Christian Church. Mr. Elliott is a member of the Salem Lodge No. 21, and of Salem Royal Arch Chapter No. 38 of Masons.

Biographical and Historical Souvenir for the Counties of Clark, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Jefferson, Jennings, Scott and Washington Indiana. Compiled and Published by John M. Gresham & Company, Chicago, Chicago Printing Company. 1889

[NI025708] STEPHEN ELROD One of Washington County's earliest settlers, was a native of North Carolina; was born in the year 1793, and came to this county and State in the year 1816, first locating in Jackson Township. His marriage with Elizabeth Wyman took place about one year later, who bore him thirteen children, of which eleven are now living. William, the oldest in the family, was born January 11, 1818, and remained at home and assisted his parents on the farm until he attained the age of twenty-five years. He received a limited education in the primitive log-schoolhouses of his day. April 9, 1843, his marriage with Mary A. Noblitt was solemnized, and to their union fifteen children have been born, of whom these eight are now living: John W., who married Elizabeth Dudley; Eliza J., now Mrs. James F. Ervin; Albert N., whose wife was Linnie Morris; Sarah E., wife of Jesse B. Davis; Emma A., consort of Benjamin F. Fitzpatrick; Dora B., unmarried; Chapman, who married Rachel L. Sturdevant, and Ishmael W., unmarried. William's occupation through life has been farming, at which he has been very successful. He now owns 300 acres of well improved land. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity at New Providence. In politics he is a stanch Democrat and he formerly took quite a live interest in the political affairs of the community in which he lives, having served as Township Trustee one term. His death occurred June 29, 1847. Eli, the eighth child, was born July 23, 1830. He remained on the old homestead farm until the death of his parents, his father having died as above given, and his mother January 2, 1852. He received a common school education such as the facilities of the day afforded. November 11, 1854, the nuptials of his marriage with Luanna J. Dudley were celebrated, and to their union eight children have been born, of which these seven are now living: James W., who married Ella Gray; Willard W., Edward L., Hester, Greeley, Stephen B. and Lizzie. His occupation, like his brother, has always been farming, and he has been very successful. He is a Democrat, has been Township Trustee, and owns 215 acres of land.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI026050] [george Naugle.FTW]

Served in military. Was wounded at the battle of Buena Vista.

[NI027167] NELSON MARKLAND Is a native of Rowan County, North Carolina, born April 7, 1810, the youngest of ten children born to Nathaniel and Susan (Boler) Markland, who were also natives of the Old North State and of English descent. Nelson assisted his parents on the home farm until he attained majority, during which time he received such education as the primitive facilities of his day afforded. In June, 1831, he arrived in Washington County, where he has ever since resided, following the occupation of farming in which, together with stock-raising, he has been very successful, now owning 160 acres of land. In politics he has always been an active Democrat. August 8, 1833, he married Elizabeth Bush, and to them have been born ten children. Mr. and Mrs. Markland are members of the Christian Church and have always contributed liberally to any charitable purposes of any institution which has for its object the moral improvement of the community. The names of their children are: John, Eliza, Nancy C., Sarah A., Susan M., William D., Milton G., James M., Amanda J. and Charles F.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI028291] DANIEL DAWALT A prominent citizen of Franklin Township, and a native of Washington Township, this county, was born July 8, 1812, being the ninth child in a family of twelve children born to Henry and Elizabeth (Gross) Dawalt, who were natives of York County, Penn., and Rockingham County, Va., both of German descent. The father came to this State and county in the year 1808, and first settled on Section 15 in Washington Township, where he remained, with the exception of four years, until his death, which occurred when he had reached the ripe old age of about ninety-one years; Mrs. Dawalt died, aged about seventy-five years. In his settlement here he was commissioned Captain of the militia by Territorial Gov. Harrison. He received several promotions, and at the time of his last connection with the service he held the office of Colonel of his regiment, and was at the head of his company at the time of the Pigeon Roost massacre. That happened about night, and they pursued them nearly to Brownstown, in Jackson County, where they surprised the Indians. Daniel remained at home and assisted his parents on the farm until he attained the age of twenty-four years. He received a limited education in the primitive log schoolhouses of his day. February 11, 1836, his marriage with Sarah Tatlock was solemnized, and to their union twelve children have been born, of which these five are now living: Francis M., who married Nancy Coombs; Catherine, now Mrs. Richard M. Johnson; James B., whose wife was Margaret Thompson; and Samuel, who married Mary Thompson. Our subject's occupation has always been farming, and he has been quite successful in that pursuit. He now owns 347 acres of well improved land. Mr. Dawalt's son Jackson gave up his life for his country at Rome, Ga. He was a member of the Sixty-sixth Indiana, Company F. Mr. Dawalt is a member of the Masonic fraternity; in politics he is a Democrat, and he manifests a good live interest in the political affairs of the community. Jackson died August 29, 1864.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI028677] SAMUEL J. GOODPASTURE Came to Indiana when quite small. His parents were David and Rebecca (Peugh) Goodpasture, natives respectively of Kentucky and Virginia. After one year's residence in Indiana they returned to Kentucky and remained until 1841, when they came again to Indiana, where David Goodpasture died September 23, 1879. His wife still survives him at the advanced age of eighty years. Samuel J. Goodpasture was born in Bath County, Ky., November 7, 1822, and was the eldest of a family of nine children. He received a limited education in youth, but has since improved it. Being the oldest of the family he was compelled to contribute a large part to its support, as his father was in delicate health for many years previous to his death. In 1846 he bought the farm where he now resides. He now has about 480 acres of well improved land, all of which he has made by his own energy and good management. August 11, 1850, he was united in marriage with Ann Bush, a daughter of Solomon and Nancy (Beck) Bush. They have had five children, four of whom--Mary E., Laura A. (now Mrs. Greely Cauble), Emma R. and Nancy M. (now Mrs. Charles Batt)--are living. Both Mr. Goodpasture and wife are members of the Christian Church. He is also a member of the F. & A. M. and is Democratic in politics.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI029098] DAVID BECK An old and influential citizen of Howard Township, and proprietor of Beck's Mill, was born in 1821, being the second child born to George and Elizabeth (Masters) Beck--one of thirteen children. His parental ancestors were natives of North Carolina, from which State they removed to Indiana in 1807, locating about five miles south of Beck's Mill. The subject of this sketch had a very limited chance to secure an education, but by his energy succeeded in securing enough for the business of life. In 1843 his marriage with Sarah Elliott was solemnized, and to their union were born six children; Elizabeth J., Malinda (deceased, 1865), John A., Thomas J. (deceased, 1877), George M. and Lorena A. He is not a member of any church, but contributes liberally to the support of the church and charitable causes. He is a member of the Masonic order, and in politics is a stanch Democrat, and takes much interest in the political questions of the day. He has made a decided success in his business, now owning the splendid mills and 130 acres of well improved land. He was elected to the responsible position of County Commissioner in 1872, serving six years. He has also been Postmaster at this point since James Buchanan's administration.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI029145] Pictoral and Biopgraphical Memoirs of Indianapolis and Marion County by Goodspeed 1893

JESSE WRIGHT, well and favorably known throughout Marion County, and particularly in Wayne Township, of which he served as trustee from 1876 to 1878, is a native born Marian County Indianian, his birth occurring April 7, 1830. He was reared to man's estate in the county of his birth, secured such schooling as the limited facilities of that day afforded and his general employment was that of clearing, grubbing, planting, reaping and the usual occupation of farming. August 22, 1853, occurred his marriage with Sophronia C. Sinks, an estimable lady, and to their union seven children were born only the following named now living: Belle; Albert A., who married Mariah Hoover and is the father of three daughters and two sons; Owen S. , married Eva Malone who has borne him one daughter, and Lillie M. , who wedded Charles Shaffer and has one son. Owen and Lillie reside in Haughville, and Albert on his father's farm west of Indianapolis. Jesse Wright is an intelligent and progressive citizen, was a Democrat until the foes of the Union tired upon Fort Sumter, when, like thousands of others of our best people, he became a Republican and has ever since affiliated with that party. He is a worthy member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. His eldest brother, Isaac N., was born October 11, 1828, served in the Fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry in the Mexican. War, re-enlisted in the United States Mounted Riflemen, was orderly-sergeant, served over four and a half years and was killed by Mexicans. Philburd S., youngest brother of Jesse Wright, was born July 19, 1831, was in the service of his country under three enlistments and died at Baton Rouge, La. The two sisters of Jesse Wright are Nancy, born December 26, 1833, married Jesse Smith and resides in California, and Elizabeth, born July 5, 1835, married John Doty, resides at Greencastle, Ind., and is the mother of one son, Isaac A. Doty, who is a teacher of High School No. 1 of Indianapolis.

[NI029756] GEORGE W. BECK A prominent citizen of Howard Township, was born January 25, 1832, being the sixth child in a family of thirteen born to George and Elizabeth (Masters) Beck. His people were natives of North Carolina, from whence they removed to Indiana in the early spring of 1807, settling on Mill Creek in the early spring of 1808. His schooling was very limited owing to the poor facilities at that early period. By his energy, however, he secured a fair practical education, enough to enable him to perform any business transactions. He stayed with his parents while they lived, the death of the father occurring on the 22d of September, 1876; that of the mother in April, 1877. Mr. Beck has never been married, and is not a member of any church. In politics he is a Democrat, and is one of the successful farmers of the Township.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI030024] NATHAN MOTSINGER A native of the township and county in which he now resides, was born December 28, 1821, being the oldest and only one now living of four children born to John and Delilah (Harmon) Motsinger, the former of German and the latter of Irish descent. In 1809, John Motsinger, together with his parents, immigrated to Indiana territory, locating on the farm now owned by Michael Brown in this township. When thirteen years of age, Nathan's father died and he was bound out to George W. Waltz, under whom he received but a limited education. May 9, 1844, he married Melinda Crouch, by whom he is the father of thirteen children, the following named yet living: Delilah M., Mary J., Sarah E., Michael G., Eliza B., William O., Amanda A. and Junietta, the two latter being twins. Mr. Motsinger began life's battle a poor boy and is one of the self-made men of this township. He owns 168 acres of nicely improved property, is a Democrat in politics, a member of the Masonic fraternity and is one of Washington County's best citizens.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI030455] WILLIAM JOHNSON A prominent citizen of Polk Township, is a native of Kentucky, where he was born December 20, 1822, and is the third in a family of six children born to William and Mary (Alvis) Johnson, who were natives respectively of Kentucky and Virginia, and came to this State in the year 1832, and settled near where our subject now resides. William, Jr., remained at home and assisted his parents on the farm until he attained the age of twenty-five years, receiving a limited education in the subscription schools of his day. November 11, 1847, his marriage with Elizabeth Elrod was solemnized, and to their union eight children were born, of which these five are now living: Sarah J., now Mrs. William Wells; Mary I., wife of N. H. Gray; Luanna E., consort of A. J. Brock; John W., unmarried, and Elizabeth C., now Mrs. Dennis McKinley. April 5, 1863, Mr. Johnson suffered the bereavement of losing his beloved wife. December 28, 1865, his nuptials with Mary A. (Wells) Baggerly were celebrated. Our subject's occupation has always been farming, and he has been quite successful in that pursuit. He now owns 410 acres, the greater part of which is yet in timber. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are members of the Christian Church. In politics he has been a life-long Democrat.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI031091] From Pierce Township, Washington County, Indiana book, Alva Bierly took the name of Alva Baker when raised by Uncle Lemon Baker

[NI031544] Bigham Funeral Home records list Rachel's date of death as "21 Feb 1920" and spell her first name as Racheal, even though it is spelled as Rachel on her headstone.

[NI031564] Marriage License states "of Tulsa in the County of Tulsa and State of Oklahoma, who is (22) over the age of twenty-one years". Ruby Mae had a child from a first marriage named Charles Lee (unknown last name), who purportedly had been in trouble from his childhood through his adult years. Charles either enlisted or was drafted into the Korean War. He was reportedly killed when his troop ship landed on a beach. As the soldiers began disembarking, a bomb went off. Supposedly, there was nothing left of Charles Lee. Another version is that he went AWOL and never returned to the states.

[NI031565] According to Nadine Gilman Scott, Frank's two children by his first wife, Rose Watson, were adopted by his brother, Guy Augustus Gilman upon Frank's death.

[NI031572] According to family, Clyde lived most of his life in Modesto, California.

[NI031574] John Willard Scott, in his obituary, was noted to be a lifelong resident of the Racine-Joplin area. He "was employed as a welder for the W.R. Grace and Company and retired in 1975 from H and H Manufacturing."

[NI031575] Her name was recorded as "Wilma Lorrenine Scott" in the transcription of the Scott Bible record. Funeral services were held at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, May 7, 1985 at Clark Funeral Home. Roger Owens, minister, officated.

[NI031577] Oliver Scott was noted in his obituary to be a lifetime resident of Neosho. "He was a retired machinist and had worked at Vicker Inc., in Joplin."

[NI031580] The legal description of the land that Donald C. Scott resides on is Section 35, Township 26, Range 33, E. 1/2 NE 1/4 + N 1/2 SE 1/4. This land includes that of the original purchase deeded to George Warren Scott, Donald C. Scott's father. Don's address for many years was RR2, Box 184, Neosho, Misouri.

[NI031581] Mabel's mother, Caroline Barcus, kept a scrapbook with family history and biographical information. (In the scrapbook, Caroline spelled the family name as Barkes). Mabel continued to add family information to the handwritten scrapbook until her death in 1988. In the scrapbook, Mabel noted that "all of Grandmother Harris' ancestors were either driven out, or were slain, in the awful massacre of Christians in Ireland". According to an undated clipping from an unknown newspaper (probably the Joplin Globe published on Oct. 18, 1988), "Services for Mable C. Scott, 79, ... will be at 2 p.m. Wednesday at the Clark Funeral Chapel, Neosho. Roger Owens and John Anderson, ministers, will officiate. Burial will be in the Burkhart Cemetery, Racine. Pallbearers will be Greg Scott, Davis Scott, Randy Scott, Edward Scott, Doug Williams, and James Lankford."

[NI031591] Cynthia had lived in Neosho, Missouri since 1961, after moving here from California. She and her husband, Davis, operated Scott's Boot and Tackle, Neosho.

[NI031604] Weaver Watson was noted to be confirmed and baptised on 12-20-1900 in original membership records of the Burkhart Church of Christ, Racine, Missouri.

[NI031617] Services were held at "Clark Chapel of Memories with John Anderson and Roger Owens, ministers, officiating."

[NI031620] Mary Watson was noted to be confirmed and baptised on 12-20-1900 in original membership records of the Burkhart Church of Christ, Racine, Missouri.

[NI031621] Military service records of Richard M. Watson give a place of birth of Lancaster, Kentucky, which is the seat of Garrard county, Kentucky. The records also say that Richard gave his age at 19 when he enlisted on March 27, 1862. There is a 4 year difference between that and later census records. He was a Private, originally enlisting with Co. H, 6th Kansas Calvary. He was later transferred to Co. G, 6th Kansas Calvary when his originally enlistment expired. He supplied his own horse and equipment when he enlisted at Camp Dietzler, Missouri. He mustered out of Co. G at Duvalls Bluff, Arkansas on April 17, 1865.

The 1860 Federal census indicated that Richard M. Watson had attended school within the year while working as a farmer. The 1860 Census of Newton County also listed a Marion Watson, 24 years of age, from Kentucky (page 6, record 189). This was probably Daniel M. Watson, Richard's brother. Richard's middle name may also be Marion, after Richard's father.

Goodspeed's History of Newton County, lists a "R. Watson", a soldier of the Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.), who was mustered in the "Gen. George F. Foster Post No. 137, G.A.R." after March 27, 1884. The post was organized at Neosho on March 11, 1884. A photo of Richard shows him wearing what is probably a G.A.R. membership badge, which looks very much like a Medal of Honor. According to the 1890 Special Federal Census of Union Veterans and Widows of Veterans of the Civil War, Book III, Richard suffered from chronic diarrhea and measles while serving in the Civil War. His Pensioner Certificate No. is 352496. Donald C. Scott, Richard Watson's, grandson, said he remembered Richard being called "Cap Watson" even though Donald did not know if Richard had ever become an officer in the Civil War.

Richard Watson's obituary reads "His parents moved to Missouri when he was seven years old and settled on a farm near where Richard died and where he has [sic] resided for 57 years. When the war began he volunteered with Sixth Kansas Cavalry and served with a record of being a brave soldier. He had been justice of the peace for fourteen years and held that office when he died. He was the father of seven children, five of whom survive him."

If the obituary is correct, Richard moved to Newton county about 1846. His biological father has not yet been located in Newton county records.

The original membership records of the Burkhart Church of Christ of Racine, Missouri include "R.M. Watson". The records also indicate that Richard Watson was a charter member and a deacon, joining the church on 13 Jan 1896.

[NI031624] According to Spurgeon Mining Days Then and Now, "Miss Rose Watson Gilman" was the teacher at Willow Springs School in 1904. Willow Springs School was located two miles northeast of Racine and organized sometime before the 1880's. A list of teachers in the book does not include her, as the list starting date was 1906.

Etta Watson was noted to be confirmed and baptised on 12-18-1900 in the original membership records of the Burkhart Church of Christ, Racine, Missouri.

[NI031625] Bessie Watson was noted to be confirmed and baptised on 11-22-1908 in orginal membership records of the Burkhart Church of Christ, Racine, Missouri.

[NI031919] Private

[NI032123] "A Portrait and Biographical Record of Boone, Clinton and Hendricks Counties, Ind.", (A. W. Bowen & Co., Chicago, 1895), p. 1023, "Biography of Hiram Rains", p. 1020, 1023.

"Hiram Rains, one of the foremost men of Guilford township, Hendricks county, Ind., is a native of the state, was born in Fayette County, October 21, 1824 and is descended from an old North Carolina family of colonial prestige. His father, James Rains, was born in August, 1795 in Guilford county, North Carolina, and was twenty-five years of age when he came to Wayne county, Ind., with his parents, Joab and Martha (Aldred) Rains, who were also natives of Guilford county, North Carolina

James Rains was first married in Wayne county, Ind., to Catherine DeMoss, who bore two children, George and Charles, and after the death of this lady Mr. Rains espoused Elizabeth Wright, daughter of Philbert and Elizabeth Wright, who early became settlers of Wayne county----Philbert Wright having been a Revolutionary soldier, who bore to his grave a scar on his face, inflicted by a British officer. To this second marriage of Mr. Rains, were born a round dozen of children, named as follows: Hiram, Alfred (died in the Mexican War in 1847), Catherine, Martha, Vashti, Harvey, Milton, Marion, Levi, David C., Mary and Martin V. In 1828, James Rains and family removed to Marion county, Ind., where he wrought out a good farm from the woods and tilled it until his death, February 10, 1851, his widow dying in Zionsville, Boone county, Ind., in 1865.

Hiram Rains was reared to agriculture, and on the twenty-fifth day of September, 1851, married Sarah Owen, daughter of Benjamin and Esther (Gibson) Owen, and born September 12, 1831. The parents of this lady were natives of Ohio and in 1837 settled on a farm in the east part of Guilford township, Hendricks county, Ind. The parents of Benjamin Owen were Samuel and Jemima (Sanders) Owen, who were members of the Society of Friends, and had entered 240 acres of land in the east part of Guilford township, before the county of Hendricks was organized. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Rains two children were born, and were named Martha A. and Flora. After his marriage, Hiram Rains for two years resided on a farm near Indianapolis, and then sold and moved to or near Oshkosh, wis., where he passed nine years of his active life, and where he received many valuable hints and gained a great deal of solid information as to the lumber trade. Returning to Hendricks county, Ind., at the close of the war, his financial judgment and foresight led him to believe large money could be made in the lumber business, and he immediately decided to improve the golden opportunity. After first successfully operating two saw-mills a number of years and averaging $50 a day, clear money most of the time, supplying hundreds of thousands of feet of lumber to Indianapolis, and even so far as Terre Haute, he, in company with Andrew Wilson and Laurence M. Vance, formerly of Indianapolis, contracted to grade through the green woods, lay ties and iron material furnished by the railroad company on forty-six miles of the old Indianapolis, Lawrenceburg & Cincinnati railway. He next bought a large farm adjoining Rainstown, Hendricks county (which town is named in his honor), and where he lived fifteen years, and successfully engaged in its cultivation. He then sold out and retired to a small farm of forty acres one-fourth of a mile east of Plainfield, on the gravel road, where he now resides in affluence and comfort. But his irrepressible business impulses will not be controlled, and, as consequence, he and his brother own and are now operating 2,000 acres of fine timber land in Obion county, Tenn. Hiram Rains also owns sixty acres of cranberry land in Wisconsin, eighteen lots in Pierre, capital of South Dakota, fourteen lots in Indianapolis, and stock in several extensive gold and silver mines in Colorado. The indomitable spirit of enterprise possessed by Mr. Rains and his wonderful business instinct and sagacity, are probably unequaled by those of any man in Hendricks county, or, perhaps, in the state of Indiana."

[NI032198] JONAS B. BERKEY One of the old and successful merchants of Salem, is a native of Summerset County, Penn., his birth occurring January 20, 1808. He is one in a family of thirteen children born to Christian and Fanny (Brensier) Berkey, who were of German descent and natives of the Keystone State. from whence they emigrated to Clark County, Indiana Territory. in May, 1808. They removed to Washington County the fall of 18138, and entered land three miles south of Salem, where they resided until l820, when they moved to Jackson County, where Christian Berkey died in 1840, and his widow in 1841. Jonas B. Berkey was raised on a farm where he remained until twenty-two years old, securing but it limited education. In 1831 he embarked in merchandising at Vallonia, where he continued until 1845, when he came to Salem, and has since been identified as one of the leading merchants of the place, as well as one of its most honorable and respected citizens. April 19, 1828, Evaline Henderlider became his wife, and to their union ten children have been born, only the following being yet alive: Susan (Mrs. W. M. Clark), Fredrick N., Elizabeth (Mrs. Dr. George L. Lee), Delilah (Mrs. John Cochran) and Jonas W. In politics Mr. Berkey is a Democrat, and for many years be and wife have been prominent members of the Christian Church.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI032744] JEREMIAH DAVIS Came with his parents in 1841, from Hamilton County, Ohio, and settled on the farm where he has since resided. His father during the spring and winter months followed flat-boating on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. The remainder of the year he spent upon the farm. He died January 16, 1863. His wife survived him until June 6, 1878. Jeremiah Davis was one of the five children born to Samuel M. and Nancy (Hutchinson) Davis, both natives of Ohio, and the former of Irish descent. He was married September 20, 1857, to Eliza Jamison, a native of Washington County. She is a daughter of James Jamison and was born February 24, 1842. They have had seven children: Charles A., Samuel N., Emmet, Margaret J., Dodie, Araminta and John (deceased). Mr. Davis, politically, is a Democrat, and a highly esteemed citizen.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI034902] He was a retired carpenter: a US Army Air Corps veteran of WWII, serving from Dec, 9 1942 to October 25, 1945. Took training in the states, was sent to England August 1943. He was in the 245th Figther Group of the 361 St. Fighter Squadron. He earned six Bronze Battle Stars, Distinguished Unit Badge, and the Good Conduct ribbon. He was active in the European Air Offensive Campaign, the Normandy Campaign, and the Northern France Campaign. He was wounded and in the hospital for several months. Received a disability discharge on October 25, 1945. He was Protestant.

[NI035032] Obituary

Again the grim repearer death has visited our community and takes from us our neighbor Lewis Ikamire. He was the son of Riley and Mary Ikamire. He was born in Ohio September 19, 1859 and departed this life at his home December 14, 1939, age 80 years, 2 months and 25 days.

Mr. Ikamire came to Putnamville, Indiana, with his parents at the age of two years where he spent his boyhood and early manhood. He was married to Etta Mullinix, March 1, 1893, living in Manhattan one year, then movi
Greencastle Township where he spent six years, later moving to Marion Township where he spent the remaining years of his life.

He was converted and became a member of the Presbyterian church at Putnamville when a young man. He was a Past Master of the Applegate Masonic Lodge and also a member of the Fillmore Chapter of Eastern Star.

Mr. Ikamire was a great lover of nature and the outdoors, and spent many hours the last few years working among the flowers he loved. He also was a great reader both of books, the daily news and current events.

He leaves to mourn his loss his wife, one daughter Mrs. Lillie Day of Bainbridge, one son Roy of Greencastle, three grandchildren, four sisters Ana, Lucy and Allie Ikamire and Mrs. Catherine Duree all of Greencastle a
other relatives and friends.

[NI036208] Funeral services for Helen G. Swartz, 66, were held Wednesday, Oct. 28, from Hastings Funeral Home in Jefferson.

The Rev Robert G. Beard officiated. Joyce Kinsman was organist and Jack Pinckert sang. Casket bearers were Dennis Goshon, Lloyd Sloan, Bill Raney, Bill Ecklund, Howard Olson and Doug Hawn. Interment was in Wright Cemetery in Greene county.

Helen G. Swartz, daughter of John T. and Minnie Wright Murphy, was born August 27, 1921, on the Wright farm in Jackson township west of Jefferson and died October 26, 1987, at the home of her son Harvey at Jefferson.

Helen moved with her parents to Jefferson in the fall of 1924 and lived the rest of her life in Jefferson. She attended Jefferson schools and graduated from Jefferson High School in 1940. Other education included a journalism course from the University of Nebraska and many secretarial seminars.

On Sept. 27, 1941, Helen was united in marriage with Raymond Swartz at Maryville, Missouri, and they made their home in Jefferson. To this union a son Harvey and a daughter Bonnie were born.

Helen worked as a secretary for Murphy Trucking; the Thermogray Company; Frosty Flower Shop; Ecklund Plumbing Company; Greene County Farm Bureau; Cal-Car Service Company; American Athletic Equipment; Cudahy, Wilcox, Magee Law Firm , and Greene County Extension Service.

Helen was a dedicated member of the First Baptist Church in Jefferson since 1942. She had served on various church boards, had taught Sunday School, sung in the church choir, was church clerk, was past president of Baptist Women and had recently served as chairperson of Mary Circle. She was currently serving on the Budget and Finance Committee and had looked forward to serving as church secretary had her health permitted.

She was a Past Noble Grand of Rebekah Lodge, was member of Royal Neighbors of America, Garden Club and Business and Professional Women.

Helen had been leader of the Mixed Species 4-H Club for several years. She was an honorary 4-H member and on Nov. 1 she would have been presented a silver platter in recognition of her meritorious service in 4-H. She had received the Bell Ringer award from the Greene County Pork Producers. She had worked on CROP campaigns and had served as county chairman.

She was preceded in death by her father, John T. Murphy, her husband, Raymond in 1985, one sister, Vergene Friess, two infant sisters and and infant brother.

She is survived by her son, Harvey of Jefferson; her daughter, Bonnie Murphy and her husband Randy of Des Moines; her mother, Mrs Minnie Murphy and two brothers, Oliver Murphy and his wife, Marjorie, and Lee Murphy and his wife, Gloria all of Jefferson; and aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews.

Jefferson Bee - November 3, 1987

[NI036333] [james rooker.FTW]

The 1870 Neosho County Kansas census lists Hiram Wright Rooker and his wife American Wise Rooker in Erie Township, Neosho County, Kansas. This owned 4000 acres of land. James Alfred was born in 1872, so we are assuming he was born in Neosho County, Kansas. Josephine Dolen Rooker, Alf's wife said her husband was born in Kansas.

Hiram and America were husband and wife by the time of the 1860 census and lived in Hamilton County Indiana with Hiram's parents. They had their first two children already--Joseline and Frank. In the 1850 Hamilton County Indiana census Hiram was 14 and lived with his parents and a brother. America was 12 and lived with her parents and siblings on the same block as the Rookers.

It is not known yet when Hiram and America moved to Kansas. However, we know from the family stories that James Alfred had some kind of quarrel with his family and left home. He went to Oklahoma where he met and married Josephine and had a family. The family insists that he would not attend a family reunion held in Kansas and that he never went home again.

[NI036461] PASSING OF A PIONEER
---------------------------------------
Aged Lady Died Last Week
-------------------------------------------
Had Lived in Greene County 74 Years - Burial in the Wright Cemetery
------------------------------------------
The death of Mrs. Apaline Wright last Thursday afternoon brought sorrow to many residents of the county. She had been in Greene county for more than 74 years, having come here in a prairie schooner when a young girl. She was the widow of Merida Wright who was one of the pioneers. She was always ambitious and active until advancing age brought on infirmities incident to her years. She was a loving and faithful mother and an ardent follower of her Lord. She lived the life of the pioneer, with its self-denial and service for others. During her last years, she made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Frank Buchmiller, where she passed away at 2:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon.
Apaline Snyder was born in Columbus, Ohio, Nov. 5, 1837 and passed away at the home of her daughter Mrs. Frank Buchmiller Feb. 9, 1928, at the age of 90 years, 3 months and 4 days. She came with her parents to Indiana at the age of 5 in a prairie schooner and when 17 years of age came to Greene county in a schooner. Mrs. Wright united with the Church of Christ when 19 years of age and has lived in this faith for 71 years. She was married to Merida Wright May 18, 1860. Mr. Wright preceded her in death 28 years ago. She leaves to mourn her death four daughters and two sons who are present today with the exception of one son, besides these she leaves numerous relatives and friends who mourn her death. Funeral services at the Church of Christ on Sunday afternoon at 2 p.m., Feb. 11 conducted by the pastor L. R. Gans and burial at Wright cemetery.
Jefferson Bee - February 15, 1928

[NI036471] RITES WEDNESDAY FOR MONROE WRIGHT
A life-long resident of Greene county, Monroe Wright died Monday, March 13, at St. Anthony's hospital in Carroll at the age of 78 years. Mr. Wight, who was born Dec. 23, 1865, about seven miles west of Jefferson, was the son of the late Apeline and Merida Wright.
The funeral service was conducted at Slininger's at 4 p.m., Wednesday,
March 15, with the Rev. M. Dwight Walker, pastor of Central Church of Christ in charge. Pall bearers were Tom Ferrell, Fred Walters, George Wilt, Al Crose, Orson Beebe and O. O. Smith, Grosvenor Needham sang "In the Garden" and "Going Home" as solos, and was accompanied by Miss Joyce Rhoades. Interment was in the Jefferson Cemetery.
Mr. Wright was educated in the rural schools of Greene county, later going into farming for himself. He was married May 1, 1895, to Emma Russell at Rocky Point, north of Jefferson, in the home of his uncle, the Rev. Ervin Wright.
They resided in the Farlin vicinity until the year 1918, when they retired from the farm and came to Jefferson. They were the parents of a daughter and two sons, Mrs. Harold Hall of Elkader, Leo R. of Jefferson and Harold E. of Redfield. Mr. Wright was taken to the hospital in Carroll two and one half weeks ago for medical treatment.
A sister, Mrs. Delana Buchmiller, died in 1922.
Survivors include his wife; the three children; four sisters, Mrs. Mahalia Reynolds of Rockwell City, Mrs. Eva Buchmiller and Mrs. Martha Buchmiller of Jefferson, and Mrs. Delia Keith of Boone; a brother, Kelley Wright of Flasher, N.D., and six grandchildren, Arlene and Zadonna Hall of Cedar Rapids, Barbara and Gerald Wright of Jefferson and Dale and Phyllis Wright of Redfield.
Jefferson Herald - March 16, 1944

[NI036695] SOLOMON LOCKENOUR A native of Franklin Township, Washington Co., Ind., was born October 23, 1817, the fifth child in a family of ten children born to John and Elizabeth (Motsinger) Lockenour, natives of North Carolina, who came to this State about the year 1812, locating near where Farabee Station is now situated. Solomon received a limited education in the primitive log-schoolhouse of his day, and at the age of eighteen went to work on a Government snag-boat. In August, 1840, he was wedded to Catherine Wilson, and to their union a large family of children were born, the following now living: Francis M., Barbara E., Leander, Jerome W. (who is in the United States Regular Army), Matilda, Hannah, Rosanna, Charles and Alice. Mr. Lockenour has always followed agricultural pursuits, in which vocation he has been quite successful, and is now proprietor of 160 acres of valuable land. Mr. and Mrs. Lockenour always contribute generously to the enterprises of the Christian Church, of which they are members. Mr. Lockenour is a Republican, and takes a live interest in the affairs of his party.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI036927] WILLIAM M. BRANNAMAN The paternal grandparents of the above, Jacob and Nancy (Fawbush) Brannaman, were among the first settlers of Washington County. Their son Wallace married Mary Bush, and to them were born two sons, one of whom is our subject. He received his education in the common schools, and after attaining his majority worked on the home farm during the summer season and taught school in winter for several years. About 1869 he bought his first land. He has been a very successful farmer, and now has 400 acres of land, upon which he has erected a good house. Mr. Brannaman has been twice married; first, in 1863, to Lucinda F. Shryer. Mrs. Brannaman died June 2, 1867, leaving one son--Willard. Mr. Brannaman was again married January 28, 1869, to Mary C. Malicoat, a native of Washington County. Seven children have been born to them. They are: Leuella E., Laura M., Melora A., Walter H., Calvin T., Hattie I. and Lelia P. Mr. Brannaman was Trustee of Jefferson Township for four years.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI037362] JOHN ELLIOTT When a young man learned the blacksmith's and wagon-maker's trade of George Smith, at Mill Point, with whom he afterward worked in partnership until 1868. He then spent a few months in Holt and Jasper Counties, Missouri. In March, 1869, he returned to Washington County and bought the farm of 180 acres where he now lives. He now has 480 acres in Monroe and Jefferson Townships. He also still continues to work at his trade when it does not interfere with his farming. In July, 1863, he enlisted in Company C, One Hundred and Seventeenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which regiment he served mostly in Tennessee, until mustered out at Indianapolis in February, 1864. Mr. Elliott was born in Monroe Township, July 17, 1836, being one of four children born to John and Mary (Stuart) Elliott, the latter a native of Virginia, and the former of South Carolina, from which States, when young, they came with their parents to Washington County, Ind., where they lived the remainder of their lives. He died September 27, 1864. John Elliott, the subject of this sketch, chose for his companion Margaret Haley, daughter of David and Catharine (Persinger) Haley, to whom he was married February 18, 1870. They have two children--David and Kate.

History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties, Indiana copyright 1884 Goodspeed Brothers and Company, Chicago

[NI037498] From: Nathan Bertelson 17 Oct., 2000 - “
His wives were Rosetta Moss and Julia Mickey. John was my great
grandfather and is buried about 6 blocks from
my house. Rosetta died about 15 days after giving birth to my
grandmother and John married Julia Mickey less than 9 months
after her death. “

[NI037499] From: Nathan Bertelson 17 Oct., 2000 - His wives were Rosetta Moss and Julia Mickey. John was my great grandfather and is buried about 6 blocks from my house. Rosetta died about 15 days after giving birth to my grandmother and John married Julia Mickey less than 9 months after her death.

[NI037500] From: Nathan Bertelson 29 Oct., 2000
“died...heart failure.”

[NI037501] From: Nathan Bertelson 29 Oct., 2000

[NI037502] From: Nathan Bertelson 29 Oct., 2000

[NI037503] From: Nathan Bertelson 29 Oct., 2000

[NI037504] From: Nathan Bertelson 29 Oct., 2000 “Two
aunts took Grace to care for as the oldest living daughter was
already married and living away from home. He
married Julia Mickey shortly after and had a heck of a time
getting Grace back...Grace died ...after repeated strokes over
24 years. Both are buried about 150 feet from her parents and
150 feet from her grandparents...My grandmother, Grace Garnet
Fouts married Charles Henry Stewartand he is the man I referred
to as Grandpa Charlie.”

[NI037506] From: Nathan Bertelson 17 Oct., 2000 “Lung
cancer...Grace died ...after repeated strokes over 24 years.
Both are buried about 150 feet from her parents and 150 feet
from her grandparents...My grandmother, Grace Garnet Fouts
married Charles Henry Stewart and he is the man I referred to as
Grandpa Charlie.”

[NI037509] From: Nathan Bertelson 17 Oct., 2000 “She
was named after the two MOSS aunts”

[NI037513] From: Nathan Bertelson 29 Oct., 2000

[NI037514] From: Nathan Bertelson 29 Oct., 2000

[NI037516] Nathan Bertelson “My family, including
Abner Fouts, was one of the first to settle in this
area...William N. Fouts was married Elizabeth Smith from Ohio
and had 5 daughters and three sons. Alma deceased at the age of
21 yrs and 5 mo., and is buried next to Abner at Oak Grove.
History of Harrison County that was written in 1891.”
!Elizabeth Smith named in brother John Smith's Will dated 19
Apr., 1698 and proved 1 Aug., 1698, Calvert Co., Md. wife Joan,
brothers Philip and Charles and Elizabeth, sister named as
Elizabeth Plummer- Book 6, p. 143

[NI037518] Nathan Bertelson Oct., 2000 “worked in the
Missouri Valley (Ia.) carriage factory”

[NI037520] Nathan Bertelson Oct., 2000

[NI037521] Nathan Bertelson Oct., 2000 “still living
at home in 1898. "

[NI037522] Nathan Bertelson Oct., 2000 “still living
at home in 1898. "

[NI037525] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 48

[NI037529] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code B82: " . . . . Family #5-064 & 5 -under ch.
Dr. Davenport has '(Others?)' with Family #6-141" ! "5
Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and published
by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S. Harvard,
Independence, Mo., 64052 -- pp. 33, 41: " . . . Date of death
not given. . . . "William N. Relates that 3 ch. were born to the
first mar., two boys and one girl . . . The youngest boy had
died prior to 1840 according to the Census of that year . . . ".
. . Abner mar. 2nd, . . . 6 boys and 2 girls . . . "In 1891 the
four living sons of the 2nd mar. were residing in Douglas co.,
Nebr., and one dau. residing in Tex. (their names are not
recorded.) . . ."
Nathan Bertelson “My family, including
Abner Fouts, was one of the first to settle in this area... He
is the original man to come to Missouri Valley before there was
even a town here. He brought with him his son William N. Fouts
by his first marriage to Rosey Woodrum who died in Sullivan
County, Indiana “(Missouri Valley, Ia.)

[NI037530] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code B83: " . . . .of Putnam Co., Ind., Family
#5-066" ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled
and published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824
S. Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 33, 42

[NI037531] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code Bf79: " . . . .of Putnam Co., Ind., Family
#5-067" !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 33, 44: " . . . Delila
is believed to be one of two Fouts sisters, of Sarah (Fouts)
Funican, who were buried on the back of the Funican Farm, near
Manhattan."

[NI037532] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code Bf80: " . . . .of Putnam Co., Ind., Family
#5-068" ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled
and published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824
S. Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- pp. 33, 45: " . . .
youngest child was born in 184. She is bur. on the back of the
farm that once belonged to John Funican . . .

[NI037533] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code B84: " . . . .of Shelby Co., Iowa, Family
#5-069" ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled
and published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824
S. Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- pp. 33, 46

[NI037534] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code Bf81: " . . . .of Putnam Co., Ind., Families #5-070 & 71" ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S. Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- pp. 33, 47: " . . . according to family tradition, is bur. on the back of the Funnican farm beside her sister. . . mar. 2nd . . . former husband of her sister, Rachel, deceased . . ."

[NI037536] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code Bf83: " . . . .of Putnam Co., Iowa, Family
#5-073" ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled
and published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824
S. Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- pp. 33, 48

[NI037537] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code Bf84: " . . . .of Putnam Co., Iowa, Family
#5-074" ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled
and published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824
S. Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- pp. 33, 49: " . . .
Death cert. . . states . . her mother was 'Jane Kerlin' . . .
The best we could come up with wa the surname 'Curtis' . . .
learned Jane's maiden name was 'Wright' . . . When asked for
proof, . . . 'We have always known it', but . . . Histo. of
Harrison Co., Iowa. 'Kerlin was Jane's middle name 'Caroline'."

[NI037539] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code Bf85: " . . . .of Putnam Co., Ind., Family
#5-076" ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled
and published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824
S. Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- pp. 33, 46, 51: " . .
. largest most beautiful monument in the cemetery. . . Cynthia .
. . marriage was brief because she came to Pottawatomie Co.,
with her parnets, in the fall of 1850, at the age of 22 . . ."

[NI037541] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code B82: " . . . . of Putnam Co., Ind., Family
#5-064 " ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled
and published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824
S. Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052: p. 41: " . . . Mar.
register records bride's name as 'Patsy', however her son,
William N. fouts, gives his mother's name as 'Rosy' Woodrum.
Nathan Bertelson “My family, including
Abner Fouts, was one of the first to settle in this area... He
is the original man to come to Missouri Valley before there was
even a town here. He brought with him his son William N. Fouts
by his first marriage to Rosey Woodrum who died in Sullivan
County, Indiana “(Missouri Valley, Ia.)

[NI037542] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code B82: " . . . . of Harrison Co., Iowa, Family
#5-065 " ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled
and published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824
S. Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052: p. 41: " 6 boys and 2
girls. . . living in Valparaiso, Nebr. in 1891."

[NI037543] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code B83: " . . . .of Putnam Co., Ind., Family
#5-066" ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled
and published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824
S. Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- pp. 42-3: " . . .
(Bible, 1850 Census.) . . . mar., 2nd., Grandison Brotherton, 10
Feb., 1849, Putnam Co. . . Grandison was her brother-in-law,
former husband of Delila Fouts, deceased. . . ."

[NI037544] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code Bf80: " . . . .of Putnam Co., Ind., Family
#5-068" !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 45: " . . . mar., 2nd,
Mary (Fouts) McIntosh, 31 Aug. 1848, Putnam Co. Mary a sister
of his 1st wife, widow of Preston McIntosh. . . 3rd Eliza Fox,
26 Oct., 1851, Clay Co., Ind. . . Tradition that Silas had 21
children - names of 16 are known.)"

[NI037545] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code B84: " . . . .of Shelby Co. Iowa, Family
#5-069" ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled
and published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824
S. Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 46: " . . . Andrew
sold his land back to his father, or brother, Noel, Jr., and
moved to Iowa. . . "

[NI037548] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code Bf83: " . . . .of Putnam Co., Iowa, Family
#5-073 ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled
and published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824
S. Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 48: " Three
brothers, Michael, John and Martin Funican, came from Ireland
prior to 1838 . . . boarded with Noah and Jane Fouts and mar.
two of their daughters, Martha and Sarah."

[NI037549] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code Bf84: " . . . .of Putnam Co., Iowa, Family
#5-074" ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled
and published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824
S. Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 49 " Three brothers,
Michael, John and Martin Funican, came from Ireland prior to
1838 . . . boarded with Noah and Jane Fouts and mar. two of
their daughters, Martha and Sarah."

[NI037551] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code Bf85: " . . . .of Putnam Co., Ind., Family
#5-076"

[NI037553] John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code B123: " . . . Families #5-142,3" From: Nathan Bertelson 17 Oct., 2000 - His wives were Rosetta Moss and Julia Mickey. John was my great grandfather and is buried about 6 blocks from my house. Rosetta died about 15 days after giving birth to my grandmother and John married Julia Mickey less than 9 months after her death.

[NI037554] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 49

[NI037555] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 49

[NI037556] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S. Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 p. 41: " . . . only surviving child in 1891. The youngest boy had died prior to 1840 according to the Census of that year. "William N. Foutz served in the Civil War from Harrison Co., Iowa, enlisting in Co. C of 13 th Iowa Inf. and was in Sherman's 17th Army Corps, and participated in the battle between Thomas and Hood." Nathan Bertelson My family, including Abner Fouts, was one of the first to settle in this area... He is the original man to come to Missouri Valley before there was even a town here. He brought with him his son William N. Fouts by his first marriage to Rosey Woodrum who died in Sullivan County, Indiana History of Harrison County that was written in 1891.“(Missouri Valley, Ia.)

[NI037557] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052-- pp. 42-3 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
B220 ...of Appanoose Co., Iowa, Family #6-143"

[NI037558] "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S. Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- pp. 42, 43: " . . . age 27, Confidence, Iowa. Pvt. 36th Inf., Co. F. Oct., 1862."

[NI037559] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- pp. 42-3 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
Bf206 ...of Appanoose Co., Iowa, Family #6-146"

[NI037560] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- pp. 42-3

[NI037562] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- pp. 42-3 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
B222 ...of Harlan Co., Nebr., Family #6-148"

[NI037563] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 42, 43: " . . . age 30,
Corydon, Iowa. Pvt. rth Inf., Co.I, Sep., 1861"

[NI037564] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 42 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
B219 ...of Appanoose Co., Iowa, Family #6-142"

[NI037565] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 43 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
B220 ...of Appanoose Co., Iowa, Family #6-143"

[NI037566] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 43

[NI037567] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 44: " . . . dau. of
William and Anna (Smith) Worley. . ."

[NI037569] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 44

[NI037570] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 45

[NI037572] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 45

[NI037573] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 45

[NI037574] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 45

[NI037575] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 45

[NI037576] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 45

[NI037578] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 45

[NI037580] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 45

[NI037581] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 45

[NI037582] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 45

[NI037588] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 46 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
Bf208 ...of Shelby Co., Iowa, Family #6-149"

[NI037589] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 46: "George H. Fouts .
. . Pvt. in Co. C, 29th Iowa Infantry, Magnolia, Iowa, 15, Aug.,
1862 . . . "

[NI037590] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 46 ( has name as Jane
Fouts, same as Emma Jane?) ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D.,
Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code Bf210 ...of Shelby
Co., Iowa, Family #6-151"

[NI037591] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 46 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
B223 ...Families # 6-152 & 3"

[NI037593] orphaned dau. of Preston and Mary Fouts McIntosh, who came to
Iowa with her Fouts grandparents in 1850 . . ."

[NI037597] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 47

[NI037599] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 48

[NI037600] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 48

[NI037601] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 48

[NI037602] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 48

[NI037603] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 48

[NI037604] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052

[NI037605] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 48

[NI037606] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 48

[NI037607] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 48

[NI037608] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 48

[NI037609] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052

[NI037610] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 49

[NI037611] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 49

[NI037612] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 49

[NI037613] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 49

[NI037616] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 50 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
Bf212...of Shelby Co., Iowa, Family # 6-156"

[NI037617] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 50 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
Bf213...of Shelby Co., Iowa, Family # 6-157"

[NI037618] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052-- p. 50 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
B224...of Shelby Co., Iowa, Family # 6-158"

[NI037619] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 50 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
Bf214...of Shelby Co., Iowa, Family # 6-159"

[NI037620] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 50 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
Bf215...of Shelby Co., Iowa, Family # 6-160"

[NI037621] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 50 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
B225...of Shelby Co., Iowa, Family # 6-161"

[NI037623] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 50 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
Bf216...of ?, Family # 6-163"

[NI037633] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 51

[NI037634] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 51

[NI037635] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 51

[NI037636] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 51

[NI037637] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 51

[NI037638] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 51

[NI037639] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 51

[NI037642] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 50 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
B224...of Shelby Co., Iowa, Family # 6-158"

[NI037643] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 50 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
Bf214...of Shelby Co., Iowa, Family # 6-159"

[NI037644] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 50 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
Bf215...of Shelby Co., Iowa, Family # 6-160"

[NI037645] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 50 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
B225...of Shelby Co., Iowa, Family # 6-161"

[NI037647] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 50 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
Bf216...of ?, Family # 6-163"

[NI037649] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code B218 ...of Douglas Co., Nebr., Family #6-139"

[NI037650] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code Bf205 ...?, of ?, Family #6-140"

[NI037652] !John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code B218 ...of Douglas Co., Nebr., Family #6-139"

[NI037655] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code B222 ...of Harlan Co., Nebr., Family #6-148"

[NI037656] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code Bf209 ...?, of ?, Family #6-150"

[NI037658] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code Bf210 ...of Shelby Co., Iowa, Family #6-151"

[NI037660] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- pp. 42, 44

[NI037661] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- pp. 42, 44

[NI037662] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 49
! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 49

[NI037663] !John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code Bf79: " . . . .of Putnam Co., Ind., Family
#5-067" !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 42, 44

[NI037666] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 42, 44

[NI037667] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 42, 43

[NI037668] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- pp. 42, 44

[NI037669] !"5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 45From e-mail from William "Bill" W. Turner, Jan. 31, 2001 (wwturner@starpower.net)
Don't know Quinces death date, he did dispose of his property in Harmony, Indiana in 1896.
Encyclopedic Directory of Clay County, Indiana (1896) list him as a wagon maker.
In 1850 census they were living in Washington Township of Putnam County, Indiana.
Living in Reelsville, Quince bought 2 lots on Main Street March 25, 1859, listed in census as a master carpenter. May have been a 4th wife named Ellen Wells, married March 6, 1872.

[NI037670] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 50 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
Bf212...of Shelby Co., Iowa, Family # 6-156"

[NI037672] ! John Scott Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981:
"Patrinymic Code B223 ...of Monona Co., Iowa, Family # 6-153"

[NI037682] "Mary Ann Killion obit gives her birth date as December 11, 1860 and her gravestone reads
1860 but when the census taker visited their home on June 11, 1860 he found a Mary A. Killion 6/12ths
of a year old, making her born in 1859."

[NI037683] "Wm. Anderson was a saloon keeper in Harmony & Terre Haute, Indiana and later became a coal miner."

[NI037685] "Before their marriage Avis was a long distance operator at Brazil and Wallace was a shoe salesman at the Wm. H. Block Co. in Indianapolis. During WW I he served in Battery C of the 27th Field Artillery. After his discharge he returned to Brazil to assist his brother Lester in operating the Turner Shoe Store. Later he took a job at the Terre Haute Brewery."

[NI037687] "This couple was divorced Sept. 8, 1950 at Alton, Illinois, where they operated a restaurant. Anna Mary returned to Terre Haute and was the executive secretary of the vice president of a coal corporation and later was the alumni secretary at Rose Polytechnic Institure. She had no children."

[NI037689] "Dorothy did an outstanding job of raising four children during troublesome times."

[NI037699] "Henlty(?) is also buried on their plot between his parents at Harmony Cemetery, Clay County, Indiana. The question mark after his name is because I am not sure of it. I can recall visiting my grandmother's grave as a small boy & seeing an undertaker's marker on his grave but I am not sure that the name was Henley. He died when he was very young."

[NI037701] "Frank was a furniture finisher and worked in furniture factories in Brazil and Bloomington, Indiana before moving to Indianapolis to work for Banner-Whitehill."

[NI037702] "Ben operated a confectionery store in Carbon, Indiana until 1923 when they moved to Terre Haute and opened one there. He was also the Postmaster at Carbon."

[NI037706] "Gene and Annette were divorced, probably in the 1970's. He tried his hand at many things. He was a salesman for a building supply firm, a trackless trolley and Greyhound bus driver, an insurance agent and manager of the Speedway Branch of the Hoosier Motor Club."

[NI037707] "Bow" owned and operated a children's clinic in Johnson City, Tennessee."

[NI037711] "Jack was a musician. He left Indiana State to enroll in the Army Air Corps where he underwent pilots training, received his commission and was assigned to the 91st Photo Reconnaissance Squadron. He and his crew were killed when the plane he was piloting crashed near Manta, Ecuador while on a mapping mission. They had no children."

[NI037774] [lewis shull.FTW]

Lewis enlisted in the 26th Regiment, Iowa Infantry, Co. A., on August 15, 1862. He was discharged June 6, 1865.

[NI037784] Jacob remarried after Lizzie died.

[NI037785] Winifred remarried after Edward died.

[NI038113] SOURCE: Letter from Elizabeth Wright Jackson. Interview with Florence Jacks Wright by Lee Jackson, Holbrook, AZ. "James was the only child of Miles and Lucinda Wright to marry. He was the first Postmaster of Coal Bluff, Indiana. He fell from the roof of a house and landed on his head. He was put into a sanitorium in Indianapolis in about 1889. He remained there until his death."

[NI038185] Scranton Journal: The funeral services of Mrs. Alexander Bartley were conducted last Sunday at 1 p.m. from the Friends church in Kendrick township by Rev. J. C. Wright, pastor of the Christian church in Farlin. A large concourse of old friends and neighbors gathered on this beautiful afternoon to pay such tribute as they might to a good wife and mother who had resided for fifty-eight years among them and whose kindness and hospitality many of them had shared. Following the service at the church the remains were laid to rest beside her husband in the Dillavou cemetery. The Pall bearers were; Albert Pound, B. C. Allstot, W. A. Eason, Arlie Jamison, Webster Ott and J. P. Miller.

Mary Wright was born in Putnam county, Indiana, October 22, 1836, and died at her home in Kendrick township Thursday, Sept. 24, 1914, after a severe illness of six weeks and three days with gal stone trouble, aged 77 years, 11 months and 2 days. She was married to Alexander Bartley April 1, 1852. Eight children were born to this union, four sons and four daughters, all of whom survive her and are honorable and esteemed residents of their communities. Mr. and Mrs. A. Bartley came to Greene county in 1856 and have resided on their Kendrick township farm for fifty-eight consecutive years. Mrs. Barkley united with the church of Christ when twelve years of age. She was faithful throughout her long life to her church vows and her children received the truest admonitions of a Christian mother. Her husband was laid at rest early in May of the present year, and thus two of the best people which Greene county has known have found a rest and peace which the world knows not of.

The Jefferson Bee - October 14, 1914

[NI038250] DEATH OF COLEMAN P. WRIGHT

Coleman Peter Wright, a lifelong resident of Greene county, died at his home in Jefferson Thursday noon of a heart ailment. He had been in seemingly good health and was able to walk down town to get the mail in the forenoon. After returning home he laid Down to rest and died in a few minutes.

Funeral services were held from Slininger's chapel Sunday afternoon, Jan. 14, in charge of Rev. Gerald Berneking, pastor of the Church of Christ. Burial was in the Toliver cemetery, northwest of town.

He was the eldest son of John; E. and Martha Wright. He was born in Greene county, Iowa, August 24, 1861, and departed this life in Jefferson, Jan. 11, 1934, at the age of 73 years, 4 months and 18 days.

Mr. Wright spent all his life in Greene county. In January 1882 he was married to Harriett Caroline Sprague, and on January 1st of this year they celebrated their 52 anniversary.

To this union nine children were born. Four preceded their father in death, leaving to mourn his wife. two daughters and three sons: Mrs. Sadie Kelley, Independence, Mo.; Mrs. Ollie Galvin, Jefferson, Ia.; Fred and Walter, both of Jefferson, Ia. and Earl of Ventura, California. All were present at the funeral except Earl of California.

Mr. Wright has one sister living, Mrs. Hazel McCormick, of Independence, Mo, Besides these relatives he leaves many friends to mourn his death,

Jefferson Bee - January 19, 1934

Note: this is the Fair Oak cemetery. MLM

[NI038448] HARRIET CAROLINE WRIGHT

Harriet Caroline Wright was buried in the Fair Oaks cemetery after services were conducted Wednesday, June 19, at 4 p.m. in the Slininger chapel, Jefferson. The Rev. M. Dwight Walker, pastor of Central Church of Christ conducted the service, during which Cecil Enlow sang "Beautiful Isle" and "No Night There," accompanied by Mrs. Dean Barker.

Pallbearers were Henry Blasnitz, Roy Bartley, Roy Kendall, Bert Capehart, John Murphy and Ernie Cummings.

Mrs. Wright was born Aug. 7, 1862, in Cedar county near Tipton and died at her home, 900 N. Pinet street, Jefferson, late Monday evening, June 15, 1942, at the age of nearly 80 years.

Mrs. Wright came to Greene county as a young girl of 14, and it was here that she was married Jan. 1, 1882, to Coleman Peter Wright. Of their nine children, three remain: A daughter, Mrs. Ollie Galvin of Jefferson, and two sons, Earl of Ventura, Cal., and Walter of Jefferson. Six children preceded their mother in death, four as young children, and Fred, March 5, 1937, and Sadie Kelly, March 1, 1936.

Mrs. Wright lived to see her family increase to include 18 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Mr. Wright passed away Jan. 11, 1934, just a few days after the couple had celebrated their 52nd wedding anniversary.

Jefferson Bee - January 23, 1942

[NI039003] SOURCE: Letter written by Elizabeth Wright Jackson and given to her four children."...Great-grandfather, James W. Chadd married a girl named Corrinda Wright. They had seven children, five of whom were Ruth Jane, Sarah Ann, Laura Florence, Morgan, Freelin, all born in Putnam Co. Ind. Ruth Jane Chadd, my grandmother, was born in 1852 and died Dec. 10, 1934."

MILITARY SERVICE: He originally entered service as Private on 12 August 1861 at Mason, Illinois. He later enlisted in Company B, 38th Regiment of Illinois Veteran Infantry Volunteers, on 29 Feb 1864 to serve three years or during the war. He was promoted to Corporal 1 Oct 1865. (Source: Certificate, original in possession of Jerald Jackson, Kansas and copy in possession of W.H. Jackson, AZ. ) Discharged 20 March 1866 at Victoria, Texas by reason "his services being no longer required." According to his discharge papers he was 5'8" high, dark complection, black eyes, dark hair and by occupation when enrolled, a farmer.

NOTE: James Chadd is not listed in the LDS Ancestral File (1/13/99) nor in the LDS IGI File nor the IGI Addendum.

NOTE: A James Chadd is listed in the 1850 Census Index for the state of Indiana, Putnam County, Marian Twp., page 457. Check 1850 Indiana census records.

[NI039009] OBITUARY in possession of Jerry Jackson: "Mrs. Edna Whalen, 75 years old, 1412 North Tenth Street, died at 3:35 o'clock yesterday afternoon at the home of a nephew, Marion Wright of Coal Bluff. A niece, Mrs. Elizabeth Jackson of Phoenix, AZ also survives. The body was taken to the Gillis Memory Chapel, where friends may call after 1 o'clock this afternoon and where services will be held at ? o'clock Thursday afternoon. Burial will be at Calvary Cemetery."

[NI040224] [james morgan.FTW]

On the 1880 census Arcola, Douglas County, Illinois, her middle name is listed as Malvina and sh e is listed as S. Malvina.

[NI040239] [james morgan.FTW]

His will written 12 Apr 1869 in Washington County, He was apparently getting ready to marry Eliz a Beth Applegate who was listed as his intended wife on the will. His son-in-law Gary T. Mor ris was listed as the executor of the will. His heirs listed were sons: Aaron, Thomas J., Jo hn Newton, and James M. Daughters were Annis Applegate, Mary Jane Morris and Amanda E. Morgan . One grandchild is listed Hester Morgan and his intended wife Eliza Applegate.
He died 15 Jun 1875 and the will was probated 17 Aug 1875. His oldest, Joel had died by Ma r of 1855 as had his other son William. What happened to Francis Marion Morgan is not known .
In 1861 when John Newton Morgan died, Hestor, the daughter of William C. Morgan and Mary Tow nsend stated that Thomas was no longer living. He may have been killed during the Civil Wa r or died in an epidemic. However, I have a date for 1869 for Thomas's death, not pre 1861 , so I am not sure what is going on. Prehaps there are two John Newton Morgans.

[NI040243] [james morgan.FTW]

This information came from Don Coatney, William's descendent.
William was enlisted 1 Mar 1862 and served County, E 53 Reg. Indiana Volunteers. He was capture d by Rebels 22 July 1864 and then exchanged and returned to Washington County, Indiana. He is li sted as being buried in two different cemeteries. As soon as Don gives me additional informa tion I will add it.

[NI040245] [james morgan.FTW]

Thomas seems to have disappeared and his family did not know where he was. In a letter Mar y Morgan wrote, she implied he had been gone for some years. Its possible he died during th e war and no one knew where he was buried. So far I haven't found any record of a marriage f or him.

[NI040250] [amos ash.FTW]

On 1900 US Census, Medicine Lodge, Barber County, Kansas
On 1910 US Census, Medicine Lodge, Barber County, Kansas, Roll 432, Book 1, Page 148

[NI040281] [james morgan.FTW]

Amos worked for the railroad in Arcola after marrying Ida. His first two children were bor n there while his father-in-law Aaron Morgan, lived with them. Then c. 1903, they decided t o move to Spokane county, Washington state where some of their family had already moved.
As they could not afford a train ticket, they decided to travel by horse and wagon across th e country stopping where they had family to stay with, working along the way to cover the cos t of food for themselves and their horses. They took with them a bitch dog whose puppies ha d just been weaned. Sometime after they got pass the Mississippi River, she got loose and to ok off. They didn't know what happened to her until after they arrived in Spokane and wrot e back to Arcola. It took her 6 months, but she made it back to where her puppies were las t and one of the neighbors who kept one of the pups took her in. Amos told me this story whe n he was in the nursing home before he died. He was amazed that the dog crossed the Mississi ppi as there were no bridges and she would have had to swim or ride the ferrys.
His daughter Bessie who was born in Arcola remembered the Christmas they spent in Little Rock , Arkansas. Her mother made Bessie and Dora stay in the wagon and then told them Santa had c ome and to see what he brought. Bessie said there was a tea set on a stump near the wagon fo r her. It was while they were in Little Rock that Mamie was born. They arrived in Spokane i n 1905.
Amos got a job as a carpenter with the Great Northern Rail Road. As the job was in Hillyard , then not more than a wide spot in the road, Amos built a home there for his family. He lat er built a home for his daughter Bessie in the Driscoll area. Both homes are still standing.
He was a Methodist, by faith and a kind and gentle man that everyone liked by life style. Ta ll and slender, he stood in stark contrast to his short and heavy wife. He died when I was 1 0.

[NI040341] [james morgan.FTW]

She was listed on the 1880's census as the daughter of Aaron and Polly Morgan and she is buri ed next to Polly in the Arcola cemetery.

[NI040342] [james morgan.FTW]

He was born blue right after Amos and Ida arrived in Spokane. There was also a second child , a girl who lived a month and starved to death because she couldn't digest milk of any kind.

[NI040345] [james morgan.FTW]

Aaron was born the third son of his father's second wife in Washington County, Indiana. He marri ed Pollyann Richey in her father's house according to a bible record I have and took up farmi ng .
During the Civil War he was drafted and reported for enlistment 22 Sept 1864, in Jeffersonvil le. He was 28 years old at the time.
His records reveal that he stood 5' 11 1/2 inches tall, with blue eyes and light hair. He wa s apparently living in Polk Township, Washington county at the time. It had to have been a h ardship on the family as his oldest son was about 8 years old.
He was part of Sherman's March to the Sea and as such saw alot of killing and alot of dying . On 23rd of Mar 1865, he was sent out with some men to guard Cox's Bridge, near Bentonville , North Carolina. He was wounded in the hip and taken captive. While being sent to the rear , one of the Rebel's went off the deep end and starting fireing on the men whose hands were t ied. Aaron was hit in the hand and badly frightened.
He was treated by a Rebel surgeon and then traded for Confederate captives. He was discharg ed from Camp Chase, Ohio and returned home unable to farm. The wounds to his hand and hip le ft him unable to do manual labor, including farming, plus he suffered from what we call delay ed stress. He was given a pension.
He continued to live in Washington County, until 1 Nov 1875, when he moved to Arcola, Douglas County, , Illinois. His youngest Ida Jane was an infant at the time. I was told by Ida's daughter B essie that the move was due to his inability to farm and he had family in Arcola who asked hi m to come. At this time I don't know which of his brothers lived there, but the cemetery i n Arcola bears grim proof that at least one of his brothers was living in Arcola.
Pollyann died in 1899 in Arcola and is buried there next to a 17 year old Hester Morgan, wh o appears to be a niece of Aaron's. After that Aaron apparently ended up living with Amos an d Ida Jones until they left Arcola in 1903. He was hospitalized, according to IRAD records 1 6 Aug 1901 at the Danville Home for Disabled Vol. Soldiers, Illinois. NARAs list it as Dayton , Ohio even though he lived in Illinois at the time. He was discharged at his own reques t 6 Jun 1903 and then went to live in Oklahoma before ending up in an old sholdier's home i n Kansas.
According to the National Archives and Records Administration he died from epilepsy at the We stern Branch Vets hospital known as Leavenworth Old Sholdier's Home or Wadsworth. He was adm itted there 2 Nov 1904. His son Samuel was notified in Edmond.
He was buried in grave 2729 at the Leavenworth National Cemetery which is south of Forth Leav enworth National Cemetery.
This biography is based on his military records, census records, burial records, his obit i n Arcola and family history, NARA records and hospital records.

[NI040347] [james morgan.FTW]

Mary was listed as "in service" in the 1880's census of Arcola, Douglas County, Illinois, in othe rwords, she worked as a day maid for one of the families in Arcola.

[NI040532] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 49: " . . . John's
brother, no ch."

[NI041354] [druzilla ash.FTW]


Individual: Sturgeon, Otho
Birth date: 10 Jan 1897
Death date: Feb 1976
Social Security #: 445-38-9029
Last residence: Hennessey, Oklahoma. 73742
State of issue: Oklahoma

[NI041369] [druzilla ash.FTW]


Individual: Blodgett, Bertie
Birth date: 14 Oct, 1900
Death date: Jul 1977
Social Security #: 448-56-5170
Last residence: Hennessey, Oklahoma. 73742
State of issue: Oklahoma

[NI041370] [druzilla ash.FTW]


Individual: Blodgett, Thompson
Birth date: 8 May, 1894
Death date: Oct 1968
Social Security #: 446-09-6326
Last residence: Hennessey, Oklahoma. 73742
State of issue: Oklahoma

[NI041384] [druzilla ash.FTW]


Individual: Sturgeon, Archie
Birth date: 31 Jan 1911
Death date: Jun 1974
Social Security #: 565-14-3527
Last residence: Belle Plaines, Kansas. 67013
State of issue: California

[NI041397] [druzilla ash.FTW]


Individual: Jordan, Sylva
Birth date: 20 Mar 1911
Death date: Dec 1973
Social Security #: 440-22-4377
Last residence: Ames, Oklahoma 73718
State of issue: Oklahoma

[NI041400] [druzilla ash.FTW]


Individual: Sturgeon, Alwilda
Birth date: 6 Jan 1898
Death date: Jul 1983
Social Security #: 442-44-3926
Last residence: Hennessey, Oklahoma. 73742
State of issue: Oklahoma

[NI041401] [druzilla ash.FTW]


Individual: Sturgeon, John
Birth date: 12 Nov 1918
Death date: Nov 1979
Social Security #: 448-09-9267
State of issue: Oklahoma
Zip of last payment: Upland, California. 91786

[NI041670] Mrs. Elizabeth Chick died at her home in Mt. Auburn Sunday, Sept. 11, 1910, after an illness of several months, at the age of 79 years, 9 months and 8 days. She was born at Greencastle, Ind. January 3, 1840, and came to this part of Illinois with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. David Copple, in 1849. In 1855 she was united in marriage to Chas. Chick, who died in 1899. To them were born eleven children, five of whom survive. James and C. O. Chick and Mrs. John Miller of Mt. Auburn, and Mrs. Jacob Miller and John Chick of Illiopolis.

She united with the Christian Church at Walnut Hill under the preaching of Elder John Williams when about 15 years old. She had been a member of the Mt. Auburn Christian Church for the past 14 years and lived a consistent Christian life.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family residence,conducted by the Rev. John W. Augur. Interment was made in Mt. Auburn Cemetery.

[NI047498] Biographical and Historical Record of Putnam County, Indiana
Page 492
---------------------------------------------------------

Prementer Mullinix, M. D. of Cloverdale Twp. was born in Jefferson Twp. this county 5 October 1835, son of Elisha and Hannah Mullinix, pioneers of that township, where the father settled about 1828, locating on section 20, where he lived until 1868, then sold out and removed to Illinois, living there 10 years, He then returned to Indiana where he died in Owen County, 17 May 1882. He was born in Rowan County, North Carolina 22 May 1790. His parents, Greenbury and Christian (Morgan) Mullinix, were also natives of North Carolina. The family are Scotch-Irish ancestry. Greenbury came to Washington County about 1810 or 1815 and to Putnam County about 1824, settling in Greencastle where he lived until his death in 1854-55 aged over 80. His wife died in 1857, age 85 years. She was a member of the Old School Baptist Church. Elisha Mullinix was reared a farmer and came to Indiana about 1810, locating in Washington County came to this county some years later. He was twice married his first wife being Charity McCollum from whom he was divorced in 1828. His 2nd wife was Hannah (Hunt) Jenkins whom he married in 1830. By his first marriage were 8 children and by his second marriage were 7 children. The mother died January 1885 in Boone County, Iowa. Both were members of the missionary Baptist Church. Dr. Mullinix was reared on a farm. He attended the common schools and also attended Asbury University 2 years. He read medicine under Dr. Washington Brenton, of Mount Meridan, and engaged in the practice of his profession at Mt. Tabor, Monroe County remaining there 3 years. He then went to Quincy, Owen Co., practicing there 18 years then removed to Bloomington, Monroe Co., and in the spring of 1882 came to Cloverdale Twp. Where he has since been since engaged in the practice of medicine. He attended Miami Med College during 1866-67. The doctor has always taken an active interest in educational matters and in the improvement of his Township. In politics he is a zealous Republican casting his 1st Presidential vote for John C. Freemont in 1856. He united with the Masonic frat in 1864 and has held the office of Jr. and Sr. Warden several terms. He is now Worshipful Master of Cloverdale Lodge #132. He united with the Baptist Church in 1860 and 1861 was ordained deacon. He was married 24 Feb. 1895 to Julia A. Brown born in Laurence Co., this state 8 July 1840 and their children are: Nettie T., wife of Prof H. Brown, a graduate of DePauw Univ., Elmer E., Tele operator and Orres D., a clerk at Indianapolis. Mrs. Mullinix is a member of Christian Church. The doctor owns 120 acres of land in Owen Co. His residence is one of the finest in the village. It was purchased in 1882 at a cost of $2500.00. He also owns the lot upon which his office is situated. He is a genial gentleman and has a lucrative practice. He never fails to respond to a call on account of the limited means of his patrons.

[NI047823] [william frakes2.FTW]

Caught in a rainstorm and died of pneumonia with son Van Cleave.

[NI047825] Was a coin collector, had no children.

[NI047833] [william frakes2.FTW]

Placed in orphanage at age 7.

[NI047834] [william frakes2.FTW]

died at birth

[NI049799] ! "5 Generations of the Pfautz-Fouts Family" compiled and
published by Audrey L. Woodruff, C.G.R.S.--Order from 1824 S.
Harvard, Independence, Mo., 64052 -- p. 50 ! John Scott
Davenport, Ph.D., Working Draft May 1, 1981: "Patrinymic Code
Bf213...of Shelby Co., Iowa, Family # 6-157"

[NI051541] Obituary:
Ed ward Franklin Lambeth was born in Thomasville, North Carolina, July 23,
1889; and departed this life in Asbury Hospital June 6, 1963, at the age
of 73 yea rs, 10 months, and 14 days. He was united in marriage to Rosie
Stafford July 11, 1912. Six children were born to this union. One son,
Loren, preceded h im in death June 11, 1939. Mr. Lambeth had lived at
Culver Kansas, for over 50 years, and was a carpenter for many years. He
was retired, and had been c onfined to his home in Culver for almost all
of the past 3 years due to sickn ess. He leaves to mourn his wife Rosie,
of the home; 3 sons, Donald of the h ome, Lee of Grover City, California,
and William of Springfield, Missouri; 2 daughters, Mrs. Violet Washburn
of Hoxie, Kansas, and Mrs. Pauline Watson of Lubbock, Texas; 3 brothers,
Albert of Boulder, Colorado, David of Englewood, Colorado, and Marvin of
Abilene, Kansas; 2 sisters, Mrs. Elmer Kilgore of Str ongburg, Nebraska,
and Mrs. Dick McCaddon of Ft. Dodge, Kansas; 14 grandchild ren; 10
great-grandchildren; many nieces and nephews and a host of friends.
Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at the Culver Presbyterian
Ch urch, and Mrs. Ira Dent in charge. Music was furnished by Mrs. Larry
Knox an d Mrs. Joe Armstrong. Pall bearers were Clyde Reed, Carl Baker,
Don Base, Sa m Andrews, Clarence Base and Cecil Humbarger. Interment was
in Culver Union Cemetery, with guy R. Ryan Sons Mortuary in
charge.

[NI051542] [robert lambeth.FTW]

Obituary:
Rosie Mae Lambeth, daughter of Mary and George Staff ord, was born May 14,
1897 in Bennington. She passed away April 17, 1989 in the Asbury Salina
Regional Medical Center at the age of 91 years 11 months an d 3 days.
Rosie spent her entire life in the Culver area. She was a homemak er and
was a paper hanger for many years. She loved to work in her garden,
crochet and piece quilts. She was a member of teh Presbyterian Church in
Cu lver. On July 11, 1912 Rosie was united in marriage to Edward F.
Lambeth in Culver, and to this union six children were born. Preceding
her in death wer e her husband Edward, three sons, Donald, William, and
Loren and a daughter V iolet Washburn. Mrs. Lambeth is survived by a son
Robert Lee an dhis wife Do rothy of Almena; a daughter Pauline Watson of
Brookville; a daughter-in-law L ibbie of Springfield, Missouri; a brother Elmer
Stafford and wife Girtie of Salina; sister Millie Dewhirst of Denver, CO;
14 grandchildren, 33 great grandchildr en, and 15 great great
grandchildren, nieces and nephews and a host of friend s. Funeral
services were held Friday, April 21, 10 a.m. in the Ryan Mortuary , Salina
with Helen Dent officiating. Music was furnished by Edna McCall, Ve ta
Armstrong and Ethel Knox. Casket bearers were Charles Vanderbilt, Jimmie
Vanderbilt, Loren Washburn, Fred Washburn, Mark Washburn, and John
Washburn . Interment was in the Culver Union Cemetery. The family
suggests memorials to the Culver Presbyterian Church.

[NI052999] Bible Record:

"My Grandfather, Amos Wright, began to preach when quite young and continued until his death. He died October 14th 1846 and was buried about 12 miles south of Salem, the County Seat of Washington County, State of Indiana."

[NI055149] [John Beard.FTW]

[101429 grubb.FTW]

[NI060396] [durnil.FTW]

Fredericksburg News Obituary of Fred Trotter Allen
Date of Death: January 7, 1941

FRED ALLEN, RETIRED GROCER DIES IN LOUISVILLE

Fred Allen, a retired Louisville, Ky. grocer, 62 years old, a native of Salem and for many years a resident of Fredericksburg, Ind., died at three o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the Baptist Hospital, where Jan. 2, he submitted to major surgery.

He was the youngest son of Robert W. and Clementine Trotter Allen, of Salem.

The body will be at the Melton Funeral Home, 2108 West Broadway until ten o'clock Friday morning. The body will arrive at twelve o'clock at the Fredericksburg Methodist church, where services will be held at two o'clock by the Rev. C. P. McKinney of New Albany, with burial in the Fredericksburg cemetery.

Surviving are the widow, Lucinda Kay Allen; one son, John Kay Allen, who is in the navy and stationed at Minneapolis, Minnesota; four daughters, Mrs. George Rieger, Baton Rouge, La., Mrs. Max Radcliff, Hardinsburg, Mrs. J. Ray Durnil, Indianapolis, Mrs. Clyde E. Moore, Louisville, Ky.; one brother Claude Allen, Joplin, Mo.; three half-brothers Jason and Harry, Fredericksburg, Robert Allen, Indianapolis and two half-sisters, Mrs. Ross D. Hawes, Indianapolis and Miss Lillian Allen, Brooklyn, New York.

(The following two articles about Fred T. Allen appeared in the Fredericksburg News, but I don't know the dates. The first appeared sometime after his father's death in 1904. The second was obviously later}

FRED T. ALLEN
Fred T. Allen, junior member of the firm of R.W. Allen & Son has purchased the interest of Mrs. R. W. Allen and now assumes full control of the establishment, which will now be known by the firm name of Fred T. Allen.
Fred has been one of our hustling young men who has climbed well up the ladder of success by commencing at the bottom.
He began store work with Trotter and Kay as a clerk some 12 or 1 5 years ago and soon showed his ability as a salesman and a few years later was taken into his father's store in which he helped to build up an excellent trade. After passing through many trying circumstances of a business life he succeeded in establishing a good trade and about 6 years ago he became a partner of half interest. His trade has been increasing ever since and now can only be surpassed by stores of large towns. In addition to the general store he has two good huxter routes, a farm of 40 acres, and also is in charge of the post office.
He is a busy man always at his duties ready to great you with accommodations and courteous treatment.


(Second Article)

Fred T. Allen, the enterprising merchant, has purchased an auto truck from the International Harvester Company, which he will use in transporting the produce from his store to the market at Louisville and in hauling out his merchandise. The auto truck will take the place of the large four-horse wagon that he has been using for this purpose for many years. By the use of the auto truck he will be able to get his produce to the market much quicker than with the wagons and when necessary to make the trips more frequent, in short this is a big step forward in the way of transportation to and from the city market. He is the first merchant along the old New Albany-Vincennes pike to purchase an auto truck although the Standard Oil Company and the Coca Cola people and several other business houses in the city (Louisville) have been supplying their customers along the road by the use of trucks for some time. Mr. Allen's lead will probably be followed by other businessmen on this road and the use of these modern means of transportation will no doubt result advantageously not only to the merchants but to the entire community.

[NI060397] [durnil.FTW]

Edith Lucinda Kay was separated from her mother at an early age and was raised by her father's parents, John S. & Lucinda Austin Kay. She had a good sense of humor and was a loving grandmother.

[NI062522] [durnil.FTW]

John Kay Allen made a career of the United States Navy. Following his retirement he entered the real estate business in Boulder Creek, California. His wife was Mary ? No children.

[NI062527] [durnil.FTW]

James Ray Durnil was known as Ray. He was a motorcycle and automobile mechanic early in the history of the combustion engine. He worked his way from southern Indiana to Indianapolis during the depression and obtained a job as a mechanic. Later he opened his own business as Ray's Garage. Later yet, he entered the ornamental iron business as the owner of Indiana Ornamental Iron, Inc. His education extended to the 3rd grade. He worked hard and pinched his pennies to provide for a family of six children.

[NI062528] [durnil.FTW]

Ellen Merle Allen (Durnil) graduated from the pubic schools in Fredericksburg IN and then the New Albany Business College. As a young girl she was quite beautiful and also quite the "cut-up." She enjoyed good humor and was a strong and disciplined mother for four boys and two girls.

[NI062541] [durnil.FTW]

Ray served in the United States Navy in World War II on LST 55. He participated in the Normandy invasion in June 1944. He also served during the Korean War. He had a successful career in the trucking business (D&N Trailers). He suffered from cancer and passed away following a traffic accident.

[NI062643] [mosteller.FTW]

Birthdate may be 25 Nov 1909

[NI062671] [mosteller.FTW]

Name Suffix: Jr.

[NI062700] Mary E. Judson 69 and her brother William D. Hane 67, both of New Discovery- near Rockville, were killed instantly at Coal Bluff on Sunday 25, Dec. 1932 when hit by a Big 4 Train. The severed head of one of the victims was not found until the train reached Terre Haute. They were on the way to visit William F. Crabb of Seelyville, son of Mrs. Judson to have a holiday meal. Mrs. Judson is survived by the son and two step daughters, Mattie Gibson of New Goshen and Daisy Ransler, two brothers Ed Hane of Seelyville and Ira Hane of Jessup. Four sisters, Kate Dobson of Silverwood, In, Eva Gibbs, New Goshen; Mrs. James Marsh, and Mrs. Joe Gibbs.

[NI065709] [james rooker.FTW]

Memories of Melvin Wells, JoAnn Wells Hopper, Mary Rooker Bacon:

Carrie was born on a farm near Salina, Oklahoma, the daughter and fourth child of Alfred Rooker and Josephine Dolen Rooker. As a child, she was very pretty, with lots of dark hair. She loved pretty dresses and tried very hard to please her father and her big brother Howard.

The two eldest children of the family, Vera and Clemmie, died as babies. Howard was Carrie's "big brother," and she loved him dearly. She tried so hard to please him and liked to tell about how kind and good he was, admired by many. Carrie liked to get his compliments, so she baked him biscuits which he said were the best he ever ate. It was an enduring tragedy to her that her big brother took ill in the summer of his twelfth year and never recovered, dying far too young. She mentioned him often and never forgot him.

By this time, there were two younger brothers in the family, George and Hogan, and two younger sisters, Waneta ("Dudie") and Mary. With the death of Howard, Carrie became the eldest child. She always spoke in loving terms of her brothers and sisters. My own personal memories recall many trips to visit them.

She went to school at Wickcliff School, a country school near her family's home. There are pictures of her with his brothers and other friends at school. Carrie liked to go to school in new dresses; she knew that if she cried at her father's knee, he would buy her a new dress. She did this so often that he nicknamed her "April" for her tears.

Carrie was a favorite of the family which employed her father, the Bullens. They owned the ranch and had a big house. Carrie often went to "tea" with Mrs. Bullens who gave her a love for pretty things and told her that she she was talented, pretty, capable and could do anything she wanted. The rest of the famly did not understand this very well.

After the family moved to Barnsdall, Carrie went to high school and participated in the school plays, the glee club, women's basketball, and sang in the girls trio of the high school. She took Latin and Spanish as well as all the other requirements and hoped to go to college to learn to be a nurse. Because her beloved father died before she finished school, there was no money for her to go to college. In fact, she had to go to work before she finished high school. She worked in the local drug store, making sodas. And there she met Melvin Wells, who came to town often because he had a brother nearby. The depression was on, jobs were nearly non-existent, and young people had to move around to get jobs. Melvin would often come to Oklahoma looking for a job.

Melvin and Carrie fell in love, but Melvin had to wait to marry until he had a job. In 1933 he got a job working in the dairy at the State Home for the Mentally Ill in Parsons, Kansas. So in November 1933, Melvin and Carrie married, living in Parsons.

Melvin wanted to try to make a better living, so he entered a restaurant venture with his cousin John E. Wells and his wife Blanche in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Carrie and Melvin both worked very hard in the restaurant. Some kind of misunderstanding occurred, after which Melvin and Carrie left the restaurant. Melvin began looking for work, and he found it in a brass foundry where he worked very hard making brass fittings for all kinds of things. One was parking meters for big cities. Some of those meters are still in use. Carrie had worked hard in the restaurant, but now she was expecting her first child, so she began her carreer as a homemaker.

They lived in a small house just off Central Park in Tulsa, and it was there that their first child, JoAnn, was born on October 5, 1936. Marilynn Sue was born November 11, 1938. Melvin still worked in the brass foundry, but Carrie stayed home now to be a full-time mother and homemaker. She had never lost her desire to go to school and become a nurse, but that dream was impractical now.

Carrie and Melvin bought a house soon after the birth of Marilynn. It was located at 704 North Zunis, north of downtown Tulsa. The house was very small but had a large yard. They kept a big garden and grew most of their own vegetables. That house saw many well-remembered family events. Visits from Grandma Rooker and Aunt Mary, who sometimes came to babysit with the kids. The birth of a son, Melvin Albert Wells, Jr. on June, 14, 1941. Marilynn's terrible illness at Christmas of 1943 when she suffered a ruptured appendix and nearly died of the resulting peritonitis. Marilynn was in St. John's Hospital in Tulsa for a long time, and Grandma Rooker came to take care of JoAnn and Melvin, Jr. No one really thought Marilynn would recover, but the grace of God brought her back. Carrie remembered a "Sister" (a nun) at the hospital who kneeled and prayed all night for Marilynn. After she recovered and came home, she was weak for a long time.

JoAnn started to school from this house. She went to John Whittier Elementary School for Kindergarten, first and second grades. Marilynn began Kindergarten. From this house they all walked to Immanuel Baptist Church. Carrie had been a Baptist for a long time. It was not easy to convince Melvin that he should be re-baptized and become a Baptist. He did make the decision, however, and was baptized and later ordained a deacon.

Then in the summer of 1943 the family moved to E. Zion Street, to a house which needed lots of renovation. Melvin and Carrie no sooner finished this work than they decided they were not satisfied in this house. So they moved to a house south of downtown on East 17th Place just off Peoria Blvd. The children all went to Lincoln School (little Melvin began school here).

Here Melvin Wells suffered his difficult bouts with his stomach ulcers. Carrie also suffered illness here. The doctors finally decided she had severe anemia. She recovered only very slowly.

In 1951, the family moved to a large, brand-new house on Quebec St. near the Tulsa fairgrounds. JoAnn was in high school, Marilynn in Junior High and Melvin, Jr. in elementary school. Carrie began to work as a saleslady for Frougs and Vandivers. She loved pretty clothes and was did well in sales. She then became a real estate agent and also did well in that field.

But Carrie and Melvin had been visiting Carrie's mother and sister in California for several years. The temptation of fine weather and a good place to live was too much. In February 1953, the house was sold and the car loaded, and the furniture packed to move. The family settled in Downey, California at 9204 La Reina. All joined Trinity Baptist Church in Downey, and the kids all went to school in Downey. JoAnn graduated from Downey High School in 1954 as did Marilynn in 1956. Melvin, Jr., by now called Mel, graduated From Earl Warren High School in Downey in 1959.

Carrie finally was able to pursue her calling as a nurse when she went to a nursing school and got her license as a technician. She started in general nursing but went on to the obstetrics ward and then to surgery. She became a fine surgical nurse. She never regreted becoming a nurse even when it was hard and when her feet hurt from the standing in the operating room. She always loved it.

Carrie taught Sunday School classes, led the missions organizations and was active in many other ways in church. She contributed when Melvin and Carrie joined their sons-in-law's churches in Long Beach and Downey. Henry and Marilynn Blackaby at First Southern Baptist in Downey and John David and JoAnn Hopper at Signal Hill Baptist Church in Long Beach. Mel graduated in music from Oklahoma Baptist University and Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary and became a Minister of Music. He eventually got his Doctorate in Musical Arts.

JoAnn and her husband went to Europe to be Baptist missionaries. Henry and Marilynn went to pastor a church in Saskatoon, Sask. Canada, so Carrie and Melvin also went to be missionaries. Carrie resigned and Melvin retired from Sears and they were chosen by the Foreign Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention to be missionary kid houseparents in Lusaka, Zambia, Africa. They first had to build the missionary kid residence, and they learned to love the children, who had to come to Lusaka to go to school since their parent worked in remote areas as missionaries. Melvin built churches, directed the Bible Way Correspondence Courses, served as a deacon; Carrie worked in nursing clinics, took care of children, taught Sunday School. They both loved Africa and the African people.

When they returned to the USA, Melvin and Carrie settled in Riverside, California. Carrie's sister Mary moved to Riverside, and together they cared for their mother Josephine Rooker until she died in November of 1980. Carrie and Melvin also cared for JoAnn's son David, who came to live with them and go to high school because there was no suitable school for him where his parents lived in Austria. They were "houseparents" to him until he went to Baylor University in 1979.

Then Carrie and Melvin moved to Miami, Oklahoma to be near Melvin's mother, who was 99 at the time and living in a rest home in Parsons, Kansas. Carrie was just as active as ever in Baptist Women's Missionary Union and in her Sunday school class in First Baptist Church in Miami.
She loved to travel with Melvin and enjoyed many trips all over the United States. She loved to tell stories about the places they had seen. In old age, she had gorgeous silver hair, and she never lost her love for pretty clothes.

Carrie suffered from high blood pressure for many years. Then her heart weakened and doctors installed a pacemaker. But when the pacemaker failed, her doctors failed to notice what was going on. Her heart continued to weaken, and she suffered several strokes. Melvin cared for her in the last two years of her life, keeping her at home, cooking for her and doing his best to make her comfortable. She died at Baptist Hospital in Miami on March 16, 1996 and is buried in Rose Hills Memorial Park in Whittier, California beside her mother.

[NI065710] [james rooker.FTW]

Information from Census records:

The 1870 Neosho County Kansas census lists Hiram Wright Rooker and his wife American Wise Rooker in Erie Township, Neosho County, Kansas. This owned 4000 acres of land. James Alfred was born in 1872, so we are assuming he was born in Neosho County, Kansas. Josephine Dolen Rooker, Alf's wife said her husband was born in Kansas.

Hiram and America were husband and wife by the time of the 1860 census and lived in Hamilton County Indiana with Hiram's parents. They had their first two children already--Joseline and Frank. In the 1850 Hamilton County Indiana census Hiram was 14 and lived with his parents and a brother. America was 12 and lived with her parents and siblings on the same block as the Rookers.

It is not known yet when Hiram and America moved to Kansas. However, we know from the family stories that James Alfred had some kind of quarrel with his family and left home. He went to Oklahoma where he met and married Josephine and had a family. The family insists that he would not attend a family reunion held in Kansas and that he never went home again.

Information from Mary Rooker Bacon, Carrie Rooker Wells and Melvin A. Wells:

James Alfred Rooker was always known as Alf Rooker. He had some kind of disagreement with his parents and left home, never to go back again, not even to attend family reunions. He refused even to accept his inheritance when they died. He was very good with animals. He worked on a ranch as a foreman for the owner of the ranch. There were many horses and lots of cattle on this ranch. Alf handled the cattle and horses. He went to sales and shows and state fairs The Rooker family lived on the farm in a house provided by the owner.
After World War I farms began to fail, and farmers could not get sufficient funds for their crops and cattle to live. The Rookers stayed with the farm as long as they could. For several years, Josie's mother, Sarah Fair had been urging them to move to Barnsdall. She thought Alf could get work there. At some point in the late 1920s (Mary Rooker Bacon remembers that she was a very little girl about four years old which would put the move at around 1927) they did move to Barnsdall, but Alf was not able to get work there. He worked some for a highway construction company. This work was seasonal, so he did not work all the time. He was the timekeeper for the company, keeping the books on when the men worked, what hours and how much they should be paid. He was the only one of men who could read well, write and do figures.
In about 1932 he had not worked regularly. A State Senator from the area had an office in Barnsdall and happened to be a friend of Alf's. This man called the construction company and asked them to re-employ Alf and they did. He traveled to the place where the construction was taking place. In about September 1932, he was on the back of a truck at the work site, lost his balance and fell off onto a piece of steel, running the steel up into his body and injuring several organs. He was very ill, but the company did not treat him or send him home. Finally, the other workmen convinced the boss that he was so injured that he should be taken home. He got home on a Saturday about noon and died on the next Friday. Dr. Sullivan of Barnsdall treated him, but he was unable to do anything. Mary and Dude slept in the back room, and Mary remembers being so afraid there alone without Daddy, who usually slept in their room when he was home. They were not allowed to go into the front room where Daddy was in bed. When Alf heard that the girls wanted to see their daddy, he said, "Bring my little girls in here." They went and loved him and were told to leave again. He died shortly afterward. Carrie remembers that at the end, he looked up and saw some relatives and greeted them. They had been dead several years. Mary remembers that her mother cried very loudly at the death of their papa. "Mama could sob so loudly."
He died in October 1932. He was taken back to Locust Grove to be buried in the Logan Cemetery. The funeral home from Barnsdall took his body back to Locust Grove. They did not want to make the long trip on a weekday because this would mean they would lose business during the week. So the funeral and burial were held during Sunday School in Locust Grove, and the hearse and other vehicles could be taken back to Barnsdall on Sunday afternoon. This is the memory of Mary Bacon.
Alf did not go to church, but he sat on the rooking chair at his house across the alley from the First Baptist Church and listened to the hymns and old Brother Allee, who had a very loud voice. Mary Rooker Bacon remembers that he read to the children a lot. She said he read to all but her because she could never sit still long enough. She also remembers her ninth birthday when her papa was home. He gave older sister Carrie one dollar with specific instructions on what to get for Mary's birthday cake. Carrie bought 25 cents worth of flour, some sugar, eggs and lard and made Mary a birthday cake. Alf went away to work on the highway soon after that.
Alf was just younger than Josephine's mother, Sarah Dolen. Sarah liked Alf very much and hoped that he would be interested in her (Sarah's husband William H. Dolen died in 1899), so she invited him to the house a lot. It happened that Alf became interested in Josephine, "Josie", and not in Sarah. Since Sarah wanted her girls to get an education, she was unhappy when Josie and Alf slipped off to marry. It is told in the family that Sarah never really liked Alf after that.

[NI065711] [james rooker.FTW]

Josephine Dolen Rooker:

Josephine Dolen, along with her mother Sarah Bean Dolen and her sisters May and Carrie, is entered in the Cherokee census book made whne Indian Territory was opened white settlers. A census was made of all Indians because each one was to receive a headright, land of 144(?) acres, to keep as his own after the white settlers were given access to the land. The census does not say where they lived.
Also I do not know where Josephine was born or when she married Alf Rooker. If she were born in 1890, as her sons-in-law insist, and her eldest child Vera was born in 1907, she had to be about sixteen or younger when she married. Alf was more the age of her father than her husband. She would have been not yet 23 when Carrie was born, yet Carrie was her fourth child. She was widowed at 42 and never married again.
From stories about her, I have learned that she was a hard worker, and a devoted Christian who became a Baptist when the family moved to Barnsdall from the farm near Salina. She was certainly always a good cook. She earned her living as a cook in small cafes and restaurants in Oklahoma and California. I can remember the good meals we ate with her. Another thing I remember about "Grandma Rooker" is her sweet smile. She had a gentle disposition and gave us big hugs and pats on the back when she saw us. She was always making something pretty with her hands, some piece of sewing or a painted towel or pillow case.
She lived in Tulsa, Oklahoma during World War II but moved to Fullerton, California very soon after the war. Mary, her youngest child, moved to California with her, and they lived together in rooms over the drug store where Josephine was a cook and Mary was a waitress. Mary soon married Fred Bacon. Josephine continued living in Fullerton in a house that Fred bought across the street from Fullerton High School and Junior College.
After Mary and Fred moved to Yorba Linda, she still lived alone in Fullerton until it was neccessary for her to have more care. She moved to a rest home in Fullerton and later to one in Riverside when Carrie moved there. Mary and Fred also moved to Riverside to be near her. At that time Waneta (Dude) lived in Hesperia, also near Riverside. She died in Riverside and was buried in Rose Hills Memorial Park in Whittier.

[NI065718] [james rooker.FTW]

From JoAnn Wells Hopper:

George Rooker was my uncle, two years younger than my mother, Carrie Rooker Wells. George served in the U.S. Army in Europe during World War II. He was wounded in his first battles and recuperated in a hospital in Europe. Then he was sent to Gen. George Patton's Third Army as a replacement and fought with that Army across Europe. He entered Czechoslovakia with Patton and with those troops was ready to enter Prague when Patton was forced to leave Czechoslovakia as per the agreement with Stalin that the Russians would be allowed to conquer Czechoslovakia. The Third Army pulled back to Austria. Uncle George spent the first months of the Occupation in Steyr, a beautiful and historic town in Upper Austria Province, Austria. He told me stories of the place, and since we lived in Vienna, Austria at the time, I went to visit Steyr and told Uncle George how it looks today.

George was a wonderful musician and story teller. He could make people sit spellbound with his stories. He had a great talent. Sometimes the stories kept you waiting on pins and needles for the ending, and when the last line came, it was all a joke. We usually fell out of our chairs laughing.

He could sing and play the guitar. There was a lot of music in the Rooker family. George could also pick up languages easily. Even in later life, he still remembered the German he picked up in Austria. He also had some knowledge of the Cherokee language because of his association with Cherokees in Oklahoma. Of course, "Grandma Fair" (Sarah Bean Dolen Fair, who was Josephine Dolen Rooker's mother and the Rooker children's grandmother) was Cherokee.

Uncle George had many illnesses in his later years and was sometimes in the Indian Hospital in Claremore, where my mother was also treated many times. He died on March 12, 1989 in the Claremore Hospital and is buried in the Barnsdall Cemetery.

[NI065720] [james rooker.FTW]

From JoAnn Wells Hopper:

Waneta or Dudie, sometimes Dude, as she was known to the family, was dark-haired, with sun-darkened skin, deep brown eyes. She was very pretty and might have been an Indian princess. I remember her as one who questioned the norms that most people accepted as true without thinking about the reasons. But Aunt Dudie questioned all those things and asked "Why?" and wanted to know the reasons. I think she was really very intelligent and widely read.

She and Uncle Alan Wilson with their daughters moved to California in the 1940s. The third daughter, Candy, was born in California. They lived in Palmdale and loved the desert. We visited them often after our family moved to California in 1953.

At the end of their lives, Alan and Dudie lived in Hesperia, California. They both died there.

[NI065722] [james rooker.FTW]

From JoAnn Wells Hopper:

Most of the information I have on Uncle Hogan comes from my mother, Carrie Rooker Wells, Hogan's elder sister. She and Aunt Mary remember that he was the first of the children to attend church regularly when the family lived in Barnsdall. Hogan and George and mother (Carrie) attended the Baptist Church in Barnsdall which was just across an alley from their house. Their father sat outside in his rocker and listened to the music and to the very loud preacher, Brother Allee. Their mother went to church with them. Dudie (Waneta--two years younger than Hogan) went to the Methodist Church with a friend, and Mary, the youngest, went with Dudie at first. Because she liked a particular friend who was Baptist, Mary later began going to the Baptist Church.

Hogan could sing very well and was often asked to sing for weddings because of his beautiful tenor voice. He and Aunt Winnie lived in Hominy, and we visited them sometimes while we lived in Tulsa. I remember playing with their son, James Hogan, whom we called "Jitter" as his mother and father did. I have no idea why he was called by that nickname.
Hogan was a butcher in a grocery store in Hominy, and when he moved to Tulsa, he was a butcher in a meat market there.

He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II in the Pacific Theatre.

He visited his mother, Josephine Rooker, in California while she was in a rest home and then attended her funeral in California in November of 1980. He died shortly after in May of 1981. I remember the huge shock this caused my mother who was very upset by his early and untimely death.

[NI069499] [george Naugle.FTW]

died in a truck, train accident

[NI069543] [george Naugle.FTW]

died in a farm accident

[NI069552] [george Naugle.FTW]

Died as infant

[NI069553] [george Naugle.FTW]

Died as infant lived 9 days.

[NI069558] [george Naugle.FTW]

served in Army during WW I

[NI069588] [george Naugle.FTW]

Never married Servered in military during WW II

[NI069589] [george Naugle.FTW]

served in the Army during WWII

[NI069634] [george Naugle.FTW]

William and Nellie moved from Indiana by covered wagon to Lawndale, Illinois. They moved to Mt. Pulaski,Illinois and later to a farm near Chestnut,Illinois. 13 of 14 children were born in these areas. William died at the farm in 1917.

[NI069635] [george Naugle.FTW]

Nevered married

[NI069636] [george Naugle.FTW]

Listed on Jackson Twp census but not on George's war pension.

[NI069655] [george Naugle.FTW]

After William died, Nellie with 2 children,Lester and Nell moved to Minnesota for a short time. They then moved back to Chestnut,Illinois. Nellie maintained her own home for many years. She died at her daughters home in Waynesville,Illinois in 1944.

[NI069658] [george Naugle.FTW]

never married

[NI069785] [george Naugle.FTW]

Died in a home fire with his sister Beverly.

[NI069786] [george Naugle.FTW]

Died in a house fire with her brother Delbert.

[NI069787] [george Naugle.FTW]

died during an appendectomy operation

[NI070162]

Sarah Daniels was killed in a motorcycle accident.

[NI070293]

[NI070617]

James Louis Gilstrap was married three times. After Anna Baldwin died
he married Sarah McCrary. She died when pregnant with their first
child when a horse she was riding fell with her. Occurred in
Grandbury, Texas about 1880. He was a member of the Baptist Church and
was a farmer and carpenter. Since leaving the service he has resided
at Paris, Kansas and there abouts for 20 years and about 17 years at
Granbury, Texas. DECLARATION FOR PENSION: State of Oklahoma, County of
Muskogee On this 25th day of June, 1927, before me, the undersigned,
personally appeared for pension under the provisions of the act of
Congress approved May 1, 1920: That he is 80 years of age, that he
was born November 20, 1847 in the State of Illinois. That he is the
identical James L. Gilstrap who enlisted 1864 at Paris, Kansas, under
the name of Jim Gilstrap, in Company 'F' 6th Kansas Volunteers.
Discharged, 1865, at Mound City, Kansas, having served the United
States in the Civil War.

[NI070746]

Anna died in child birth with their third child.

[NI071251]

[NI071252]

[NI071275]

Chautauqua County, Kansas Census 1900 Name
Sex Age Born Where William W. Gilstrap
Male 33 3 /1867 Kansas Myrtle Gilstrap
Female 28 10 /1871 Missouri Fenton Gilstrap
Male 7 7 /1892 Kansas Katy Gilstrap
Female 5 3 /1895 Kansas Ruth Gilstrap
Female 2 7 /1897 Kansas Grace Gilstrap
Female 1 6 /1898 Kansas
**********************************************************************
* Husband: William Washington Gilstrap Wife: Lillie Jane
Feeback Marriage Notes The Wichita Eagle, Thursday Morning, March 5, 1925, Page 4 GILSTRAP - Funeral services for Mrs. Janie Gilstrap [Feeback], 35, will be held in Cunningham, Kansas today at 3PM, Maude Cemetery. William Washington Gilstrap died twenty six years later and is buried beside Lillie Jane Feeback in Maude Cemetery, Cunningham, Kansas.

[NI071277]

Jess was born at home in Cunningham, Kansas, June 26, 1917. He was the
oldest of six children and had a half sister and brother. The family
lived in Cunningham till around the time he was seven years old. After
his mother died from a fire in 1925, he and his brother, Jack, went
with his Dad to Chautauqua, Kansas. At nine years old he was driving a
four horse team pulling a four section harrow in the wheat fields.
Upon their return to the Cunningham area, he went to Lincoln School,
Tulley School and the Artisan Valley School. In 1932 he, Jack, Bill,
Lee and their Dad went to Branson, CO in two covered wagons. It was a
14 day trip with Jack and Jess taking turns driving the wagons with
their Dad. In Colorado times were hard. Jess and Jack bought the
families first firearm. It was a 22 single shot. They sometimes
provided the only meat on the table which was mostly rabbits. They
also trapped gofers, as there was a 10 cent bounty paid by the
government at that time. Jess went through High School in Branson.
During one summer he went to California to participate in the gold
rush. Upon his return trip home he was arrested and held for
suspicion of murder, but was released. He seemed to fit the
description of the hunted culprit. During his high school years he
worked for and purchased a class ring in his senior year. It was
something he did not need but so desired. He later lost it in the
barnyard of Dorothy's parents. It was discovered many years later by
Jack and returned. But luck would have it, that the day he stopped by
in Wichita to give the ring back to Jess, was the very day Jess passed
away in Wesley Hospital from his dreaded disease, sugar diabetes. He
was diagnosed with the disease when he was 17 and was to young to
realize it's seriousness. He was eventually blinded by cataracts and
after several operations was able to see through very thick glasses.
He suffered from insulin reactions in his later years. He married Fern
C. Grove on his 31st birthday and they were married for 13 years. Her
loving care saw him through his last rough years. He adopted his
step-daughter, Marilyn, in 1957. He owned and operated a lumber yard,
contracted to build and roof houses and later drove a truck for
Sedgwick County. Jess is now buried in Maude Cemetery in Cunningham,
where next to him are two of his grandchildren, of whom he never got
to know. Not far away are his Mom and Dad and various other family
members. He is now with his Lord and in the home ground he loved so
much. Written with love, by his daughter, Marilyn September, 1996

The Wichita Eagle, Tuesday Morning, April 17, 1962, Page 7B GILSTRAP-
Jess Malhon, age 44, of 359 N. Tracy, passed away Saturday, April 14,
1962, in a local hospital. Funeral services will be held at 10:00 AM
Wednesday, April 18, 1962, in the Rock Garden Chapel of the Culbertson
Mortuary. Grave side services will be held at 2:00 PM in the Maude
Cemetery at Cunningham, Kansas.

[NI071687] Shirley was a very fine poet. The great William Allen White declared her to be Kansas finest poet while she was still in her teens. Her masters degree thesis was a collection of her poetry. Margie Stanley 1996

[NI072996] [alexander henry.FTW]

Buried in a military cemetary.
Worked as a logger in the Red Woods of Californ ia.

[NI081396] [amos ash.FTW]

1920 US Census, Lamar, Prowers County, Colorado, Roll 169 Book 2, Page 202

[NI081397] [amos ash.FTW]

On 1900 US Census, Goldsberry Township, Howell, MO
On 1910 US Census, Haskell Township, Haskell, KS, Roll 440, Book 2, Page 171
On 1920 US Census, Lamar, Prowers County, Colorado, Roll 169, Book, 2, Page 221

[NI081399] [amos ash.FTW]

On 1900 US Census, Medicine Lodge, Barber County, Kansas
On 1910 US Census, Medicine Lodge, Barber County, Kansas, Roll 432, Book 1, Page 148

[NI094101] Miss Ikamire Funeral Held This Afternoon Well Known Greencastle Woman Passed Away at Home Saturday Evening Ill only Two Days Came to Greencastle from Putnamville; Was a Member of Presbyterian Church

Miss Lucinda Elma Ikamire, born near Putnamville October 2, 1864, died Saturday evening [13 Jan 1940] at the family home on south College avenue in this city, from a diabetic trouble which had confined her to her bed only
two days. She came to Greencastle with her sisters to reside in 1915 but had many friends here before that time, being known, even then as an expert needlewoman.

Miss Ikamire was the daughter of Riley and Mary Bickel Ikamire who moved to the vicinity of Putnamville in 1861, from Millersburg, Ohio. They became known in the neighborhood in which they lived as an exceedingly sturdy,
dependable family. They were members of the Putnamville Presbyterian church and those who moved to Greencastle transferred their membership to the Presbyterian church of this city. Miss "Lucy," which was the more commonly known name of Miss Lucinda, became a member of that Putnamville church in
1879 and united with the church here 42 years ago.

Miss Ikamire attended the Coates college for young women at Terre Haute two years and the Danville Normal one year, with the intention of teaching, but she did not complete her preparatory work for that profession.

Surviving her are two sisters living in Greencastle, Miss Anna Allen Ikamire and Mrs. Catherine Duree. There are several surviving nieces and a nephew.

Service for Miss Ikamire were held at the residence at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon, conducted by the Rev. V. L. Raphael, pastor of the Presbyterian church, and the interment was in the cemetery at Amo where the family
purchased a burial lot at the time of the death of another sister, Mrs. Emma Neese, in 1893, who home was in Amo.


Pall bearers were C. C. Gautier, Harry Lueteke, Dr. W. D. Edington, Henry Werneke, L. R. Chapin, and G. E. Black.

[NI095768] From "Early Times in Clinton County" (KY), Vol. 1, by Jack Ferguson
"Another Revolutionary War veteran who came to this county around 1812 or 1813 was Joseph Wright. He was born January 13, 1754 in Frederick County, Maryland. He moved to Randolph county, Virginia where he volunteered as a militia private in December, 1780. In 1796 he moved to Tennessee where he lived until moving to Clinton county. Two of his sons, John and Philbert Wright, had moved to this county several years earlier. He settled in a remote part of the county, next to the Tennessee state line, adjoining Fentress county. He died in this county in January, 1845."
-----------------
Footnote for Wright Family Chart "Early Times of Clinton County" VII, Jack Ferguson page 275.
According to Mrs. E.G. Tyler, 221 East 1st St., Austin, Texas 78702. Joseph Wright was born in Frederick Co., North Carolina (This is most likely Maryland not NC). He enter Revolutionary War Service, serving from December 1780 to 1781, in the North Carolina Light Horse and Minutemen. At that time he lived in Randolph Co (NC) but enlisted in neighboring Chatham Co. He served a second tour of duty ending in early March 1782. He was a wheelwright. He moved to Blount Co., TN about 1812, he moved his family to then Cumberland Co. (now Clinton Co., KY) settling in the Ill Will community, close to the Fentress County line. In his application for a pension, filed with the County Court January 2, 1843, he included an affidavit by his nephew, John Wright, who stated that "his father John Wright in the Randolph Co., North Carolina, on Hickory, and lived a part of the time on the farm of the father of Joseph Wright". This indicates that Joseph Wright had a brother named John, and this John had a son, also named John.
----------------
Joseph Wright applied for his veteran's pension not long before his death, on 17 Sept. 1832. He stated he entered service in Chatham Co., NC in Dec 1780 under Capt. James Robinson and Col. Lettrelle (NC Light Horse and Minutemen). He was a resident of Randolph County when he entered service. Having served the 3 months of his agreement, Joseph received a written discharge in Guilford Co. in the spring of 1781. He served another term of less than 3 months under Capt. Hill and Col. Colyer that ended in March 1782. Joseph's son Isaac Wright, as administrator of his father's estate, refiled this claim and stated that Joseph died January 1843 in Clinton Co., KY. The surviving children were Isaac and Abner Wright and Betsy Waller. Isaac enclosed an affidavit by John Wright written 2 Jan 1843, stating that Joseph Wright had brothers named James Wright, Joshua Wright, and John Wright who also served in the war.

[NF00071] State of North Carolina Randolph County

To any Minister of the Gospel Regularly Calld to any Congregation Or to any Justice of the peace within this State. You or any of you are hereby authorized and Impowered to Solemnize the rights of matrimony between Richard WRIGHT [and] Nany MORGAN agreeable to act of General Assembly in that Case made and provide, Witness, Absalom TATOM Clerk of said Court this 15th day of Novemr. Anno domini 1780 - A. TATOM CC

[NF00133] From J. P. Dick

Morgan Wright and Jane Allen were first cousins thru the Morgans. Because of this they could not legally marry in I ndiana, so crossed into Kentucky, with a party of friends for the wedding.

[NF02252] [nathan hibbs.FTW]

They were married at the home of Reverand Slaton near Madisonville KY. Witnesses were Eva Wright and Mrs. Slaton.

[NF02320] 1850 - - - - - - Macon County, Missouri Census

Philip Gilstrap 43 Male Real Estate $300. Born: KY
Elizabeth Gilstrap 43 Female KY
Patience Gilstrap 21 Female KY
James Gilstrap 19 Male KY
Thomas Gilstrap 17 Male Missouri
Bright Gilstrap 15 Male Missouri
Allen Gilstrap 11 Male Missouri
Sherold E.W. Gilstrap 9 Male Missouri
Elizabeth Gilstrap 7 Female Missouri
D G W Gilstrap 5 Male Missouri
Drusilla M Gilstrap 11/12 Female Missouri

[NF02321] Macon, Missouri, July 1, 1925
WILL OF BRIGHT H. GILSTRAP

In the name of God Amen:
I, Bright H. Gilstrap of the town of Callao, Macon County, Missouri, being now in good health of body and mind, but sensible to the uncertainties of life and desiring to make disposition of my property and affairs, while in health and strength, do Hereby make, publish and declare the following to be my last will and testament, hereby revoking and cancelling all other or former wills by me at any time made:

ITEM ONE: I will and direct that all my just debts be paid including funeral expenses.

ITEM TWO: I will, devise and bequeath that all of my property and estate be disposed of among my children as follows: I have heretofore given to each of my sons, James D. Gilstrap, John A. Gilstrap, Charles O. Gilstrap and Damon H. Gilstrap, land and real estate amounting in value to One Thousand ($1000.00) Dollars to each as advancements and as their share in my estate. I have heretofore given to my daughter, Laura Sisson, the sum of Five Hundred ($500.00) Dollars in personal property as advancement and as her share in my estate for which she gave me a receipt. I have heretofore given to my daughter, Lizzie Schenck, now deceased, the sum of Five Hundred ($500.00) Dollars in personal property for her share of my estate for which she gave receipt, and I further devise and bequeath that no part of my estate more than Five Hundred ($500.00) Dollars shall go to her estate or to any heir or descendant of her, said Five Hundred ($500.00) Dollars I devise to be her full share in my estate. I give, devise and bequeath to Abbie Thomas and Gracie Miller my granddaughters, and daughters of Ambrosia Schenck, deceased, my daughter, the sum of One Hundred ($100.00) Dollars to each as their full share of my estate. I give and devise to Charles O. Gilstrap and to Damon H. Gilstrap each the sum of two Hundred ($200.00) Dollars - - - unreadable - - - in this trust the sum of Fifteen Hundred ($1500.00) Dollars for the use and benefit of my daughters, Amelia Gilstrap and Wiletta Wright and I direct that said trustee shall purchase and have deeded to them a house and lot or lots for such part of said Fifteen Hundred ($1500.00) Dollars as in his judgement may be best and that he shall pay the remainder of said Fifteen Hundred ($1500.00) Dollars to them and take their receipt all to be their absolute property.

I devise and bequeath full power to my executor to sell all real estate of which I may die seized either at public or private sale and authorize him to make full deed and title thereto and to distribute the proceeds of my estate as set out in this will. After the payment of the bequests above named, I devise and bequeath that all the remainder of my estate of any form shall be paid and distributed in equal amounts to my sons and daughters now living and that no heir or descendant of mine shall have any part or interest in any estate except as set out in this will.

ITEM THREE: I appoint my son, Damon H. Gilstrap, as Executor of this will and request that he act as such without giving any bond.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF I, Bright H. Gilstrap, have to this, my last will and testament, consisting of two sheets of paper, subscribed my name this First day of July, 1925.

Obituary
Martha Elizabeth Gilstrap was born February 15, 1838, and died May 18, 1917, aged 79 yrs. 3 mos. and 3 days.

She was married to Bright Harrison Gilstrap January 28, 1858 and to them ten children were born, six girls and four boys, all of whom survive her except Ambrosia Schenck who died March 9, 1889.

She joined the Christian Church in 1856 and when Concord Church was built she placed her membership there and lived a devoted Christian life until the end came at Callao, Missouri.

She leaves a husband, nine children, twelve grand children, eight great-grandchildren and three brothers and three sisters, a number of relatives and friends to mourn her departure.

Funeral services were conducted at Concord Church Sunday, May 20, by Eld. J. W. Davis of Kirksville, in the midst of a very large and sympathizing audience. He preached a very instructive and comforting discourse.

Obituary
Bright H. Gilstrap died at his home in Callao Sunday morning, Feb. 20th, after a ten day illness. He was born August 16th 1835 and was married to Miss Martha E. Wright on Jan 28th, 1858. To this union ten children were born namely, Mrs. Laura Sisson, James D. of Macon, Mrs. Willetta Wright, Miss Armelin, John A., Charles, Miss Leona and Damon and two daughters deceased. His wife died on May 18th 1917.

His brother Allen died on January 18th, 1927. Uncle Bright, as he was usually called, was the last of a family of ten. Funeral services will be held at the home at 11 o'clock Monday by the Rev George Manifold of Canton and burial will be at Concord.

[NF02375] During the Civil war bushwhackers, which were Quantrells Raiders came and took Peters food and went out in the fields where Peter and his ten year old daughter, Ida were working. They took Peter and his best horse, traveled that day and into the night talking of how they would kill him. Quantrell accused them of being northern sympathizers. While they slept the guard dozed off and he slipped away without his horse through the hills. When he got home his shoes were worn off and his feet bleeding.

Just before this happened their neighbor was called out of his house and shot down. Peter and Mary packed up and moved into Douglas County, Kansas. Mary wanted to take her Old Seth Thomas clock but Peter didn't. He threatened to blast it with his shhotgun but Mary hid it in her feather bed. The clock is still in the family. They saw the town of Lawrence, Kansas burned down. After the war some of the family went back to their land in Newton County, Missouri.

[NF02376] James and Nancy were married by John Potts, Justice of the Peace, in Jasper County.

[NF02542] Services for Lloyd D. Gilstrap 94, Macon, were Wednesday, May 12, 1993, graveside at the West Oakwood Cemetery in Bevier. The Rev. Gary Daud officiated.

Mr. Gilstrap died May 10, 1993 at the Loch Haven Nursing Home in Macon. He was born on October 21, 1898 in Macon to William and Josephine Phipps Gilstrap. On May 19, 1921, he married Helen Jones in Macon. Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Lloyd [Helen] Jones Gilstrap of Macon; a daughter, Mrs. Dick [June] Curtis of St. Louis; five grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents; one son, Harold; and four brothers and sisters.

Mr. Gilstrap was a truck driver for Patch Brothers Trucking in Glenn Ellya, IL before retiring and moving back to Macon in 1960. The Carney Funeral Chapel was in charge of the arrangements.

[NF02554] Belva Berniece Gilstrap, age 80, of Farmington, IL, died at 3:40 p.m. on Thursday, June 24, 1993, at her home in Farmington. Services were to be held today at 1:30 p.m. at the Anderson Funeral Home in Farmington, IL, with Rev. Raymond H. Carter officiating. Burial was to be in Oak Ridge Cemetery in Farmington. Mrs. Gilstrap was born on Aug. 21, 1912 in Bevier, the daughter of Roy and Pearl Cornelison Vawter. She married Raymond Gilstrap in Macon County.

Survivors include four sons, B. David and Robert D., both of Farmington, IL, William D. of Bevier, and Bennett of Jefferson City, two daughters, Bonnie J. Danner of Trivoli, IL, and Betty J. Perrine of Farmington, IL; one brother, Harry L. Vawter of farmington, IL; twenty grandchildren; and 24 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband on June 23, 1990; one son, Barry Gilstrap; and one grandson.

[NF06245] Kentucky Land Grants - Grants South of Green River 1797 - 1866
Grantee Acres Survey Date County
Water Course Bright Gilstrap 200 7-26-1799
Pulaski Grassey Valley Philip Gilstrap 100
7-25-1807 Wayne Otter Creek Kentucky Land Grants Wayne
County 1816 - 1873 Page 566 Acres Survey Date Water
Course Lewis Gilstrap 50 12-15-1822 Beaver Creek Bright
Gilstrap 50 3-20-1822 Beaver Creek Bright Gilstrap 50
1-17-1825 Beaver Creek Lewis Gilstrap 50 1-12-1829 Otter
Creek Philip Gilstrap 50 2-8-1831 Otter Creek Philip
Gilstrap 50 5-9-1831 Otter Creek Records Of Deeds:
1800 Record Books; Wayne County, Kentucky Page Volume Amount Acres
Date Bright Gilstrap 538 D $ 50.00 25 1826
Bright Gilstrap 445 D $150.00 200 1828 Bright
Gilstrap 95 F $200.00 200 1831 The act of Randolph and
Macon Counties govering this group of grants opened for sale at $20.00
per 100 acres, all the vacant lands to anyone in Kentucky, except an
alien. Marriages and Vital Records - Wayne County, Kentucky Lewis
Gilstrap and Rhoda Dabney, Surety Henry Dabney, were married March 5,
1820 by J. Jones. Elizabeth Gilstrap and Russell Shoemaker, Surety
Lewis Gilstrap were married on May 16, 1824 by Henry Trggle. Polly
Gilstrap and Daniel Barrow, Surity Bright Gilstrap, were married
January 2, 1823 by William Summers - witnessed by David Barrow. David
Gilstrap and Hannah Reid [Reed], Surity Bright Gilstrap, were married
March 1, 1813. Will of Bright Gilstrap The State of Missouri,
Randolph County December 23, 1835 Myself being determined to make this
my last will and testament after giving my body to the grave and my
spirit to God who gave it viz; Whereas I give to my wife Selah my
Negro woman named Salsa during her lifetime then the said Negro woman
to be sold and the money equally divided between my heirs share and
share alike. I also give and bequeath unto my wife Gilstrap the
benefit of the east H of the South west qr. Sec No. one Range 15
Township 54 and forty acres of the Eighty acres lying north of the
aforesaid eighty acres or so much as lies south of the branch leading
through the cleared land by or near the spring also my grist mill all
to the benefit of my wife during her lifetime then at her death to be
sold and the money to be divided among the heirs share and share
alike. I give and bequeath unto my wife Selah all my household and
kitchen furniture also my clock with all the beds and bed clothing all
that is included for her use and benefit in said house household and
kitchen then the balance of the estate to be administered upon
according to law as other estates there are no will made this my last
will and testament whereunto I have set my hand and affixed my seal
the day and date above written. My will is that there shall not be any
alteration nor change made so as to distress for such a note I Bright
Gilstrap hold on Phillip Gilstrap for $90 until such a time as he can
get his money from Kentucky. Be it known that I Bright Gilstrap hereby
appoint and constitute Lewis Gilstrap & Selah my lawful Administrators
of my estate. Bright Gilstrap [Seal] Attested Joseph Turner Moses
Summers Randolph County, Missouri Court - 15 June 1836 [pages 128-129]
Selah Gilstrap, exrx. and Lewis Gilstrap, exr., produced will of
Bright Gilstrap, deceased. Will dated 23 December 1835. To wife,
Selah, all property, including a grist mill....to be equally divided
among the heirs at her death. [names not given] Exrs, Lewis Gilstrap
and Selah Gilstrap. Wit: Joseph Turner and Moses Summers. Recorded 29
June 1836.

[NF06325]

Lewis Gilstrap, a few years before his death, buried the families
valuables somewhere on his farm. He did this with his oldest son,
Bright Gilstrap, who was the only one who knew the location. As Lewis
was dying he kept asking for Bright, saying he needed to talk to him
as he had to tell him something. Bright was away at the time and did
not return until after Lewis had died. Bright went to the location
where the families valuables had been buried, but nothing was there.
Lewis, it is believed, had moved the valuables and would not tell
anyone but Bright where he had moved them. It is not known why the
valuables were buried, or what the valuables were.

[NF07482] Lloyd Gross Gilstrap, 90, West Grove, died July 21, 1993, at the Long Term Care Unit at Davis County Hospital. He was born 9-14-1902, in Macon County, Missouri to Albert Ervin and Belle Gross Gilstrap. He married Helen Gail Bain on July 21, 1923, in Moberly, Missouri. She died March 30, 1989.

He worked at Burlington Transportation Co. in Ottumwa from 1934 to 1954, and later moved to a farm in the West Grove area, retiring in 1980. He was affilated with the West Grove United Methodist Church.

He is survived by a daughter, Jane Denny of Bloomfield; two granddaughters and three great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, his wife and a brother, Carl.

Funeral services were held July 24, 1993 at the Wagler Funeral Home with the Revs. Jon and Leila Disburg officiating. Burial was in the West Grove Cemetery. Memorials may be made to the West Grove United Methodist Church.

[NF07484] Uncle James C. Gilstrap, after a short illness, died at his home south of Callao, September 28, aged 79 years. He was born in Wayne County, Ky. and moved with his parents to Missouri at an early age.

He had been a faithful member of the Christian Church for the past 50 years. He leaves two children, Mrs. Mary Perrin and B. F. Gilstrap, both living south of town, several grandchildren, one sister, three brothers, and a number of relatives and friends. The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. J.W. Ramsey at Concord and the remains were laid to rest in the Concord Cemetery. A large crowd was present to do honor to the memory of this grand old man.

[NF07488] The Republican - Concord News
30 October 1896

Death entered the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Gilstrap last Wednesday, 21 October 1896 and took away the spirt of little Earl who was three years old. The struggle for life lasted only a few hours, the united efforts of some of the best medical skill being in vain. On Thursday, the family, relatives and friends followed the little white casket to Concord church where the funeral services were conducted by Rev. Mayhew. Only those who have these little rosebuds in their homes can fully sympathize with Mr. and Mrs. Gilstrap in the loss of their baby and only child.


Obituary
Macon Chronicle Herald
Wednesday August 1, 1945

Funeral services for John A. Gilstrap will be held from Perry and Edwards funeral home tomorrow afternoon at 1:30 August 2, 1945 conducted by Rev. J. Presley Pound of Macon.

He was born in Callao, Missouri April 17, 1871 and died at his home in Callao yesterday afternoon July 31, 1945 at 3 PM at the age of 74 years 3 months and 14 days.

Those who survive are his wife, one son Russell, who lives in Kansas City, Missouri, one sister Mrs. Leona MsGregor of San Antonio, Texas, one brother, Damon of Callao, Missouri and three Grandchildren.


Obituary

Macon Chronicle Herald
Wednesday June 15, 1955

Mrs. Lillie Gilstrap, 84,died today at her home in Callao, Missouri after being in ill health for some eight months.

Funeral services will be held at 2 PM Friday at the Christian Church at Callao, Missouri with burial in the Locust Grove Cemetery. Mrs. Gilstrap was born in Macon County 27 February 1871. She was a member of the Concord Christian church south of Callao. She was married to John Gilstrap who preceded her to death ten years ago.

Survivors are: One son Russell of Hamilton; three grandchildren, one brother, Ezra Jones of Callao and one sister, Mrs. Della Williams of Aurora, IL.

The body was taken to the Edwards Funeral Home at Bevier and will be taken tomorrow to the Perry and Edwards Funeral home at Callao to be in state until the funeral hour.

[NF07490] Mrs. Susan A. Summers, wife of T. J. Summers, departed this life at her home in Callao, Friday, 1-16-1925 at the age of 78 years, 11 months and 25 days. She has been an invalid for the past eighteen years, only being able to walk a very short distance. For the past three years she has been entirely confined to her home. Mrs. Summers was born in Randolph County, Missouri 1-21-1846, and was married to T. J. Summers in Macon, Mo., 10-26-1868. To this union five children were born, two sons, Oscar and Emmett B. and three daughters, Mrs. A. C. Wright, Mrs. Stella Johnston and Miss Mae. Two of the children preceded their mother to their last resting place, Mrs. Stella Johnson died 10-9-1917 and Oscar Summers, died 5-14-1920.

Mr. and Mrs. Summers moved to a farm three miles south of Callao shortly after their marriage and lived in that community for about 41 years, then moving to Callao, where they have been for about 16 years. She leaves to mourn her departure her husband, one son, Emmet B. Summers, two daughters, Mrs. A. C. Wright, and Miss Mae Summers, two brothers, B. H. Gilstrap, Callao and A. W. Gilstrap of Macon County, Missouri and three grandchildren, besides many other relatives and friends. The funeral services were held at the residence, Sunday afternoon, January 18, 1925.

[NF07491] Mrs. Laura Sisson Passes Away

Mrs. Laura Wayne Gilstrap Sisson, 85, widow of Hiram Sisson, died Sunday at 6:20 May 13, 1945 at the home of her son Mark Sisson south of Callao. She was born August 12, 1859 south of Callao annd lived in that community most of her life. They moved to Callao in 1917 where Mr. Sisson died September 1, 1925. Since 1941 she had lived with her son and daughter-in-law. Survived also are four grandsons, Glen of the home, Harry of the army, stationed in New Mexico, George of the Army in Germany and Layton of Callao, one granddaughter Nadine Sisson of Callao, two brothers, John Gilstrap and D. H. Gilstrap of Callao and one sister Mrs. Leona McGregor of San Antonio, Texas. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday in the Concord Church conducted by Rev. Kring Allen of Brookfield and burial will be in Concord cemetery under the direction of Gilleland Funeral service.

Monday May 14, 1945
Macon Chronicle Herald

[NF07493] Lived in Bevier and Callao communities. He farmed and at one time was president of the bank of Callao.

J. D. Gilstrap, who had spent practically his entire life in Callao, passed away Thursday evening at 8:45 o'clock at the home of his son, H. L. Gilstrap, 104 Sheridan Street. He was about 70 years old. Mr. Gilstrap was born in Callao, the son of Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Gilstrap, pioneer settlers of the community. He was one of 10 children. Mr. Gilstrap had lived in Callao practically all his life except the past five years. He and Mrs. Gilstrap moved to Macon where they resided three years. The last two years they have been in Jonesboro, Ark., with their daughter, Mrs. J. H. Mathis.

About two years ago Mr. Gilstrap sufered a stroke. He suffered a second stroke six months ago and a third three weeks ago. His son, H. L. Gilstrap, drove to Jonesboro for him last Saturday and they arrived in Macon Monday. He seemed improved Tuesday but has been steadily failing since then. Surviving are his wife, a son, H. L. Gilstrap of Macon, and one daughter, Mrs. J. H. Mathis. Five brothers and sisters also survive, four having preceded him in death.

The body will lie in state at the home for funerals until the funeral hour Saturday. Services will be held at the Christian Church in Callao Saturday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock, conducted by the Rev. Manifold. Burial will be made in the Callao Cemetery.

[NF07497] Charley C. Gilstrap departed this life May 19, 1929 at the age of 55 yrs. 6 mos. and 9 days after several years of ill health. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Gilstrap, was born on the old home place south of Callao. After his marriage he lived for about 15 years on a farm one mile east of Concord and on account of ill health was compelled to search for a change of climate. He moved to the west and northwest where he lived for several years but failed to regain much strength.

By his departure he leaves two daughters, Mrs. Bessie Snyder and Mary Elizabeth both of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Four sisters, Mrs. Laura Sisson, Mrs. Willetta Huffman, Miss Armelia Gilstrap, all of Callao and Mrs. Walter McGregor [Leona] of San Antonio, Texas and three brothers, J. D. Gilstrap of Macon, John A. and Damon H. Gilstrap of Callao, besides many other relatives and friends. He united with the Concord Christian Church in early life where he kept his membership until his death. The funeral services were held at the Callao Christian Church Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev. Alfred Munyon, and interment was made at the Locust Grove Cemetery.

[NF07499] Damon H. Gilstrap, 73 died yesterday at his home after a short illiness. Mr. Gilstrap was born near Callao on February 26, 1879 the son of B. H. and Martha Gilstrap and until October 1951, when he moved to Callao, he spent most of his life farming. On April 2, 1902 he was married to Josie Summers who survives him. The couple celebrated their golden wedding anniversary last April. They had no children. Mr. Gilstrap was a member of Callao Christian Church. Besides his wife, Mr. Gilstrap is survived by one sister Mrs. Leona McCregor of San Antonio, Texas and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held at 2 PM tomorrow at the Callao Christian Church, the Rev. Leo Spurling of Kirksville officiating. Burial will be in Locust Grove cemetery. His body is at the Perry and Edwards funeral home in Callao, Missouri and will remain there until the services.

Thursday December 4, 1952
Macon Chronicle Herald

[NF07509] Obituary
Macon Chronicle Herald
December 5, 1972

Russell B. Gilstrap, 75, of Chillicothe, Missouri died at Livingston Manor Nursing home there at 11:55 AM yesterday, 4 December 1972. Funeral services will be held at the Lindley Funeral Home on Chillicothe Wednesday afternoon followed by graveside services at the Locust Grove cemetery in Callao.

Mr. Gilstrap was born south of Callao August 11, 1897, the son of John A. and Lillie Belle Jones Gilstrap. He was married to the former Miss Maudella Cook, who died in January 1962. They were the parents of two children, Russell Paul Gilstrap of Chillicothe and Mary Ellen Unger of Springfield, IL. He was retired after being in the hardware business in Callao with his brother, Ramey, in the early 1920s, after which he traveled for the DeLaval Separator Co. and has since dealt in Real Estate in Chillicothe.

Mr. Gilstrap was preceded in death by his parents, and two brothers, Earl and Ramey. Survivors are his two chhildren and six grandchildren, David, Brenda, Jon, and Bradley Gilstrap of Chillicothe, and Connie Sue and Timothy Unger of Springfield, IL, his daughter-in-law, Evelyn Gilstrap, and his son-in-law John Unger of Springfield, IL.

Mrs. Rowland Roberts of Callao is a niece and there are several cousins surving in the country.

[NF07510] Ramey Alan Gilstrap, son of Mr. and Mrs. John A. and Lillie Gilstrap, of Callao, Missouri departed this life at the age of 27 years, 7 months and 3 days. He was born 2-5-1901, and died 9-8-1928. He leaves to mourn his early departure, a faithful and loving wife and daughter, father and mother, one brother, Russell B, wife and one nephew, Russell Paul all of Callao, Missouri, besides many other close relatives and friends, one brother, Richard Earl, preceded him in death, at the age of 3 years, 1 month, and 13 days. He was married to Miss Margaret Louise Showen, of Macon County, Missouri, 2-5-1924 and to this union one child, Jayne Gayle was born, 1-29-1925.

For about four years, Ramey Gilstrap with his brother, Russell B. operated in Callao, The Gilstrap HDWE and Furniture Store, where they were very highly respected and gained the confidence of the whole community. For the past three years or longer he has held a position as traveling salesman with the De-Laval Separator County, where he was employed until his death. Ramey Alan Gilstrap was a highly respected, faithful and beloved brother of the Masonic order, having joined the Callao Lodge #38, A.F. and A.M., May 25, 1922, and was everfaithful in his duties to all man kind, and the fulfilling of his obligations, and the loss will be a source of great sorrow felt by all of the brothers of this order.

Ramey's tonsils had for some time been slightly effected and he had talked with the doctors in regards to their removal and it is reported that he was told that in doing so, he would be in better health, though his condition was not thought serious by any of his relatives or friends, neither was the operation given a serious thought in their minds. It is reported that on Saturday morning he made the statement that he was going over to Macon and have his tonsils removed, his wife and daughter accompanied him as far as her father's home, and wanted to continue with him, but he said it wasn't necessary, that the operation wouldn't amount to but very little.

M. L. Showen, Mrs. Gilstrap's father went with Ramey to the sanitorium in Macon, where he was unable to stand the operation as the medicine given failed to quiet his nerves or kill the pain, and after it was thought best by the doctors to remove him to Kirksville, Mr. Showen told Ramey he would make arrangements to go with him up there, but it was thought unnecessary, so he gave up going at that time, but said he would come up the next day and bring him back, to this Mr. Showen was advised to wait until Monday, when it was thought the patient would be in a condition to come home, and shortly after 9:00 o'clock Saturday evening, the telephone rang, and Mr. Showen expecting to receive a message reporting a successful operation and was shocked by the report that Mr. Gilstrap had passed away.

It was stated that Ramey was given a local anesthetic at Macon, but was taken to the ASO Hospital for completion of the operation and at 9:05 PM Saturday night had died. He was returned to his home in Callao, arriving about 5 o'clock Sunday morning. Ramey was reared in the Callao community,and with his pleasing disposition, gained respect and admiration of every one, he was ever frank and pleasing in all of his dealings, and a favorite throughout the community, and whether business or pleasure would put his whole heart in what ever he under took. Wednesday afternoon 9-12, funeral services were held at the Christian Church conducted by Rev. O.L. Angle of Macon County, Missouri and Mr. H.R. Mason of Brookfield, Missouri held the Masonic services. A goodly number of the A.F. and A.M. were present to pay their last tribute to their lost brother, and accompany him to his last resting place. Interment was made in the Locust Grove Cemetery.

[NF07575] Miss Mae Summers has received word of the death of her cousin Ernest S. Gilstrap, 81 of Sharpes Ferry Road, Ocala, Fla., on June 15, in the Munroe Memorial Hospital. He had been ill for several months.

Mr. Gilstrap was born July 19, 1881 in Macon. His parents were Irve and Nancy Banta Gilstrap. He was manager of the Callao Lumber Co. for several years and served as Postmaster here in 1920-1921. He was accountant until his retirement several years ago. He was a member of the First Christian Church in Winterhaven, Fla.

Survivors include his wife Ethel of the home; his daughter Lorine G. Lawler of Ocala, Fla; a stepdaughter Mrs. W.W. Russell, Orlano; a step-son, Robert Thomas, Maywood, N.J; a grandson, Joel Radford, Jacksonville; and three grandchildren and step-grandchildren.

Funneral services were held at 11 a.m. Monday June 17, at Heirs Funeral Home Chapel with burial in the Live Oak Cemetery.

[NF08972]

Linn County, Kansas State Census July 13, 1860 House
Name Sex Age Born 411 Bright
Gilstrap Male 39 KY Nancy Gilstrap
Female 41 KY Joseph Gilstrap Male 19 Missouri
Lewis Gilstrap Male 15 MO John Gilstrap
Male 13 MO William Gilstrap Male 6 MO
Susan Gilstrap Female 3 Kansas Sarah Gilstrap
Female 1 Kansas Linn County, Kansas Mortality Census
1860 Name Sex Age Born Died
Martha Gilstrap Female 16 MO April James
Gilstrap Male 10 MO April Richard
Gilstrap Male 8 MO April These are
children of Bright Gilstrap and Nancy Bradley. Jefferson County,
Kansas Census Kentucky Township 1870
Name Sex Age Born
Bright Gilstrap Male 49 KY Nancy Gilstrap
Female 51 KY William Gilstrap Male
17 MO George W Gilstrap Male 15 MO
Rhoda Gilstrap Female 13 Kansas Sarah Gilstrap
Female 11 Kansas Mary E Gilstrap Female
9 Kansas Bright Gilstrap Male 6 Kansas Jefferson County,
Kansas Census 1875 Name
Sex Age Born Bright Gilstrap Male 54 KY
Nancy Gilstrap Female 56 KY William Gilstrap
Male 22 MO George Gilstrap Male 20 MO Rhoda
Gilstrap Female 18 Kansas Francis Gilstrap
Female 16 Kansas Mary E Gilstrap Female
14 Kansas Bright Gilstrap Male 10 Kansas Nelson
Gilstrap Male 2 Kansas George M Gilstrap
Male 1 /4 Kansas Nelson and George believed to be William's children.
Jefferson County, Kansas Census 1880 Name
Sex Age Born Bright Gilstrap Male 59
KY Nancy Gilstrap Female 61 KY Tempie Gilstrap
Female 20 Kansas Mary E Gilstrap Female 18 Kansas
Bright Gilstrap Male 15 Kansas William Gilstrap
Male 27 MO Richard N Gilstrap Male 7 Kansas George
Gilstrap Male 5 MO Osawatomie County, Kansas
State Census 1900 George W. Gilstrap Male Age: 44 Born:
1856 MO [Kansas State Insane Asylum]

[NF08976]

Jefferson County, Kansas Census 1870 Name Sex
Age Born John Frost Male 43 KY Mary
Gilstrap Female 43 KY Rhoda Frost Female
18 MO John G. Frost Male 16 MO
James M. Frost Male 15 MO Oscar Frost
Male 13 MO Robert Frost Male
12 MO William Frost Male 9 MO Thomas
Frost Male 7 MO Lewis Frost
Male 5 Kansas Lillie Frost Female
2 Kansas

[NF08978]

Living with Lewis and Rhoda during 1850 census.

[NF14488] William Frizelle, Justice of the Peace, performed the marriage ceremony at the house of Jeremiah Gilstrap, in Dayton Township, Newton County, Missouri, in Feb., 1875.

[NF14493] The marriage license says that James and Ruby were united in marriage by "J. W. Moore, Minister First Methodist Episcopal Church". On the license application, James C. indicated he was 26 years old and Ruby Mae indicated that she was 22 years old. License #235.

[NF14494] United in marriage by "W. A. Phipps, Probate Judge". Frank A. Gilman's residence is given as Seneca, Newton County, Missouri. Rose Watson's residence is given as Racine, Newton County, Missouri. Frank Gilman's age is recorded as over the age of twenty-one. Rose Watson's age is recorded as over the age of eighteen years.

[NF14495] United in marriage by "W. A. Phipps, Probate Judge". Harry L. Wetherell's residence given as Seneca. Bessie Watson's residence given as Racine, Route 1. Harry Wetherell's age is recorded as under the age of twenty-one years. Bessie Watson age is recorded as over the age of eighteen years.

[NF14499] Their marriage was solemnized by "D. H. Gregory, a Minister of the Gospel" at Rev. Gregory's residence. Both G.W. Scott's and Mary Watson's residences are given as Spurgeon, Newton County, Missouri on their marriage license.

[NF17265] Nathan Bertelson “My family, including
Abner Fouts, was one of the first to settle in this area... He
is the original man to come to Missouri Valley before there was
even a town here. He brought with him his son William N. Fouts
by his first marriage to Rosey Woodrum who died in Sullivan
County, Indiana (Missouri Valley, Ia.) and his second wife, Edisy
Tresner whom he married in 1842 and 8 children. Abner died in
1862. Edisy took her 4living sons and one daughter and moved to
Valparaiso NE.”

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The exact date of Josie and Alf's marriage is not yet known, but the family says that they slipped off to get married because Sarah Dolen, Josie's mother, did not want Josie to marry yet. She thought Josie was too young. Indeed, Josie was probably no more than 15 or 16.

[NF29290]

Ruth Gilstrap was born at the Crum community near Sedan. She taught a
rural school near there before she married Jess B. Sawyer. Jess was
drafted during the first World War and was overseas when his first son
John was born. They lived around Sedan until they moved to Tribune
area in 1931 where he became a large wheat farmer with several
quarters of land. He preceded her in death, as did John. They had five
sons and two daughters. Ruth was devoted to her family and to her
church. She taught Sunday School for fifty years. She belonged to
United Methodist Women, Rebekah Lodge, Farm Unit, Senior Citizens,
American Legion Axillary and she loved to read. She read the Bible
through four times and read every book in the county Library. She had
checked four books out of a new shipment, [drove her own car and took
another lady] the day before she died and she had gone to Senior
Citizens luncheon and UMW. She was an active healthy energetic person
and was a hard working farm wife raising her family in earlier years.
Ruby Mae Sawyer-Temple 1997

[NF29325]

SHORT HISTORY OF: John Kelso 'Kelly' Gilstrap, Darrell William
Gilstrap, Kate Cyrena Gilstrap Kennedy and Shirley, John, Dick and
Lucylle Gilstrap. John Kelso Gilstrap was born in Elk Falls, Kansas May 2,
1904. He lived near Sedan, Kansas on a farm as a child. He was eleven
years old when his mother passed away. He always said he was on his
own when he was twelve. I'm sure his older sisters and brother Fenton
helped him. When he was sixteen he and another young man rode freight
trains to Colorado. There were some ranches in Burns, CO where he
worked until he was twenty one and could homestead. He had 160 acres
of land staked out that he wanted. He met Helen Mason, his future
wife, at one of those ranches where she worked cooking and cleaning.
Her mother brought her three sons and Helen in a covered wagon from
Custer County, Nebraska to Burns, CO to homestead also. They came in
1921. Helen's father had passed away about three years before. I,
Shirley Gilstrap, was born April 30, 1924 and I was three years old
when they built a place to live on the homestead. Daddy got six 12x12
floors from an old tent camp from a railroad building crew [I think].
He used one for a floor, four for walls and one for the roof. My
brother John was a baby about 1 1 /2 years old. I can't remember when
Daddy built the house. I know the next few years we all worked and I
really got tired piling sage brush. When I was six I rode six miles to
school on a horse. Daddy was a very compassionate man. He always saw
to it that my grandparents and aunts and uncles had meat on their
table. He was a very good shot and we all had elk meat or venison to
eat. He helped with their fences and farming also. He had a good sense
of humor and always a twinkle in his eye. Daddy was twenty when I was
born. I think Uncle Darrell came to live with us when I was about 3 or
4. I know I could walk because I used to steal his crutches when he
would go to get up. He thought that was cute but later I got in
trouble for it when John got in a big mud puddle when Uncle Darrell
was tending us and there was no way for Uncle Darrell to get him out.
He had a crippling disease of arthritis. I think I was about 4 years
old when Aunt Katie came the first time. Aunt Hazel also lived with us
for a summer but her condition was so bad and I think she went back to
Aunt Ruth or Aunt Grace. After Aunt Katie left Daddy got another 160
acres down close to the school and filed on it for Uncle Darrell. We
needed it for a winter place so that we children could go to school.
I've learned to admire my Dad for his kindness and concern he had for
his family. For such a young man he took allot of responsibility. When
I was about 10 he sold our first homestead and bought my grandfathers
place and we moved permanently out on the point in a new two story
house and still in Burns, CO. Aunt Katie had moved back and her and
Uncle Darell and Ruby all lived together on Uncle Darrell's homestead.
It didn't have allot of good ground for farming but it was good
pasture and a real pretty place with a stream running through it and
lots of trees and bedrock. For us and our families I think the
depression started when I was born. I can't remember ever being very
well off until after World War II. We were always poor but I don't
ever remember being hungry. I know there were lots of men who came and
worked for food and a place to sleep. Daddy and Mamma never turned
anyone away. Sometimes I thought they should have because some of
those people really frightened me. There were four of us kids. I was
first, then John, Dick and Lucylle. Uncle Darrell never married; Aunt
Katie had one daughter, Ruby and a baby son that died. Uncle Darrell
was very talented. He carved beautiful statues out of gypsum rock. I
loved the bucking horses with riders, and the Indians, cowboys and
animals were so perfect and lifelike. He was a kind cheerful man and a
good teacher. He helped us kids with our school work and was a good
patient sitter when Mamma and Daddy were out in the fields working.
Daddy always said my little five foot tall mother was the best hired
hand he ever had. When Uncle Darrell and Aunt Katie were still living
in Burns and we had moved and bought the Elk Ranch in Glenwood
Springs, Uncle Darell was pulling a tub of water across the floor with
a hook and rope; the hook slipped off and he fell over backwards and
broke his back and injured his spinal cord. Daddy took him to Denver
to the hospital but he died in a couple of weeks and is buried in the
Fairmont Cemetery in Denver. He died April 9, 1945. Aunt Katie and
Ruby continued living in Burns for several years after that. Ruby
married and I know her and her husband and Aunt Katie lived in Paxton,
NE for a few years. They later moved to Ogden, UT. Ruby had two
children, Danny and Glenna. I used to love going there after I moved
to Utah. Aunt Katie told me lots of wonderful stories about our
family. She always had a sharp mind and a cute laugh, but she also had
heart trouble like allot of the rest of our family. She died November
13, 1965. I loved my dear Aunt Katie. When Daddy sold all of our
property in Burns and we moved to the big ranch in Glenwood Springs,
it was 1940. I think Daddy worked to hard. We had a wonderful life
there but he started having heart problems and died May 17, 1953. He
was only forty nine years old. He was a good man and was respected by
all who knew him. He loved his brothers and sisters and was so happy
when any of them came to visit. He lived a full and prosperous life
and one to be proud of. I moved to Utah in 1957 and later married
Moyal Anderson, a nice man who had eight children. Their mother died
of cancer and it was a tragic time for Moyal and his children. The
oldest was fourteen and the youngest two. They are a wonderful family.
We joined together April 27, 1961 along with my one daughter, Jan.
They have all been like my own and took Jan in as their oldest sister.
There are now sixty one grandchildren and seven great grandchildren.
We're very happy and proud of our family. We've made our living in
real estate. Moyal is a broker and I'm a salesman. John was the second
child and my oldest brother. He was born April 19, 1926. We had a big
dairy herd at the ranch in Glenwood. He and Dick were a great help to
Daddy and Mamma during that time. We sold a lot of milk to the
Creamery and the Navy Hospital during World War II. The Navy had taken
over the big Colorado Hotel and the Hot Springs Pool for a hospital
for the injured sailors. My brothers always worked right along side of
their Dad. I remember the wealthy doctors from Denver who came to
Burns to have Daddy take them hunting and fishing and how those two
young boys could set up camp and handle that big string of horses all
alone. Daddy would get them all situated and then leave then high in
the Colorado mountains while he went back to get the 'Dudes' as we
called them. John served as a tail gunner on a B27 in World War II and
while he was stationed in Wisconsin he met Marion Ward at a USO dance.
[I think] They fell in love and had six real great kids, Danny, Karen,
Marcia and Julie. I love them all. They have a big posterity also.
John was a master electrician in Nebraska and Wisconsin. He was proud
of his wife and family and dearly loved them. Marion was an excellent
wife and mother and she worked allot of her life as a secretary. John
died September 9, 1987 of heart failure and was only sixty one. We all
miss him. My youngest brother, 'Dick', Richard Dean Gilstrap was born
August 24, 1928. He was Mamma's brown eyed boy; the only one in our
family with brown eyes. Mamma was quite young when he died at age
thirty nine. [Helen Mason's father] Dick was a smart little guy and
always busy. He always had his pockets full of rocks and could hit
just about anything he aimed at. Later in his life he was the star
pitcher for the baseball team at Glenwood High School. He's been very
compassionate to his sisters and his brothers family and was also to
his mother. He has spent allot of hours on a piece of the ranch that
is left to make it pay a substantial amount to us all when it is sold.
He could have just bought it himself. that was what Mamma asked him to
do but instead he set it up for all of us and still paid her $1,200 a
month and the thing that I appreciate is that he does it out of love
and concern for the rest of us. He's a good man. He has made his
living in the bulk oil business and has several convince stores. He
married Cecyl Bea Snyder and they had two fine sons, Kelly and Keith.
Then tragedy struck and Cecyl Bea died of cancer. Later on he married
Lois Beals and they had a cute little red headed girl named Kathleen.
Their marriage never quite worked out and he later married Evelyn
'Evie' Siegmund. We sure love and appreciate the good care she takes
of Dick. My sister, Mildred Lucylle Gilstrap, was born April 1, 1932.
She and Edward Downing had three cute little girls, Lori, Lana and
Linda. They were almost like triplets, always together. Lucylle and I
worked at the First National Bank for many years. She was the beauty
queen in Glenwood when she was eighteen. She was the last one to leave
the ranch and was a great comfort to Mamma those last years of Daddy's
life when he was sick with his heart. She and Mamma were always close
and I am grateful for her. Her life has revolved around her daughters
and grandchildren. After the girls graduated from high school Lucylle
and Eddie separated and she later married Donald Laukala who has one
daughter, Kari who fits right in with the rest. Lucylle and Don live
in Dodge City, Kansas and they bought the Bel Air Motel and have ran it
for many years. They are now planning to retire and sell the Bel Air
and move back to Glenwood to be near her family and grandchildren.
We've had a great respect and love for our parents and their extended
families and all they've done for us and will be eternally grateful to
them all. Shirley Gilstrap-Anderson February, 1997

[NF29366]

Linn County, Kansas Census July 13, 1860 House Name
Sex Age Born 1167 James S. Gilstrap Male
37 KY Elizabeth Gilstrap Female 30 IL James
Gilstrap Male 12 IA William Gilstrap
Male 9 MO Mary Gilstrap Female
7 IA John Gilstrap Male 4 Kansas Martha
Gilstrap Female 9mo Kansas 1880 Benton County,
Arkansas Census Records, Round Prarie Shelby Gilstrap 56
Male Farmer Born: KY Elizabeth Gilstrap 52 Female
Wife IL Emma Gilstrap 17 Female
IL Rebecca Gilstrap 15 Female
Kansas Rosa Gilstrap 10 Female Kansas Wilson County, Kansas
State Census 1880 Name Sex Age
Born Shelby Gilstrap Male 56
KY Elizabeth Gilstrap Female 53 KY
Emma J.D. Gilstrap Female 17 Kansas Rebecca C.
Gilstrap Female 15 Kansas Rasutha Gilstrap
Female 10 Kansas

[NF29381]

Chautauqua County, Kansas State Census 1900 Name
Birth Age Born John M. Gilstrap 6 /1886
31 Kansas Florence Gilstrap 3 /1866 34 IL Ross J.
Gilstrap 8 /1895 4 OK Effie C. Gilstrap
7 /1897 2 OK Bure R. Gilstrap 5 /1899
1 Kansas

[NF29405]

Linn County, Kansas State Census 1875 Name
Sex Age Born John William Gilstrap Male 27
MO Milla A. Gilstrap Female 25 MO Richard
M. Gilstrap Male 6 Kansas Ezra Gilstrap
Female 4 Kansas Bright Gilstrap Male 2
Kansas John Burton Gilstrap Male 10 /12
Kansas Linn County, Kansas State Census 1900
Name Birth Age Born Millie Gilstrap 8 /1850
50 KY Richard Gilstrap 1 /1869 30 Kansas
Ezra Gilstrap 7 /1870 29 Kansas Obituary
Pleasanton Herald October 1926 Late Monday night Ezra
Gilstrap received a telegram from his brother, Bert, of Lance Creek,
WY informing him that his mother had died that afternoon at his home
in that place. The news was a shock to Mr. Gilstrap as he did not know
that his mother was sick. Friday morning the remains accompanied by
son and grandson, Bert and James Gilstrap, arrived here. Funeral
services were held Saturday afternoon in the Christian Church
conducted by Elder Hays, in the presence of a large crowd of sorrowing
relatives and life long friends of deceased after which all that was
mortal of this good woman was conveyed to Fisher cemetery and tenderly
laid to rest by her life companion and two sons who preceded her.
Millie Margaret Baugh was born in Hopkinsville, Hopkins County, Kentucky,
August 15, 1849; died at the home of her son in Lance Creek, Wyoming,
October 11, 1926; age 77 years, 1 month and 27 days. In 1850 she came
with her parents, John Baugh and wife, to Kansas, settling on the farm
where P. B. Goss lives. She was one of a family of twelve children -
eleven girls and one boy. She was united in marriage to a neighbor
boy, John W. Gilstrap, a son of old pathfinders of Linn County, August
18, 1867. Her life companion passed over March 27, 1897. To this union
four sons were born: Frank, Ezra, Bright and Bert. Frank died when a
young man and Bright passed over when a small boy. Ezra of this place
and Bert of Lance Creek survive her. She is also survived by three
sisters, besides a number of grandchildren and other relatives. After
the death of her husband she resided with her son, Bert, later moving
with him to Lance Creek, WY.

[NF29406]

Obituary Pleasanton Observer November 29, 1956 Ezra Gilstrap
Died Last Wednesday Ezra Gilstrap, 86, pioneer farmer of the Green
Valley district northwest of Pleasanton, died at his home Wednesday
afternoon, November 21, at 1:30 p.m. He is survived by two daughters,
Grace Gilstrap, of the home, Charlotte Powell, Kansas City; three
sons, Paul C. of the home, John V. of overland Park, Kansas and
Russell, of Valasco,Texas, and a brother, J.B. Gilstrap, of Lewiston,
Montana. Mr. Gilstrap was born in Linn County, Kansas on July 9, 1870
the son of John and Millie Baugh Gilstrap. Funeral services were held
at 3:30 o'clock Friday afternoon at the Torneden chapel. Burial was in
the Pleasanton cemetery.

[NF29409]

Mongomery County, Kansas State Census 1900 Name
Sex Age Born Bright Gilstrap
Male 35 Kansas Ida Gilstrap Female 35 IL
Albert C. Gilstrap Male 13 Kansas Clate L.
Gilstrap Male 1 Kansas

[NF29410]

I was born and grew up on a farm four miles south of Elk City, Kansas.
Iris and I were married when we were Seniors in Elk City High School.
I played high school football as a quarter-back or a half back, also
was on the basketball team, took part in track. After graduation I
attended Springfield College in Springfield, MA, where I received a
Batchelor of Physical Education Degree. I coached football,
basketball and was the Physical Director at Roosevelt High School from
1928 to 1932 in Salina, Kansas. Moved to Texas where I was a Building
Contractor for over 20 years, in Lubbock, Texas. I later became
interested in ranching and cattle feeding. Moved to Denver, CO in
1976. Guy H. Gilstrap January 1979

[NF29434]

Linn County, Kansas State Census 1865 Name
Sex Age Born Lewis Gilstrap Male 20
MO Harriett Gilstrap Female 21 IL Linn
County, Kansas State Census June 29, 1870 Name
Sex Age Born Lewis Gilstrap
Male 25 MO Harriett Gilstrap
Female 25 IL Willie G. Gilstrap Male
5 Kansas George E. Gilstrap Male 3 Kansas
Wesley Gilstrap Male 1 Kansas Linn
County, Kansas State Census 1875 Name Sex
Age Born Lewis Gilstrap Male 30 MO
Harriett Gilstrap Female 31 IL Willie Gilstrap Male
9 Kansas Franklin Gilstrap Male 6 Kansas
Otto Gilstrap Male 4 Kansas Linn County, Kansas State
Census 1880 Name Sex Age
Born Lewis Gilstrap Male 35 MO
Harriett Gilstrap Female 36 IL Willie G.
Gilstrap Male 14 Kansas Franklin Gilstrap
Male 12 Kansas Otto Tom Gilstrap Male
6 Kansas Jessie M. Gilstrap Male 4 Kansas Earnest
R. Gilstrap Male 3 Kansas Lane County, Oregon
State Census 1900 Name Birth Age
Born Lewis Gilstrap 1 /1844 56 MO
Harriet Gilstrap 2 /1846 54 IL
William Gilstrap 11 /1865 34 Kansas Frank
Gilstrap 8 /1874 25 Kansas Otto Gilstrap
1 /1872 28 Kansas Jessie Gilstrap [dau] 3 /1876
24 Kansas Earnest Gilstrap 8 /1877 22
Kansas Orva Gilstrap 11 /1881 18 Kansas Lulu
Gilstrap 1 /1883 17 Kansas Lillian
[dau-in-law] 1 /1875 25 OR
Obituary May 1926 Former Linn County Man Dies Louis
Gilstrap, who conducted the first lumber yard in Blue Mound, died at
his home in Eugene, OR, on April 28, according to word received by his
sister-in-law, Mrs. W. B. Sproul. Mr. Gilstrap was 81 years old at the
time of his death. The Eugene Register says: His death was
unexpected. Mr. Gilstrap had apparently enjoying god health for his
advanced age and during the day and evening he chatted with his family
and he had retired when the end came. Mr. Gilstrap was a veteran of
the Civil War and belonged to the G.A.R. He was born in Mason County,
Missouri, January 1, 1845. Near the close of the Civil War, in 1863,
he was married to Harriett Fisher, of Pleasanton, Kansas, the wedding
ceremony being conducted by her father, Rev. George W. Fisher, a
minister of the Methodist Church. In 1888, with his family, Mr.
Gilstrap moved to Oaksdale, in eastern Washington, and in 1892 came to
this city. During the last eight years Mr. and Mrs Gilstrap have lived
in Portland and had recently returned to Eugene. Besides the widow,
seven children survive. They are Ernest R. Gilstrap, 515 Tenth Ave.
West; W. F. Gilstrap, 666 Eleventh Ave. East; Mrs. A. R. Curtis, 947
Eleventh Ave. East; W. G. Gilstrap, Alhambra, Calif.; Orville C.
Gilstrap and Mrs. L. B. Lowe, Portland. There are also several
Grandchildren. During his active years Mr. Gilstrap was a lumberman.
He retired many years ago.

[NF29435]

Chautauqua County, Kansas State Census 1900 Name
Birth Age Born William H. Gilstrap 2 /1853
47 MO Mary A. Gilstrap 10 /1854
46 KY Nelson Gilstrap 3 /1873
27 Kansas

[NF29488]

Thomas was a spy and recruiter for the Confederacy in the Civil War.
He was caught and searched several times. On one occasion, soldiers of
the Union Army caught him at a farmhouse near Booneville, Missouri. He
narrowly escaped detection by forcing incriminating papers between
loose floorboards. He attained political prominence and served as
Judge of Macon County for several terms. [Quote from a book written by
Jack Lee]

[NF29691]

Jefferson County, Kansas Marriages Joseph Gilstrap - -Katherine Cyrena
Adams, 2-21-1864 at Oskaloosa by the Rev. Terry Trapp, Baptist
Minister. Jefferson County, Kansas Census Kentucky Township 1870
Name Sex Age Born Joseph
Gilstrap Male 28 MO Serina Gilstrap
Female 20 MO Martha Gilstrap Female
5 Kansas William Gilstrap Male 3 Kansas John
Gilstrap Male 1 Kansas [Living next
door to Washington Adams] Shawnee County, Kansas State Census
March 1, 1875 Name Sex Age Born
Joseph Gilstrap Male 33 MO Syrena
Gilstrap Female 25 MO Martha A. Gilstrap
Female 10 Kansas William W. Gilstrap Male
8 Kansas John M. Gilstrap Male 6 Kansas
Sarah B. Gilstrap Female 4 Kansas Isadora
Gilstrap Female 1 Kansas Shawnee County,
Kansas State Census 1880 Name Sex
Age Born Joseph Gilstrap Male 37 IA
? Serena Gilstrap Female 32 MO M. A.
Gilstrap Female 15 Kansas W. W.
Gilstrap Male 13 Kansas John M.
Gilstrap Male 11 Kansas Arie B.
Gilstrap Female 8 Kansas Dora Gilstrap
Female 6 Kansas Maud Gilstrap Female
3 Kansas Susan Gilstrap Female 1 Kansas
Haskell County, Kansas State Census 1900 Name Sex
Age Born State Joseph Gilstrap Male 58
11-18-1841 MO Cyrena Gilstrap Female 51
2-15-1849 MO Arie B. Gilstrap Female 28
4-3-1871 Kansas Bright A. Gilstrap Male 17
1-28-1883 Kansas Grover A. Gilstrap Male 15
12-1-1884 Kansas The Wichita Eagle, Wednesday Morning, May 22, 1918,
Page 2 GILSTRAP - Cyrena Gilstrap, age 69 years, died at her home, 605
S. Hydraulic avenue, Monday evening after a short illness. [May 22,
1918] Mrs Gilstrap has been a resident of Wichita for several years.
She is survived by ten children: Mrs Martha Davis of Tulsa, Oklahoma;
Mrs Arie Evans; Mrs Dora H. Stanley; Mrs Maude Wagner, all of
Wichita; W. W. Gilstrap of Mountain View, Arkansas; J. M. Gilstrap of
Dewey, Oklahoma; C. H. Gilstrap of Canyon, Texas; B. O. Gilstrap of
Drumwright, Oklahoma; and G. C. Gilstrap of Claflin, Oklahoma. No
funeral arrangements have been made.

[NF29697]

My nephew, Ron Gilstrap, ask me if I would write something about my
mothers family. Yes was my reply, with out thinking I almost said
I'll ask Aunt ? to help me. But now they are all gone, of the older
ones. I am the only one left, no one else is left that is older than I
am. The Feeback people were good people. I grew up in a good Christian
home, a Gilstrap home. Dad Gilstrap [William Washington Gilstrap]
always treated me and my brother Walter as if we were his own
children. It was a happy home, we knew we were loved and Mama [Lillie
Jane Feeback] and Dad were completely in love with each other. I never
heard any cuss words between them, never. Mama was a very happy
person. She loved her home, her husband, her children and the
Christian Church there in Cunningham; the womens meetings there at the
church. Mama always had a clean white apron hanging near the front
door so if anyone knocked she could slip the apron on before she
opened the door. If she was talking to someone she would always refer
to Dad as Mr. Gilstrap, or my husband, never Will. I remember times
when I was doing school work, before I had the figures even on paper
Dad would have the problem worked out in his head. I thought he was
really smart. Years later my brother Jess could do the same thing.
Mother was a little person, about 5' tall, she had a beautiful head of
hair. She wore it long, brown, and it would curl around her face. I
always thought our mother was pretty. She was such a kind loving
person and so was Dad. Mama would tell funny little things about her
and her sisters. They really had fun together. Mama was a happy person
and she made others happy to be around her. She would sing bites of
songs from her childhood. There is this one I'll never forget she
would sing to her babies while she was rocking them to sleep. I rocked
you babies too. I was so happy when Naomi was born because I had a
little sister. I said Mama we don't need any more babies. Mama said,
Well we have to make them welcome when they come. You kids were the
cutest little people, and you were loved and made welcome. The first
thing I remember about Mama and Grandma Feeback, I'm sure we were in
the rock house at Mulhall, Oklahoma. In the yard the sunflowers were so big
I thought they were trees. Seems to me I was sick a lot. I had been
having convulsions. Jack remembers how horrible I would feel before
the shaking began. Then I remember living in Dewey, Oklahoma with Grandma
Feeback in her rooming house, and our mother was doing washing and
ironing for the men that were living in the rooming house. My
grandmother, Katera Ann Feeback, I have always thought of her as being
quite a business woman. I know she had the farm in Mulhall and the
rooming house in Dewey, then the farm in Missouri, and she was a
salesperson in Dewey. I remember her telling me and laughing about her
girls Ethel and Florence could not get her to slow down. When the
family lived in Arkansas Grandma was the Post Mistress at the post
office. Grandma had a still back in the timber on their farm. She told
me about the still with out any shame so this must have been a common
thing. I don't know when Grandma passed away. I have some old letters
of grandma's from Grandpa. Seems like he hauled things for people with
a team and wagon. The letters are from him when he was away on a trip.
My brother Walter and I did a lot of playing on the sidewalks in
Dewey. He liked to play like he was driving horses. I was 15 months
older than he so I would get to be the horse. We did a lot of trotting
and galloping just like there was no one else around. We found a place
to turn around in a Bakery. It was a great place to turn around in
with our make believe load. The smell was delicious, cakes, cookies,
pies and fresh bread. The people that owned the Bakery never said get
out and stop slamming the door. They were so nice and the owners were
Uncle John and Aunt Florence Gilstrap. The man that was helping them
was really nice and kind, William Washington Gilstrap. Mama and Dad
met through Bud and I. Grandma, Bud and I went to their wedding. They
really made a nice looking couple; Mama in her 20's and Dad in his
40's. When they stood up to be married I stood up too. Grandma had to
pull me back. Then the long trip by train to Cunningham, Kansas. Then all
the glorious days, months and years until the untimely death of our
wonderful, beautiful [inside and outside] of our darling mother. It
has never been the same since. Now we all have the scars and the hurts
of the real world. But looking at us now we have lost two of our
brothers. We miss them and there is pain there, but looking at us
maybe we came through it pretty well. Lillian Pettett-McGuire January,
1996

[NF29724]

A LEGACY OF LOVE According to John William Stanley the moment he saw
Isadora Gilstrap stepping down from a buggy, he told himself that she
was the woman he would marry. As a child, when I first heard him tell
this story, it was hard for me to understand his uninhabited laughter,
but later on I realized that my grandfather was telling me the
beginning of a true love story- the day he lost his heart to Dora. A
newspaper clipping tells us that Will and Dora were married by the
Rev. Hail in Garden City, Kansas on March 26, 1899. She was 23 and he was
29. Their first home was near Santa Fe, Kansas, in Haskell County. Quoting
the newspaper, 'Mr. Stanley is a well respected, industrious
gentleman, and the bride is a young lady of talent and education
having been a successful school teacher in the county.' In the summer
of 1901, Will took Dora to Garden City to await the birth of their
first child. They felt the need to be near both a midwife and a
doctor. The birth was most difficult, but both mother and child
survived. Verne William Stanley was a great joy to them. In 1910, the
family, Will, Dora, Verne and Will's father, James K. Stanley, moved
to a farm three miles from Cunningham, Kansas. There Uncle Robert Wagner
helped build a large comfortable home. In 1912, eleven years after
Verne was born, a lovely baby girl came to them as a complete
surprise. She was named Dorothy Pauline. In 1929, when my parents,
Verne and Shelly, moved to the farm from Wichita with their four
children, Shirley, Margie, Bill and Russell [Jim and Norman came
later], we lived in a house a very short distance east of the
grandparents. It was one of the greatest privileges of my life to
have lived close to such grandparents. Grandmother Dora never failed
to answer any question I would ask. She was the kindest, most gentle
person I have ever known. I never saw any friction between Will and
Dora. She, ever patient, he, less calm. Many times Grandpa would get
carried away over politics, his favorite topic of discussion; but when
Grandma saw that he was 'going on too long', she would smile sweetly
and softly say, 'Now Will'. Grandpa would stop instantly as though
touched with a magic wand. It was an impressive sight! I too, was
touched by her magic. As a child I felt the grace of her influence
and at her death realized the magic simply came from her loving heart.
In January, 1939, we lost Grandmother Dora. She had been bed-ridden
with heart failure for some time. We were attending Sunday evening
church service at the Methodist Church when the call came for us to
come home. Family members and friends quietly gathered at the house to
console the family. A number of people sat with us in the pallor all
through the night. I remember so vividly how comforting it was to me,
as a teenager, who could not hold back a flood of tears. Dora's
father, Joseph Gilstrap had died just seven years previously in her
home. She had cared for him the last years of his life. Before
Great-grandfather passed away we children had the chance to know him.
He enjoyed trying to sing the old civil war songs as he tapped his
cane in rhythm. We would sit at his feet as he slowly rocked in the
big high-backed rocking chair. Grandfather Will spent his last years
in Chicago with Pauline. He died at 81 in 1950, eleven years after
his beloved Dora. We have been eternally blessed with the legacy of
Will and Dora. Margie Stanley Robinson August 1996

[NF29730]

Grover was the youngest of Joseph's ten children. After Normal School,
as it was called on those days, he became a teacher. Shortly after he
and Mary Derby were married, he became the manager of Citizen's Lumber
and Supply Company in Claflin, Kansas. Some 15 years later, he sold this
to enter the Grocery business in Pawnee Rock, Kansas - the Fall of 1928.
During the Great Depression of the 1930's he lost the Grocery Store,
and took on several different jobs during the next few years, moving
to Great Bend, Kansas, the County Seat about 1937. He finally began
working as a bookkeeper for Mid-Continent Propane in Great Bend until
long after retirement. Even then, about every year for another ten
years, he was called back for a short time, to get their Income Taxes
straightened out because their new younger bookkeeper always had it
messed up. He and Mom were strong Church Members throughout the years,
with a strong faith. He became an Elder in the Christian Church in his
late 20's and was an honorary Elder Emeritus the last few years of his
life. It seemed 'fitting' that his only son to live to maturity become
a minister, graduating from Seminary in 1953 from Phillips University
in Enid, Oklahoma. That son, Orvan, served three different churches:
Artesia, New Mexico 1953 - 1962; Lyons, Kansas 1962 - 1972; and Winfield,
Kansas 1972 - 1982, when he retired. Grover and Mary had two girls of
their own: Myrna, born in 1914; [a boy, Myron, had been born in 1912,
but died in 1915] and Margaret, born in 1919. The third girl, always a
sister to us, Esther Ruth Gilstrap, was born in 1919, also, but came
to live with us at about 3 months - a double cousin. Her natural
father was Clarence, Dad's brother. Her mother was Nellie Derby
Gilstrap, one of Mom's sisters, so our third sister was truly a double
cousin - but she's always been, and still is our 'sister'. Orvan
Gilstrap 1996

[NS0038513] National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C.

[NS0038613] http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/index.html

[NS0064051] ABBR Newton County Missouri Census 1910

[NS0064053] Neosho-Newton County Library

[NS0064121] ABBR Newton County Roots

[NS0064123] Neosho-Newton County Library

[NS0064201] ABBR Newton County, Missouri - 1880 Census Index, Dayto

[NS0064203] Neosho-Newton County Library

[NS0039261] ABBR Click, Carol Click Benedict of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Email dated 6/20/2000

[NS0039262] My dad Jack Click died March 24, 1981 in Camby, Indiana. Troy, Katherine and my dad are all buried here in Oklahoma City at Rose Cemetery.

[NS0052203] USGENWEB-Indiana

[NS0064891] ABBR Obituary of Ana Scott

[NS0064951] ABBR Obituary of Cynthia Ruth (McQuery) Scott

[NS0065021] ABBR Obituary of John Willard Scott

[NS0065081] ABBR Obituary of Mabel C. Scott

[NS0065301] ABBR Obituary of Madeline Scott

[NS0065371] ABBR Obituary of Oliver Scott

[NS0065441] ABBR Obituary of Richard Watson

[NS0065501] ABBR Obituary of Wilma Lorrine Anderson

[NS0065971] ABBR Order Refusing Letters for Spouse - Estate of Mary

[NS0028551] ABBR 1850 U.S. Census, Lost Creek Township, Newton Coun

[NS0054001] Look-ups and hard copies kindly supplied by Donna Williams.

[NS0054183] ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/in/clay/census/1870/c1870a-b.txt

[NS0029201] ABBR 1860 U.S. Census, Lost Creek Township, Newton Coun

[NS0029203] Neosho-Newton County Library

[NS0067491] ABBR Pioneers of the Six Bulls The Newton County Missou

[NS0054821] ABBR Information for Inquiry into Sanity - Mary Frances

[NS0042251] ABBR Declaration for Widow's Pension - Rachel Watson

[NS0067601] ABBR Pioneers of the Six Bulls, The Newton County Misso

[NS0029791] ABBR 1880 U.S. Census, Empire City, Cherokee County, Ka

[NS0029793] Columbus Genealogy Center, Columbus, Kansas

[NS0042471] ABBR Department of Interior, Bureau of Pensions Questio

[NS0055263] files

[NS0042603] http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/t/r/u/Joyce-N-Truitt/index.html

[NS0030111] Secondary

[NS0030113] National Archives

[NS0042963] http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/c/h/a/David-E-Chapman/index.html

[NS0043073] Personal Files of Bryce Allen

[NS0068591] ABBR Proof of Will - Richard Watson

[NS0055931] ABBR Jasper County Marriage Record

[NS0055971] ABBR Jasper County Missouri Census 1850

[NS0030811] ABBR 1900 U.S. Census, Shoal Creek Township, Newton County,

[NS0030813] Neosho-Newton County Library

[NS0030941] ABBR 1910 U.S. Census, Five Mile Township, Newton Count

[NS0030943] Neosho-Newton County Library

[NS0056471] ABBR John Gilman Begat, Vol. 1

[NS0031391] ABBR 1920 U.S. Census, Five Mile Township, Newton Count

[NS0031393] Neosho-Newton County Library

[NS0031503] Allen County Public Library, Ft. Wayne, Indiana

[NS0069591] ABBR Records of the Bigham Funeral Home, Neosho, Missou

[NS0044631] Data on Elizabeth Ann McFerren, marriage, and all children, dates, and locations. Her sources are cited in the e-mail.

[NS0070483] Independence Public Library

[NS0070871] ABBR Scrapbook of Caroline Barkus and Mabel Alderman S

[NS0033031] Application for Letters of Administration - George W. Scott

[NS0033121] Application for Letters of Administration - Rachel E. Watson

[NS0045871] Good

[NS0045873] In Possession of Diana A. Mitchell

[NS0033371] Application for Letters of Administration - Richard M. Watson

[NS0046111] ABBR Final Settlement Approved, Finding and Order of Di

[NS0033471] Form SS-5

[NS0033473] Treasury Department, Internal Revenue Service

[NS0058893] In Possession of Diana A. Mitchell

[NS0072483] http://www.wico.net/~zacho/jackson_township_biographies.htm

[NS0059891] Old licenses were transferred from the Courthouse to the Library.

[NS0059892] Primary

[NS0059893] Neosho-Newton County Library

[NS0059991] Have scanned copy also. Look-up performed by (and hard copy provided by Donna Williams (e-mail: pinky@blueriver.net), 9-Feb-2000.

[NS0059993] Personal Files of Bryce Allen

[NS0073011] E-Mail Dennis at: gcems@netins.net

[NS0073013] http://www.netins.net/showcase/morlanco/

[NS0073291] ABBR Tombstone of Carol Ann & John Richard Scott

[NS0073341] ABBR Tombstone of Cindy Scott

[NS0073381] ABBR Tombstone of Glenn Anderson

[NS0073621] ABBR Tombstone of J. W. Watson

[NS0073721] ABBR Tombstone of Mabel Scott

[NS0061061] ABBR Marriage Record, Book 3, Newton County, 1925, p. 2

[NS0073761] ABBR Tombstone of Oliver Quentin & M. Madeline Shepherd

[NS0023133] http://www.geocities.com/prairiecreek

[NS0073821] ABBR Tombstone of Richard & Rachel Watson

[NS0073871] ABBR Tombstone of Wilma Lorrine Anderson

[NS0061271] ABBR Marriage Record, Book K, Newton County, 1903-1913

[NS0061491] ABBR Marriage Record, Book N, Newton County, 1911

[NS0061551] ABBR Marriage Record, Book P, Newton County, 1913

[NS0074431] TITL Walkers's Texas Division
ABBR Walker's Texas Division

[NS0061781] ABBR Marriage Records, Jasper County, Book 52, 1930, p.

[NS0036601] TITL Broderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 3, Social Security
Records: U.S., SS Death BenefiABBR Broderbund Family Archive #110

[NS0036931] ABBR Burkhart Cemetery Records - Newton County Roots

[NS0037431] ABBR Cemetery Seneca, Missouri - Oklahoma Standing Grav

[NS0076001] ABBR Pension of Amelia McLaughlin

[NS0076003]
NAME Texas State Archives
ADDR 1201 Brazos St., PO Box 12927
CITY Austin
STAE Texas
POST 78711-2927

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