Edmond Jordan

A pioneer of Wilkes and Oglethorpe Counties

By Philip James McGinty
Great Great Great Great Grandson of Edmond Jordan

August 31, 2005

This is dedicated to the memory of my mother, Elisabeth Jordan Smith McGinty. May our loved ones never be forgotten.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Sacred Memories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 1
Northampton County, North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . .Page 1
On to Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 2
1785. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . Page 2
Mack’s Creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3
Cousins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3
Charles and Thang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .Page 4
The Jordan Farm on Dry Fork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .Page 4
The Road to Allen’s Iron Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . Page 6
Family Ties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . Page 7
Captain Edmond Jordan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . Page 8
A Late Marriage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . Page 9
Oglethorpe County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . Page 9
A Settlement of North Carolinians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... . . .. Page 10
515 Acres of Controversy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... Page 11
Golden Grove Creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . Page 12
Parenthood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ... . . .Page 13
The Road to Athens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . .Page 14
Grove Creek Neighbors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .  . .Page 15
The Lexington Races . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . .Page 17
Expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..  . Page 17
The Georgia Lottery of 1805 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .Page 18
Connecting the Dots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . Page 18
A Legacy of Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . Page 19
King Cotton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 20
Family Matters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . Page 21
A Sprint to the Finish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . Page 24
A Contentious Finale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . . . . Page 25
Epilogue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . . . . Page 26
The Will and Estate Settlement of Edmond Jordan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....  . . . . Page 27
Footnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..  . . . . . .Page 30

Sacred Memories

The family Bible of Lucy Jordan Smith, my mother’s grandmother, states:

“Captain Edmond Jordan, born about 1761 - died in 1836 in Oglethorpe County. Married Jemima Pope*, daughter of Lewis Pope. Their children were: Reverend Willis Asbury Jordan born November 8, 1801 - died April 1877, Daridla Jordan, and Jemima Jordan. Captain Jordan fought in Rev. War under Gen. Hugh Mercer. He lived in either Halifax County, VA or Halifax, NC. He is not listed on the roster of Rev. soldiers in either state, but we know by word of mouth handed down that he was wounded in battle. His first battle was Princeton. He was a cripple till death.”1 (See Exhibit A.)

Exhibit A: Wilmore's New Analytical Reference Bible, Struthers and Company, New York.
Family Bible
The family Bible was recorded by Ora Mae Daniel, the daughter of Lucy Wesley Jordan and James Monroe Smith. Lucy was the great grand daughter of Edmond Jordan and Polly Pope.

*Mr. Phil McGinty states Edmond actually married Mary Ridley "Polly" Pope, the daughter of Lewis and Jemima Pope.

NORTHAMPTON COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

Edmond Jordan was born in 1761, probably in Northampton County, North Carolina. His parents were Over and Alsey Jordan. This line of Jordans is believed to go back to an Arthur Jordan, Jr who came to Jamestown in the later part of the 17th Century. Over Jordan died sometime after 1771. In his will, he referred to his children as Mon Jordan, Sue Jordan, Miranda Jordan, Over Jordan, River Jordan, Thomas Jordan, and a child as yet unborn. To Mon specifically he bequeathed, “150 acres of land lying on the cypress swamp.” 2 The name “Mon” was a shortened form of Edmond. It is believed that since Mon was named first in the will, he was the oldest child.

Verification of Over Jordan as the father of Edmond Jordan is found in the Revolutionary War Pension Application of John Jordan of Washington County, GA. In that document, Ann Howell of Northampton County, NC, testified that her father Christopher Foster and John Jordan were related by marriage. Her mother, Miranda Jordan Foster, was the sister of Edmund Jordan who died in Oglethorpe County, GA in 1836.3

Another confirmation is found in a publication titled “Arthur Jordan: The Moses of an American Family”, where it states that the Edmund, Miranda, and Thomas Jordan, mentioned in the will of John Dupree, were the children of Over Jordan who died in 1771, in Northampton County, NC.4

Northampton County is bordered by Southampton County, Virginia on the north and Halifax County, North Carolina to the south. Its southern boundary sits on the north bank of the Roanoke River across from the town of Halifax, North Carolina. This is the area, in southern Northampton County, across the river from Halifax, where Edmond Jordan was raised.

Halifax is known in North Carolina as a cradle of the American Revolution. On April 4, 1776, the Fourth Provincial Congress of North Carolina met in Halifax and adopted, on April 12, 1776, the “Halifax Resolves” declaring independency from Great Britain. It was the first official provincial action for independence in all the colonies. Later, that same August, the Declaration of Independence was read for the first time in North Carolina on the town square of Halifax. Halifax would become the major recruiting and staging center

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in the Roanoke River Valley for the Continental Army.5 During this time of fervor, Edmond Jordan would have been an impressionable fifteen year old teenager.

According to various DAR records, Edmond fought with the Continental Army of Virginia and/or served in Georgia. The Oglethorpe Chapter of the NSDAR, based in Columbus, GA, lists Edmund Jordan as a patriot from Virginia.6 To date, no official military records of Edmond’s service have been found. However, shortly after arriving in Wilkes County, Edmond was appointed Captain of a militia district.7 The local militia units were formed to protect the early settlers from Indian attacks. The appointment of Edmond to the rank of Captain may reflect his military experience. In addition, the 1827 Land Lottery of Georgia lists Edmund Jourdan, R. S., of Oglethorpe County drawing land in Coweta County.8 The letters “R. S.” identify him as a Revolutionary Soldier.

ON TO GEORGIA

After the war, Edmond along with many of his neighbors in North Carolina and Virginia moved to Georgia. The presence of Edmond in 1786 Georgia is confirmed by three types of evidence: deeds, tax lists and land plats. First of all, a deed in North Carolina, dated January 6, 1786, describes the sale of land from Edmond to John Jordan.9 Edmond was selling off his North Carolina lands in lieu of his move to Georgia. Secondly, tax lists confirm Edmond’s presence in his new Georgia home during the year of 1786. The 1786 tax list of Wilkes County, GA shows Edmond Jordan living in Benjamin Jordan’s Militia District, owning 400 acres and one slave. Curiously, these 400 acres are listed as being in Franklin County, GA.10 In 1786, the southeastern county line of Franklin County was shared with the northwest county line of Wilkes County. The subsequent 1787 tax list of Wilkes County records Edmond living in Captain Lane’s District with two slaves and owning 487 acres, all listed in Wilkes County.11 A third piece of evidence is found in the surveyor records of the colonial headrights and land grants in Georgia. A land plat for James Goolsbee, warrant dated 4 September 1786 and survey dated 18 December 1786, confirms that Edmond Jordan was in Wilkes County during 1786. It depicts 250 acres of land in Wilkes County “on the waters of Mack’s Creek” adjoining the lands of Edmond Jordan.12

1785

The above citations from 1786 suggest that Edmond was granted 400 acres of land in Franklin County, Georgia before 1786. Surely, he had acquired land in Georgia before the January 1786 sale of property in North Carolina. Unfortunately, no tax list from 1785 Franklin County has survived. His first tangible records appear in Wilkes County. The tax list for 1786 shows that he was in Wilkes County during the year of 1786. That is where he paid taxes. The warrant for the Goolsbee land plat, shows Edmond already established in Wilkes County as a neighbor of James Goolsbee by September 1786.

Intriguingly, there may actually be evidence for Edmond in 1785 Wilkes County. A Wilkes County land plat for Richard McRee, warrant dated 23 November 1785, survey

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dated 25 November 1785, shows 575 acres of tobacco land on a “branch of the Dry Fork Creek that is a branch of Long Creek” adjoining the lands of Jordan, Payne, Oliver, Browne, Darden and Allen.13 The lands indicated for “Jordan” might be lands owned by Edmond Jordan in 1785. Several years later, the 1797 Oglethorpe County tax list did indeed show Edmond living on 515 acres of land originally granted to “self and McRee”.14 It is interesting to note, that since Edmond would eventually (by at least 1797) own some of McRee’s “tobacco land,” Edmond probably began his career as a tobacco farmer. His residence in 1785 Wilkes County, however, remains speculation. The “Jordan” shown on the 1785 land plat of McRee may be either Benjamin or Josiah Jordan, both of whom owned land in this same area during the time in question.

MACK’S CREEK

The land plat showing Edmond Jordan living next to James Goolsbee near Mack’s Creek (a branch of Long Creek) indicates the area of his first residence in Wilkes County. The deed record also confirms Edmond’s presence near Mack’s Creek. Two deeds, dated November 22, 1790, reflect transactions over the same piece of land. The first shows the sale of 250 acres of land owned by James Goldsby to Daniel Safford on the waters of Mack’s Creek15 The second deed shows this same 250 acres of land sold in turn by Daniel Safford to Benjamin Blake.16 Both of these deeds state that the Mack’s Creek property adjoined the lands of Edmond Jordan. (See Exhibit B.) However, a land plat, dated 1788 and warranted to Edmond Jordan, firmly places Edmond further upstream, on the waters of Dry Fork Creek.17 The 1792 Wilkes County tax list also places him near Dry Fork Creek.18 Obviously, the situation depicted at this time in Wilkes County is a fluid one, with ownership of multiple tracts of land in various locations and property changing hands frequently.

COUSINS

As previously mentioned, the tax lists indicate the co-presence of Benjamin, Josiah and Edmond Jordan in Wilkes County between the years of 1786 and 1793. A family dynamic must be at work among these three. In 1786, Edmond is living in Benjamin Jordan’s Militia District. Is the commonality of the last names mere coincidence? Then there is evidence that he paid his taxes with Josiah Jordan. Imagine a line of tax payers at the tax office. As one pays, his name is recorded by the clerk. Then the next person in line pays and his name is recorded, and the process repeats itself. The fact that the tax records list Josiah Jordan and Edmond Jordan, one name under the other in 1786 and close together again in 1787, might indicate some sort of relationship.

Wilkes County documents show that Benjamin and Josiah Jordan were brothers, the sons of George Jordan. Sometime around 1790, Benjamin died. (There has been speculation that he was killed by Indians.) A deed shows the sons and daughters of Benjamin Jordan, deceased, asking the court to appoint their uncle, Josiah Jordan, as their guardian. The request was granted on September 26, 1791.19 In addition, guardianship papers list a gift of slaves that were given to James Jordan, one of the orphan children of Benjamin Jordan.

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The slaves were given by his grandfather, George Jordan, deceased, and received by Josiah Jordan, guardian, December 31, 1799.20 Since Josiah was the uncle of James, then George Jordan would be the father of Josiah and Benjamin. George is believed to have been the brother of River Jordan, who was the grandfather of Edmond. Edmond, then, was the second cousin of Josiah and Benjamin.

After Benjamin’s death, Josiah and Edmond, continue to appear together in the record. A land plat, warranted on 4 July 1791 and surveyed 1 November 1791, shows Josiah Jordan owning 465 acres “lands on the dry fork of Long Creek”.21 Adjoining this property are the lands of Edmond Jordan. An entry on the 1793 Wilkes County Tax list, under Captain Matthew Stone’s Militia District, confirms that the property of Edmond Jordan adjoined the property of Josiah Jordan.22

In conclusion, Benjamin and Josiah Jordan were more prominent - and a generation older - than Edmond Jordan. The 1786 tax lists show Benjamin with 500 acres and 14 slaves in Wilkes County and 500 acres of land in Washington County.23 For his part, Josiah, owned 485 acres and 9 slaves in Wilkes County and 575 acres in Washington County.24 By contrast, during this same tax year, Edmond owned just 400 acres and 1 slave. These older and more established second cousins may have been the lures that enticed Edmond to leave North Carolina and move to Georgia after the Revolution.

CHARLES AND THANG

Back in Virginia, on January 28, 1788, several of the children of Over Jordan were cited in the will of John Dupree. “I give to Edmund Jordan two Negroes, Charles and Thang. To Merinda Foster: one girl, Abby. To Thomas Jordan: one negro girl, Rachel.”25 This gift of “two Negroes” to Edmond Jordan may be reflected on the 1790 tax list of Wilkes County as well. (The Wilkes County tax lists of 1788 and 1789 are missing from the record.) In 1790, Edmond Jordan is listed with 487 acres and four slaves, twice many as the two slaves shown in 1787.26 Another observation can be made about the John Dupree estate settlement in Virginia. It suggests that Alsey Jordan, the mother of Edmond Jordan, had passed away sometime before 1788 and that the guardianship of these Jordan children had been assumed by John Dupree. Alsey Jordan must have been either the daughter or sister of John Dupree.

THE JORDAN FARM ON DRY FORK

The exact location of the Jordan farm site in Wilkes County proves difficult to pinpoint. The only land grant specifically assigned to Edmond Jordan was a 200 acre plot in Wilkes County, granted on September 13, 1788 and surveyed on September 29, 1788. This land, originally assigned to William Brown (apparently William never possessed it), was located “on a branch of the Dry Fork of Long Creek” and adjoined the property of Thomas Payne. An actual copy of this land warrant is found in the Loose Records Section, in the Edmond Jordan File, at the Georgia Archives. William Brown is also shown on the 1785 McRee land plat as one of the neighbors of Richard McRee.

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Consequently, both the 1792 tax list of Wilkes County27 and the 1797 tax list of Oglethorpe County show Edmond (in place of Brown) living next to Thomas Payne.

A deed dated December 26, 1790, shows the transfer of 200 acres of land on the Buffalo Fork of Long Creek from Joseph Cook to Milly Mann.28 These 200 acres are described as adjoining the property of Edmond Jourdin. Like Dry Fork Creek, Buffalo Creek drains into Long Creek from the southwest. It flows almost parallel to, and to the north of, Dry Fork Creek. Since Edmond is cited as next to the property of Mann, his land would have been situated below Long Creek and between Dry Fork and Buffalo Creeks.

The Wilkes County tax lists for this period also point to Edmond living in the area between Long Creek and Dry Fork Creek. The 1792 tax list, shows Edmond taxed on 240 acres on the waters of Dry Fork Creek adjoining Thomas Pain. The quantity of land taxed (240 acres) in 1792, however, reflected a decline of some 235 acres from the year before. In 1791, he had been taxed on 475 acres. Somewhere, somehow, some property was sold off.

The 1793 tax list continues to identify Edmond’s holdings as on the waters of Dry Fork Creek, but by 1793, he has reacquired enough land to be taxed on 510 acres. Edmond maintained this same amount of land (510 - 515 acres), with minor fluctuations, through the tax year of 1798. The repeated reference to 510 and/or 515 acres of taxable land attributed to Edmond during the period of 1793 -1798 would seem to indicate stability and that the locations on Dry Fork Creek and Long Creek were used interchangeably to describe the same land parcel.

Perhaps, even the earlier description of Mack’s Creek property might refer to the same land on the waters of Long Creek. As previously noted, in 1786, Goolsbee’s land on Mack’s Creek was sold to Daniel Safford, who in turn, sold it to Benjamin Blake. This land is described as next to Edmond Jordan. Eleven years later, the tax list of 1797 Oglethorpe County identifies Sarah Blake, the widow of Benjamin Blake, as living next to Edmond Jordan.29 And, it should be noted that Benjamin Blake, although deceased, is listed on the 1798 Oglethorpe tax list with land on the waters of Long Creek adjoining Edmond Jordan. This same 1798 tax list, shows Edmond taxed on 515 acres and adjoining Benjamin Blake on the waters of Long Creek.30 Perhaps Benjamin and Edmond owned two separate pieces of land, one on Mack’s Creek and one on Long Creek, and each were adjoining. Geographically, the position of Mack’s Creek is on the opposite side of Long Creek and well down stream from the Dry Fork. The Mack’s Creek reference, therefore, continues to be an enigma.

The evidence points to the location of the farm between Dry Fork Creek and Long Creek. An interesting mosaic can be pieced together using the early land plats. The plats are positioned on a line running from the northwest to the southeast, from the fork of Long Creek and Buffalo Creek to the northwest bank of Dry Fork Creek. The fork of Long

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Creek and Buffalo Creek, a very noticeable landmark, is found on the 1783 original land plat of Benjamin Allen. Allen is shown on the 1797 and 1798 tax lists as a neighbor of Edmond Jordan. Directly to the southeast of Allen’s property and the fork in the creek is the 1783 land plat of Nathan Nall. The southeastern boundary of Nall’s land shares the boundary line with the 1786 land plat of Benjamin Blake. Blake’s land formed the eastern boundary of the 1791 plat of Josiah Jordan. The southern tip of the plat of Nathan Nall also touches the 1791 land plat of Josiah Jordan. On its southern side, Josiah Jordan’s land is bounded by the 1788 land plat of Edmond Jordan and the 1784 land plat of Thomas Payne. Thomas Payne’s land plat is bordered by Dry Fork Creek on the south. A summary of the progression of plats follows:

Benjamin Allen - On the fork of Long Creek and Buffalo Creek.
Nathan Nall - Below Benjamin Allen and adjoining Benjamin Blake.
Josiah Jordan - Adjoining Benjamin Blake on one side and Edmond Jordan on the other.
Edmond Jordan - Between Josiah Jordan and Thomas Payne.
Thomas Payne - Between Edmond Jordan and Dry Fork Creek.
(See Exhibit B.)

THE ROAD TO ALLENS IRONWORKS

An interesting piece of evidence appears in the form of a road designated “to Allen’s Ironworks” that cuts across Edmond’s property on Josiah Jordan’s 1791 land plat. Lloyd's Topographical Map of Georgia, dated 1864, shows a road that runs from Centerville toward Lexington that crosses Dry Fork Creek, Buffalo Creek, and Long Creek, in that order. This 1864 road might be the very same road as the road depicted on the land plat! If so, Edmond’s homestead was probably located on the road just above its intersection with Dry Fork Creek.

Two entries in the Inferior Court minutes further link Edmond Jordan to a road. The first states: “Ordered that Edmond Jordan, John Fanning and Benjamin Knox be appointed commissioners of the road beginning at the county line on the Dry Fork and leading up by Musgrove’s Iron Works into Knox’s settlement.” 31 This citation must concern the same road designated as “from Allen’s iron works” on Josiah Jordan’s 1791 land plat. (See Exhibit B) Incidentally, Musgrove’s Iron Works were formerly known as Allen’s Ironworks. A Wilkes County court case in 1798 awarded 1000 acres on Long Creek, previously mortgaged by Benjamin Allen and foreclosed upon, to Jane Musgrove.32

A second entry appears one year later and shows Edmond appointed a road commissioner again:

“Edmond Jordan from Allen’s old iron works to the Dry Fork of Long Creek with all lawful hands.” 33

In conclusion, the constant factor throughout all these land references is Long Creek. All the streams, Mack’s Creek, Buffalo Creek and Dry Fork Creek, flow into Long Creek. Consequently, all of these streams could be considered as “waters of Long Creek”. Since

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Mack’s Creek is well downstream from Buffalo Creek, it would seem that Edmond’s land on Mack’s Creek was a unique holding, entirely separate from the Dry Fork property. Mack’s Creek was probably the location of his first residence in Wilkes County. With the land grant in 1788, Edmond left Mack’s Creek and moved further upstream to the area below the Buffalo Fork near Dry Fork Creek. This later site is well documented. It would appear, therefore, without any deed evidence showing it to be sold off, that Edmond continued to own the property around Mack’s Creek while he lived at Dry Fork Creek.

Lloyd's Topographical Map of Georgia, dated 1864
Map

FAMILY TIES

An interesting observation can be made about the neighbors that appear in the deeds, tax lists and land plats along with Edmond Jordan. Often they are more than just geographic neighbors, they are blood neighbors. And, if they aren’t family in an early record, the chances are good that they will be related in a later record. An example of a blood relative

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would be Over Jordan, who appears next to Edmond Jordan on the 1792 tax list of Wilkes County. He is believed to be the younger brother of Edmond from Northampton, NC. Another example was found on the 1791 land plat of Josiah Jordan. The plat shows several people with land adjoining Josiah, one of whom is Edmond Jordan, his second cousin.

Sometimes the connections were more remote. Isaac Eason appears on the Oglethorpe County tax list, dated 1796, adjoining Edmond Jordan. Isaac Eason had either a son or brother named Abraham Eason, who died in 1806. Abraham Eason seemed to be related to Isaac Eason because his land also lay next to Edmond Jordan on the 1796 tax list.34 Abraham Eason had several known daughters, one of whom was Rebecca Eason. She would marry John Ogilvie. Later on, one of Edmond’s children, Daridley Jordan, would marry Benjamin Ogilvie, a cousin of John Ogilvie. Another daughter of Abraham Eason, Nancy Eason, would marry Archelaus Pope, the brother of Edmond’s wife, Polly Pope Jordan. 35 When Abraham Eason died, Edmond Jordan and Archelaus Pope, served as executors for his estate. So while Isaac Eason was not a blood neighbor of Edmond Jordan, their families certainly became entwined through the future generations. These early communities were webbed together as one family.

“Know all men by these presents that we Archelaus Pope, Edmond Jordan and Shadrack Smith are held and firmly bound into their honors, the judges of the Court of Ordinary for the County of Oglethorpe and State of Georgia and their successors in office, in the sum of four thousand dollars for the payment of which sum to the said judges and their successors in office, we bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators firmly by these presents sealed with our seals and dated this 7th of July 1806 in open court. The condition of the above obligation is such that if the above bound Archelaus Pope administrator of the goods, chattels and credits of Abraham Eason, late of this county deceased, do make a true and perfect inventory.” 36

CAPTAIN EDMOND JORDAN

Of further interest are the 1790, 1791 and 1792 Wilkes County tax lists where Edmond Jordan is designated as the Captain of his Militia and Tax District, and serving in Colonel Freeman’s Battalion. The title of “Captain” that was ascribed to Edmond in the family Bible may be derived from this service in the Georgia Militia. A notice in the Augusta Chronicle, dated April 23, 1791, states:

“GOVERNMENT HOUSE, Augusta, April 16, 1791 - The rank and arrangement of the militia of Colonel Freeman’s battalion in Wilkes County, are established this day in the following order . . . .

Thirteenth Company - Edmond Jordan, Esq. Captain, Richard Nalls, Gent. 1st Lieutenant, Theophilus Hill, Gent. 2nd Lieutenant.” 37

A reference made in The Hills of Wilkes County, Volume 2, page 658, ties the militia service of Edmond Jordan to his marriage: “A DAR entry claimed that Edmund Jordan of

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the 13th Company Freeman’s Battalion of Wilkes Co., m. Apr. 16, 1791, but no bride’s name is given.” 38While no documentation has been found to support this marriage date, the reference to Edmond’s service in the 13th Company of Freeman’s Battalion does agree with both the 1791 article in the Augusta Chronicle and his title of Captain on Wilkes County tax lists.

A LATE MARRIAGE

The name of the bride in the above DAR citation is unknown, but at some time Edmond did marry Mary “Polly” Ridley Pope, the daughter of Lewis Pope and Jemima Jones. The Pope/Jordan marriage is confirmed by the will of Lewis Pope: “Item, I will & bequeath unto my daughter, Polly Ridley Jourdan, one negro woman named Anaka at the valuation of three hundred & fifty dollars, also one bed & furniture, both of which she now has in her possession.” 39

It is interesting to note that like Edmond Jordan, Polly Pope was born in Halifax, NC. Certainly, the Pope and Jordan families were acquainted with each other before the Revolution and afterwards in post-war Georgia. It would seem, however, that Edmond was unusually old (he was born in 1761) to be marrying for the first time in the 1790s. His first known child, Jemima, was born around 1799. (The 1800, 1820, and 1830 Oglethorpe County census records establish the birth of Jemima between 1794 and 1799.)40 If Jemima’s birth actually occurred in 1799, then Edmond would have become a new and first time father at the tender age of 38 years! This begs the question of whether or not Edmond had been married previously.

It must be said, however, that a 1791 Pope/Jordan marriage is entirely possible. Lewis Pope is shown on the 1790 Wilkes County tax list in Colonel Freeman’s Battalion and Captain John Pope’s militia district. Although in different militia districts, he does share the same County and the same Battalion as does Edmond Jordan. The Pope family certainly is near and in position for the marriage of Mary Polly Pope to Edmond Jordan in 1791.

OGLETHORPE COUNTY

The close of 1793 saw the formation of Oglethorpe County from parts of Wilkes County, other counties and Indian lands.41 The area where Edmond lived, southeast of present day Lexington, was in the portion of Wilkes County that became Oglethorpe County. In fact, it appears that Dry Fork Creek, a landmark used to identify Edmond’s property on multiple deeds, land plats and tax lists, actually formed the county line between Oglethorpe and Wilkes County. (See 1864 map above.) This would suggest that all his Wilkes County property was located on the northwest bank or “Oglethorpe side” of Dry Fork Creek. The two references found in the Minutes of the Inferior Court (as previously cited) confirm that Edmond’s property and neighbors near Dry Fork Creek were now in Oglethorpe County. From 1794, until his death in 1836, Edmond would claim his county of residence as Oglethorpe County.

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A SETTLEMENT OF NORTH CAROLINIANS

It is interesting to note that Lexington, the county seat of Oglethorpe County, was planned and established near a group of settlers from North Carolina. “Lexington was established in 1793. When the state legislature created Oglethorpe County, it also selected the county seat's location. The town's original site was chosen because of its proximity to a settlement of North Carolinians. Because of the lack of good springs, the county seat was moved to its current location, located near approximately twenty springs. The original location lies two miles southeast of Lexington. Thought to have been a small, preexisting village, Lexington was named after the Massachusetts town where the first blood was shed in the Revolutionary War.” 42 The North Carolinians responsible for Lexington were none other than Edmond Jordan and his neighbors. Edmond would remain close to Lexington for the rest of his life. Some of these North Carolinian neighbors are listed below:

Josiah and Benjamin Jordan were second cousins of Edmond and from the same area in northern North Carolina and southern Virginia as was Edmond. On his land plat of 1791, Josiah is shown as a neighbor of Edmond Jordan. (See Exhibit C). On the tax list of 1792 Wilkes County, Josiah Jordan is shown with lands adjoining McRee. On the tax list of 1797 Oglethorpe County, Edmond Jordan is taxed on land originally granted to “self and McRee.” On the tax list of 1793 Wilkes County, Josiah Jordan’s land adjoins Edmond Jordan. Benjamin Jordan’s land is listed as adjoining Blake on the Wilkes County tax lists of 1792 and 1793, and the Oglethorpe County tax list of 1796.

Benjamin Blake is shown on land plats dated 1786 and 1791 as situated between Josiah Jordan and Abraham Hill on the waters of Dry Fork and Long Creek.(See Exhibit B.) He also purchased the land ( from Goolsbee/Safford) next to Edmond Jordan at Mack’s Creek in 1790. Benjamin continues to show as a neighbor of Edmond on the Oglethorpe County tax lists of 1797 and 1798. He married Sarah Hill, the daughter of Abraham Hill, in Wake County, North Carolina.

Abraham Hill, the father of Sarah Hill Blake, came to Georgia from Wake County, NC. He served as a Lieutenant Colonel in Wade Hampton’s North Carolina Regulars during the Revolutionary War. His property is shown next to Blake on a land plat dated 1786 and the 1797 Oglethorpe County tax list. He married Elizabeth McGeehee in 1791 Wilkes County. Miles Hill, a son of Abraham, married Tabitha Pope, the daughter of Burwell Pope. Burwell Pope was the brother of Lewis Pope. A daughter, named Judith, married Josiah Jordan. 43

More notes concerning Abraham Hill:
His son, Theophilus Hill, served under Captain Edmond Jordan as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 1791 Wilkes County Militia. Another son of Abraham Hill, Thomas Hill, married Sally McGehee. Thomas apparently died young, and Sally remarried Dionysius Oliver. A Wilkes County land plat granted to Richard McRee and dated November 25, 1785

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shows the lands of Dionysius Oliver adjoining the lands of Jordan.

As already mentioned, Lewis Pope, the father of Mary Pope Jordan, came from Halifax, North Carolina. Lewis owns land next to Edmond Jordan on the 1800 and 1805 tax lists of Oglethorpe County. Lewis Pope initially appears in Wilkes County on the 1790 tax list in Captain John Pope’s Militia District of Colonel Freeman’s Battalion.44

Dr. Thomas Johnson of North Carolina, and his son James Johnson, were permanent and long time neighbors of Edmond Jordan after Edmond moved to Grove Creek (near Lexington) around 1799. The lands of Thomas Johnson appear next to Lewis Pope on the Oglethorpe County tax lists of 1796, 1799, and 1800, and next to Edmond Jordan on the Oglethorpe County tax lists of 1799, 1801, 1802, and 1803. The same property, now attributed to his son, James Johnson,45 appeared next to Edmond on the Oglethorpe County tax lists of 1806, 1807,1809, 1810,1811, 1812, 1813,1814, 1815, 1816, 1817, 1818, 1819, 1820, 1821, 1822, 1823, 1824, 1825, 1829, and 1830.

Benjamin Allen of North Carolina owned extensive holdings around the fork of Long Creek and Buffalo Creek. A land plat dated 1785 shows him with 1000 acres in this same area. Allen’s land appears next to Jordan’s land on the 1785 land plat of Richard McRee and next to Josiah Jordan’s land plat of 1791. There is a road that cuts across Richard McRee’s 1785 land plat that is labeled “road from Washington to Allen’s Mill”. It is believed that this same road, labeled as “Road to Allen’s Ironworks” appears on the 1791 land plat of Josiah Jordan. (See Exhibit C.)

515 ACRES OF CONTROVERSY
On November 15th of 1797, Edmond bought 275 acres on Dry Fork Creek from Richard McRee. The land is described as lying and situate “on a branch of the Dry Fork of Long Creek containing two hundred & seventy five acres, the same more or less, beginning at a red oak corner on the branch, thence on Eason’s line North forty five East three chains to a red oak corner, thence on said Jordan’s line North ten East thirty chains to a post oak corner, thence on Jordan’s line & Darden’s North eighty West, seventy four chains to a hickory corner, thence on Benjamin Allen’s line & surveyed land South ten West fifty one chains to a pine corner, thence South eighty West to a hickory corner on the aforesaid branch, thence down the same as it meanders to the beginning.” 46 This is an exact description of one half of Richard McRee’s 1785 land plat, containing the road from Washington to Allen’s Mill. The tax list of 1797 Oglethorpe County seems to reflect this purchase. It shows that Edmond was taxed on 515 acres of land granted to “self and McRee“.

The collection date of the 1797 tax list, however, and the late purchase date of November 1797, would seem to indicate that Edmond owned some of McRee’s land before November 1797. The 1797 taxes were paid for land occupied during 1797, before the purchase of McRee’s land. Curiously, the 1796 tax list of Oglethorpe County showed

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Edmond Jordan taxed on 515 acres. The 1797 tax list shows Edmond taxed on 515 acres, originally granted to “self and McRee”, as did the 1798 tax list of Oglethorpe County. So, if Edmond owned a constant 515 acres for the years of 1796, 1797, and 1798, then where are the 275 acres listed that he purchased from Richard McRee? With the addition of 275 acres during this period, he should have owned 790 acres on the tax list of 1798, assuming no property has been sold off. In this case, the tax record does not agree with the existing deed record.

In 1792, Wilkes County taxed Edmond Jordan on 240 acres. In 1793, he was taxed on 510 acres, an increase of 270 acres. This would appear to reflect the acreage picked up from McRee in 1797. Could the deed between McRee and Jordan, dated 1797, and ascribed to Oglethorpe County, actually be from 1792 Wilkes County?

Also, several other deeds, as they are dated, are not reflected on the corresponding tax lists. On one, dated October 20, 1802, Edmond purchased 40 acres of land from Josiah Jordan. The property is described as: “Lying on the waters of Dry Fork Creek adjoining lands of said Josiah Jordan, beginning at a post oak corner on Edmond Jordan’s line, thence South 41 E to a post oak corner, thence North 65 E to a white oak corner on Payne’s land, thence North 72 W to a post oak corner on Blake’s land, thence North 20 W to a pine corner on said Blake’s land, thence South 70 W to a post oak corner on Blake’s land, from thence to the beginning corner.” 47 The Oglethorpe County tax lists for both the years of 1802 and 1803, show Edmond taxed on a constant 168 � acres.48 49

These 40 acres of land were included in a parcel of 240 acres lying in the County of Oglethorpe on the waters of Dry Fork Creek that Edmond sold to James Colley on October 23, 1804. “Beginning at a stake corner on Benjamin Fry’s land, thence East to a white oak corner on said Fry’s land, thence South 22 E. to a post oak corner on said Fry’s land, thence East 5 N to a pine corner on Abraham Eason’s land, thence North 49 E to a post oak corner on said Eason’s land, thence North 49 W to a post oak corner on said Colley’s land, thence North 65 E to a white oak corner on Benjamin Blake’s land, thence North 72 W to a post oak corner on said Blake’s land, thence North 20 W to a pine corner on said Blake’s land, thence South 70 W to a post oak corner on said Blake’s land, thence South 33 W to the beginning.” 50 Again, this transaction was not reflected on the tax list. In 1805, Edmond was still taxed on the same 168 � acres that were reflected in 1802 and 1803.51

It would appear that all these transactions, the purchase of 275 acres from Richard McRee, the purchase of 40 acres from Josiah Jordan and the 1788 land grant of 200 acres to Edmond Jordan, are reflected in the 1796 -1798 Oglethorpe County tax lists where Edmond was taxed on 515 acres, and originated before 1793 in Wilkes County. Was this a case of post dating, to get the newly formed Oglethorpe County and its records up to date? By 1799, all the lands in question were sold off, even though one of the deeds was dated as late as 1804, and replaced by 168 � acres on Grove Creek.

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GOLDEN GROVE CREEK
The 1793 tax list of Wilkes County shows Lewis Pope, the father of Mary “Polly” Pope Jordan, living in Captain Needham Norre’s Company between Grove Creek and Beaver Dam Creek.52 The 1798 tax list of Oglethorpe County further adds that this land was originally granted to John Freeman.53 In 1783, Freeman was granted 1000 acres of land on Golden Grove Creek. His land plat shows the creek flowing east to west, through a beaver pond, and bisecting the property. On the western side of the property were lands owned by Absalom Knox.54 (See Exhibit D.) Not so coincidentally, by the end of 1799, Edmond and Polly would also be living near Grove Creek, on land formerly granted to Absalom Knox.55 In other words, the Jordans would move next door to Polly’s parents, Lewis and Jemima Pope. The move to Grove Creek may have been dictated by a family crisis such as the birth of Jemima Jordan or the failing health of Polly’s father, Lewis Pope.

As has been stated, Edmond’s move to Grove Creek is first noted on the Oglethorpe County tax list of 1799 where Edmond Jordan is shown to be living in Captain Seymour Lee’s District and taxed on 168 � acres. These acres are described as being part of an original land grant to Absalom Knox and they adjoin the property of Thomas Johnson. This time, the acquisition of land is confirmed by the deed record. On January 1, 1799, Mary Knox of Iredell County, North Carolina, sold to Edmond Jordan for the price of $422, 168 � acres of land on the waters of Grove Creek. Mary Knox is the widow of Absalom Knox. Her land is described as follows: “Beginning at a hickory running North thirty two chains fifty links to a pine, thence West thirty chains to an ash, thence north thirteen chains fifty links to a poplar, thence West fifteen chains and fifty links to a dogwood, thence South forty six chains to a poplar, thence east forty five chains fifty links to the beginning, being part of a tract of land granted to Absalom Knox the 14th day of February, 1788.” 56

The tax list of 1799 shows Edmond Jordan and Lewis Pope, their names recorded next to each other, and the lands of both adjoin the property of Thomas Johnson. Like the case of Josiah and Edmond earlier, paying taxes together seems to have been a family thing. The tax lists continue to show the lands of Lewis Pope adjoining those of Edmond Jordan through the year of 1805. (Lewis Pope is listed as deceased on the 1805 tax list of Oglethorpe County.)57 With the Grove Creek purchase, a new chapter began in the life of Edmond Jordan.

PARENTHOOD
Once settled at Grove Creek, Edmond and Polly began to concentrate on raising their family. As previously mentioned, Jemima Jordan, the first known child of Edmond and Polly, was born during this same time period. She was named after Jemima Jones Pope, the mother of Polly Jordan and the second wife of Lewis Pope. The very name of the child, Jemima, might indicate that the new parents were much indebted to Polly’s mother, also named Jemima, for her help during the birth ordeal. Unfortunately, Jemima Jordan

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would die young, sometime after 1830. An entry found in The Hills of Wilkes County places her birth around 1799 and her death around 1821.58 The 1799 birth date is supported by three Oglethorpe County census records (1800, 1820, 1830) that show her birth may have fallen anywhere between 1794 and 1799. Again, if she were born in 1799, then this date would coincide with the 1799 acquisition of land next to Lewis Pope at Grove Creek. [NOTE: The date of Jemima’s death as reported in The Hills of Wilkes County is wrong. She appears on the 1830 Census of Oglethorpe County, in the family of Edmond Jordan, as a female, age (30-40).]

The family Bible states that a son, Willis Asbury Jordan, was born on November 8, 1801.59 This date is also confirmed in The Hills of Wilkes County.60 It is thought that Willis was named after two people, Willis Pope, a cousin, and Francis Asbury, a prominent Methodist preacher in early Georgia. Willis Asbury Jordan would become a Methodist preacher and my Great Great Great Grandfather.

Oglethorpe County census records place the birth of a second daughter, Day Ridley Jordan, between 1803-1806.61 The Hills of Wilkes County places her birth around 1803. She was named after her grandmother, Mary Elizabeth Ridley, and her great grandmother, Elizabeth Day. The Day and Ridley families were prominent in Colonial Virginia.

THE ROAD TO ATHENS
Court records in 1802 reflect Edmond’s becoming an integral and respected part of the Grove Creek/Lexington community. The Inferior Court of Oglethorpe County during its June 1802 term appointed Edmond for jury duty to begin in November 1802. (He would also serve as a juror in January 1808.) During the same June term, the court would call upon his experience of maintaining the road back at Dry Fork Creek. It appointed Edmond to be a road commissioner to survey and report on the feasibility of building a road near his property on Grove Creek. This road would eventually become the road from Athens to Lexington.

“Ordered that Edmond Jordan, Henry Johnson, and Thomas Lester be and they are hereby appointed to view and report to the next Court the necessity of a road to be opened from near the head of Grove Creek to Knox’s old ford and from thence by William Biers and by Pitman Lumpkin’s and from thence to meet a road cleared from Jackson Court house to the sulphur spring.” 62

The investigation apparently took longer than expected. It was a year and a half later before the report was presented to the Court. But, based on Edmond’s endorsement, the report was promptly approved and the tasks of construction were delegated to overseers.

“By virtue of an order appointing Edmond Jordan, Henry Johnson, and Thomas Lester commissioners to view and report to this Court the necessity of a road to be opened from near the head of Grove Creek to Knox’s old ford and from thence by William Biers and

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by Pitman Lumpkin’s store and from thence to meet a road cleared from Jackson Court house to the sulphur spring ---- Said commissioners report necessary and that it should run from the line of Clark County to the Beaver Dam Meeting House from thence to John Lester‘s house from thence to William Beirs from thence a marked line to Thomas Jordan’s.
Ordered that: Frances Baily be overseer of the road from the County line near the Sulphur Springs to the Beaver Dam Meeting House.
John Lester from the Beaver Dam Meeting House to Lester’s house.
Lewis J. Dupree from John Lester’s to Thomas Jordan’s.
William Leslie overseer of the road from Lexington to Grove Creek.” 63

A year later, the scope of the road had increased. It is no longer described as stopping at the County Line. Now, it extends all the way to Athens. Edmond was given responsibility for maintaining a portion of this road: “It is ordered that William Leslie be overseer of the road leading from Lexington to Athens, beginning at Lexington and work to Grove Creek with the following hands (to wit): Edmond Jordan, William Applewhite, Thomas Jordan, Ezekiel Gilham, William Day and Logan Vint.” 64

Again in 1807, Edmond was appointed to work on the road, this time under the supervision of his brother, Thomas Jordan: “It is ordered that Thomas Jordan be overseer of the road from Lexington to Grove Creek with the following hands: Edmond Jordan, Ezekiel Gilliam, John Good, Logan Vint, Daniel G. Moore, William Lasley.” 65

By following the various descriptions for the route of the road, a rough sketch of the neighbors, starting with Edmond Jordan at Grove Creek, proceeding west along the Lexington to Athens Highway, and finishing at the Oglethorpe/Clarke County line is presented. Many of these names are shown near Edmond on the tax lists and land plats. Some are actually his relatives.

GROVE CREEK NEIGHBORS
It is necessary at this time to break with the narrative in order to identify the relationships that exist among some of these neighbors. The neighborhood will be found to be a tangled web of parents, siblings and in-laws.

First and foremost is the appearance of Thomas Jordan’s property on the road description of 1804. Thomas Jordan was Edmond’s younger brother from North Carolina. He first appeared in Oglethorpe County near Edmond on the 1802 tax list.66 The deed record agrees with the tax list. On October 2, 1802, Thomas Jordan bought 169 acres in Oglethorpe County from Benjamin Knox.67 Benjamin was the brother of Absalom Knox. Again, the tax list of 1804 shows him with 169 acres of land on Grove Creek, originally granted to Absalom Knox, and living next to George Philips.68 (Note, Thomas and Edmond are both living on land originally granted to Absalom Knox.)

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Dr. George Philips, the 1804 neighbor of Thomas Jordan, was married to Jemima Pope, the sister of Polly Jordan and the daughter of Lewis Pope. In fact, the will of Lewis Pope appointed George Philips and Lewis Pope’s son, Archelus Pope, to be executors of the estate. George also served as an agent for Absalom Knox, deceased. Apparently, he paid taxes for the estate of Absalom in 1804.69

The 1804 tax list also shows George Philips living next to William Ogilvie. 70 William Ogilvie was the husband of Rebecca Pope, the sister of Polly Jordan and the daughter of Lewis Pope.

Back to Thomas Jordan, he married Priscilla Applewhite back in Greensville County, Virginia. Priscilla was the sister of William Applewhite who appears with Thomas Jordan as a “lawful hand” on the road crew appointed by the court in June 1805. William and Thomas were brothers-in-law. The 1805 tax list shows William Applewhite with 190 � acres on Grove Creek originally granted to Absalom Knox and adjoining the property of Edmond Jordan.71 The same tax list shows Edmond Jordan’s property adjoining the property of Lewis Pope. The relationship of the road to Applewhite’s property is shown in a deed dated November 13, 1818. In the warranty deed, William Applewhite sold to Robert Freeman, 17 acres on the Lexington and Athens Road.72

The 1805 tax list shows Thomas Jordan’s property adjoining the property of William Vint 73 while the 1812 tax list shows Thomas next to Logan Vint.74 William was probably the father of the Logan Vint who is shown as a “lawful hand” on the road crew appointed in 1807.

The tax lists 1801-1803 all show Edmond Jordan living next to Thomas Johnson. In 1806, however, Edmond Jordan’s property adjoins the property of James Johnson. Thomas Johnson died in 1805. His will, recorded February 13, 1805 states: “I lend to my beloved wife, during her natural life, or widowhood, the use of the tract of land whereon I now live, also my tract of land on the grove creek, containing 203 acres, adjoining Lewis Pope and Edmond Jordan, and at the death or marriage of my wife, I give and bequeath said tract of land to my son, James Johnson…. Having given to my son, Henry Johnson, three hundred acres of land on Clouds Creek, I also give and bequeath to him and his heirs, one negro man named George.” 75

Henry Johnson, the son of Thomas Johnson, was appointed a Commissioner in 1802 along with Edmond Jordan for the road project running from Grove Creek to the County line.

Lewis J. Dupree, who was appointed overseer in 1804 for the section of road running from John Lester’s to Thomas Jordan’s, may have been a cousin of Edmond Jordan. As previously noted, Edmond’s mother was probably named Alsey Dupree. Lewis witnessed the will of Edmond Jordan in 1836.

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Thomas Lester was one of the three commissioners appointed in 1802 to do the feasibility study for the road. The 1800 Census shows him with a son, 16-25. This was probably John Lester. In 1804, John Lester was appointed to be an overseer.

Pittman Lumpkin married Nancy Hendrick on January 23, 1802. Part of the road to be surveyed in 1802 is identified by Pittman Lumpkin’s place. Pittman died shortly thereafter, and Nancy remarried John Lester. In 1804, the road is no longer identified as Pitman’s place, but rather, Lester’s house.

THE LEXINGTON RACES
Apparently, horse racing was a popular pastime for the early pioneers and citizens of Lexington, Georgia. Around the turn of the Twentieth Century, Rebecca Latimer Felton, the widow of the Honorable W. H. Felton, wrote:

“After I married into the Felton family I gathered a lot of information as to the way Georgia pioneers lived from such reminiscences. One of the stories that delighted me was their recollections of some famous race horses that were trained and raced at Lexington, Ga. These were four-mile heats and sixteen miles to run to be declared the winner. As I recollect, Col. Wade Hampton's medium-sized gray mare was the best racer of that early time. Money was staked by men from a number of different states, and crowds attended from all eastern Georgia.” 76

It seems that Edmond might have been a participant in this excitement surrounding the horses. On July 4th 1807, an advertisement appeared in the Augusta Chronicle that solicited business for “E. Jordan’s” equestrian services:

The Imported Horse
WHIP

Will stand in the town of Washington until the 20th of September next, at 31 dollars, payable by note, the 1st of January next; good accommodations for mares, and fed as directed, at a moderate price. E. Jordan & J. Barnett 77

More evidence of Edmund‘s involvement in the horse business is the 1813 tax list of Oglethorpe County that shows Edmond being taxed on a “stud horse”.78 The training, boarding and studding of horses must have been a big part of the livelihood on the Jordan farm. This might explain the relatively small amount of acreage (168 acres) on which Edmond was taxed during the years 1799-1809. Horse training and studding would not necessitate the extensive acreages that were required by cotton and tobacco. Perhaps the move to Grove Creek was neither dictated by Jemima’s impending birth, nor a health crisis in the Pope family, but rather, by the Lexington Races.

EXPANSION
With the settlement of the affairs of his late father-in-law, Lewis Pope, and a wife and

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three children to support, Edmond turned his attention to increasing the size of his estate. First of all, he moved to increase the lands of his horse farm. On the 15th day of November 1808, Edmond for the sum of $462.00 purchased an additional 84 acres on Grove Creek from Willis Pope. The deed reads: “All that parcel of land situate, lying and being in the aforesaid County and State on the waters of Grove Creek containing eighty four acres beginning at a sweet gum corner and running East 37 chains to a pine stake, thence South 25 E 22 chains 50 links to a pine, thence West 40 chains to a dogwood, thence North 20 chains 10 links to the beginning corner. It being part of a tract originally granted to John Freeman, deceased, and conveyed by said Freeman to Lewis Pope, deceased, and bequeathed by said Lewis Pope to Willis Pope.”79

The tax list of 1809 confirms that Edmond’s land holdings on Grove Creek have increased from 168-½ acres in 1808 to 252-½ acres in 1809. In addition, Edmond is shown on the same tax list as owning 202-½ acres in Wilkinson County.80 All total, Edmond owned some 455 acres by the end of 1809.81 Another indication of this growing estate is reflected in his slave holdings. For the year 1799, Edmond owned nine slaves. By the end of 1810, he would own 15 slaves.82

THE GEORGIA LOTTERY OF 1805
It should be noted that during this period, due to the 1805 Georgia Land Lottery, Wilkinson County became an attractive area for our Oglethorpe family. Thomas Jordan, Over Jordan, and Edmond Jordan all appear in the lottery as “persons entitled to draws”.83 All the Jordan brothers are listed as entitled to one draw. Thomas Jordan seems to have led the “charge”. The 1808 Oglethorpe tax list shows Thomas Jordan with a recently acquired land grant of 202-½ acres in Wilkinson County, District 7.84 Thomas almost immediately sold this grant to William Applewhite, his brother-in-law. The tax list of 1809 shows William with 202-½ acres of land in Wilkinson County, originally granted to Thomas Jordan.85 By 1809 Edmond, too, had received a grant for 202-½ acres in Wilkinson County, District 19.

The land rush to Wilkinson County, as such, appears to be short lived. Thomas, as noted, sold off his grant to his brother-in-law, William Applewhite, almost immediately. And, by the end of 1812, Edmond had sold his grant,86 as had William by the end of 1815.87 Of all three, the absence of William Applewhite on the Oglethorpe tax lists, for the years of 1813 to 1814, would suggest that he was the only one to actually move to Wilkinson County. (No tax records of Over Jordan have been found to confirm his possible land history in Wilkinson County, as of the date of this manuscript.)

CONNECTING THE DOTS
Piecing together the Lexington neighborhood surrounding Edmond Jordan, for the time period of 1810 to 1820, would produce the following mosaic:

Edmond Jordan lives next to William Applewhite. William Applewhite lives next to

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Thomas Jordan. Thomas Jordan lives next to John and Catherine Newton, and, after 1812, Thomas Jordan is next to William H. Crawford.88 The widow, Catherine Newton, must have sold her land to Crawford. William H. Crawford continues to show on the tax lists as a neighbor of Thomas Jordan until 1819. (Oglethorpe County Tax Lists, 1810 -1819). Rev. John Newton, who lived just “two doors” down from Edmond,89 was the famous preacher who brought the Presbyterian Church to Georgia. Although he died before 1800, his land was recorded on the tax lists as “Newton’s land” well into the 1800s. William H. Crawford began his career as a lawyer in Lexington, then became a Georgia Senator in 1802. He progressed to the United States Senate in 1807, where he became President Pro tem of the Senate. After serving as Minister to France, he was appointed Secretary of the United states Treasury in 1816. He was nominated in 1824 to run for the Vice Presidency on the same ticket with Andrew Jackson. When the election did not go his way, he returned to Georgia, to the same Grove Creek community where Edmond lived. Both Crawford County, Georgia, and more importantly for this report, the town of Crawford (between Lexington and Athens), are named for him. 90

A LEGACY OF EDUCATION
Status in a community was not just a function of personal wealth. It was also a measurement of education. Many of the early pioneers could not read or write. Many of the early deeds, for example, were signed with “His Mark”, which was usually an “X”. Edmond, on the other hand, would often sign his name, “EDMd Jordan”, without vowels. This is frustrating for the researcher because it is difficult to determine whether the name was spelled “Edmond” with an “o”, or “Edmund” with a “u”. Never-the-less, the fact that Edmond could write placed him above the norm. In the Augusta Chronicle dated January 28, 1797, “Edmund Jordan” appears in a list of letters that have not been picked up at the Augusta Post Office. A letter addressed to him would indicate that he could read. Again, this indicates that he was educated in the literary skills. Another example of his literacy might be the already cited advertisement that appeared in the 1807 Augusta Chronicle (about his boarding services for horses). He understood the power of print and desired to attract literate upscale clients.

Education was, therefore, an important priority for Edmond as he struggled to maintain his status among the William H. Crawfords of the community. He sent his only son, Willis A. Jordan, to the newly formed Meson Academy in Lexington, Georgia. Willis was being groomed to maintain the social status that his father enjoyed. An article appearing in the Athens Gazette testifies to Willis being a student at Meson Academy:

“At an examination of the students of Meson Academy, the trustees, with a view to excite in the minds of the youth of this Institution a laudable ambition to persevere in the pursuit of knowledge, have deemed it proper to notice those who excelled in the several

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branches…. Those next examined were: John Gresham, Edmund Jenkins, Willis Jordan, William Walker, and William Wray in Arithmetic. J. Gresham was entitled to first distinction. - Lexington, July 23, 1814” 91

While the thirteen year old Willis Jordan did not earn academic honors in 1814, the power of education would still serve him and his future family well. One of the sons of Willis Jordan, Lorenzo H. Jordan, would become a doctor. Another son, Willis P. Jordan, would become a lawyer. Wesley Thomas Jordan, would become the Spalding County Surveyor. A daughter, Emily C. Jordan, would marry Dr. J. J. Caldwell, a famous politician and doctor in Pike County. The legacy of education and status that Edmond imparted to Willis would manifest itself many times over in future generations.

KING COTTON
During the same time that Edmond was boarding and studding horses, an economic revolution was occurring throughout the South manifesting itself in the form of cotton.

Eli Whitney had invented the cotton gin in 1794, but it was not until 1807, when Congress refused to renew the patent rights, that the gin was made accessible to small planters throughout the South. This was the very same year in which E. Jordan’s horse boarding ad ran in the Augusta Chronicle. Eli Whitney's machine could produce up to 23 kg (50 lb) of cleaned cotton daily, making southern cotton a profitable crop for the first time. Raising cotton literally became the rage. By the year of 1810, the effects of Eli Whitney’s cotton gin were beginning to be felt through out Georgia, and on Edmond’s farm. The demand for more cotton (and more profits) led to a higher demand for more slaves. The dramatic switch to a cotton based economy can be seen in the increasing numbers of slaves that Edmond owned during the period of 1807 to 1820.

In 1786, the Wilkes County tax list shows Edmond with 1 slave. Twenty one years later, in 1807, he would still own a modest 11 slaves. Then the cotton gin was introduced into Georgia. In progression, by 1808, Edmond owned 12 slaves, by 1809 - 13 slaves, 1810 - 15 slaves, 1811 - 15 slaves, 1812 - 18 slaves, 1813 - 18 slaves, 1814 - 20 slaves, 1815 - 21 slaves, 1816 - 24 slaves, and by 1817 - 25 slaves. In the ten years that followed the patenting of the cotton gin, Edmond had increased his slave holdings by 14, as compared to ten in the twenty one years prior to 1807. Over this ten year period, the rate of increase was triple the rate prior to 1807. And, the rate of increase would become even faster. By 1820, the Oglethorpe County census listed Edmond with 30 slaves.

By 1822, cotton had become so integrated and entwined into the culture, that it became the “currency” that was awarded in court cases.

“Willis A. Jordan versus John Crutchfield - Attachments the same - Returnable to April Term 1822. It appearing to the Court that the first of said attachments has been levied on ten bales of cotton & the last mentioned are on six bales of cotton & that the said property is of a

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perishable nature, on motion of council for plaintiff, it is ordered that the said property levied on be sold by the Sheriff and the monies arising from such sale be deposited in the Clerk’s Office subject to future orders of the Court.” 92

While nothing is known about the complaint that Willis Jordan filed against John Crutchfield, it is interesting that the settlement was to be paid the form of cotton. Apparently, once the entire settlement (in cotton) had been collected by the court, then it would then be turned over to the plaintiff. Concerned that the cotton would perish before the entire levy was collected, the attorney for Willis, the plaintiff, asked for that which was already collected to be sold and converted to currency.

The 1820 Oglethorpe County census indicates that both male and female slaves, as well as entire slave families, were employed in picking the cotton. Of the thirty slaves belonging to Edmond, fourteen were male and sixteen were female. Two of the thirty were over 45 years in age, one being a male and the other a female. 93 They were probably a married couple and some of the other slaves listed were their children. Of special note, the 45+ male might have been either the Charles or Thang that were bequeathed to Edmond in the will of John Dupree. Future documentation will point to him being Charles.

Incidentally, the 1820 census is the only census that shows the entire known family of Edmond Jordan, under one roof. It reads:

1 male (16-26) - Willis A. Jordan
1 male (45+) - Edmond
1 female (10-16) - Daridley
1 female (16-26) - Jemima
1 female (45+) - Polly
[Note: Edmond and the oldest man slave (Charles) are both in the same age category (45+).]

As Edmond approached his sixtieth birthday in 1821, any dreams of becoming a prominent horse trainer had been submerged under a tidal wave of cotton. Edmond Jordan, tobacco farmer and horse trainer, had become Edmond Jordan, the cotton planter.

FAMILY MATTERS
The seventh decade of Edmond’s life would be dominated by family concerns. By 1832, One of his three children, Jemima, had either left home or passed away. His other two children, Willis and Day Ridley Jordan were married and busily raising their families. By age seventy, Edmond could claim the title of grandfather with four, and maybe even six, grandchildren.94 These golden years would begin solemnly. In the early summer of 1822, William Applewhite, Edmond’s neighbor and Thomas Jordan’s brother-in-law passed away. Since Thomas Jordan had relocated to Madison County, that left his son, Henry, as the nearest and closest in-law of William Applewhite. Accordingly, Henry applied for and

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was granted letters of administration for the Applewhite estate. Edmond helped out his nephew Henry by serving as an appraiser. This was a dramatic gesture because it symbolized the passing of the torch from the older generation of Thomas and Edmond to the younger generation of Henry, and by association, Willis.

On July 11th 1822, citation was granted unto Henry Jordan letters of administration on the estate of William Applewhite, deceased:

“We do hereby certify upon oath that as far as was produced to us by Henry Jordan, Administrator, the above and foregoing is a true appraisement of the goods, chattels, and credits of the Estate of William Applewhite, deceased to the best of our judgment and understanding. - William Ogilvie, EDMd Jordan, Mathew Barber

I do hereby certify that the above appraisers were sworn before me according to law -
30th October 1822. John Hardeman, JSC” 94

Henry Jordan would marry the daughter of William Applewhite, Betsey Applewhite, on December 23, 1823 in Oglethorpe County. They were first cousins.

As stated, two children of Edmond and Polly Jordan would be married in the decade of the 1820s. In their cases - not them, but their spouses were first cousins. On September 10, 1822 in Oglethorpe County, Willis Asbury Jordan, married Sarah Wesley Dunn. 95 Sarah was the daughter of the Reverend Thomas Dunn SR and Elizabeth Collier. Thomas Dunn was a Methodist preacher and a veteran of the Revolutionary War. Elizabeth Collier was the daughter of Vines Collier, a veteran of the French and Indian Wars.

Edmond may have supplied the young couple with an unusual marriage gift. The Oglethorpe County tax list of 1823 shows Edmond Jordan with just 23 slaves, down seven from the thirty he owned in 1820. 96 The same 1823 tax list shows Willis Jordan with seven slaves! 97 (Willis did not show any slaves on his first tax list, dated 1822.) It appears that Edmond, a good and caring father, has presented seven slaves to Willis and Sarah on the occasion of their marriage. In so doing, the loving act of a father forwarded the institution of slavery to a younger generation. Son Willis, although becoming a Methodist preacher (like Thomas Dunn, his father-in-law), would maintain slaves for his entire life until the Civil War ripped them away.

The younger daughter of Edmond and Polly Jordan, Day Ridley Jordan, would marry Benjamin Ogilvie some four years later: “On January 3, 1827, Benjamin W. Ogilvie and Day Ridley Jordan applied for a marriage license in Oglethorpe County. The ceremony occurred one day later of January 4th, officiated by Thomas Neely, Minister of the Gospel.” 98

Benjamin Ogilvie was the brother of the William Ogilvie who had married Rebecca Pope,

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Polly Jordan’s sister. Benjamin and Daridley would live next door to Edmond and Polly. The close proximity of the newly weds and the Jordan parents is reflected in an 1831 deed involving Mark Smith:

Oglethorpe County, Georgia
October 27, 1831

Mark Smith to William H. Smith, $150 for land adjoining Edmond Jordan & others lying on the west side of Troublesome Branch where the saw mill belonging to the estate of James A. Hill, deceased, is built with entrance on the lands of Benjamin W. Ogilvie.99

Since the Smith land adjoined the land of Edmond Jordan and had an entrance on the property of Benjamin Ogilvie, then Benjamin’s land must have adjoined Edmond’s property, too. The reference in this deed to Troublesome Branch is also interesting. On the Thomas Moss Map of Oglethorpe County, dated May 1894, there is a notation for “Jordan’s Place.” It is located near Lexington, on the road to Athens, between the head waters of Grove Creek and Troublesome Creek.

Tragically, Benjamin Ogilvie would die on January 10, 1832 leaving Daridley a young widow. It appears from the 1840 census records that the two children of Benjamin Ogilvie, Lucius B. and James B. Ogilvie did not remain with Daridley. Court records show that guardianship papers for them were granted to William J. and A. W. Ogilvie. These children continue to show up in the Letters of Guardianship for more than fifteen years. In 1843, an interesting receipt for $10.83 is itemized concerning a tuition payment made to Emory University at Oxford in Covington, Georgia. The payment, on the behalf of James B. Ogilvie, was made by Asbury MaKendree Jordan, the oldest son of Willis A. Jordan.100

There are indications that Edmond was distraught over the loss of his son-in-law, Benjamin. On January 2, 1833, Edmond Jordan gave 300 acres of land to Daridley Ogilvie and her children:

“Witnesseth that the said Edmond Jordan for and in consideration of the love and affection he bears for his daughter Day Ridley Ogilvie and her children, I have given and granted and by these presents do give and grant unto my said daughter and her children, and their heirs and assigns in fee simple forever, all that tract of land or parcel of land lying and being in the County and State aforesaid containing three hundred acres more or less being the tract of land I purchased from Charles Smith and Pleasant Glass and whereon my wife Polly R. Jordan now lives, the deeds from Charles Smith and Pleasant Glass both of which are of record in the County and State aforesaid.” 101

Unfortunately, this gift may have been annulled by future events. According to a

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reference made in The Hills of Wilkes County, Vol. II, Page 658-659, Polly Jordan died just five months later, on July 5, 1833. The death of Polly Jordan, following close on the heals of the death of Benjamin Ogilvie, would change the entire family dynamic.

In 1835, three and a half years after the death of Benjamin Ogilvie, Daridley would marry Edward Collier. “I do hereby certify that I have joined in the holy state of matrimony, Edward V. Collier and Mrs. Daridley Ogilvie. Given under my hand this 1st day of September 1835. - J. C. Simmons, Minister of the Gospel” 102

Edward Vines Collier was the son of William Collier and the grandson of Vines Collier. As such, he was the first cousin of Sarah W. Dunn Jordan and shared Vines Collier with her as a grandfather. After Edmond’s death, there are indications that Edward Collier and his brother-in-law (and also first cousin-in-law), Willis A. Jordan, did not see eye to eye. This must have proved awkward, and by 1840, Sarah and Willis had moved to Monroe County while Edward and Daridley remained in Oglethorpe County for twenty more years. Edward Collier died on September 6, 1860.103 [The death date of 1858 as listed for Daridley Collier in The Hills of Wilkes County is premature. Both Edward B. Collier and Daridley appear in the 1860 Oglethorpe County Census.] Life in Oglethorpe County was a family affair - sometimes good, sometimes bad.

A SPRINT TO THE FINISH
As Edmond approached his seventieth birthday, he still remained extremely active. On May 8, 1827, he participated in the 1827 Georgia Land Lottery where he drew Lot #27 in District 1 of Coweta County. The really interesting thing about this drawing is that it describes Edmond Jordan as “RS” - Revolutionary Soldier. Another mystery to our family is why he did not apply for a war pension in 1832, as did many of his neighbors. Perhaps he was distraught over the loss of Benjamin Ogilvie and/or he was overwhelmed by the declining health of his wife and/or he felt it unpatriotic to be paid for service to one’s country. We will never know. One thing, however, is quite noticeable about Edmond during this time. His signature on various documents was extremely shaky, almost as if he had Parkinson’s disease. In spite of this condition, however, he was noted on the tax lists as being a Notary Public for the last ten years of his life.

Beginning in 1830, the deed record of Edmond Jordan exploded with activity. On August 18, 1830, Edmond purchased for the sum of $400, 205 acres from Charles Smith. These were located on Troublesome Branch of Long Creek.104 On September 9, 1830, he purchased an additional 101 � acres next to the Smith property. These were sold to him by Pleasant Glass for $300.105 On January 2, 1833, these two tracts of land were combined and given to Daridly Ogilvie, his newly widowed daughter, as a tract of some 300 acres more or less.106

On December 10, 1832, Edmond sold, for $600, his Grove Creek property to his long time neighbor, James Johnson. He had lived there for thirty two years. A major chapter in

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his life was over. Grove Creek was where he and Polly had raised their children. I would imagine that at this time, he was living on the 300 acres of property that he would give to Daridly a month later.

“Beginning at a hickory running North thirty two chains fifty links to a pine, thence West thirty chains to an ash, thence north thirteen chains fifty links to a poplar, thence West fifteen chains and fifty links to a dogwood, thence South forty six chains to a poplar, thence east forty five chains fifty links to the beginning, this tract was deeded to Edmond Jordan by Mary Knox in the year 1799 the first day of January. One other tract or parcel of land adjoining the aforementioned tract on the North side containing 84 acres more or less which land was deeded by Willis Pope to the said Edmond Jordan the 15th November 1808 beginning at a sweet gum corner and running East 37 chains to a pine stake, thence South 25 E 22 chains 50 links to a pine, thence W 40 chains to a dogwood, thence North 20 chains 10 links to the beginning corner.” 107

But, Edmond was still not finished. On November 15, 1833, Edmond purchased 155 acres of land on Indian Creek from John Bledsoe, formerly granted to Azariah Bailey on the 12th day of July 1781.108

The tax record, as usual, raises some questions about the deed record or lack thereof. From 1808 until 1830, there is no activity recorded in the deed record for Edmond Jordan. Over this period, Edmond is consistently taxed on 252 acres. This was the land on Grove Creek. The tax record, however, shows him with a pickup of 202 � acres in 1828.109 This is not shown on the deed record. This may reflect the draw of land in Coweta County that Edmond received in the 1827 Georgia Land Lottery. By 1831, these extra 202 � acres are gone. Did he forfeit the draw or sell it off?

In 1833, the tax record does reflect the addition of 307 acres that he purchased from Smith and Glass. 110 And, it also reflects the sale of 252 acres of land on Grove Creek (168 + 84) to Thomas Johnson in 1832. However, beginning in 1832 and continuing through 1834, Edmond is taxed on a new parcel of 160 acres, as yet unknown. This may have been located in the city limits of Lexington. The tax record of 1834 does show the addition of another 155 acres, which corresponds nicely with the 155 acres picked up from John Bledsoe in 1833.111

By 1836, the year of his death, the 160 acres have disappeared and he is just taxed on 462 acres. 112 This would be the combination of the land he had given to Daridley and the land he purchased from Bledsoe (307 + 155 = 462). The question begs to be answered, “Was the 307 acre love gift, given to Daridley Ogilvie and her children, taken back when she married Edward Collier?” The tax lists show that the 307 acres only belonged to Edmond, from their purchase in 1833 until his death in 1836. The responsibility for paying taxes on this land was never transferred to his daughter.

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A CONTENTIOUS FINALE
Edmond Jordan died in Oglethorpe County sometime between the writing of his will on the 12th of November 1836 and the recording of the will on the 7th of December 1836. His will is an interesting and divisive document, not only for what it specifies, but also, for what it doesn’t specify.113 It appoints Willis A. Jordan, Edmond’s only son, to be the executor of the estate. As executor, Willis was to equally divide Edmond’s property between Daridley Collier and himself. Property, as defined in the will, consisted of slaves, wearing apparel, livestock, furniture, and various implements, with an overriding emphasis on slaves. In fact, Edmond seemed to be more concerned with his slaves than anything else. Amidst this dark obsession, a ray of compassion shone through: “In grateful remembrance of the valuable services and great fidelity of my good servant Charles, my desire is that in the division of my negroes, he may be permitted to choose where he will live and to whom he may belong.” Looking back from the 21st Century, this proclamation of free choice might seem to be rather shallow. But for this age and time, this was a magnanimous act. The slave in question, Charles, may be the same Charles who was given to Edmond in the 1786 Will of John Dupree. If he was, then he had been with Edmond in Georgia from the beginning, through good times and bad, and certainly was deserving of a special consideration.

Amidst the obsession over slaves, Edmond completely forgot about his real estate holdings. As already stated, for the last year of his life (1836), Edmond was taxed on 462 acres. This was quite a sizeable holding to be ignored. Land was one of most important measures of wealth in the Antebellum South. More importantly, Edmond’s gift of 300 acres to Daridley Ogilvie in 1833 had never been legally consummated and made up a sizeable portion of the 462 acres. For his part, Willis, who was a non party to the deed in 1833, apparently had no desire to disburse the 300 acres. As a result, Daridley and Edward Collier contested the will based on two counts: 1. That the testator (Edmond) was not of sound mind and disposing memory, and 2. That undue influence was practiced upon the testator. The Colliers apparently believed that Willis had swayed his father to renege on the deed of gift to Daridley.

Almost two years later, on October 15, 1838, the judges in the Court of Ordinary for Oglethorpe County took the road of compromise. They awarded “one third of the value” of the contested land, or 98 acres, to the Colliers. The balance remained under the control of Willis Jordan. The families of Edward Collier and the Willis Jordan would soon separate, with Willis going to Monroe and Fayette County and Edward remaining in Oglethorpe County. Whether this was due to family friction or the economic crash of 1837, or both, remains speculation.

EPILOGUE
After the death of Edward Collier in 1860 and faced with the approaching war, Daridley moved to Louisiana with her son, F. P. Collier. It is believed that she died shortly

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thereafter and was buried there. As for Willis, his journeys carried him to Spalding County, near Griffin, Georgia, where he owned a plantation on Head’s Creek. The lure of family was still strong as he settled near his wife’s brother, Ishmael Dunn. He would die in 1877.

THE WILL AND ESTATE SETTLEMENT OF EDMOND JORDAN

Georgia, Oglethorpe County

I, Edmond Jordan, of the County and state aforesaid, do make the following disposition of my property to take effect after my death as my will and testament.

It is my will that all my negroes be divided into two equal portions by any three persons to be appointed by the Court of Ordinary of the County aforesaid, and then my son, Willis A. Jordan, to have his choice of such portion - to belong to him and his heirs forever. And the other portion, I lend to my daughter Daridley Collier for her life and at her death to be equally divided among her children then living, and the descendants of such as may be dead - the descendants of each child who may be dead to be entitled to the share which such child, if living, would have been entitled to.

I give to my son, Willis A. Jordan, my wearing apparel.

I will that all my horses, cattle, hogs, sheep, stock of all kinds, all my cotton, corn, fodder, oats, and provisions, all my farming utensils, household and kitchen furniture, and all other personal property which I may own, not already described, shall be sold by my executor and the money arising there from, after paying my debts, to be equally divided between my son Willis and my daughter Daridley. If I have any money on hand when I die and debts owing to me, it is my will that such money and debts be in the same manner equally divided between my son and daughter.

In grateful remembrance of the valuable services and great fidelity of my good servant Charles, my desire is that in the division of my negroes, he may be permitted to choose where he will live and to whom he may belong.

I appoint my son, Willis A. Jordan, sole executor of this last will and testament.

And lastly, I do hereby solemnly revoke all former wills and testaments at any time heretofore by me made & declare this only to be my last will and testament.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this the twelfth day of November eighteen hundred & thirty six.

EDMd Jordan

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In the presence of the following witnesses:
G. M. Dudley
Lewis J. Dupree
Daniel Jenkins

Georgia, Oglethorpe County Personally appeared in open Court, G. M. Dudley & Lewis J. Dupree, witnesses to the within will, and after being duly sworn, deposeth and saith, that they saw Edmond Jordan sign, seal, publish and declare this writing to be his last will and testament. That at the time thereof, he was of sound, disposing mind and memory; and that he did it freely, without compulsion; and that you saw Daniel Jenkins also sign the same, as a witness to the best of your knowledge, so help you God.

Sworn to in open Court, the 7th day of December 1836,
G. M. Dudley
Lewis J. Dupree
Henry Britain CCO
(Recorded the 8th day of December 1836)

Georgia, Oglethorpe County
Court of Ordinary, November adjourned term 1836

The last will and testament of Edmund Jordan having been duly proven at this adjourned term in open court, upon the oaths of George M. Dudley and Lewis J. Dupree, ordered that the same be admitted to record.

Edward V. Collier, the Caveator, being dissatisfied with the decision of the Court in admitting the will of Edmund Jordan to record, came into court and prays an appeal, and having paid all cost that has accrued and given security for all further cost that may accrue by reason of such appeal and brings Thomas R. Andrews and tenders him as security, and they, the said Edward V. Collier & Thomas R. Andrews, acknowledge themselves jointly and severally bound to Willis A. Jordan, the propounder for the eventual condemnation money in said case.

Witness the hands and seals this seventh day of December 1836.

Edward V. Collier
Thomas R. Andrews

Georgia, Oglethorpe County
Inferior Court - Sitting for ordinary purposes at an adjourned term held on the seventh day of December 1836.

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The will of Edmund Jordan having been propounded by Willis a. Jordan, the executor for probate, Edward V. Collier, husband of Daridly Collier, formerly Daridly Jordan, daughter of the said Edmund Jordan, comes into court and caveats the will of the said Edmund Jordan on the following, to wit:

First - That the testator was not of sound mind and disposing memory.
Second - That undue influence was practiced upon the testator.

Joseph Henry Lumpkin
Attorney for the Caveator

Georgia, Oglethorpe County
We the undersigned appointed by the Superior Court have assigned and laid off for Edward V. Collier ninety eight acres of land being one third of the value of the tract of land formerly belonging to Edmond Jordan late of said County, marked and designated of the plat of said tract of land No. 3, beginning at the branch and running North 35 E to a mulberry, thence North 53 E 18 chains 50 links to a hickory on the road, thence 42 E 26 chains 75 links to a stake corner, thence South 80 W 11 to pine corner, thence South 30 W 39 to a black oak on the road, thence South 40 E 5 chains to a post oak, thence South 50 W 30 to a willow oak on the branch, thence down said branch to the beginning - as will be more fully shown by reference to a plat of said tract of land. October 15th 1838. Commissioners: Robert Hubbard, John Jenkins, Robert Harrison, John Baughan, Henry Banks JSC

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1 Family Bible of James M. and Lucy Jordan Smith, inscribed by their daughter, Ora Mae Smith Daniel.
2 Will of Over Jordan, Northampton County, North Carolina, Court of Ordinary, Record of Wills 1759-1789, Will Book 1,
    pages 203-204.
3 Revolutionary War Pension Application, File #29726, for John Jordan of Washington, County, GA.
4 “Arthur Jordan: The Moses of an American Family”, by Jordan Pugh Ed. D., page 191.
5 Halifax County website
6 Oglethorpe Chapter NSDAR, Columbus, Georgia
7 1791 Wilkes County, Georgia Tax list
8 1827 Land Lottery of Georgia
9 Edmond Jordan to John Jordan, Northampton County, NC, Register of Deeds, Book 7, page 367.
10 1786 tax list of Wilkes County, GA, Captain Lane’s Militia District, for Edmond Jordan.
11 1787 tax list of Wilkes county, GA, Captain Lane’s Militia District, for Edmond Jordan.
12 Land plat of James Goolsbee, dated 1786, Georgia Surveyor General - Plats, Colonial and Headright, Book I, page 193.
13 Land plat of Richard McRee, dated 1785, Georgia Surveyor General, Plats, Colonial and Headright, Plat Book Q, p.203.
14 1797 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain Strong’s District, for Edmond Jordan, showing Edmond Jordan on 515
     acres of land, originally granted to self and McRee, adjoining Thomas Pain.
15 James Goldsby to Daniel Safford, dated 1791,Wilkes County, Deed Book HH, page 166.
16 Daniel Safford to Benjamin Blake, Wilkes County, Deed Book HH, page 111.
17 Land plat of Edmond Jordan, dated 1788, Georgia Surveyor General, Plats, Colonial and Headright, Plat Book Q, p.152. 18 1792 Tax list of Wilkes County, GA, Captain Edmond Jordan’s District, for Edmond Jordan, showing Edmond on waters
     of Dry Fork Creek.
19 James Jordan, et al, Wilkes County, GA, Deed Book GG, page 349, requesting appointment of guardian.
20 Early Records of Georgia, Volume II, Wilkes County, pages 244-245, guardianship papers submitted by Josiah Jordan. 21 Land plat of Josiah Jordan, dated 1791, Georgia Surveyor General - Plats, Colonial and Headright, Plat Book Q, p.155.
22 1793 Tax list of Wilkes County, GA, Captain Matthew Stone’s District, for Edmond Jordan, showing lands adjoining
     Josiah Jordan.
23 1786 tax list of Wilkes County, GA, Captain Lane’s Militia District, for Benjamin Jordan.
24 1786 tax list of Wilkes county, GA, Captain Lane’s Militia District, for Josiah Jordan.
25 The will of John Dupree, Greensville County, VA - Wills, Book 1, 1781-1806, page 51.
26 1790 tax list of Wilkes County, GA, Captain Edmond Jordan’s District, for Edmond Jordan, showing four slaves.
27 1792 tax list of Wilkes County, GA, for Edmond Jordan, showing land adjoining Thomas Payne.
28 Joseph Cook to Milly Mann, dated 1790, Wilkes County, Deed Book HH, page 111, showing land adjoining Edmond
     Jordan on Buffalo Creek.
29 1797 tax list of Sarah Blake, showing 300 acres originally granted to self, adjoining Edmond Jordan.
30 1798 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain Duke’s District, for Edmond Jordan, showing his land containing 515
     acres, adjoining Benjamin Blake.
31 Oglethorpe County, GA, Minutes of the Inferior Court, June term 1794, showing Edmond commissioned to maintain
     a road.
32 Oglethorpe County, GA, Minutes of the Court of Ordinary, November term 1798, concerning the Estate of Harrison
     Musgrove Jr.
33 Oglethorpe County, GA, Minutes of the Inferior Court, June 4, 1795, showing Edmond commissioned again to maintain
     a road.
34 1796 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain Strong’s District, for Edmond Jordan, showing his land, containing 515
     acres, adjoining Isaac Eason and Abraham Eason.
35 See “The Hills of Wilkes County” for more information concerning the Pope, Jordan and Hill families.

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36 The estate settlement of Abraham Eason, Oglethorpe County, GA, Guardian and Administrator’s Bonds, 1794-1848,
      page 56.
37 The Augusta Chronicle, Vol. I, 1786-1799, dated 23 April 1791, page 2 column 3.
38 “The Hills of Wilkes County”, Vol. 2, page 658.
39 The Last Will and Testament of Lewis Pope, February 14, 1805, Oglethorpe County, GA, Court of Ordinary, Will Book
     A (1794-1806), Pgs 146-148.
40 The 1800 census of Oglethorpe County, GA for Edmond Jordan, Captain Lees District, shows Jemima as a female
      (0-10). The 1820 Census of Oglethorpe County, GA, for Edmond Jordan, Ancestry image 20 of 41, shows Jemima as
     a female (16-26). The 1830 census for Oglethorpe County, GA for Edmond Jourdin, Captain Wright’s District, page 74,
     Ancestry image 26 of 86, shows Jemima as a female (30-40).
41 “The History of Oglethorpe County”, from the Oglethorpe County website site.
42 From an article on Lexington, contributed to the Oglethorpe County Georgia Gen Web website by the Northeast
     Georgia Regional Development Center.
43 “Roster of the Revolutionary Soldiers in Georgia”, by Mrs. Howard H. McCall, Vol. I, p. 89; Vol. III, p. 113
44 1790 tax list of Wilkes County, Captain John Pope’s Militia District of Colonel Freeman’s Battalion, for Lewis Pope.
45 “Oglethorpe County, Georgia Abstracts of Wills, 1794-1903,” by Fred W. McRee, Jr., Will Book A, page 140, showing
      the Will of Thomas Johnson, dated 5 September 1803. In his will, Thomas identified his neighbors as Lewis Pope and
      Edmond Jordan and his sons as James Johnson and Henry Johnson.
46 Oglethorpe County, GA, Deed Book B, page 353, Richard McRee to Edmond Jordan.
47 Oglethorpe County, GA, Deed Book D, p. 360, Josiah Jordan to Edmond Jordan.
48 1802 tax list of Oglethorpe County, Captain Tillery’s District, for Edmond Jordan, taxed on 168 � acres.
49 1803 tax list of Oglethorpe County, Captain Seymour Lee’s District, for Edmond Jordan, taxed on 168 � acres.
50 Warranty deed, Edmond Jordan to James Colley. Oglethorpe County, GA, Deed Book D, page 437,
51 1805 tax list of Oglethorpe County, Captain Henry Hartsfield’s District, for Edmond Jordan, taxed on 168 � acres.
52 1793 tax list of Wilkes County, GA, Captain Needham Norre’s, for Lewis Pope.
53 1798 tax list of Oglethorpe County, Captain Lee’s District, for Lewis Pope, showing his land originally granted to
      Freeman.
54 Land plat of John Freeman, Georgia Surveyor General - Plats, Colonial and Headright, Plat Book B, page 158.
55 1799 tax list of Oglethorpe County, Captain Seymour Lee’s district, for Edmond Jordan, showing his land originally
     granted to Knox and adjoining Thomas Johnson. On the same tax list and in the same district, Lewis Pope is also
     shown adjoining Thomas Johnson.
56 Oglethorpe County, GA, Deed Book C, page 340, Mary Knox to Edmond Jordan.
57 1805 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain William Hatchett’s District, for 48. Lewis Pope, deceased.
58 “The Hills of Wilkes County,” Vol. II, page 659, for Jemima Jordan.
59 Family Bible of James M. and Lucy Jordan Smith, showing the birth date of Willis A. Jordan.
60 “The Hills of Wilkes County,” Vol. II, page 659, for Willis A. Jordan.
61 1850 census of Oglethorpe County, Division 66, Edward V. Collier, Ancestry image 82 of 104. Daridly is listed as 47.
      The 1860 census, however, lists her as 54.
62 Oglethorpe County GA, Minutes of the Inferior Court, June Term, 1802, Edmond Jordan, showing jury duty and
     appointment as road commissioner.
63 Oglethorpe County GA, Minutes of the Inferior Court, January Term, 1804, report on road feasibility.
64 Oglethorpe County GA, Minutes of the Inferior Court, January Term, 1805, Edmond appointed to maintain road.
65 Oglethorpe County GA, Minutes of the Inferior Court, June Term, 1807, Edmond appointed to maintain road.

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66 1802 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain Tillery’s District, #41, Thomas Jordan.
67 Benjamin Knox to Thomas Jordan, January 31, 1803, Oglethorpe County, GA, Deed Book D, page 232, Deed
     for 169 acres
68 1804 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain William Hatchett’s District, #57, Thomas Jordan.
69 1804 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain William Hatchett’s District, #88, George Philips, agent for
     Absalom Knox deceased.
70 1804 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain William Hatchett’s District, #17, George Philips, Doctor, adjoining
     the lands of William Ogilvie.
71 1805 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain William Hatchett’s District, #75, William White.
72 William Applewhite to Robert Freeman, November 1818, 17 acres on the Lexington and Athens Road, Oglethorpe
      County, Deed Book J, page 55.
73 1805 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain William Hatchett’s District, #105, Thomas Jordan.
74 1812 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain Landrum’s District, #65, Thomas Jordan.
75 The Last Will and Testament of Thomas Johnson, dated 5 September 1803, recorded 13 February 1805,
     Oglethorpe County, GA Court of Ordinary, Will Book A, page 140.
76 “Country Life in Georgia in the Days of My Youth,” Pp. 44-45, Copyright 1919 by Mrs. Rebecca Latimer Felton.
     Printed by Index Printing Company, Atlanta, GA. The author of this speech, Rebecca Latimer Felton, might be a
     descendant of George Latimer, who appears as a neighbor of Willis A. Jordan, and near to Edmond Jordan, on the
     Oglethorpe County tax lists from 1825 to 1831.
77 The Augusta Chronicle, July 4th 1807, page 3, column 3.
78 1813 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain Landrum’s District, #119, Edmond Jordan and Stud horse.
79 Warranty deed, Willis Pope to Edmond Jordan, November 1808, Oglethorpe County, Deed Book E, page 425.
80 The 1808 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain Joseph Morton’s district, #171, Edmond Jordan.
81 The 1809 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain Joseph Morton’s district, #143, Edmond Jordan.
82 The 1810 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain Landrum’s district, #166, Edmond Jordan.
83 The 1805 Land Lottery of Georgia
84 The 1808 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain Joseph Morton’s district, #42, Thomas Jordan.
85 The 1809 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain Joseph Morton’s district, #107, William Applewhite.
86 The 1812 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain Landrum’s district, #135, Edmond Jordan.
87 The 1815 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain Landrum’s district, #162, William Applewhite.
88 The 1813 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain Landrum’s district, #64, Thomas Jordan is next to W. H. Crawford.
89 John Newton had purchased 375 acres of land on Golden Grove Creek from James Finley in March 1789. Wilkes
     County, GA, Deed Book HH, page 136, as recorded in “The Early Records of Georgia“, Volume II, Wilkes County,
     Page 110, abstracted and compiled by Grace Gillam Davidson, published in 1933 at Macon, GA.
90 The information on William H. Crawford and John Newton came from the Georgia Genealogical website of Oglethorpe
      County.
91 The Athens Gazette, August 14, 1814, p. 3.
92 “Jordan versus Crutchfield,” 1822, Oglethorpe County, GA, Superior Court Minutes.
93 The 1820 census of Oglethorpe County, GA for Edmond Jordan, showing 30 slaves.
94 Edmond certainly knew four of the children of Willis A. Jordan. A question, however, arises about the two children
     shown in the household of Daridley and Benjamin Ogilvie. After Benjamin died and Daridley married E. V. Collier, the
     children had guardians appointed them by the court. The 1840 census does not record these Ogilvie children in the
     household of Edward and Daridley Collier. Were they children from a previous Ogilvie marriage and, therefore, not the
     responsibility of Daridley?
94 Letters of administration on the estate of William Applewhite, June 1822 - October 1822,Oglethorpe County, GA,
     Inferior Court Docket 1801 -1823.
95 Willis A. Jordan and Sarah W. Dunn, Oglethorpe County, Court of Ordinary, Marriages 1794-1829, page 284.

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96 1823 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain Bailey’s district, #46, Edmond Jordan, showing 23 slaves.
97 1823 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain Bailey’s district, #13, Willis A. Jordan, showing 7 slaves.
98 Benjamin Ogilvie and Day Ridley Jordan, Oglethorpe County, Court of Ordinary, Marriages 1794 -1829, Book A,
     page 106.
99 Warranty Deed, Mark Smith to William Smith, Oglethorpe County, GA, Deed Book N, pages 327-328.
100 Guardianship records concerning the minors of Benjamin W. Ogilvie, Oglethorpe County, Ga, Inferior Court minutes,
       1834-1849. The children in question were Lucius Blanton Ogilvie and James B. Ogilvie.
101 Deed of Gift, Edmond Jordan to Daridley Ogilvie, Oglethorpe County, GA, Deed Book N, Pages 463-464.
102 Edward V. Collier and Mrs. Daridley Ogilvie, Oglethorpe County, Court of Ordinary, Marriages Book A.
103 The death of Edward V. Collier is noted on the Administration Papers of said estate, F. P. Collier, Administrator,
       Oglethorpe County, GA, Court of Ordinary. (Georgia Archives, Drawer # 306 - Box # 118)
104 Warranty Deed, Charles Smith to Edmond Jordan, August 1830, Oglethorpe County, GA, Deed Book N, page 266.
105 Warranty Deed, Pleasant Glass to Edmond Jordan, September 1830, Oglethorpe County, GA, Deed Book N, page 266.
106 Deed of Gift, Edmond Jordan to Daridley Ogilvie, Oglethorpe County, GA, Deed Book N, Pages 463-464.
107 Warranty Deed, Edmond Jordan to Thomas Johnson, December 1832, Oglethorpe County, GA, Deed Book N,
       Page 460.
108 Warranty Deed, John Bledsoe to Edmond Jordan, 1833, Oglethorpe County , GA, Deed Book N, page 81.
109 1828 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Captain Bragan’s district, #47, Edmond Jordan, showing an additional
       202 � acres.
110 1833 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Lexington, #55, Edmond Jordan.
111 1834 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Lexington, #59, Edmond Jordan.
112 1836 tax list of Oglethorpe County, GA, Lexington, #66, Edmond Jordan.
113 The Last Will and Testament of Edmond Jordan, 12 November 1836, Recorded 8 December 1836, Oglethorpe County,
       GA, Will Book D, page 39.

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