NP7: Chute Family Notes: Notes 7-86 through 7-100
Notes


Note    N86          Index

Joseph and Sarah lived on the farm that was owned by her father "The Winslow Place", and died there. Their son Edwin lived on his father's farm.


Notes


Note    N7-87         Back to Index        Back to Sergeant Josiah Chute and Mary Noyes Chute.

Notes on Sergeant Josiah Chute and Mary Noyes Chute:

"Born in Windham, Cumberland Co., Me., June 4, 1759; was a soldier in the Revolution, in the battles of Hubbardstown, July 7, 1777, - when he was wounded in the shoulder by a musket ball - Monmouth, June 28, 1778, and at Valley Forge in 1779, he was appointed or promoted to the 5th Company of the 11th Regiment of Massachusetts on January 1, 1778, and was honorably discharged, Jan 1, 1779, having been in the service two whole years. He was orderly sergeant and by many was honored with the title of Colonel. After he returned home in 1781, he was made constable and collector of taxes. He collected a tax of £370 in 1782, and £421 1 1 in 1783. He bought of Zebulon Noyes for £45, a town lot in Portland, Aug. 7, 1786. He was one of the selectmen in 1788, 1791-6, 1798, 1791-6, 1800, 1802-4, 1806-11, 1814-16. He was town clerk of Windham in 1804, and represented the "District of Maine" in the General Court of Massachusetts in 1805-12 and again in 1816-20. He married Mary, daughter of David Noyes of Portland, Sept. 11, 1781, and had ten children."


War Department

Invalid Pension

A statement that Josiah Chute, late a sergeant in the Army of the Revolution, was on the 9th day of March 1821, inscribed on the pension list, Roll of Maine Agency, at the rate of five and thirty-three and one third one hundredths dollars per month; and that his name is now on the roll of the same Agency, at the rate of eight dollars per month, commencing on the 9th day of Jan., 1830. This certificate is issued in lieu of one dated on the ninth of March 1821 (cancelled).

Given at the War Office of the United States this 25th day of Jan. one thousand, eight hundred and thirty.

J. L. Edwards, Secretary of War


War Department

Revolutionary Claim

I certify that in confrmity with the laws of the United States of the 7th June 1832, Josiah Chute of the State of Maine, who was a corporal and sergeant in the army of the Revolution is entitled to receive $103.50 per annum, during his natural life, commencing on the 4th of March 1831, and payable semi-annually on the 4th of March, and 4th of September in every year. Given at the War Office of the United States, this 8th day of March, 1833.

J. L. Edwards, Secretary of War


"Chute, Josiah, (also given Joseph), Windham. Private, Capt. Samuel Knight's (Seacoast) CO. ; enlisted July 12, 1775; service, 6 mos. 5 days, at Falmouth, Cumberland Co. ; also, Corporal, Capt. Richard Mayberry's co. Col. Ebenezer Francis's regt.; pay abstract for travel allowance, etc., from Dorchester Heights home; credited with 7 days allowance; warrant allowed in Council Nov. 29, 1776; also, return of men enlisted into Continental Army from Capt. Thomas Trott's co., Col. Timothy Pike's (4th Cumberland Co.) regt., dated Nov. 24, 1778 ; residence, Windham; enlisted for town of Windham; joined Capt. Mabury's co.. Col. Francis's regt. ; enlistment, 3 years ; reported mustered by Col. Yarrick ; also, Sergeant, Capt. Maybery's co., Col. Benjamin Tupper's regt. ; Continental Army pay accounts for service from Jan. 1, 1777, to Dec. 31, 1779; reported as serving 13 mos. as Corporal, 23 mos. as Sergeant; also, Capt. Richard Mayber3-'s co., Col. Ebenezer Francis's regt. ; subsistence allowed from date of enlistment, Jan. 14, 1777, to time of arrival at Bennington ; credited with 64 day's allowance ; also. Col. Tupper's (l0th) regt.; muster roll for March, 1779, dated West Point; enlisted Jan. 1, 1777."

Source: Office of the Secretary of State, State of Massachusetts, Massachusetts soldiers and sailors of the revolutionary war, A compilation from the archives by Massachusetts. Vol. 3 CAAL - CORY. Wright and Potter Printing Co., State Printers in Boston, pages 464-465, "Chute" entries. 1896.


Josiah and Mary Chute owned the covenant in the church 1785, Col Josiah Josiah Chute died Oct. 2, 1834; and immediately after, Mary Chute, wife of Josiah, was granted $103.50 per annum as a pension. She died Nov. 19, 1843, aged eighty."

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Pages 39-42.


Notes


Note    N7-88         Back to Index        Back to Captain John Wildman or Wyldman and Eleanor Chute Wildman.

Notes on Captain John Wildman or Wyldman and Eleanor Chute Wildman:

Eleanor's name is also spelled CHOUTE in some records.

"Major JOHN WILDMAN (father of Captain John Wildman) of Becket, Shrivenham, Berks, born 1621. Republican. Supported Parliament. Later critic of Cromwell. Attended 'Putney Debates' October 1647. Land speculator 1650s. Involved in 'Rye House Plot' with Algernon Sidney 1683. Supported Monmouth Rebellion 1685, and William of Orange 1688. Given position of Post Master General 1689 by King William III. Took possession of the Post Office, Lombard Street, in 1689. Placed his servant and accountant George Searle in Post Office, later to be Accomptant General. Wildman dismissed post February 1691. Knighted by William III, 29 October 1692. Died 4 June 1693 aged 70 years. Monument at Shrivenham, Hants. Married, first, FRANCES dau. of FRANCIS ENGLEFIELD of Berkshire. Bart. m. c.1650, 1st wife. Married, second, LUCY, dau of Lord LOVELACE. Married before 1655. Died aged 63 years, 6 months before husband. No Issue. Lucy was his 2nd wife. Captain JOHN WILDMAN was his only son. Widower after 1677 and did not remarry. Died 1710. Bequeathed estate to John Shute, an adopted son and kinsman by of marriage, later 1st Earl of Barrington. Will, Herts. PCC Prob.11/517. ff.309-311. 11 Oct 1710. Will included legacy of £100 to George Searle who was "long my father's faithful servant." Married there by Licence 5 Sept 1676 to ELEANOR, 2nd dau of Edward Chute of Bethersden, Kent & Elizabeth Westrowe formerly Chute, later of Stanstead, St Margarets. She died August 1677 aged 19 years. No surviving issue."

Source: Website of BRYANT G BAYLIFFE, Section 1: "The Story of George Searle, Gent. (1654 - 1723) and Sir John Wildman (1621 - 1693)"
URL: http://www.bayliffe.me.uk/searle&wildman.htm

Comment: The actual relationship to John Shute, 1st Earl of Barrington is unknown. It may be a relationship derived from his father's second marriage to Lucy Lovelace, daughter of Lord Lovelace. It is not a relationship between the Chute and Shute families.


Notes


Note    N89         Index
Also listed as "Philipus Chute", b. 1612 and Philip, 1615.

Notes


Note    N90         Index
Nickname: Leafy.

Notes


Note    N91         Index
Also listed as Kate A. Morse

Notes


Note    N7-92         Back to Index        Back to Charles Ernest Chute and Tamar McConnell Chute.

Notes on Charles Ernest Chute and Tamar McConnell Chute:

"Born Feb. 13, 1815; after his mother's death, he was taken and brought up by his uncle and aunt Barteaux, and went with them to Ohio, Grand River and London, Ontario, and finally to the first concession of Malahide, 1838, where they still live. Mr. Chute has been a good and useful man, both civic and religious, farmer, magistrate, etc."

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Page 111.



Burial Information:
"7. Grey granite on cement base, oval top; sun rising motif
East - Charles CHUTE / died / July 18, 1900 / in his 86th year /
At rest /
his wife Tamar McCONNELL / died Dec. 23, 1920 / in her 96th year / CHUTE/
See Source 341 for source detail

Source on information on Tamar McConnell's first or second husband, Peter Shoemaker:

Haggan Papers, Part I, Page 131, McConnell
Publication: Available through LDS Library System
Source researched by Sheila Stewart: stewart57@excite.com
for Gertridge Tree
Ancestry.com
Updated: Mon Jul 16 2001


"Charles Ernest Chute was an active police magistrate for over 50 years. Tamar McConnell Chute came from Nova Scotia to Malahide Township in 1829 - her brother was the locally famous preacher, Shook McConnell. As an elderly lady, she gave a newspaper reporter an interesting account of the family's voyage from Nova Scotia to Ontario."

Rodney Cecil Chute, 12 DEC 2002, Family Data Worksheet

Notes


Note    N7-93         Back to Index        Back to Alexander Chute/Chewte.

Notes on Alexander Chute/Chewte:

"1. Alexander, lord of the manor in Taunton of Somersetshire, d. in 1268. Left two sons."

Source: "Pedigree of the Chutes in England. No. 1". Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Page 9


CHALONER CHUTE, Speaker of the House of Commons, and the first of the Chutes of the Vyne, was born about 1595. According to the inscription upon his fine marble monument in the Tomb Chamber next the Chapel (Plate VI.), his ancestors possessed the manor of Taunton until the reign of Henry VIII.; but if this be so, they must have held it under the see of Winchester, to which it belonged from Saxon times until the seventeenth century. The family was, however, of ancient standing in Sussex, Kent, and Somersetshire; and can trace1 a direct male descent from Alexander Chute of Taunton, who died 1268. They are said to "carry the memorial of the third nation of the Germans that conquered the Britons, commonly called Jutes."2

1Berry's Hampshire Genealogies, p. 117.
2Manning's Lives of the Speakers, p 356- [Note: Chaloner W. Chute used a different edition of this book than we possess.]

Source: Chute, Chaloner W. A History of The Vyne in Hampshire: Being a Short Account of the Building & Antiquities of that House Situate in the Parish of St. John Co. Hants & of Persons Who Have at Some Time Lived There, Jacob & Johnson, Winchester, Simpkin, Marshall & Co., London, 1888. Pages 67-68.


This ancient family derives from Alexander Chute, Lord of the Manor of Taunton, in Somersetshire, as early as 1268, at which place the Chutes continued until the sixteenth century, when they removed to Wrenham, in Suffolk, and subsequently purchased the beautiful seat of" The Vine" in Hampshire, long the residence of the noble family of Sandys."

Source: Manning, James, Esq., The Lives of the Speakers of the House of Commons: E. Churton, 26 Holles Street, London, Publisher, 1850. Page 334


Alexander Chewte/Chute was reported by oral tradition to be "Lord of the Manor of Taunton, Somersetshire, England". His earliest ancestor was reported, also through oral tradition, to be one "Baron Edouard LeChute, granted land by William the Conquerer after the Battle of Hastings". Edouard's grandson, Robert, was reported to have built the manor in which Alexander lived. However, Edouard does not appear on the Battle Abbey Rolls, the Domesday Book, or anywhere else. Another suggestion, from the same Chute Genealogies, is that the name is descended from the descendants of Hengist and Horsa, of the Jutes, the same ancestor that the entire House of Saxony derives its royal line.

These two oral traditions have been passed down through the Chute family for centuries, and it is only recently that we have begun to take a serious look at them. As a result, much of this earliest history is now questioned, if not outright disregarded and disputed, by Chute genealogists on both sides of the Atlantic. While it is known that record of an Alexander Chewte probably did exist, and that he may have been significant enough to have armorial bearings (the three swords which appear in every Chute coat of arms, no matter which Chute displays them), and that the date of 1268 is associated with him (his death), the rest of the oral tradition in these early times is extremely doubtful. For a longer explanation of the reasoning, see Baron Edouard and the Jutes.

Other 'oral tradition', which did not appear in the 1894 Chute Genealogies, refers to the existance of an earlier individual by the name of "Adam", although it is not certain where he was supposed to have appeared in the pedigree. [Note: This individual was located by Walter John Chute of Nova Scotia in 1970.

Genealogical research is a lengthy, time-consuming process of researching original records and documents ... and in some cases requires the necessity of reviewing fragile documents in person. At the moment, one interesting candidate has come to light, purely by accident. Frederick Stephen ("Steve") Chute uncovered this man, while surfing the Internet, looking for "Shutes" who might have been confused with "Chutes" at some time in history, and in doing so, discovered a "Robert de Chete" or "de Shete", located about 20-30 miles away from Taunton, in Devonshire. This Robert, one generation older than Alexander, had a wife, Roesia Coffin, and a father, Lucas. Naturally, the similarity between the names "Robert LeChute" and "Robert de Shete" caught everyone's attention - in a big way - and we are now in the process of backtracking the original source. At this point, the last known recorded source for the name was Devon Feet of Fines; Volume I, Richard I to Henry III 1196-1272 by The Reverend Oswald J. Reichel, published at Exeter by The Devon and Cornwall Record Society, in 1912. The record in this case was a marriage dowry. Francis Chute of Arundel, his interest piqued along with the rest of us, has begun the process of tracking it down further. It may be that our origins are in Devonshire, rather than Taunton.

HISTORICAL TIMELINE: But if Alexander did live, and eventually die, in Taunton, in 1268 (although in some other capacity than as a "lord of a manor"), he may have been alive in 1226, when Peter des Roches and William Brewer, the Bishop of Exeter, led a group of crusaders from England to the Holy Land. Their journey lasted five years; although the group was in Jerusalem when Sultan Kameel agreed to surrender the Holy City. If not a participant, he certainly would have been aware of it.

Historically, the King of England at this time was Henry III (1216-1272), who was only nine when his father, a ruler who was so unpopular he had been the inspiration for the writing, and signing, of the Magna Carta, died. Without a family history (yet) prior to Alexander, it's impossible to determine the precedents for the names of his sons, which very easily could have been his father, uncles or brothers. Nonetheless, it should be noted that the father of Henry III was John, and his sole brother named Richard.

Henry III was himself quite unpopular for his continued financial support of the papacy and his habit of granting important offices to foreigners. That financial support was excessive enough that eventually, the country's checkbook, as it were, was separated from the monarchy and placed under baronial control. Opposition to Henry was considerable enough, that some historians credit him for sowing the early seeds of British nationalism, so many people were united in opposition against his support of "foreigners". However, Alexander did live in a region that was under the control of the Church, through the Bishops of Winchester. It may have been that the hostility felt by many other barons throughout England was not felt as keenly in Taunton, which would have benefitted from Henry's acquiescence to the papacy. Considering this family's tremendous royalist traditions and leanings, even at their own expense (consider the American Revolution), we may have been strong and stubborn Royalists even then.

Franciscan Roger Bacon (1214-1294) wrote his Opus Majus in response to an order on 2 JUNE 1266 by Pope Clement IV, elected a year earlier. He was also a resident of Somersetshire, born in Ilchester, and is now considered one of the earliest European proponents of the scientific experimental method.


PEDIGREE OF CHUTE, OR CHEWTE: As we have in the present number referred to a parchment pedigree of the Chutes, we here reprint the account given in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, XIII., 123. The original is in the possession of Ariel P. Chute, Esq., of Lynnfield, Mass: Alexander1 Chute of Taunton, in the county of Somerset, A. D., 1268, had issue: John2 of the same town, m. Jane, dau. of Sir John Bromfield; and Richard, temp. Edw. I. 1274.

Source: The Heraldic Register Recording the Armorial Bearings and Genealogies of American Families, page 142


"The Chutes were of long-standing in the counties of Kent and Somerset, wherer they were originally settled. They were lords of the manor of Taunton, until about the year 1500, when Edmond Chute sold the manor to Lord Denham. The Kentish branch of the family expired in 1700, on the death of Sir George Chute, bart.

Alexander, lord of the manor in Taunton in 1268, had a son, John Chute, living in 1274, who wed Jane, daughter of Sir John Brumfield, knt., and was succeeded by his son, Cuthbert Chute."

Source: A Genealogical and Heraldic History of Great Britain and Ireland, Enjoying Territorial Possessions or High Official Rank But Uninvested with Heritable Honors, John Burke, Esq., Volume I. Published for Henry Colburn by R. Bentley, New Burlington Street, London. 1833.



Notes


Note    N7-94         Back to Index        Back to John Chute/Chewte and Jane Bromfield, Brunfeld or Bamfield (Bampfylde) Chute.

Notes on John Chute/Chewte and Jane Bromfield, Brunfeld or Bamfield (Bampfylde) Chute:

"1. Alexander, lord of the manor in Taunton of Somersetshire, d. in 1268. Left two sons:
2. i. John, 1274, m. Jane daughter of Sir John Brumfield, Kt.
ii. Richard."

Source: "Pedigree of the Chutes in England. No. 1". Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Page 9


Estimated birthdate. The surname was given in WEC as "Brumfield", although "Bromfield" is the currently accepted spelling. There is a wonderful rural legend associated with this union that bears repeating, for its entertainment value if nothing else. The legend has to do with the “Crawling Field”, and as it did not appear in William Chute’s work; our family records make no mention of the source. I found a variation of the story on a web site devoted to the parish and village of Bromfield. My grandfather George M. Chute, Jr., had to have heard it from somewhere, but didn’t think enough of the story to include it in his supplement. I can understand why.

“The parish and village of Bromfield lie immediately to the west of Ludlow. The village stands between the rivers Onny and Teme which eventually merge a little way downstream. In the fork formed by the two rivers stands the remains of a Benedictine Priory. What is left is mainly in the form of St. Mary's Church, the nave of which was originally the name of the priory, and there is still ample evidence of its Norman origins. In the church is a memorial to Henry Hickman who was born at nearby Lady Halton. It is believed by many that he was the first to experiment successfully with anaesthetics.

To the south of the village are some fields which bear the unusual name of 'crawl meadows'. Legend tells us that a certain maid of Bromfield fell in love with a landless knight. Her father disapproved and vowed that if she married this landless knight her marriage portion would only be as much land as she could crawl over between sunset and sunrise. Dressed in leather to protect her delicate skin, she managed to crawl a distance of four miles.”

Coincidentally, our next Chute in line, Cuthbert, suddenly appears in records having married into “landed gentry”. The designation did not appear after his father’s name. Was his wife Jane Bromfield the plucky “maid of Bromfield”?


"John2 and Jane had a son Edward3* m. Christiana Chiddiock, dau. of Sir John C, and had issue, temp. Edw. III. 1308, the three following sons: Phillip44 of Taunton, m. the dau. of Sir John Brittan; James4 m. the dau. of Richard Greenfield; Anthony4m. Anna Indford*, and d. s. p."

Source: The Heraldic Register Recording the Armorial Bearings and Genealogies of American Families, page 142

*Clearly, there are problems with this source. John and Jane's son is consistently identified in other sources as "Cuthbert", not "Edward" and this is also the only source that mentions "Indford" instead of "Treforth", the latter clearly visible as such in the BCHR. I'm not at all sure where he came by the name of "Indford"; it could be a typesetter's error, a mistranscription or copied, erroneously or not, from an unknown source. As the BCHR identifies Anthony's wife as "Treforth", we are using "Treforth" until there is a compelling reason to change or correct it. I suspect "Edward" was merely sloppily transposed from "Temp. Edw. III".


Alexander, lord of the manor in Taunton in 1268, had a son, John Chute, living in 1274, who wed Jane, daughter of Sir John Brumfield, knt., and was succeeded by his son, Cuthbert Chute."

Source: A Genealogical and Heraldic History of Great Britain and Ireland, Enjoying Territorial Possessions or High Official Rank But Uninvested with Heritable Honors, John Burke, Esq., Volume I. Published for Henry Colburn by R. Bentley, New Burlington Street, London. 1833.


Notes


Note    N7-95         Back to Index        Back to George Chute/Chewte and daughters of Tirell and Squire.

Notes on George Chute/Chewte and daughters of Tirell and Squire:

5. i George, son of Philip, 1344; m. da. of Theo. Tirrell. ii Joane, m. Sir John Carmine, Kt.

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Page 9.


Record date associated with George Chute per the BCHR: 1344. Daughter Tirell's father is also identified as THOMAS TWILL. William Edward Chute and the Heraldic Register identify her as "Faril", although this is probably a mistranscription of information obtained, probably from the BCHR. George's father-in-law is identified as Cameron in the Heraldic Register, although the BCHR clearly identifies him as Carmino or Carminow.


"Cuthbert Chute, who m. in the reign of Edward II Christian, daughter of Sir John Chideoke, knt. and had (with two other sons, James who espoused the daughter of Richard Grenfeld; and Anthony, m. to Anne Treforth), Philip Chute, flourishing temp. Edward III, who m. a daughter of Sir John Britton and left, at his decease, a daughter Joane, the wife of Sir John Carmine, and a son and successor, George Chute, lord of the manor of Taunton in 1334; this gentleman wedded a daughter of Thomas Tirrell and was s. by his son."

Source: A Genealogical and Heraldic History of Great Britain and Ireland, Enjoying Territorial Possessions or High Official Rank But Uninvested with Heritable Honors, John Burke, Esq., Volume I. Published for Henry Colburn by R. Bentley, New Burlington Street, London. 1833.


"Phillip4 had issue, George5 m. the dau. of Thomas Faril, Esq., about 1344, and Jane5 m. Sir John Cameron [Carminow]. George5 had Ambrose6 of Taunton, m. Amabel Chittester, daughter of Sir John C, and had Edward7 and Christian7."

Source: The Heraldic Register Recording the Armorial Bearings and Genealogies of American Families, page 142


Notes


Note    N96         Index
Sargeant at Law and baron of the Exchequer in time of Henry VI.

Notes


Note    N7-97         Back to Index        Back to Edmund Chute and (Given name unknown) Kempe.


Notes on Edmund Chute and (Given name unknown) Kempe:

Original biographical detail of Edmund Chute, repeated via numerous sources, is that he "Sold the Manor of Taunton to Lord Denham, in 1502". Subsequent research has shown this claim to be untrue, for two reasons: the land and property in Taunton was, at that time, owned by the Bishops of Winchester and could not have been sold to a "Lord Denham" by any Chute, Edmond or otherwise, and secondly, there was no "Lord Denham" at that time.

It now is believed to have been invented to explain the movement of members of the Chute family out of Taunton, and to give them a more heavily propertied ancestral background than they had.

Interestingly, the following record does confirm the death of a William Chute in Wrentham, Suffolk in 1524. He is believed to be the same individual as a William Chute who was related to a Kempe family member.


Robert9 (1438) had Charles10 who m. the dau. of Sir John Chang (?) [Cheney], and about 1480 had a son Edmond, who sold the manor of Taunton to Lord Donhare(?) [Denham], about 1502. His son and heir Robert12 m. Jane Lucas, dau. of John L., and had issue; Oliver13 m. the dau. of Relide [Redd]. Charles13 m. the dau. of John Crips of the Isle of Guernsey [Thanet]; and William13 m. the dau. of John Braddelson [Badlesmere]of Turbridge.

Note that Lyonell, fourth son of Robert Chute and Jane Lucas has been omitted from this pedigree.

Source: The Heraldic Register Recording the Armorial Bearings and Genealogies of American Families, page 142


Notes


Note    N98         Index
Was living in 1696.

Notes


Note    N7-99         Back to Index        Back to Cuthbert Chute and Christian or Christiana Chiddock or Chideake Chute.

Notes on Cuthbert Chute and Christian or Christiana Chiddock or Chideake Chute:

"3. Cuthbert, in the time of Edward II, 1308, m. Christian, da. of Sir John Chideake, Knt."

Source: "Pedigree of the Chutes in England. No. 1". Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Page 9


"John2 and Jane had a son Edward3* m. Christiana Chiddiock, dau. of Sir John C, and had issue, temp. Edw. III. 1308*, the three following sons: Phillip44 of Taunton, m. the dau. of Sir John Brittan; James4 m. the dau. of Richard Greenfield; Anthony4m. Anna Indford*, and d. s. p."

Source: The Heraldic Register Recording the Armorial Bearings and Genealogies of American Families, page 142

*Clearly, there are problems with this source. John and Jane's son is consistently identified in other sources as "Cuthbert", not "Edward" and this is also the only source that mentions "Indford" instead of "Treforth", the latter clearly visible as such in the BCHR. I'm not at all sure where he came by the name of "Indford"; it could be a typesetter's error, a mistranscription or copied, erroneously or not, from an unknown source. As the BCHR identifies Anthony's wife as "Treforth", we are using "Treforth" until there is a compelling reason to change or correct it. I suspect "Edward" was merely sloppily transposed from "Temp. Edw. III", which is also incorrect. It was King Edward II (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327(?)) who reigned from 1307 until he was deposed by his wife Isabella in January 1327. King Edward III was born on 13 November 1312 and died 21 June 1377.


"Cuthbert Chute, who m. in the reign of Edward II Christian, daughter of Sir John Chideoke, knt. and had (with two other sons, James who espoused the daughter of Richard Grenfeld; and Anthony, m. to Anne Treforth), Philip Chute, flourishing temp. Edward III, who m. a daughter of Sir John Britton and left, at his decease, a daughter Joane, the wife of Sir John Carmine, and a son and successor, George Chute, lord of the manor of Taunton in 1334; this gentleman wedded a daughter of Thomas Tirrell and was s. by his son."

Source: A Genealogical and Heraldic History of Great Britain and Ireland, Enjoying Territorial Possessions or High Official Rank But Uninvested with Heritable Honors, John Burke, Esq., Volume I. Published for Henry Colburn by R. Bentley, New Burlington Street, London. 1833.


HISTORICAL TIMELINE: "In the time of Edward II ..." (Reigned 1284 - 1327). This name stands out pretty dramatically from other Chute names. Again, without knowing an extended prior pedigree, we have no way of knowing if the name was taken from a relation or friend, Chiddock, Chideake or Chewte. If not, the most famous Cuthbert around at the time would have been St. Cuthbert, famed as a miracle worker, whose remains resided in Durham at that time (making it a well known pilgrimage site), and were reportedly famous for having been uncorrupted and un-decomposed when the casket was opened. The site was so well known that even William the Conqueror paid it a visit after his arrival. The Venerable Bede, who wrote so poorly of Hengest and Horsa, also wrote a well known biography of Cuthbert, and the various miracles reported as associated with Cuthbert might shed some light on why our Cuthbert was given the name if in fact, the saint was the inspiration for it: possibly a difficulty at birth from which he - or perhaps his mother - surprisingly recovered. Cuthbert may have been a patron saint of one of his parents, who was often invoked against serious illnesses.

Edward II, who became the 1st Prince of Wales in 1301, met a rather gruesome end during this period of time. His reign was a troubled one, and it was this King who went up against (and lost badly to) Robert the Bruce at Bannockburn, Scotland in 1314. Edward II was deposed on 21 Jan 1327, "and murdered by a red-hot poker in his bowels."


Notes


Note    N100         Index
Came over on the "James", April, 1685.







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