Chute Family Notes: Notes 45-712 through 42-725
Notes


Note    N45-712         Back to Index        Back to Joseph Dimock Chute, Elizabeth Hoffman Chute and Carrie Dale Chute.

Notes on Joseph Dimock Chute, Elizabeth Hoffman Chute and Carrie Dale Chute:

"Born Apr. 26, 1837; married Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph and Sophia (Viditoe) Hoffman, son of John and Ann (Wheelock) Hoffman, son of Joseph, Feb. 4, 1859. Mr. Chute, a first-rate carpenter, went to Boston 1867, settled at Milton Lower Mills, where his wife died May 28, 1884; he married 2nd, Carrie Dale, widow of Hezekiah Hall (James, John, William), 1885."

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Page 135.


Notes


Note    N714         Index
2 sons.

Notes


Note    N715         Index
2 sons.

Notes


Note    N716         Index
1 son.

Notes


Note    N45-717         Back to Index        Back to Joshua Marsden Chute and Irene Potter Malloch Chute.

Notes on Joshua Marsden Chute and Irene Potter Malloch Chute:

"Joshua Marsden Chute, born two miles below Hampton, Oct. 15, 1818; married Irene Potter, daughter of Rev. Peter and Anna (Greenlow) Malloch, Apr. 28, 1849. (Anna Greenlow, was the daughter of James Greenlow and Abigail, daughter of Joseph Alline, son of William and Rebecca Alline, from Rhode Island to Horton, N. S., 1756.) Mr. Chute lived at Campobello Island, N.B., about thirty years when he moved to Cambridgeport, Mass., but he returned again in a year or two, and she has remained, a hard working, sober, Christian woman.

Irene P. Malloch, daughter of Rev. Peter Malloch (1794-l877), and Anna Greenlow (1795-1882). Was born at Fair Haven, Charlotte Co., N. B., Jan 30, 1830, (the parents were Free Baptists), was a home missionary in New Brunswick, over three years and raised one thousand dollars, with which a meeting house was built on the Isle of Campobello, near the coast of Maine, 1874, for the Free Baptist church, which has flourished ever since. In Cambridgeport she has been useful in the churches, Christian missions and temperance organizations, and has composed several recitations, lectures and poems, one of which we subjoin:

John B. Gough (1817-1886) was a well known public speaker on the subject of abstinence from alcohol:

DEATH OF JOHN B. GOUGH (1817-1886)
1.
Our ranks again are broken, a warrior has fled,
From all his earthly troubles, he's numbered with the dead;
But when his sleep is ended, and he's ransomed from the grave,
He then shall meet the army, he tried on earth to save.
2.
I know you all would like it, to know what was his name,
'tis John B. Gough the warrior, for you have heard the same;
When but a boy in sorrow, he struggled hard for life,
And then got married early and took a loving wife.
3.
But when the ruby cup passed, he couldn't well refrain,
His wife tried to prevent him, but found 'twas all in vain;
But when death came and took her, who was to him so dear,
Then he began to realize, his fearful, wild career.
4.
He signed the temperance pledge then, and there began to preach,
And warn poor drunkards soundly, their doom to them did teach;
Aud when the church was crowded, he would a story tell,
How he escaped the monster which always pleased them well.
5.
But his career is ended, he lies beneath the sod,
And freed from all earth's trials, his soul is with his God;
But when the last, loud trumpet, shall bid the sleeper rise.
We then shall see the warrior, with unbeclouded eyes.

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Page 136.



This family sustained a double tragedy in the winter of 1879 when their two eldest sons, William and Lorenzo, sailing on different vessels, were both lost in the same gale, one off of the Newfoundland Coast, in the fishing area known as the Grand Banke, the other in Georges Banke, east of Nantucket. Both ships had sailed out of Gloucester, Massachusetts. The names of both brothers appear on a bronze plaque in Gloucester, in memory of the Gloucester fishermen who had perished at sea.



Listed in the 1851 Campbello Census as "Marsden Chute". There is a conflict in this record on birthplace of son William, with birthplace recorded as "Nova Scotia", while the family moved to Campbello 6 years earlier, in 1845. It may be that the record is in error, or that Irene Chute returned to Nova Scotia for the birth of William. However, 10 years later he is listed as a native. For some reason son James Loring is listed as "Hoammi" in the 1871 Census. He may have been called "Jimmy" or "Jamie" at that age, and the name was mis-transcribed in the Census Records.



1851 Campobello Census
NAME: Chute, Marsden
AGE: 32
ORIGIN: Nova Scotia
RELATION: Husband
OCCUPATION: Fisherman
ARRIVED: 1845
ALSO IN HOUSEHOLD:
Chute, Irene 24 NS Wife
Chute, William 1 NS Son

1861 Campobello Census

NAME: Chute, Marsden
AGE: 40
ORIGIN: Nova Scotia
OCCUPATION: Ship Carpenter
ALSO IN HOUSEHOLD:
Chute, Irean, Wife, 33 Native
Chute, William, Son, 11, Native
Chute, Orenzo, Son, 9, Native
Chute, Daniel, Son, 6, Native
Chute, Millard, Son, 4, Native
Chute, David, Son, 2, Native
Chute, James, Son, 7 wks, Native

1871 Campobello Census

NAME: Chute, Marsden
AGE: 52
ORIGIN: Nova Scotia
OCCUPATION: Joiner
ALSO IN HOUSEHOLD:
Chute, Irene, 43, NB, M
Chute, William, 21, NB, Fisherman
Chute, Lorenzo, 19, NB
Chute, Daniel, 16, NB
Chute, Filmour, 14, NB
Chute, David, 12, NB
Chute, Hoammi(male), 10, NB
Chute, Ida, 8, NB


Lovell's 1871 NB Directory

CAMPOBELLO - A village and settlement on the west end of an island of the same name, parish of Campobello, county of Charlotte. It is chiefly inhabited by fishermen and is situated immediately opposite the towns of Eastport and Lubec in the State of Maine, at the entrance to the Bay of Fundy. The Island of Grand Manan lies south, Indian and Deer Islands north, and the "Wolves" east of Campobello Island. A good trade is done here in smoked herring and line fish. Copper and lead mines are said to exist on the island. Distant from Eastport 2 miles, fare 25c.; from St. Andrews, the shiretown, 17 miles fare 75c.; from St. John 55 miles, fare $1.75. Mail semi-weekly. Population about 600. Population of whole island about 1100.

....
Chute, Marsden, carpenter
....


Unpublished Manuscript, Campobello History, Mary Gallagher

The following consists of Campobello History as taken from the notes of an unpublished manuscript of Mary Gallagher now held in the library at Campobello. The notes were held in private hands at the time they were transcribed with permission of the owner Signed: Pat Townsend". [Note: In this brief account, the date of arrival of ancestor Lionel is incorrect, but I particularly enjoyed her description of Peter Malloch's occupations in Maine: apparently, he not only built the vessels, he built the fish, too.]

"Joshua Marston Chute came from Chute's Cove at the head of the Bay of Fundy. His father was David Morse Chute who came from Massachusetts to Hampton, NS in 1817. Joshua M. Chute was 7th in direct descent from Lionel Chute who arrived at New England in 1636 and was known as the "Old Ipswich Schoolmaster." Joshua married Irene Malloch, daughter of Peter, minister of the gospel, but also engaged in fish and ship building in Eastport, ME. Peter later moved to Campobello with a large family and settled at first on North Road."
Heather Waddingham, Campobello Parish Coordinator, https://sites.rootsweb.com/~nbcampob/

Notes


Note    N719         Index
Died by drowning. The year of death recorded by William E. Chute (1877) is incorrect in the case of both Lorenzo Chute and his brother William. Both died in the same month (February, 1879) during a winter gale in the North Atlantic. The brutality of storms in this region was documented in the film The Perfect Storm. The names of Lorenzo and William Chute appear on the bronze plaque commemorating the fishermen of Gloucester, Massachusetts who lost their lives while at sea. They were on different ships at the time.

I'm uncertain as to the origin of the actual dates of death: January 24th and February 17th, respectively. It may be the dates which the vessels originally sailed (more likely, given the January 24th date, which would have preceded the date of the "February gale", or, in the latter case, the date the ship was officially recorded as "lost at sea". The exact date of the February 1879 gale is not mentioned in these records; if both brothers died in the same storm, their dates of death should have been identical, as they are not, there may be an undetermined reason why they are listed as different. I'm leaving the dates as is, although I've changed the year, based on these records.


The Gwendolen
Sch. Gwendolen, 82.41, built in this city 1877, lost on Grand Banks in February gale 1879. Owned by Cunningham & Thompson. Valued at $5154, insured for $4510 and $1500 additional on outfits.
Crew list:

Zadock Hawkins, master, left widow
Lyman H. Morey, steward, widow and child
Edward Landry, of Sydney, C. B. , widow and two children
Richard Hurley, widow
Alex. McKenzie, of Cape Breton
John McKay, of Cape Breton
Michael Donahoe, of Newfoundland
William Nelson, of Westport, Me. Augustus Crowell, of Cape Sable
John McGuire
James Calwell, of New Brunswick
Daniel McDonald
William Chute
William C. Wilson, of Maine

From Vital Stats from NB Newspapers, v 49, #893, St. Andrews Bay Pilot, iss. 17 Apr 1879:

"Editor of Bay Pilot: Dear Sir, Below I hand you a list of the young men belonging to this Island that were lost in the Great Gale on Georges Banks this winter; also the loss of four more, two on the Western Banks in the same Gale, one by the upsetting of a dory while fishing on the banks last June and one by the upsetting of a dory last week at Bliss Harbour, all engaged in the Gloucester Fisheries. Leonard REYNOLDS, Thaddeus STIMPSON, Robt. REYNOLDS, John BATSON, Lorenzo CHUTE; on Georges: William WILSON, Wm CHUTE; on Western Banks: Sylvester MITCHELL, lost in June; David B. TINKER at Bliss Harbour. (Yours truly) Henry Swires, Welchpool, Campobello, 2nd April."



Notes


Note    N720         Index
Died by drowning. The year of death recorded by William E. Chute is incorrect in the case of both Lorenzo Chute and his brother William. Both died in the same month (February, 1879) during a winter gale in the North Atlantic. The brutality of storms in this region was documented in the film The Perfect Storm. The names of Lorenzo and William Chute appear on the bronze plaque commemorating the fishermen of Gloucester, Massachusetts who lost their lives while at sea. They were on different ships at the time.


The Lottie F. Babson
Sch. Lottie F. Babson 61.96, built in Essex in 1866, lost on Georges in February gale 1879. Owned by D. C. & H. Babson. Valued at $2505, insured for $1096.
Crew list:
Seward Reynolds, master, widow and four children
Robert Reynolds, brother to master
John Graves, widowed mother
Lorenzo Chute
John Batson
Daniel Tafton
George Pooler
Samuel Thompson
Joseph Boone
James Bushey
Frederick Hall, steward

I'm uncertain as to the origin of the actual dates of death: January 24th and February 17th, respectively. It may be the dates which the vessels originally sailed (more likely, given the January 24th date, which would have preceded the date of the "February gale", or, in the latter case, the date the ship was officially recorded as "lost at sea". The exact date of the February 1879 gale is not mentioned in these records; if both brothers died in the same storm, their dates of death should have been identical, as they are not, there may be an undetermined reason why they are listed as different. I'm leaving the dates as is, although I've changed the year, based on these records.

From Vital Stats from NB Newspapers, v 49, #893, St. Andrews Bay Pilot, iss. 17 Apr 1879:

"Editor of Bay Pilot: Dear Sir, Below I hand you a list of the young men belonging to this Island that were lost in the Great Gale on Georges Banks this winter; also the loss of four more, two on the Western Banks in the same Gale, one by the upsetting of a dory while fishing on the banks last June and one by the upsetting of a dory last week at Bliss Harbour, all engaged in the Gloucester Fisheries. Leonard REYNOLDS, Thaddeus STIMPSON, Robt. REYNOLDS, John BATSON, Lorenzo CHUTE; on Georges: William WILSON, Wm CHUTE; on Western Banks: Sylvester MITCHELL, lost in June; David B. TINKER at Bliss Harbour. (Yours truly) Henry Swires, Welchpool, Campobello, 2nd April."



Notes


Note    N721         Index
5 children.

Notes


Note    N722         Index
Killed by a runaway team of horses.

Notes


Note    N723         Index
Notes on Harry I. Taylor and Cornelia Chute Taylor:

The couple had at least four children. Given the location of their marriage, the location of her birth is questionable. Need further confirmation.


Notes


Note    N724         Index
2 children.

Notes


Note    N45-725         Back to Index        Back to Paul Andrew Kimmelshue, Sr. and Thressa (Theresa) C. Chute Kimmelshue.

Notes on Paul Andrew Kimmelshue, Sr. and Thressa (Theresa) C. Chute Kimmelshue:

"My name is Roseanne Kimmelshue Metcalf. Thressa Chute was my grandmother. I found this website by accident but was thrilled when I saw my grandmother's and grandfather's names. My father, George Kimmelshue, one of Thressa's sons was very excited when I told him what I had found. I noticed some of the information was missing. Thressa (or Theresa as we knew her) died on June 25, l966. She had 4 children, Paul Kimmelshue, Jr., George E. Kimmelshue, Mary Elizabeth Kimmelshue (Clark) and Louis Kimmelshue.

This discovery has opened up a whole new dialog with my father about his family. It's amazing how much he remembers about his Aunt Victoria, my grandmother's sister, and her children, whose last name was Wills. After Victoria and her husband, George Wills, died within a year of each other, my grandmother took in and raised her 4 nieces and nephews. I was 12 when my grandmother passed away, but I remember her as one of the most loving, generous people God ever created. I often tell my sons that I wished they could have known her.

If there is any more information that you would like to have, please do not hesitate to ask. I would love to hear from anyone in the Chute family. My email address is: MLMetcalfs@aol.com Just put it to the attention of Roseanne."

Source: Chute Family Message Board Posting
Subj: Thressa C. Chute Kimmelshue
Date: 4/4/2004 1:15:10 PM Eastern Standard Time

Military Service, Paul Kimmelshue

Andrew's service record is somewhat difficult to piece together as it appears to involve two different levels of service: service in the United States National Guard, which was mostly called to provide stateside national security, followed by an overseas assignment, from July 1918 to January 1919.

Maryland in the World War 1917-1919 Military and Naval Service Records In Two Volumes, outlines the activities of the National Guard before Paul Kimmelshue's enlistment, and clarifies that "on August 5, 1917, the entire National Guard in Federal Service was drafted into the Army of the United States, thus losing its State status." (page 99) Paul would have been in the National Guard about four months when this took place.

He was assigned to the 5th Infantry: "The 5th Infantry, under command of Colonel Washington Bowie, Jr., was mustered into Federal service on April 13, 1917, at its armory in Baltimore... on April 25, 1917, under State orders, a provisional battalion comprising Companies D and H and attached sanitary personnel, under command of Major D. John Markey, reported for duty at Lake Montebello and Loch Raven in guarding the Baltimore City water supply. (Paul had been assigned to Company H).

War Department records indicate that the 5th Infantry was reorganized as or reassigned to the 115th Infantry, which explains the 10/1/1917 entry in his service record.

On July 13, 1918 he was assigned to "Company I, 49th Infantry", which appears to be the unit that was sent overseas from July 18th of that year - five days after the transfer - to the 21st of January of the following year (1919). It may have been a unit that was merged with another state's infantry unit, or a unit that drew men from many different states. Based on other mentions of a "49th Infantry" (I'm assuming we can dispense with the World War I 49th Infantries from Australia/New Zealand, Ireland, Turkey and Great Britain) he may possibly have arrived in France, and may have been part of the 49th Infantry that engaged in battle in the Argonne Forest:

"Commissioned Provisional Second Lieutenant of Infantry, U. S. Regular Army, Nov. 12, 1917. Assigned to the 49th Infantry, Camp Merritt, N. J., Nov. 24, 1917 ... sailed for France with my regiment in July, 1918. On arrival, regiment was made a small arms training regiment ..." From the alumni page of the Harvard Class of 1916, published in June of 1922 for Philip Wager Lowry

"Alphonse Wyss, 20 years old, enlisted on February 5, 1918 with the United States Marine Corps, killed in action on November 4, 1918 in the Argonne Forest, France Co. B, 49th Infantry, 5th Division of the United States Marine Corps." Wyss was from Sandusky, Ohio. Source: http://www.sandusky-county-scrapbook.net/MemorialPkwy/SoldierAlpha.htm

Anyone who would be willing to make sense of Paul's service record would be most welcome.








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