Chute Family Notes: Notes 3-22 through 3-40
Notes


Note    N3-22         Back to Index        Back to Charles Herbert Chute:
Notes on Charles Herbert Chute:

WEC: "Went on a trip to the West Indies with Captain John Graham in the schooner "Lizzie Chute", in the fall of 1867, which was wrecked and all hands lost, seven in number, at Chebogue, near Yarmouth, N.S."

This is not accurate. According to maritime records, the schooner Lizzie Chute was lost on 1 JAN 1868, with 7 lives lost. The nature of the event was "stranding", and the cause unknown. The location of the incident was Chegoggin Point, and the cargo at the time was sugar and molasses. The Captain of the schooner was Captain John Howard Graham, husband of Lois Hayden Chute Graham, and father of Jessie Imorine Graham, wife of William M. Chute.

Consequently, unless the maritime record is shown to be inaccurate, based upon this record, the date for Charles Herbert Chute and John Graham has been changed to 1 JAN 1868.

Source:
Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, Department of Tourism, Culture and Heritage
Record URL, "Lizzie Chute": Lizzie Chute, Chegoggin Point, northwest of Yarmouth, due to stranding.


Notes


Note    N23         Index
Birth year also listed as 1852.

Notes


Note    N24         Index
Notes on Mary Wood: Death date is estimated only, based on birth of youngest daughter.

"Mr. Jewt's wife was admitted to Rowley Church __ April 1695 ... Mary Chute was dismissed, 13 Oct 1706 from Rowley Church to the church in Byfield Parish (Church register, Rowley)."

Numerous genealogical databases - too numerous to count - have married off our Mary Wood, wife of James Chute, to an Edward Ordway as a second marriage. The only problem with that second marriage is that it was recorded as having taken place in 12 DEC 1678, in Newbury. Our Mary Wood married our James Chute a mere five years earlier, in 10 NOV 1673. The original source appears to have been an IGI record.

If this were true, the end result is that all of us who have descended from any of their children OTHER than Mary and Elizabeth, their two eldest children -- which would pretty much be all of us in the American and Canadian lines -- would not be Chutes at all, but Ordways. The fact that we're all here and have the surname "Chute" ought to be everyone's first clue that this reported Wood-Ordway marriage record isn't, as they say in the genealogy biz, "not even remotely supported". Our existances not being enough for some pickier genealogists, there are also records of "Mary Jewt" and not Ordway, changing churches in 1695, the birth of daughter Hannah Chute in 1700, and the fact that she died before he did. A second marriage would have been, well ... bigamous. If any of the two of them could have re-married, it would have been James, and not Mary, although there is no record that he did.

At least one family may have recorded the correct data. This would be the Colby Family. Their records record the following: "Mary WOOD was born on 31 OCT 1653 in Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. She died between 18 MAY 1699 and 14 JUN 1704. Daughter of Isaiah Wood and Mercy Thomson. She was married to Edward ORDWAY on 12 DEC 1678 in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. Children were: Ann ORDWAY, Rachel ORDWAY, Joana ORDWAY, Jacob ORDWAY, Isaiah ORDWAY, Daniel ORDWAY." No record of what their sources were on that, but even without a source -- heck, even if they made it up out of thin air -- it's still more supportable than Edward Ordway having married our Mary Wood in 1678.



Notes


Note    N3-25         Back to Index        Back to Mark Jewett and Mary Chute Jewett.

Notes on Mark Jewett and Mary Chute Jewett:

"i. Mary, b. Nov.8, 1716; m. 1740, Mark4 (Jonathan3, Joseph2, Joseph1, of Edward in England before 1600) Jewett, and had twelve children"

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Page 15.


"184. MARK JEWETT (Jonathan63 Joseph11, Maximilian3 Edward1) was born in Rowley, Mass. Jan. 15 ; bapt. Jan. 18, 1712. He married 1736, Mary Chute, daughter of Deacon James and Mary (Thurston) Chute. She was born in Byfield, Mass., Nov. 8, 1716, and died at Hopkinton, N. H., aged 93. He settled in Rowley, and about 1758 removed to Enfield, N. H., and joined the Shaker Church. He later removed to Exeter, N. H., and then to Hopkinton, where some of his children had preeceded him. His home in Exeter was a few rods from the house in which his brother Moses lived and raised his family. He died in Enfield, N. H., and was buried on Shaker Hill (Shaker records of Enfield)".

Children, born in Rowley, Mass.:
497 Moses, bom Jan. 29, 1737; married (1st) Mary Meade; (2) Mary Sawyer; (3) Mrs. Mary Varney.*
498 Mary, born Jan. 18, 1738; married Lieut. Abraham Sanborn. He was born Dec. 28, 1735, and married July 1, 1756. She, late in life, lived with her son, James Sanborn, in Kinsington, N. H.
499 Katharine, born March 30, 1740; married John Jewett (507).*
500 James, born April 4, 1742 ; died in infancy.
501 Ruth, born April 17, 1744.
502 James, born July 7, 1745 ; married Molly .*
603 Infant ; died Sept. 26, 1747.
504 Mehitable, born Dec. 5, 1749-50 ; died Feb. 13, 1753.
605 Elizabeth, born March 20, 1751.
Perhaps others.

Source: Jewett, Frederic Clarke, M.D. History and Genealogy of the Jewetts of America. Volumes I and II. The Grafton Press, New York. 1908.(Volume I, Page 80)


Notes


Note    N3-26         Back to Index        Back to Brian Chute and Brooke Leann Balding Chute.
Notes on Brian Chute and Brooke Leann Balding Chute:

Brian's parents are unknown at this time. At the moment, the working theory is that he is connected with the Michael Daniel Chute - Benjamin Daniel Chute line, but confirmation on his family connections is needed.


Notes


Note    N3-27         Back to Index        Back to Curtis Chute and Miriam Carr Chute.

Notes on Curtis Chute and Miriam Carr Chute:

"Curtis Chute ... born in Marblehead, Mass., Sept. 15, 1728, taken to Maine, with his parents and two sisters, 1737, and there grew to manhood, received his education probably from his mother, as she taught the first school in Windham, where they settled. He was admitted to communion in the Windham Church, 1753; married Miriam Carr, widow of Josiah Worcester5 (Timothy4, Francis3, Samuel2, Rev. William1), Mar 21, 1754, and lived in Windham. He bought land there of Thomas Maybery, deceased, in 1761; was selectman in 1767; killed by lightning, in Portland, June 5, 1767, and was succeeded by Peter Cobb. His widow was admitted to communion in the church that year. She was a very energetic, industrious woman and kept the family together many years. Letters of administration upon her husband's estate were given her, by the Hon. Samuel Waldo, Judge of Probate, June 7, 1768. She kept accounts of debt and credit in the same ledger that her father-in-law had kept in for years and died Oct, 16, 1799, aged 79."

Source: A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources, by William Edward Chute, Salem, Massachusetts, 1894, Pages 25-26


"Curtis Chute, son of Thomas and Mary (Curtis) Chute, came to this town with his parents. He appears to have been an active, influential young man and, like his father, to have possessed the entire confidence of his fellow townsmen. He lived with his parents on Home Lot No. 12. On March 26, 1767, at the annual town meeting, he was elected selectman and while on town business in Portland, he was instantly killed by lightning, June 4, 1767.

Parson Thomas Smith records this casualty as follows: "Curtis Chute and one young man were instantly killed by lighning at the Widow Goodings. Harrison and others hurt and nearly killed, and the house near being destroyed also." He gives the date as June 5, 1767. Curtis Chute left a widow and five children to mourn his untimely death."

Source: Windham In The Past, by Samuel Thomas Dole, edited by Frederick Howard Dole. Published by Merrill & Webber Company, Auburn, Maine, 1914; reprinted in 1981 by the Higginson Book Company, Salem, Massachusetts.


Land:
No. 12: 7 acres cleared, the house Rotten down, settled by Curtis Chute.
No. 13: 7 acres cleared, No House improved. No. 14, 7 acres cleared by Capt Thomas Chute.

Source: Archives of Massachusetts, Vol 117, Page 481. An Account of the Settlement at New Marblehead and by who Made. 26 Apr 1759. Quoted in Windham In The Past, by Samuel Thomas Dole, p. 51



"The first attacks of the Indians on the white settlements in Maine, in this war, were made July 19, 1745, at St. Georges and Damariscotta (New Castle); and from that time until 1751, the settlers were exposed to all the dangers of a savage war. In the New Marblehead block house eighteen men (not all heads of families) were gathered for safety. These men were: Thomas Chute, Rev. John Wight, Abraham Anderson, William Mayberry, Samuel Webb, John Farrow, Thomas Bolton, Thomas Mayberry, Curtis Chute, Gershom Manchester, David Webb, William Maxwell, John Bodge, William Bolton, Stephen Manchester, Seth Webb, John Webb and John Farrow, Jr." (Windham In The Past, by Samuel Thomas Dole, p. 61)

[Jackie's note: typically for the time period, Dole makes this appear as though the Windham settlers were happily minding their own business when they were attacked without cause by the natives, who all tended to blend together in their minds. The "savages" in this case were the Abenaki, the Penobscot, the Micmac and the Maliseet - who were as different among themselves at times as the English were from the French and the Spanish, although the settlers ironically failed to see any distinction between those tribal groups. Dole also neglects to mention here who actually declared war on whom, and that a good deal of the conflict originated in the War of Austrian Succession and the settlers' fear that the local tribes would ally with the French against them. There was some validity to this, as the French Jesuits - who knew the Abenaki language much better than did the English - had been known to translate the details of treaties into the Abenaki tongue inaccurately, which caused a great deal of suspicion between the Abenaki and the English settlers.

"The relatively harmonious relations following Dummer’s Treaty ended with the outbreak of the War of the Austrian Succession (King George’s War) in 1744. Uncertain about the reaction of the Penobscots to the murder of one of their tribe and false reports of their involvement in raids in Nova Scotia, Massachusetts demanded warrior support against the Micmacs and Maliseets. Although the Penobscots refused, both they and the Kennebecs informed Massachusetts about hostile Indian activities in adjacent areas and sought to dissuade other Indians from attacking the New England frontier. While the effectiveness of these efforts is difficult to gauge, no hostilities occurred in New England until sixteen months after the Anglo-French conflict had commenced. When Pemaquid and Fort St. Georges were attacked in July 1745, Massachusetts sought to divide the Abenakis by invoking their treaty commitments. Governor Shirley demanded that the two Maine tribes either furnish thirty warriors as scouts or offer hostages to insure the tribes' neutrality. When the Indians failed to comply, Massachusetts declared war on them on August 23." The excellent article cited below describes in great detail the immense difficulties the two sides had in communicating with and understanding each other, which also led to conflict.

Source: American Indian Culture and Research Journal, "Mistranslations and Misinformation: Diplomacy on the Maine Frontier, 1725 to 1755", by David L. Ghere. Volume 08, Issue 4, pages 3 through 126, dated 1984-01-01. Original source information: "Declaration of War", October 19, 1744, Documentary History of Maine, 23:296-97; Shirley to Captain Bradbury, January 25, 1745, Ibid., pp. 298-99; Shirley to the Lords of Trade, August 10,1744, Correspondence of William Shirley, Governor of Massachusetts and Military Commander in America, 1731-1760, Ed. Charles Henry Lincoln, 2 Volumes (New York: Macmillan, 1912), 1:138-39; Journal of the House, August 23, 1745.]

For further information on the Abenaki Nation today, visit their tribal website at http://www.abenakination.org/. Also, more recently, Homer St. Francis, the leader of Vermont's Abenaki, died in 2001 at the age of 66. His obituary cited him as a "descendant of Chief Graylocks, who launched raids in Massachusetts and southern Vermont in the 1700s". It is possible the settlers in Windham had heard of him.


Notes


Note    N28         Index
According to Noyes, marriage year was 1743.

Notes


Note    N3-29         Back to Index        Back to Alvin Chute, and Margaret Hayes Chute and son Albert Hayes Chute.
Notes on Alvin Chute, Margaret Hayes Chute and son Albert Hayes Chute:

GMC has Albert being born in 1852 in Dorchester, Massachusetts, but his World War I registration card gives (dated June 5, 1917) lists his age as 22, his date of birth as 20 JUL 1894 and his place of birth as Milton, Massachusetts.

Alvin was either deceased or no longer in the family group, as Albert lists his mother (not both parents) as financial dependents, which may have exempted him from active military service. He was described as tall and slender with blue eyes and dark brown hair. Albert's occupation was "printer"; he was employed by the Southgate Press, on 152 Purchase Street, Boston.


Notes


Note    N3-30         Back to Index        Back to Enoch Noyes and Elizabeth Chute Noyes.
Notes on Enoch Noyes and Elizabeth Chute Noyes:

Elizabeth's surname was spelled Chewte in most records. There is official record conflict on whether she was born in Rowley or Newbury.

Elizabeth CHEWTE (AFN: 11T1-MB5) Pedigree
Sex: F Family
Event(s):
Birth: 10 Apr 1726
Newbury, Essex, Ma
Christening: 10 Apr 1726
Newbury, Essex, Ma
Parents:
Father: Lionel CHUTE (AFN: 92QM-K8) Family
Mother: Anna Or Hannah CHENEY (AFN: 8JFZ-PB)
Marriage(s):
Spouse: Enoch NOYES (AFN: 181K-87T) Family
Marriage: 24 Feb 1746
Newbury, Essex Co., Ma
Spouse: Enoch NOYES (AFN: 14HN-XKX) Family
Marriage: 24 Feb 1746/1747

"Enoch Noyes (1717-96) was a member of the Committee of Safety of Hollis 1778. He was born in Newbury, Mass.; died in Hollis, N. H. Came from Newbury, Mass. His name first appears on the Hollis tax lists in 1747. He was selectman in 1751, and chosen deacon in 1755. His two sons, Enoch and Elijah, were soldiers in the Revolution. Children born in Rowley and Hollis, N.H. Died September 1796, aet. 80."

Source: Paul M. Noyes, Noyes Family Database


Notes


Note    N3-31         Back to Index        Back to Otis St. Clair Chute, and Cora White Chute.
Notes on Otis St. Clair Chute, and Cora White Chute:

On Otis St. Clair Chute's World War I registration card (dated 12 SEP 1918), he described himself as a blacksmith, working for the Boston & Maine Railroad. His physical description at the time was medium height and build, with blue eyes and light-colored hair. His address on the reproduction of this card was illegible.


Notes

Text of Liverpool Advance article

Note    N3-32         Back to Index        Back to Frank Augustus Chute and Atwida Harlow Chute.

Notes on Frank Augustus Chute and Atwida Harlow Chute:

Liverpool Advance, 26 Oct 1910: Nova Scotia Girl Weds on Death Bed, Boston October 24: Miss Atwida H. Harlow, dau of Freeman Harlow, of Port Mouton, NS, was married yesterday in Somerville, on what is believed to be her death bed, to Frank A. Chute, formerly of Port Mouton. They were engaged for fifteen years. Both spent a vacation in July at Port Mouton, where Miss Harlow contracted typhoid fever. The wedding was arranged as a last hope that the ceremony might help her to recover."

Apparently, it worked, as Atwida was still living in the 1930 census; son Arnold Linden, born in 1912, was 18 years old.


Notes


Note    N3-33         Back to Index        Back to Obadiah Maxwell/Maxwell Walter Chute and Edna Beatrice Perry Chute

Notes on Obadiah Maxwell/Maxwell Walter Chute and Edna Beatrice Perry Chute:

GMC: "Location in 1929: Somerville, Massachusetts, USA."

"In the family of Obadiah, his son Frank Augustus died September 30, 1964, and his son Arnold Linden died in 1959. Obadiah Maxwell changed his name to Maxwell Walter, and he died in 1961."

Source: Letter, from Marion B. Frude McCormick of Bear River, Digby County, Nova Scotia, dated 24 OCT 1967 to George M. Chute, Jr.

Notes


Note    N3-34         Back to Index        Back to James Chute, Jr. and Mary Wood Chute.
Notes on James Chute, Jr. and Mary Wood Chute:

At a meeting of the select men the 15th December, 1679: In obedience of an order made by the Honored General Court, held at Boston, October 15, 1679 - we ye select men of Ipswich, have chosen Tythingmen* as followeth:

Jeremiah Jewet,
Aaron Pengre, sen'r
Symond Stace,
Thomas Lull,
Mr. Chute, [James, b. 1649, G. Reg. No. 23, p. 247.]
John Wainwright,
Sergent Perkins,
Jaakob ffoster,
Thomas Louewell,
Edmund Heard,
Thomas Clark, winisimet,
John Denison,
Isaack ffoster,
Samuel Eyers,
Thomas Wade,
Isaack ffellowes,
John Giddings,
William Goodline,
Joseph Everly,
Will Thomson,
Richard Walker, [or Wattles]
Thomas Jaackob,
John Adams,
Edward Bragg

Abraham Hammatt, "Hammatt Papers Early Inhibitants of Ipswich, Massachusetts, 1633-1700", Originally published in seven parts 1880-1899, reprinted Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1980, 1991

What Was a Tythingman?

The role of the Puritan "tythingman" is often now discussed in issues of constitutional law as it pertains to the issue of 'privacy". A tythingman was reponsible for the conduct of ten Puritan families, and it was his responsibility to make certain every individual within these ten families obeyed church and civil law. In order to do this, he was given the right to enter peoples' homes at will and search for incriminating evidence that might indicate an individual was straying from church rulings. A tythingman would pay you a visit if you missed worship services, fine you if you had no good reason for doing so, and sometimes performed as a constable. Gossip, and open conversations that did not conform to church teachings would be reported to a tythingman.

William Edward Chute commented in his Chute Genealogies that James "seems to have been a man of kind disposition, mild temperament and pious withal. Judging by his writings, he must have received a good education." His kind disposition and mild temperament would have been something of a relief to those ten families for which James was responsible, for a "tythingman" without those qualities had the capability of making peoples' lives miserable, in some circumstances.


It is not known why Mary Wood Chute joined the new parish at a different time than her husband James and son Lionel (II), who had both voted for its creation:

"On November 17, 1706, Mr. Hale was ordained, and probably the church was organized the same day. There appear to have been sixteen members from Rowley: probably there was a little larger number from Newbury, and possibly there would be one or two from other churches. The total number would hardly reach thirty-five. Gage has preserved to us the names of the sixteen from Rowley; they were: Samuel Brocklebank, Jonathan Wheeler, Benjamin Plumer, Nathan Wheeler, John Brown, Andrew Stickney, and Colin Frazer, with their wives, also Mary Chute and Elizabeth Look.

As for where James and Mary lived in the Byfield parish restructuring area, Ewell says, "Mary Chute was the wife of James Chute, who probably lived on the James Peabody place."

Source: The Story of Byfield, John Louis Ewell.

It may have been James, then, or one of his sons, who decided to venture into the agricultural unknown and try his hand at potato planting. The story comes down via John Ewell, who heard the story from a "Mrs. J.C. Peabody":

"New articles of food and drink began to add to the attractions of the table, such as coffee and tea and potatoes. Mrs. J. C. Peabody tells me that one of the early Chutes raised a hogshead of potatoes near the church, and all his neighbors wondered how in the world he would ever dispose of so many. Up to this time the turnip had been the staple vegetable."


The potato was indigenous to the Americas and was introduced to the settlers by the tribes in the region, who taught them how to plant the new vegetable. The volume of a "hogshead" appears to vary; it's defined as "a volume or capacity ranging from 63 to 140 gallons (238 to 530 liters), especially a unit of capacity used in liquid measure in the United States, equal to 63 gallons (238 liters) OR a large barrel or cask with this capacity." To convert from hogsheads (British) to:
cubic feet, multiply by 10.114 OR
cubic feet, multiply by 8.42184
gallons (U.S.), multiply by 63


Notes


Note    N3-35         Back to Index        Back to Captain Falkiner Chute and Anne Goddard Chute.

Notes on Captain Falkiner Chute and Anne Goddard Chute.

The following entry reflects a 1793 entry in the Freeman's Journal (Ireland), identifying Falkiner Chute as a Lieutenant in the Kerry Militia.

FJ 1793 8 08 NPN CHUTE Falkiner Lt Kerry militia - Lt Falkiner CHUTE
Freeman's Journal FJ Sep 1763–1924 Source of Entry: "Nick Reddan's Newspaper Extracts — Part 10"
URL: http://members.iinet.net.au/~nickred/newspaper/np_abst10.htm


Commissions Signed by His Majesty [King George III] for the Army in Ireland, dated April 30, 1787
"3rd Regiment of Horse, Mr. Falkiner Chute to be Cornet, vice Goold, resigned."

Source: "The London Gazette", from Tuesday June 12 to Saturday June 16, 1787. From the War Office, June 16, 1787.



Announcement: Military Promotion
"To be lieutenants — Falkiner Chute, esq. late in 6th dragoon guards."

Source: Anthologia hibernica: or Monthly collections of science, belles..., Volume 2, July - December 1793
Richard Edward Mercier & Co., Dublin

Death Announcement, Anne Goddard Chute

"At an advanced age, at Chilcomb, the residence of William Ashe Esq. R.M., Anne, relict of Captain Falkiner Chute, formerly of the Carbineers."

Source: Limerick Chronicle, January 19, 1850

URL: http://uk.geocities.com/irishancestralpages/1c19Jan1850.html

From a biographical sketch of his grandson (Falkiner Cooke, Esq.), describing his military service:

COOKE, FALKINER, Esq., of Retreat, co. Westmeath. Eldest surviving son of the late William Cooke, Esq., of Retreat by his first wife, Catherine, only child of Capt. Falkiner Chute, of the 6th Dragoon Guards; b. 1823; succ 185 -; This family have been seated in co. Westmeath for upwards of a century. - Retreat, near Athlone, co. Westmeath.

Source: The County Families of the United Kingdom or Royal Manual of the Titled and Untitled Aristocracy of Great Britain and Ireland. Edward Walford, M.A. 1864, Robert Hardwicke, 192, Piccadilly, Second Edition. Page 231.


Notes


Note    N3-36         Index
Notes on Samuel Jewett and Jemima Chute Jewett:

Date of death is based on the date of husband's remarriage date to second wife, Lydia Wallingford Jewett. Marriage intent was declared 3-2-1722 or 1723; marriage would have taken place after date of intent.


Notes


Note    N3-37         Back to Index        Back to Lionel Chute, Jr. and Rose Barker or Baker Chute.
Notes on Lionel Chute, Jr. and Rose Barker or Baker Chute:

HIS ARRIVAL IN NORTH AMERICA

Lionel Chute emigrated to Ipswich, Massachusetts Bay Colony about 1634, taught school and was the first Ipswich schoolmaster in 1636 and died in 1645. We have yet to locate Lionel, Rose, James or Nathaniel on any existing passenger lists.

There are several distinct Chute family stories about how the Lionel Chute and his family arrived in Ipswich, Massachusetts:

  • They arrived on the Hercules. Passenger lists, while admittedly incomplete, have not included anyone by the name of Chute. The assumption regarding the Hercules is based on Bethersden Edward Chute's letter of confirmation on another family, the Ashfords, who also sailed on the Hercules, and Lionel's date of arrival.
  • They arrived on the Lion. The Lion/Lyon theory first appeared in print during a recorded speech made by James Milledge Chute, on March 22, 1906, at the dinner celebrating the eighty-third birthday of Isaiah Chute, of Peabody. In addition to being a magnificent speech about the Chute family, this is the first known reference to Lionel Chute, Jr. having arrived in America on the "Lion" out of Bristol. Records of this voyage have not yet been located, and it is not known how James Milledge Chute obtained this information.
  • He arrived as a sea captain, which is why he never appeared on passenger lists. Out of all the family legends, this has always seemed the most remote and unlikely: Lionel was a clerk and a teacher from Dedham, the son of a clerk from Brampton -- for him to suddenly charge across the Atlantic as a sea captain seemed ... well, ludicrous. But a "Captain Lionel Chute" does appear in print, and at least one of us found it back in the 1950's. That would be Joseph Herman Chute, who found it in a Library and mentioned it in a letter to George M. Chute, Jr. Unfortunately, he didn't tell us which "genealogy book" it was. Joseph lived in Unadilla, Georgia at the time, so if there are any Chutes in the south with access to a multi-library consortium or system with Unadilla, Georgia in it ... they might try seeing what they can find.
  • His arrival coincides with the second wave of a large migration of Puritans (the first wave began with the Pilgrim arrival in 1620), seeking freedom from persecution for their religious beliefs in Great Britain. It also coincides with the accession of King Charles I in 1625, and the appointment of William Laud (1573-1645), considered a particularly sadistic enemy of the growing Puritan movement, to increasing positions of power in Great Britain: to the Privy Council in April 1626, to Bishop of Bath and Wells, then Bishop of London in 1628, and finally to Archbishop of Canterbury in 1633. Laud was also becoming increasingly powerful in political affairs as well. While his persecution focused more on Anglican ministers, Laud's punishment for those who disagreed with him (in 1637, after Lionel and family had arrived in Massachusetts, English Puritans John Bastwick, Henry Burton and William Prynne "had their ears cut off for writing pamphlets attacking Laud's views."), the political climate under Charles I and Archbishop William Laud may have been the precipitating force behind Lionel's immigration. He was not a young man at the time of his departure from Great Britain and he must have known that he would most certainly never see his homeland again.


    In 1904, John Louis Ewell, in writing The Story of Byfield visited town in Great Britain which were the ancestral homes of early settlers in the area. Here is his summary of Dedham, Great Britain.

    DEDHAM

    "The Chute Genealogies says, "Lionel Chute, jun., the emigrant ancestor of the family in America, was born in Dedham, Essex County, England, about 1580." This statement took me to Dedham. It is in a lovely region which is a haunt of artists. It has an ideal English country inn. Memories of the great landscape painter, John Constable, who was born in its neighborhood, fill the region. He was faithful to nature and to his high ideals throughout his pathetic career, although it was not until after his death that the rare excellence of his art was recognized. Such a life is full of instruction and inspiration for the young. John Constable, however, has no special connection with Byfield; but another Dedham name has, and that is the name of John Rogers, not the martyr, but the great Dedham Puritan preacher from 1605 to 1636. The windows were taken out of the parish church so that more people might hear him. His rule was so to preach every time that he could come down from his pulpit with a clear conscience. One of his enemies said that his preaching poisoned the air for ten miles around, but a friend said that more souls were saved under his preaching than in any other part of England. Once, twice, thrice, he was silenced by the church authorities in their stickling for outward uniformity. At length the persecutions he suffered seemed to break his heart, and he is said to have fallen in his pulpit and to have been carried out but to die. His descendants filled the pulpit of the first church in Ipswich, Mass., for a hundred and fifty years, one of his grandsons was president of Harvard College, and his posterity is said to be more numerous in America than that of any other early emigrant family (Stephen's "Biographical Dictionary"). This illustrious Puritan preacher has a double connection with Byfield, for he was brought up in the family of Richard Rogers, the father of Ezekiel Rogers, first pastor of Rowley, one of the two mother parishes of Byfield, and no doubt his preaching was a potent factor in determining Lionel Chute to go with the Puritan colony beyond the sea."


    "The new arrivals found that with true Puritan zeal for the education of youth both colony and town governments were making provision for college and schools. To perpetuate a learned ministry, the general court of Massachusetts Bay on October 28, 1636, appropriated £400 for a school or college, and a year later appointed a committee "to take order for a colledge at Newetowne." (23) On April 13, 1635, the town of Boston agreed "that our brother Philemon Pormont, shalbe intreated to become scholemaster, for the teaching and nourtering of children with us," and on August 6, 1636, forty-five of the wealthier inhabitants of the town pledged £40 6s. in amounts varying from the £10 of Governor Henry Vane to the 3s. of John Pemberton for "the maintenance of a free school master for the youth with us," and chose Daniel Maude, a graduate of the University of Cambridge, as master. William Witherell undertook the education of the children of Charlestown, and Lionel Chute and John Fiske wrestled with similar duties at Ipswich and Salem. (24) With these projects, not unlike those at one time undertaken by the feoffees for the purchase of impropriations in England, Davenport was in hearty sympathy, and served as one of the first overseers for the college."

    Text Source: Calder, Isabel MacBeath, The New Haven Colony, Yale University Press, New Haven; Oxford University Press, London; 1934, page 40. Sources cited within the text:

    23. Massachusetts Colony Records, I, 217; Winthrop's Journal, I, 310-315.
    24. "Boston Records, 1634-1660," Record Commissioners of the Citv of Boston, Second Report, pp. 5, 160; George E. Littlefield, Early Schools and School-Books of New England, pp. 55-98; Walter H. Small, Early New England Schools, pp. 3-14.

    CHUTE, Lionel, schoolmaster. His will is dated 4th 7th mo. 1644, and proved November 7, 1645. He left a wife Rose, and a son James. James, is appointed administrator of his father, James', estate, August 16, 1691, consisting of one half homestead, 6 acres marsh, 6 acres pasture land, cash, and 6 silver spoons f3, total f70.

    Lionel was a commoner, 1641, and James 1648.

    NP3-37: Emigrated to Ipswich, Massachusetts, USA about 1634, taught school in 1636 and died in 1645. Savage p388,"Perhaps he was of a very anc. fam. for I have seen his geanl. trac. back to 1268, bef the first king Edward." Last Will & Testament dated October 4, 1644. Mentions wife Rose and son James. Source: Essex Deeds 1 Ips: 15] Witness to the following: "WHITING, Anthony - Dedham, Essex, clothier (f326) chldr Simon, Phoebe, Jn & Susanna; son Anthony & his wife Mary; bros Henry & Ezekiel Shereman; land in Langham; dtr Anne Loveran; Mr Rogers; Mr Cottesford; poor of Stanway; Mr Lawrence How; wife Anne exec; wtns Lionel Chewte" 1621-1630 60 acres of upland and 12 acres of meadow were granted him in 1640. Made freeman, 1641. Made his will in 1644. It is assumed he came over on the Hercules, although this assumption is based on nothing more than Edward Chute's letter of confirmation on another family, the Ashfords, who also sailed on the Hercules, and Lionel's date of arrival. Listed as a commoner, 1641. PURC DATE 1639 NOTE 2 parcels from William Bartholomew Abraham Hammatt, "The Hammatt Papers: Early Inhabitants of Ipswich, Massachusetts, 1633-1700", Originally published in seven parts 1880-1899, reprinted Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1980, 1991

    Savage p. 388,"Perhaps he was of a very anc. fam. for I have seen his geanl. trac. back to 1268, bef the first king Edward."

    Lionel Chute, jun., the emigrant ancestor of the family in America, was born in Dedham, Essex county, England, about 1580; married about 1610, Rose, daughter of Robert Baker, or Barker. Children:

    JAMES, b.____; bapt. Feb. 2, 1613.
    NATHANIEL, b. about 1616; d. in America about 1640.
    MARY, bapt. Nov. 23, 1619.

    Mr. Chute came over about 1634 and settled at Agawam or Ipswich, in Essex county, province of the Massachusetts Bay, so called. He had received a good education in England and was therefore qualified to teach the grammar school at Ipswich, which he did in 1636, and hence is called the old Ipswich schoolmaster. He bought two parcels of land of William Bartholomew in 1639; 60 acres of upland and 12 acres of meadow were granted him in 1640; made freeman, 1641 ; made his will in 1644. He died April, 1645.


    LAND GRANT

    "Granted to Lionell Chute sixty acres of upland, and twelve acres of meadow next to Mr. Appletons farms, or some other place that may be found nearest and most convenient. To be laid out by George Giddings and John Whipple."

    Source: The Ancient Records of the Town of Ipswich, Volume I, From 1634 to 1650, Edited and Published by George A. Schofield, Ipswich, Mass., Chronicle Motor Press, Ipswich, Mass, 1899.



    WILL OF LIONEL CHUTE

    The fourth day of the seventh month Anno Dom: 1644. I Lionell Chute of ye town of Ipswich, in New England, School-master, doe make & ordayne this my last will & testament revoking all former wills by me made.

    Item.  I give unto Rose, my wife, for terme of her naturall life, all this my dwelling house, with the barne & all the edifices (the two chambers over the house & entry only excepted which I will that James my sonn shall have to his only use for the terme of one yeare next after my decease, with free ingresse egresse & regresse, &c), with the yards gardens the home lott & planting lott purchased of Mr. Bartholomew, with the commonage & appurtenances thereto belonging: & after my wife's decease I give the said house barne lotts & premises with all the appurtenances unto James Chute my sonne & to his heirs.

    Item.  I give unto my said sonne James & to his heirs forever all & singular my other lands, lotts, meadow grounds, marshes with all & singular their appurtenances & profit whatsoever immediately after my decease; & I give more unto James Chute my sonne (over & above all things before given him), my heffer that is now at Goodman White's farm, & my young steere.

    Item.  I give him all my books with all things in my chest, & white boarded deep box with lock & key, one chain four hogsheads two coomsacks two flock bedds two feather pillows one rugg 2 coverletts two blankets my casting nett my silver spoone all my own wearing apparell & that which was his brother Nathaniel's & three pairs of sheets three pillow beeres two table cloths four towells six table napkins & the one half of the brass & pewter & working & five bushels of English wheate.

    Item.  I give unto my friend Joseph Morse five shillings.

    Item.  I give unto the poore of the church of Ipswich twenty shillings to be distributed by the deacons.

    Item.  My meaning is that my wife shall have my chest after that James hath emptied it.

    Item.  All the rest of my goods household stuff cattell & chattells whatsoever unbequeathied (my debts & legacies being discharged & paid), I will that Rose my wife shall have ye free use of them for terme of her life, but the remainder of them at the time of her decease over & above the value of five pounds sterling I give unto James Chute my sonne & to his heirs & assigns.

    Item.  I make Rose my wife executrix of this my last will & testament & in witnesse that this is my deed I have hereunto set my hand & seale in the presence of these witnesses hereunder written,

    Lionel Chute
    Marke Simonds    Joseph Morse

    The 7th of the 9th month 1645; Affirmed upon oath in Court that this is the last will & testament of Lionell Chute, by Marke Simonds & Joseph Morse.

    The Inventory of the goods & chattells of Lionell Chute of Ipswich, deceased, taken this 25th of the 4th month 1645.

    WEC Note: Joshua Coffin said, in 1857, that Lionel Chute, Jun., married Rose, daughter of Samuel Symonds, Lieutenant- Governor, of Massachusetts, and after the death of Lionel she married Mr. Baker, a merchant; but we find no such personage in the Symonds family, and moreover Samuel Symonds (1595-1678) was only Deputy Governor, 1673-1678.

    The explanation of this comment comes from Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England by James Savage, Boston, 1860-1862 Vol. I, pp. 387-388. The entry references Lionel's son, James.

    CHUTE, JAMES, Ipswich, s. of Lionel, b. in Eng. m. (as once was thot.) a d. of Hon. Samuel Symonds, wh. names s. C. in his will. But the mean. of the testator may have been s. or s.-in-law of Martha Epes, or ano. of sev. ws. that S. had; for such seems, also, the case of Peter Duncan, call. s. of Symonds, because h. of Mary, wh. was d. of Daniel Epes by that Martha, wh. after was w. of S. By his w. whatever was her name of bapt. or whoever was her f. he had James, and rem. 1681, to Rowley. JAMES, Rowley, s. of the proced. m. 10 Nov. 1673, Mary Wood, possib d. of Isaiah, had Eliz. b. 22 June 1676; Ann, 19 Oct 1679; Lionel, bapt, 3 Apr. 1681; James, 13 June 1686; Thomas, 31 Jan. 1692; Mary, 12 Sept. 1697; beside Martha; Ruth; and Hannah; but the three last are less certain. LIONEL, Ipswich 1639, the earliest sch.master there, made his will 4 Sept. 1644, pro. 7 Nov. 1645, leav. by w. Rose, d. of Robert Baker, s. James, and perhaps no other ch. Perhaps, he was of a very anc. fam. for I have seen his geneal. trac. back to 1268, bef. the first king Edward.

    If that entry makes as little sense to you as it might to most people, here is the translation, minus the ridiculous amount of abbreviations:

    CHUTE, JAMES, Ipswich, son of Lionel, born in England. Married (as once was thought) a daughter of Hon. Samuel Symonds, who names "son" Chute in his will. But the meaning of the testator may have been son or son-in-law of Martha Epes, or another of several wives that Symonds had; for such seems, also, the case of Peter Duncan, called son of Symonds, because he was the husband of Mary, who was daughter of Daniel Epes by that Martha, who after was the wife of Symonds. By his wife whatever was her name of baptism or whoever was her father he had James, and removed 1681, to Rowley. JAMES, Rowley, son of the proceding married 10 Nov. 1673, Mary Wood, possibly the daughter of Isaiah, had Elizabeth born 22 June 1676; Ann, 19 Oct 1679; Lionel, bapt, 3 Apr. 1681; James, 13 June 1686; Thomas, 31 Jan. 1692; Mary, 12 Sept. 1697; beside Martha; Ruth; and Hannah; but the three last are less certain. LIONEL, Ipswich 1639, the earliest schoolmaster there, made his will 4 Sept. 1644, pro. 7 Nov. 1645, leaving by wife Rose, daughter of Robert Baker, son James, and perhaps no other children. Perhaps, he was of a very ancient family for I have seen his genealogy traced back to 1268, before the first king Edward.

    Last Will & Testament dated October 4, 1644. Mentions wife Rose and son James. Source: Essex Deeds 1 Ips: 15]

    Witness to the following: "WHITING, Anthony - Dedham, Essex, clothier (f326) chldr Simon, Phoebe, Jn & Susanna; son Anthony & his wife Mary; bros Henry & Ezekiel Shereman; land in Langham; dtr Anne Loveran; Mr Rogers; Mr Cottesford; poor of Stanway; Mr Lawrence How; wife Anne exec; wtns Lionel Chewte"

    60 acres of upland and 12 acres of meadow were granted him in 1640. Made freeman, 1641. Made his will in 1644.


    An article on The Two Wives of Lionel Chute, published by the NEHGS in April of 2009. Response and commentary from Chute family genealogists is expected to follow.


    Notes


    Note    N3-38         Back to Index        Back to James Chute, Sr. and Elizabeth Epps Chute.
    Notes on Notes on James Chute, Sr. and Elizabeth Epps Chute:

    "Brought with his parents to Massachusetts in 1634." James received a good education and was often called upon to sign and witness deeds and other legal documents in Ipswich. His wife was also a good scholar, and she, too, was called upon to sign her name on several important occasions. In 1645, James Chute was allowed a bill to take a bushel of Indian corn of the constable's for two sheets of parchment for the town's use. He was styled Register of Deeds about that time. He was a commoner in 1648 and was allowed one shilling town bounty for a fox that year and the same at another time. He was one of the selectmen in 1654, 61, 64 and 78. In September 23, 1675, James Chute is credited with military service under Captain Jonathan Poole, to the amount of 1 sterling pound, 10, 10, Narragansett No. 1."

    Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894


    Court Deposition: "James Chute of Ipswich deposed that Goodwife Hermitage chose him to appraise seven hats which the constable of Linn had taken on execution for Goodman Lord of Ipswich, and he and Joseph Gardner appraised them at 42s. She found fault with the appraisal, and Goodman Lord told her that if Goodman Hermitage would satisfy the execution some other way, he could have the hats. Sworn in Ipswich court, Mar 30, 1652. Richard Mower of Lin[n] appointed Joseph Armitage his attorney in his action with Robert Lorde of Ipswich concerning Mr. Gifard's bills, which he had taken on execution and which Lord would not accept, wherein Armitage was indebted to Robert Lord of Ipswich four pounds, 29:1:1652. Wit: Rich. Haven and Edward Hall."

    Source: Records and Files, Ipswich Quarterly Court, 1652. URL: http://etext.virginia.edu/salem/witchcraft/Essex/vol1/gifs/essex258.gif, Page 249.


    King Philip's War

    The military service referenced in this payment would have been James' participation in King Philip's War. This war is known for being one of the bloodiest and costliest wars in Colonial history, with atrocities being committed by both sides. Many historians now suspect that this was the closest the American colonists came to not surviving in the Americas at all, as it took several generations for them to recover the land and people lost in this war. The date of September 23rd may have possibly constituted either an enlistment date (for which he was later paid), or an "advance payment" of some sort to James rather than back-pay for services rendered, as the most well known of Poole's activities took place in October, in connection with the defense of Hatfield, Massachusetts, about 90 miles away from Ipswich. This would have been a considerable distance for James to have traveled for this military service; he may not have returned until well into early winter:

    "By the middle of October, 1675 the lower Connecticut River Valley was alive with the activity of native warriors encouraged by their victories at Brookfield, Deerfield, Northfield and Springfield. Major Samuel Appleton had recently taken over command of the valley troops from John Pynchon, and hardly knowing from which direction the next assault might come, divided his army among three towns. In Northhampton he placed a force under Lieutenant Nathaniel Sealy, supplemented by troops under Major Robert Treat of Connecticut. In Hatfield, he stationed Captains Jonathan Poole and Samuel Moseley. Meanwhile Appleton himself commanded a force stationed at Hadley." Source: Eric B. Schultz and Michael J. Tougias, King Philip's War, 1999, Countryman's Press, page 181.


    Note that in the case of Alexander Knight (below), James actually wrote the will, as opposed to merely signing and witnessing it.

    James Chute married into an interesting family. His mother-in-law, Martha Read, had married Daniel Epps in England (his wife was a product of that union) and later, after Epps' death, married George Samuel Symonds, who was to become a deputy governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, having several children by him as well. Martha Read was one of several of Symonds' wives, but it was probably as wife of Symonds that the combined Epps-Symonds family emigrated to the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Also in this extended family are Martha Read's two sisters, one the wife of John Winthrop, Jr., the son of Governor Winthrop, one of the founders of Ipswich, and the other the wife of John Lake, another significant landowner in Ipswich.

    As noted below, this caused some confusion for Chute genealogists, who had trouble figuring out why Symonds would mention "son" James Chute in his will, thinking that either he had remarried a Symonds daughter after the death of Elizabeth, or that his mother, Rose, had re-married Symonds after the death of her second husband, Matthew Whipple. He did not, and she had not. By "son", Symonds meant, "son-in-law."

    From James Savage: "CHUTE, JAMES, Ipswich, son of Lionel, born in England. Married (as once was thought) a daughter of Hon. Samuel Symonds, who names "son" Chute in his will. But the meaning of the testator may have been son or son-in-law of Martha Epes, or another of several wives that Symonds had; for such seems, also, the case of Peter Duncan, called son of Symonds, because he was the husband of Mary, who was daughter of Daniel Epes by that Martha, who after was the wife of Symonds. By his wife whatever was her name of baptism or whoever was her father he had James, and removed 1681, to Rowley."

    WILL OF THOMAS HARRIS: [Thomas is married to the first cousin of James' wife, Elizabeth): Thomas one of twenty soldiers sent against the indians under Serj. Howlet in 1648; he was a Denison subscriber in 1648; with Martha his wife he sells lands in Rowley to Thomas and Richard Holmes and Richard Baley in 1652, tithingman 1677. In 1674 he is witness to the will of John Perkins; his will is dated July, 1687; witnessed by Daniel Epps, sen'r and James Chute, sen'r, and was proved Sept 14; he bequeaths to his wife Martha, whom he appoints exec'x. "house, barn, orchard, garden," &c. during her natural life. To his son John he gives the new house which he built in Ipswich; he gives legacies also to sons William and Ebenezer: the inventory of his estate amounted, to ;e576 11 3. Martha Harris represents in a petition to the Court January 1695, that she is widow and executrix of Thomas Harris who left three sons, John, William, Ebenezer and also two other children, viz. Elizabeth wife of John Gallop and Margaret wife.

    Abraham Hammatt, The Hammatt Papers

    WILL OF ALEXANDER KNIGHT: Alexander Knight, possessed land in 1636; was a commoner, 1641. His will is dated Feb. 10, 1663; proved, March 29, 1664; witnesses: John Whipple, James Chute, who wrote the will, and Robert Lord. In it are mentioned a son Nathaniel, born October 16, 1657, wife Hannah, and three daughters, Hannah, Sarah and Mary. He bequeathed his house and house lot and planting land to h's wife, during her life. The house with thirty-two acres of land were appraised, at 6137, 18, 11, by Walter Roper and Francis Wainwright. He appointed his wife and William Inglish, of Boston, executors.

    Abraham Hammatt, The Hammatt Papers

    WILL

    "LAKE. Mrs. Margaret Lake. The sister of Mrs. John Winthrop, jr., and Mrs. Dep. Gov. Samuel Symonds. She possessed land in Ipswich, Connecticut, Maine. Several of her Letters are preserved in the archives of the American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Mass., together with letters written to Rebekah Symonds from her son in England.

    The Will of Margaret Lake, of Ipswich, widow:

    I give unto my daughter, Hannah Gallop, and her children, all my land at New London: and also my best gotine, and my red cloth petticoat, and my enameled ring. And after her decease, my will is, that my grand daughter, Hannah Gallop, shall have the said ring.

    Also, I give unto my grandaughter, Hannah Gallop, a pair of sheets, and one of my best pewter platters, and one of the next.

    Item. I give unto my daughter, Martha Harris, my tapestry coverlet, and all my other apparell which are not disposed of to others particularly. Also, I give unto her my mantle; and after her decease to all of her children, as they need it.

    Also, the coverlet of tapestry, after my daughter Martha decease, I give it to my grandson Thomas Harris: and he dying without issue, to his brother John, and so the rest of the children.

    Also, I give to my daughter Martha, my gold ring. And my will is that after her decease, that my Grandaughter, Martha Harris, shall have it.

    Item. I give to my grandaughter, Martha Harris, my bed, and bedstead, and one boulster, two blankets, two pillows, and one coverlet.

    Item. I give to my grandaughter Elizabeth Harris, one heyfer at my cozen Eppes.

    Item. I give to my grandaughter, Margaret Harris, my carved box, and one damask table cloth, and six damask napkins.

    Item. My will is that all my brass and pewter, with the rest of my household stuffe undisposed, be equally disposed and divided amongst my daughter Harris's children.

    Item. I give and bequeath unto my sonne Thomas Harris, all the rest of my estate, viz : my part of the vessell, and all my debt, only my Bible excepted, which I give to my grandson John Harris: and a pair of frenged gloves.

    I appoint my sonne Thomas Harris and my daughter Martha Harris, to be my executor and executrix of this my last will and testament. This thirtieth day of August, the Year of Grace, sixteen hundred and seventy two. 1672.

    These being witnesses

    MARGARET LAKE
    hir mark

    Thomas Knowlton, sen'r
    James Chute

    In the inventory of Mrs. Margaret Lake's effects, appraised by John Dane, Thomas Knowlton, John Laighton, are the following items: one tapstre coverlet, one bedstead, a feather bed, and a flocked bed and three down pillows, a sarge sute and a crimson petticoat, three carved boxes, one scarlet mantle, four payer of holon sheets and three payer and one sheete of others, a damask table cloth and five napkins, four holon pilobers and two others, four shifts, her weading shift, a great Bible, a pare of gloves, part of the barke, debts due from Mathew peary, William Quarles, Mr. Ipse, Joseph Lee, Debts to be paid to Marchant Wanrite, To decon Goodhue.

    J. Wingate Thornton, Esq., has a fragment of a letter written at London, ye 5th Sept. 1672, by Lidia Bankes to her Dear Cousin. But the name of the cousin is wanting. That which is legible reads:

    "I have received yours by your Brother Symonds. Your children having attained unto learning … I doe not remember I ever saw you above once, which was at your mother's house in New England. But I very well remember you from a child & when you were in Holland, you and your cousin John Lake with us, and rejoyce you were under soe worthy a person for tuition as your grandfather.

    "Besides I well remember your family of ye Eppes, for I was brought up with them from my youth - while your mother lived we constantly corresponded - and she always gave me an account of her children and ye blessed condition of your Sister En-, who was a pretious christian. And of your Sister m-. I desire my affectionate love to your wife and all your children; not forgetting ould mr. Bourman, Mr. Rogers; and their wives, if alive, my great respects to them. My service to your father Symonds, my Cousin.

    "I have most dear respect for your Aunt Lake, but just as I was writing I heard of her death. If there be any of her childreft, remember me to them. My sister Reade and Cousin Samuel present them servise -"

    Additional: Mrs. Margaret Lake was the daughter of Edmand Reade, of Wickford, County Essex, England. An ancient copy of her father's will was found among the Winthrop Papers, and was printed in the "Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society," 1862-3. John Ward Dean said of this Will: "One of the daughters of the testator, named in the will, afterwards became the second wife of John Winthrop, Jr., and the mother of all his children. Before her marriage her father had died and her mother had become the wife of the celebrated Hugh Peter. Mrs. Margaret Lake, who was at Connecticut and Ipswich, we see by the will was an older sister of Elizabeth; and the other sister, Martha, is named in the will as the wife of Daniel Epps. We afterwards find Martha in New England, the wife of Samuel Symonds."

    One of our local papers give another glimpse of Mrs. Margaret Lake and her children:

    "The earliest Harris in Ipswich, was Thomas who married Martha Lake, November 15, 1647. His name does not appear in any of the shipping lists, and it cannot be determined when he came to New England or where he came from. He was evidently a man of quality, or he could not have married Martha Lake, a young woman allied to the Winthrops; her aunt Elizabeth being the wife of John Winthrop, Jr., who settled Ipswich, and who had houselots on Fast street, High street, and at Rocky Hill extending to Turkey Shore.

    Martha Lake Harris was the daughter of John and Margaret Lake. John Lake was of the Lake Family of Normanton, Yorkshire, who claimed descent from William the Conqueror. Mrs. Margaret Lake was the daughter of Edmund Reade, Wickford, County Essex. She lived many years in Ipswich; and her will, on file, and dated 1672, gives a quaint idea of ancient elegancies.

    Hannah Lake, another daughter of John and Margaret, married John Gallop, Jr., who was a bold and famous soldier in days of early Indian warfare.

    Thomas and Martha (Lake) Harris had four sons and three daughters. Serg't John, their son, married Grace Searle. Margaret, their daughter, married John Staniford and was remembered, for her name, in her grandfather Lake's will."

    Abraham Hammatt, The Hammatt Papers

    WILL OF PIPER, Nathaniel. Had a share and an half in Plum Island, 1664. Purchased Marsh lands of Andrew Hodges, March 18, 1664. His will is dated March 17, 1675; proved Sept. 26, 1676. He left wife Sarah. Children Nathaniel, born June 25, 1658, Josyah, born December 18, 1661, John Thomas, born November 16, 1666, Samuel, born June 12, 1670, Jonathan, William, died June 18, 1674, Sarah, Mary, born Nov. 5, 166o, died next Feb. 18, Mary born December 15, 1664, Margaret. His will was witnessed by Francis Wainwright and James Chute, sen'r.

    George Samuel Symonds had three sons named Samuel, two by first wife Dorothy Harlakenden and one by Martha Read. It is assumed that this is the third of the three.


    Estate of Samuel Symonds, Jr. of Ipswich
    Essex Probate Docket # None

    In the name of god amen, I Samuel Symonds of Ipswich in the County of Essex in New England Junr gent, being upon a voyage for England & not knowing how it may please god to deale with me in respect to my mortall condicon doe ordayne & make this my last will & Testament in manner and forme following viz: first I give my soule into the hands of my blessed god & deare Savior Jesus Christ; & my body to be decently buried. Item I give unto each of my sisters, namely Elizabeth wife of my brother Daniel Epps, Martha the wife of my brother John Denison, Ruth wife of my brother John Emerson, Mary wife of my brother Peter Duncan, & Priscilla Symonds, eight pounds a peece, to be paid in currant pay in New England, within six months after my fathers decease, Item I give unto my loving father, Mr. Samuel Symonds all the rest of my estate, both reall & psonall as howses landes, Milne, & what else is myne, with all & singular the apprtenances; whom I make my executor of this my last will, & Testament; & whom I appoynt to pay my debts & to receive what is due to me. In witnesse whereof I have hereunto set my hand & Seal Decemb 18th 1668.

    Samuel Symonds Junr (seal)
    Witness:
    James Chute
    Daniell Epps, Junr.

    Proved Nov 29, 1669, by James Chute before Samuell Symonds and 30: 9: 1669 by Daniell Epps.

    Inventory taken Nov 29, 1669, by Henry Bennet and William (his B mark) Bennett:

    2 guns, 4£ 15s.; one saddle & bridle, 1£ 10s.; wearing apparel at home, 3£; halfe the farme at Lamperele River, the wholl farme contayning 640 acres, 100£; bookes, 8li 8s. 6d.; a still, 1£ 10s; debts owing to him 25 £; debts which he oweth at home, 40 £. The court 30: 9: 1669 gave the executor additional time to perfect this inventory. The other part of the inventory taken Nov 15, 1670, by James Chute and Henry Benet; his chest of druggs, 2£; another chest with two hatts & goods, 32£; A limbeck, 4£ 10s.; bookes at the Bay, 2 £; one old black cloake & other clothes a home, 4li; A still, 2£;one stone morter, 5s.; saddle & bridle £, total, 70li 15s. Owing out of his estate, 120li; owing in England 95£10s. 7d. Brought into court 2: 10m: 1670 by Samuell Simonds, Esq.


    Source: Printed "Probate Records of Essex County, Massachusetts; 1635 - 1681," In three volumes,The Essex Institute; Salem, MA; 1916
    Essex Quarterly Court Files, vol 15, leaves 56-58


    Notes


    Note    N3-39         Back to Index        Back to Lionel Chute (II) and Hannah Cheney Chute.
    Notes on Lionel Chute (II)and Hannah Cheney Chute:

    John Louis Ewell in The Story of Byfield points out that "Byfield ... is not a town, as so many suppose, but a parish. Its people were never separated from their fellow-townsmen for civil, but only for religious purposes.

    Originally, each town made one parish, but as the towns grew and their more remote portions were settled, the population frequently became too large and too widely scattered to attend worship in one place; so there would often after a time be two or moe parishes in one town. These parishes might be marked off by definite bounds, so that no one might evade his "ministry rate.

    The Rowley records have three important entries as to the Byfield bounds. The first reads:

    "At a legall meeting of the Inhabitants of the Towne of Rowley march the: 16: 1702-3. It was Agreed and voated that the Inhabitants of the Towne of Rowley living on the North west side of the bridg called Rye plaine bridg and on the North west side of the hill called Long hill and Joyned with the farmers of Newbury that doth border on us in building a New meeting house for the worship of god Shall be Abatted their Rattes in the ministery Ratt in the Town of Rowley: if they do maintains with the help of our neighbours at Newbury an Athordaxs minister to belong to and teach in that meeting house that they have buillt : untill such times as it is Judged that there is a sufishent Number to maintains a minister in the Northwest part of our Towne without the help of our Neighbours at Newbury that doth border upon us; whose Names are as foloweth that have their Rattes Abatted: Samll Brockelbanke; Jonathan Wheeler; Richard Boynton; Benjamen Plumer; Henry Poor; John Plumer; Dunkin Steward; Ebenezer Steward; Josiah Wood; John Lull; Jonanth Looke; John Brown; Nathaniell browne; Ebenezer Browne; James Chutte; Lionell Chutte; Andrew Stickne; James Tenney. Voted and pased on the Affirmative."



    It is not known why Mary Wood Chute joined the new parish at a different time than her husband James and son Lionel (II), who had both voted for its creation:

    "On November 17, 1706, Mr. Hale was ordained, and probably the church was organized the same day. There appear to have been sixteen members from Rowley: probably there was a little larger number from Newbury, and possibly there would be one or two from other churches. The total number would hardly reach thirty-five. Gage has preserved to us the names of the sixteen from Rowley; they were: Samuel Brocklebank, Jonathan Wheeler, Benjamin Plumer, Nathan Wheeler, John Brown, Andrew Stickney, and Colin Frazer, with their wives, also Mary Chute and Elizabeth Look.

    Source:
    Story of Byfield: A New England Parish, John Louis Ewell



    How Lionel and Hannah Chute May Have Heated Their Home in Winter

    I'll admit I hadn't given this aspect of their daily living much thought, but might have assumed they simply used wood in the fireplace for warmth. But Lionel and Hannah, living in the Byfield Parish area, had another choice. From The History of Byfield (1904):

    "Between Warren Street and Long Hill are extensive peat meadows. Peat is a kind of half-made coal. Most of the young are unfamiliar with it, but those who grew up in the western part of Byfield fifty years ago need no description of it. Its brown-black to black color, its salve-like tendency to stick to the hands when newly dug, the roots with which it abounded, and the great prostrate trunks of ancient trees which sometimes stopped the peat-knife, are familiar to memory. There was a set of tools made expressly for cutting peat. After the sod had been removed the peat was cut in long black blocks about three or four feet long by four inches square, and came up dripping from the peat-ditch; then it was spread on the meadow, and when partially dry it was piled tip cob-house fashion. After about four weeks it was dried through and was fit to be stored under cover. It made a hot, durable fire. The last thing at night would be to cover up a fresh piece of peat in the coals and ashes, where it would be found all aglow in the morning to rekindle the new day's fire. It emitted a peculiar ground-like odor as it burned, and tended to smoke up the walls and furniture, but there was nothing unhealthy in the smoke or the odor, and it was a great boon to people in moderate circumstances. With the larger incomes of today and the accessibility of coal, and because it required so much labor, peat has gone out of use; but the beds are there still, and the day may yet come when somebody will be grateful to draw upon their treasures."


    Their residence before 1702; Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts; Event Marriage Intent - 21 NOV 1702; Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts; Anna Cheny Death Note (The last record of Lionel or his wife, Anna (Hannah), is his deed to Maximilian and Seth Jewett, whereby he conveyed all his land in Rowley, dated Mar., 1729/30.)

    Hannah Cheney Chute's first cousin, Daniel Cheney, married Hannah Duston, the eldest daughter of the famous Hannah Emerson Duston.


    Notes


    Note    N3-40         Back to Index        Back to Maurice Fitzgerald Sandes, Esq. and Ellen Louisa Dennis Sandes.
    Notes on Maurice Fitzgerald Sandes, Esq. and Ellen Louisa Dennis Sandes:

    SANDES, Maurice Fitzgerald, Esq. of Oak Park, co. Kerry.
    Sixth son of the late Thomas William Sandes, Esq., of Sallow Glen, co. Kerry, by Margaret, dau. of Francis Chute, Esq. of Chute Hall, in the same county; b. 1807; m. 1857 Ellen Louisa, dau. of Thomas Stratford Dennis, Esq., of Fortgranite, co. Wicklow. Educated at Trinity College, Dublin (BA 1829); called to the Irish Bar 1831; appointed Registrar of the Supreme Court of Calcutta 1848, and Administrator-General of Bengal 1850; is a Magistrate for co. Kerry - Oak Park, near Tralee, co. Kerry; University Club, Dublin.

    Source: The County Families of the United Kingdom or Royal Manual of the Titled and Untitled Aristocracy of Great Britain and Ireland. Edward Walford, M.A. 1864, Robert Hardwicke, 192, Piccadilly, Second Edition. Page 881.

    A description of his home:
    "Collis-Sandes House, or Oak Park House was designed by the Irish Architect, Mr William Atkins (1812–1887), constructed in 1849 as a family mansion for Maurice Fitzgerald Sandes, a barrister who held the position of Registrar General of Bengal, before returning to Ireland to the post of Justice of the Peace and High Sheriff of Tralee."
    Source: http://www.homeopathyireland.net/location.htm







    Previous Page
    Next Page