NP23: Chute Family Notes: Notes 23-371 through 23-385
Notes


Note    N23-371         Back to Index        Back to Deacon George Chute and Cynthia Hersey Levi David/Clarissa Day Chute.

Notes on Deacon George Chute and Cynthia Hersey Levi David/Clarissa Day Chute:

"Born in Clements, Mar. 12, 1910; married Cynthia Hersey Levi (and Clarissa Day) David, by Rev. Peter Crandel, 1830 and lived on Digby Neck a while. Then he lived on his uncle Abel's place 1832 to 1836, while he went off mackerel fishing around by Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island and Bay Cheleur of the then Canada East or Lower Canada. In 1837 they went to Canada West or Ontario, and lived in Malahide seven years, including six months in a volunteer company in London, Ontario 1838-1839; then they lived in Bayham 1844-1845; to Vienna 1846, grocer and baker; to Acton, Ontario 1855; back to Vienna again 1859; sold out and went to Michigan, 1875 and lived near Bay City, Byron and Peck; to Grand Rapids 1882. Religiously, Mr, Chute was converted in the fields 1821 (at which time his uncle Binea and his aunts Olive and Susan, were baptized in Bear River by Reverend Thomas Ansley (1769-1831), and Israel Potter, Sr. was ordained to the gospel ministry soon after), and was baptized by Reverend Ezekiel Masters at Bear River in June, 1832, with his brother Israel, uncle Edward, Lucinda Chute and Sarah Campbell; Edmund, Sarah A. and Harriet Chute, Betsy Woodworth, Betsy Camplin and others were baptized by Rev Israel Potter about that time. Mr. Chute was appointed Deacon in the Baptist Church at Acton, 1856, joined the Adventists at Peck, Michigan; Disciples at Bryon; independent since. At certain times in his life, Deacon Chute was an ambitious, active, zealous, hard-working farmer, tradesman and Christian."

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Pages 109-111


Notes


Note    N23-372         Back to Index        Back to Isaac Beals and Louise Jane Chute Beals.

Notes on Isaac Beals and Louise Jane Chute Beals:

"Moved to Sanilac, Michigan about 1870 and live near Peck."

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894


Notes


Note    N23-373         Back to Index        Back to George F. Diamond and Adaline ("Adda") Beals Diamond.

Notes on George F. Diamond and Adaline ("Adda") Beals Diamond:

This couple had 4 children.


Notes


Note    N374         Index
2 children.

Notes


Note    N23-375         Back to Index        Back to Freeman Chute and Emma Collins Chute.

The Tawas Life-Saving Station when first constructed in 1875-1876. Photo courtesy of Michigan Lights.com website, which also has a full story on the project to save and move the structure as an historic landmark of Michigan.
Notes on Freeman Chute and Emma Collins Chute:

Twin to Susan A. Chute.

"Born Sept. 26, 1841; was a sailor and a traveler several years; captain of a life-saving station at Tawas, Michigan several years; he ran a steamboat at Bay City for some time, where he now lives; he married Emma Collins, September, 1880."

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Page 170.



The life-saving station at Tawas, Michigan was quite recently the subject of an intense restoration and resettlement process. Built in 1875, Freeman Chute is not listed as any of the official "Life-Station Keepers", but his biography suggests that he may have captained a boat connected with the Tawas life-saving station.


Notes


Note    N23-376         Back to Index        Back to Walter Glendenning and Susan Amelia Chute Glendenning.

Notes on Walter Glendenning and Susan Amelia Chute Glendenning:

"v. Susan A., twin sister [of Freeman Chute], m. Walter Glendenning in Acton, Ont., Dec. 25, 1863, but a few years after they removed to Dover, O.

Children:
1. Anna M., b. Dec. 22, 1864; m. Charles Standan, Dec. 31, 1890.
2. Freeman, b. Mar. 8, 1868.
3. Amos, b. Apr. 21, 1872.
4. Belle, b. June 9, 1874.
5. William, b. Sept. 2, 1876.

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Pages 110-111.


"1841, Sept. 26. Freeman and Susan A., twins. Freeman m., 1880, Sept, Emma Collins, dau. Richard of Mitchie, Mich. Susan A., m., 1863 Dec. 25 Walter Glendinning of Acton, Ontario."

Source: Brown, George S., Yarmouth Nova Scotia Genealogies, Transcribed from the Yarmouth Herald, Prepared for publication by Martha & William Roamy, Assisted by Dr. John McDonald Hilton, Genevieve Coleman, Diane Feindt, and Richard Souther, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1001 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD. 1993. Page 690


Notes


Note    N377         Index
Died young.
Notes


Note    N23-378         Back to Index        Back to Robert Adams, Eleanor Wilmot Adams and Sarah (Glover) Short Adams
Robert Adams, Eleanor Wilmot Adams and Sarah (Glover) Short Adams:

1. i. Robert Adams, from Devon, England (said to be son of Robert (and Elizabeth Shirland), son of Richard, son of John), m. Eleanor; settled in Ipswich, Mass., 1635; removed to Salem, 1638; to Newbury, 1640; and settled on land still held by descendants of the name. He was a tailor, and a good citizen. His wife d. June 12, 1677; he m. (2d) Sarah Glover, widow of Henry Short, Feb. 6, 1678, and d. Oct. 12, 1682, aged 81. She d. Oct. 24, 1697.

CHILDREN.
i. John, m. Woodman.
ii. Joanna, b. 1634; m. Launcelot Granger, Jan. 4, 1654; the ancestor of Gideon Grander, a postmaster-general of the United States.
2 iii. Serg. Abram, b. 1639.
iv. Elizabeth, m. Edward Phelps of Andover.
v. Mary, m. Jeremiah Goodridge, Nov. 15, 1660.
vi. Isaac, b. 1648 ; d. single.
vii. Jacob, b. April 23, 1649; d. young.
viii. Hannah, b. June 25, 1650; m. William Warham, Feb. 10, 1680.
ix. Jacob, b. Sept. 13, 1651 ; m. Anna Ellen, April 7, 1677.
x. Archelaus, b. about 1653 ; m. Sarah , March, 1698 ; m. 2d, Sarah Green (1699-1719), 1717.

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Page v. Allied Families: Adams


"Born in England in 1602, Robert Adams came first to Ipswich in Massachusetts Bay in A. D. 1635, bringing with him his wife Eleanor (Wilmot?) and his first two children. He was a tailor by trade, resided in Salem in 1638-9 and removed to Newbury in 1640, where he acquired a large farm and valuable property, and died October 12, 1682, aged 81 years. His will was made at Newbury, March 7, 1680-1, and probated Nov. 27, 1682. His wife Eleanor died June 12, 1677, and he married 2nd, Feb. 6, 1678, Sarah (Glover) Short, the widow of Henry Short. She died in Newbury, Oct. 24, 1697.

He is believed by many to have come from Devonshire, and to have been a son of Robert and Elizabeth Sharlon or Sharland, connected with the Ap Adam pedigree, and through that connection to have been a cousin of Henry Adams of Braintree - (afterward Quincy, Mass.), the ancestor of the presidents, John and John Quincy Adams. This famous Welsh pedigree, beginning with Ap Adam in the time of Edward the First, about the close of the 13th century, and changing to the name of Adams in the eighth generation, runs through thirteen generations down to Nicholas, who married and had no issue. To this pedigree has been appended by a later hand, according to competent judges, a brother of Nicholas, named John, who married Margaret Squier, and had Richard, who married and had Robert, the father of Robert of Newbury. There is no evidence whatever to sustain this pleasing belief. His origin is not positively known.

Dr. James Savage, in his Genealogical Dictionary of all the earliest or first-comers in New England (1860), says: "Robert Adams, tailor, in Salem, 1638, by one tradition came from Devonshire, by another of equal value was from Holderness, County of York." According to Joshua Coffin, the historian of Newbury (1845), Robert Adams "was two or three years in Ipswich, and had before coming over, two children, John and Joanna, and at Salem, Abraham, born 1639; he removed to Newbury 1640, and had Isaac, 1648, and youngest Archelaus." He is believed to have resided within a few rods of the spot where his descendants, Col. Daniel Adams and Robert Adams, afterward lived. Mr. Coffin was mistaken in naming Archelaus among his sons. The Archelaus who has been classed as such, was a son of Lieut. John Adams, who was a son of "William of Ipswich." That he was equally mistaken in assuming that Robert Adams came from Devonshire, there is fair ground for belief.

If coming from Holderness it is not impossible that he was of Scotch origin and blood. There is a tradition among some of the descendants that he was a Scotchman.

The shears with which Robert Adams wrought and which he brought with him from England--a large pair, hand-made- are now in the possession of his descendant, Stephen P. Hale of Newbury.

The will of Robert Adams alludes to and confirms an agreement made with his loving wife, Sarah, before marriage, gives her "my great chest and the highest chair in the room wherein we live," both of which she is to restore at her death, or if she shall marry again, "also all the money I have," she not to be accountable to any one, and "to enjoy the parlor wholly for one year." To his eldest son, John, he gives 20. to be paid by his executors within twelve months after his decease; to his son Isaac he bequeaths 5 yearly during life "in English corn, pork, beef, and such like, also my wearing apparel, and the bed in the north garret and all the furniture belonging to it, and the least, brass pot and pot hooks, etc." To Jacob he gives the house he lives in and the land adjoining to it as now fenced in, and the meadow on the neck or south side of Newbury River. To his daughter Hannah he gives 20 to be paid within one year; to Joanna, or her children, the bed and furniture belonging to it in the parlor, and the biggest brass pot, and the chest and chair previously mentioned when they are returned, to have them when 18 years of age or when she marries; to daughter Elizabeth, wife of Edward Phelps, he gives one cow; to daughter Joanna, wife of Launcelot Granger, one cow; to daughter Mary, wife of Jeremiah Goodrich, one cow. To the three sons of Abraham, then born-Robert, Abraham, Isaac - he gives each a gun, and to the two older each a sword. All the rest of his effects he gives to Abraham.

He provides that his lands shall go to Robert, the eldest son of Abraham, also the great brass kettle, table, and irons and spit; Abraham and his son Robert to be joint executors, but Abraham to have power to act alone till Robert should become of age. "And though I appoint Robert Adams my heir after his father, Mary, the wife of said Abraham, is not to be debarred of any just claim if left a widow." Further, to Joanna Granger he bequeaths his pewter tankard and a pewter bowl, and to Mary, daughter of Abraham, a box with lock and key and six diaper knapkins." If Robert come into possession of the lands by reversion he is to give to either of his two brothers "now in being"-Abraham and Isaac-20 a piece. His loving friends, Mr. John Woodbridge and Mr. Nichols Noyes, were to be overseers of the will, and to them, each one, was bequeathed one of his best wethers.

Signed and sealed March 7, 1680.

ROBERT ADAMS."

Source: Adams, Andrew N., Compiler, Editor. A genealogical history of Robert Adams, of Newbury, Mass: and his descendants 1635-1900., 1900, The Tuttle Company, Printers, Rutland, Vermont.


Notes


Note    N23-379         Back to Index        Back to Launcelot Granger and Joanna Adams Granger
Launcelot Granger and Joanna Adams Granger:

"The ancestor of Gideon Granger, a postmaster-general of the United States."

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894


"JOANNA8, b. in England, about 1633-4; m. Jan. 4, 1654, Launcelot Granger, b. in England. They removed to Suffield. Conn., where he d. 3 Sept., 1689."

Source: Adams, Andrew N., Compiler, Editor. A genealogical history of Robert Adams, of Newbury, Mass: and his descendants 1635-1900., 1900, The Tuttle Company, Printers, Rutland, Vermont.


Notes


Note    N380         Index
Died young.

Notes


Note    N381         Index
Had 13 children.

Notes


Note    N23-382         Index
Notes on Thomas Scanlon and Bridget Holloran Scanlon:

"Thomas Scanlon, b.1835- Ire., wife was Bridget Holloran , b. 1840- Ire., Children were, Cornelius, b. 1867, Eng., James, b.1870. Eng., Richard, b. 1872 , Eng., Michael, b. 1874, Ct., Catherine, b., 1876, Ct., Mary E., b. 1879, Ct.

The Scanlon's settled in New Britian, Ct., which is where all of the Ct. born children were raised. We know that Mary E., ( b. 1879 - d. 1965), met & married Edward F. Chute, ( b. 1879 - d. 1921), both born in New Britain Ct., at St. Mary's Church, New Britain, Ct. Mary never remarried, raising 4 children; May, Helen, Burnice,& Edward Joseph (my father). Burnice & my dad were twins, dad being the youngest."

Edward Joseph ("Eddie") Chute, Jr. via e-mail, Sunday, February 01, 2004.

Notes


Note    N383         Index
Died by drowning.

Notes


Note    N385         Index
Had 10 children; 7 or 8 died in childhood. He then married her older sister, Susannah.







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