Chute Family Notes: Notes 20-319 through 20-334
Notes


Note    N319          Index
One daughter.

Notes


Note    N320         Index

"On June 5, 1885, Anna Jane, working in the Wheetwright & Page paper mill, North Leominister, picked up, pinned to a bankcheck, two bills of $1,000 and $500 respectively, and when they were discovered as coming from a New York bank, they were returned, and the girl got $300 for her honesty. She had found $10 before that, $5 in gold before either, and $2,50 another time."


Notes


Note    N20-321         Back to Index        Back to Cornelius Harris Chute, Lydia Sabria Colburn Chute and Mary Jane Colburn Chute.

Notes on Cornelius Harris Chute, Lydia Sabria Colburn Chute and Mary Jane Colburn Chute:

"Born at Harvard, Mass., Nov 27, 1832, married Lydia S. Colburn7 (Ziba6, William5, William4, William3, Robert2, Edward1), 1855, lived some time in Lyme, New Hampshire, to Royalston, Wisconsin next; then to Spencer Brook, Minnesota, 1857. He was Corporal in Company D, 2nd Minnesota Cavalry in the late War. Mrs. Chute died 1875; aged forty, he married 2nd, Mary Jane, an older sister, 1876, and soon after moved to Princeton, Minn."

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Page 104.



Obituary, Cornelius Harris Chute

Cornelius H. Chute, veteran of the Indian wars and an old settler of this territory, died at his home in north Princeton on Thursday morning, June 7, at 11:30 o'clock, aged 73 years, 6 months, 10 days. Up to within two weeks of Mr. Chute's death he apparently enjoyed the best of health.

Cornelius Harris Chute was born in Harvard, Mass., on Nov. 27, 1832, and settled in Spencer Brook, Isanti county in the early days. He afterwards moved to Germany, Mille Lacs county, and later purchased the premises in north Princeton where he died. On March 10, 1855, Mr. Chute was married to Lydia S. Colburn of Lyme, N. H., and of this union five children were born, three sons and two daughters. His wife died on Nov. 20, 1873, and on Sept. 29, 1874, he married, at Royalton, Wis., Mary Jane Colburn, sister of his deceased wife. By this marriage there were no children.

On Nov. 2, 1863, Mr. Chute enlisted in Company D, Second Minnesota cavalry, and was honorably discharged on Dec. 2, 1865. During his military service Mr. Chute was in the Indian campaigns in the territory of Dakota and the Yellowstone, and it was his regiment which proceeded to the relief of Capt. Fisk, who was surrounded by Indians about 200 miles west of Fort Rice.

A wife and four children survive him, viz., Jerome, who is now in Alaska; Albert, George, Mrs. Ed Latta of Baldwin and Mrs. Am Babb of Spencer Brook.

Mr. Chute was a charter member of Wallace T. Rines post, G. A. R., a member of the Masonic fraternity, and a gentleman highly respected in the community. The funeral sermon was delivered by Rev. J. R. Henderson at the family residence on Saturday and the Masons and G. A. R. conducted the service at the grave.

Source: Princeton Union, JUNE 14, 1906 [Note: correct date should be 1914, if he in fact died in 1914.]



In the 1860 Isanti County Census, daughter "Josie L." is identified as "Lydia J." She may be identified also under "Josephine": "Josephine Lydia", "Lydia Josephine", as well as "Josie".



Regimental History
MINNESOTA
SECOND CAVALRY
(One Year)

Second Cavalry. --Col., Robert N. McLaren; Lieut.-Col., William Pfaender; Majs., Ebenezer A. Rice, John M. Thompson, Robert H. Rose. This regiment was organized during the fall and winter of 1863 and was mustered in during Jan., 1864. It was engaged in garrison duty, with occasional expeditions in pursuit of wandering bands of Indians until late in May, when it left Fort Snelling for the campaign against the savages.**

[Note**: By "savages", the United States Army record keepers meant, in actuality, the Sioux, who would have posted similar claims against the United States Army of the time. Nonetheless, this record is interesting for several reasons: in the battle of Tahkahokuty Mountain (Killdeer Mountain) in August of 1864, Cornelius would have encountered (in reputation, if not in actual fact) the famous chief of the Wahpekute Dakota Indian tribe, Inkpaduta, who would have participated in this battle. This band of the Sioux was located in the prairies of South Dakota, Iowa, and Minnesota, and certainly had their own legitimate reasons for feeling backed against the wall by the U.S. Government.

As a settler in Minnesota Cornelius would have certainly heard of Inkpaduta already. "Inkpaduta's extreme hatred for whites seemed to be derived from the senseless murdering of his family in 1854 by Henry Lott ... after 1857, Inkpaduta became a legend among settlers, a storybook monster who was often rumored to be somewhere nearby, lurking. Relations between Dakotas and whites staggered on, finally exploding in 1862 with a massive uprising in Minnesota, which claimed the lives of nearly five hundred white settlers and an unknown number of Dakotas. Inkpaduta was there, but his role--if any--is unclear.

As the uprising collapsed, he fled westward onto the plains, eventually falling in with the Lakotas and becoming friends with Sitting Bull. Lakota holy man Black Elk lists Inkpaduta as one of the great men present at the Little Bighorn in 1876, when Custer was "rubbed out." As Lakota resistance disintegrated the following year, Sitting Bull and his people fled to Canada. Inkpaduta, old and increasingly nearsighted, went with them. Unlike Sitting Bull, he never returned to the U.S., never surrendered, was never captured. He died in Manitoba in 1881."]

The 8th Minn. infantry, eight companies of the 2nd cavalry, Brackett's cavalry battalion and Jones' infantry, formed the and brigade of Sully's division, under command of Col. Minor T. Thomas these troops left Fort Ridgely June 5, 1864, and effected a junction with the 1st brigade at Fort Sully on the Missouri July 1. The Indians were driven from their camp on Cannon Ball river and followed to the Little Heart river. The regiment participated and did effective work in the battle of Tahkahokuty mountain, where 5,000 Indians were strongly posted in the hills and ravines. Two men of Co. D were killed the following night, while on picket, Co. D and part of Co. A being detailed for that duty. It was in the two days' engagement in early August, known as the battle of the Little Missouri, reached the Yellowstone on Aug. 13. On the return trip it had several slight encounters with the enemy. A detachment accompanied the expedition for the relief of Capt. Fisk and a party of 50 cavalrymen, who were escorting an emigrant train west. The regiment reached Fort Ridgely Oct. 8 and the several companies were on garrison and patrol duty at Forts Wadsworth, Abercrombie, Ripley and Ridgely, and smaller posts. They were mustered out as fast as regulars could take their places in the fall of 1865, except Co. A, which was mustered out April 2, and L, mustered out May 4, 1866.

Battles Fought:
Killdeer Mountain
Other Names: Tahkahokuty Mountain
Location: Dunn County
Campaign: Sully’s Expedition against the Sioux in Dakota Territory (1864)
Date(s): July 28-29, 1864

Battle fought on 08 August 1864 at Mauvaise Terre, DT.
Battle fought on 07 May 1865 at Blue Earth River.

Details on the Mauvaise Terre and Blue Earth River battles are still being researched.

Another reason this record is interesting is that it reflects the use of the military on two distinct fronts during the Civil War: while most Union army units were engaged with battles against the south, they were also needed in the west. Cornelius's unit is an example of a cavalry unit that fought on both fronts.

Source on the Minnesta Second Cavalry:

Historical Data Systems, comp. Military Records of Individual Civil War Soldiers. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 1999-. Copyright 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000 - Historical Data Systems Inc.P.O. Box 196 Kingston, MA 02364

Sources on Inkpaduta and the Sioux:
"The Sioux Uprising of 1862", by Kenneth Carley
"Famous Chiefs of the Eastern Sioux", by Mark Diedrich

Web site on Inkpaduta Created by Clinton Engen, December 17,1999
URL: http://www.rrcnet.org/~historic/inkpadu.html


Notes


Note    N322         Index
Died young.

Notes


Note    N20-323         Back to Index        Back to William Rochford, Jr. and Margaret Alicia Chute Rochford.

Notes on William Rochford, Jr. and Margaret Alicia Chute Rochford:

"Have three children."

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894


Notes


Note    N20-324         Back to Index        Back to Alma Eldridge Chute and Lela Viola Hardy Chute.

Notes on Alma Eldridge Chute and Lela Viola Hardy Chute:

"My grandfather, Alma Eldridge, hated his names. He was a carpenter and worked near established sawmills so the family moved throughout Alabama, Mississippi,Georgia and South Carolina as required for the jobs. He ended up in Unadilla, about 20-30 miles south of Macon and lived there all the time I knew him. He was divorced from his wife (unusual in those days, I guess) and she lived in Macon."

Source: Raymond Eldredge Chute


Notes


Note    N325         Index
"I do know the one who taught in the American school system in Berlin. She was my aunt Eunice, Alma's eldest daughter, who died last April in St. Petersburg, FL at age 91. She had quite a successful career as an educator. In fact, I have a few pages about her that she herself wrote. She also tried her hand at poetry."

Notes


Note    N326         Index
"As to Elmer - the story is that her father had had a girlfriend named Elma or Alma, and when they wanted to name one of their children, the name was misspelled as Elmer. That's what she goes by. It is different and she gets a lot of attention with it."

Notes


Note    N327         Index
Children adopted by Cornelius H. Chute.

Notes


Note    N20-328         Back to Index        Back to Ezra Chute and Frances Steadman Chute.

Notes on Ezra Chute and Frances Steadman Chute:

"Born in Granville, N.S., May 9, 1804; married Frances Steadman4 (James C.3, John2, John1), by Rev. William Elder, and lived a mile below Bridgetown, on the old Benjamin Foster farm, a kind Christian couple; died Nov. 2, 1851; she died Sept. 8, 1857; aged fifty years and six months."

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Pages 104-105.


Notes


Note    N20-329         Back to Index        Back to James Chute and Bethia Foster Chute.

Notes on James Chute and Bethia Foster Chute:

"Born in Granville, a mile below Bridgton, Dec. 15, 1833; married Bethia, daughter of Samuel Foster, Jr., Feb. 2, 1856; and lives under the North Mountain, back of Bridgton, a farmer.

Children :
i Mary Fannie, b. Nov. 19, 1856; m. Whitefield Wilkins, Dec. 31, 1874.
ii Robert Morton, b. Sept. 21, 1858
iii Hannah Azuba, b. June 20, 1860; m. Wm. Brabzon, July 29, 1878; and d. Oct. 11, 1890. Four children. Brabzon, Comstock and Ladue is a firm at Marlboro, Mass.
iv Georgiana B., b. Jan. 9, 1862; d. Dec. 4, 1865.
v Emma Lovenia, b. Aug. 29, 1863; m. John P. Lawrence9 (Capt. SamuelC. 8 Joseph S.,7 John G.6 Abel,5 Jonatham,4 Ebenezer,3 Peleg,2 John1, b. in England 1609, to Salem, Mass., 1630, d. July 11, 1667), Oct. 16, 1880; and live in Allston, Mass.; have a son Lester Walter, b. 1888.
vi Georgiana, b. Sept. 28, 1865; m. Herbert J. Banks, Nov. 23, 1884.
vii Anna Gertie, b. Apr. 12, 1867; m. Frank Comstock, Aug. 29. 1890.
viii Cassie Belle, b. May 18, 1869; m. Henry Ladue, Nov. 1889.
ix William Judson, b. July 16, 1872.
x Florence May, b. Feb. 16, 1S74.
xi Anoie Savilla, b. Nov. 18, 1875.
xii Walter Steadman, b. Jan. 22, 1878.

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Page 166.


Notes


Note    N330         Index
4 children.

Notes


Note    N331         Index
Emigrated to Salem, Massachusetts, 1630.

Notes


Note    N332         Index
Lived to the 37th year of Henry III.

Notes


Note    N333         Index
Heiress and daughter of John de Washington.

Notes


Note    N334         Index
Son and successor of the Knight of the Crusades.







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