Chute Family Notes: Notes 13-195 through 13-212
Notes


Note    N195          Index
Notes on John Chute: Died young.

Notes


Note    N13-196         Back to Index        Back to Ida May Chute.

Notes on Ida May Chute:

"Single. Girl Scout leader, New London."

Source: Chute, George Maynard, Jr. Chute Family in America in the 20th Century. University Microfilms International, Ann Arbor, Michigan & London, 1967. Page 1.


Notes


Note    N13-197         Back to Index        Back to Edgar Verne ("Buddy") Chute and Rosaline Mae Pettersen Chute.

Notes on Edgar Verne ("Buddy") Chute and Rosaline Mae Pettersen Chute:


Notes


Note    N197         Index
1 daughter, perhaps two. Possibly after the death of her husband, she came with her children to Connecticut.

Notes


Note    N198         Index
Died in World War I.

Notes


Note    N199         Index
Died in infancy.

Notes


Note    N200         Index
Lived in Odessa, Texas, USA.

Notes


Note    N201         Index
Is now Sister Claire Lucy.

Notes


Note    N13-202         Back to Index        Back to Leander Vernest Beele/Beebe ("Leander B.") Chute and Helen Moore/Helen Augusta Babbidge Chute.

Notes on Leander Vernest Beele/Beebe ("Leander B.") Chute and Helen Moore/Helen Augusta Babbidge Chute:

This couple had no children.


Notes


Note    N203         Index
Single.

Notes


Note    N204         Index
1 son.

Notes


Note    N13-205         Back to Index        Back to Austin Abram Chute and Flora G. MacDonald Chute.

Notes on Austin Abram Chute and Flora G. MacDonald Chute:

This family is somewhat difficult to piece together as, by 1930, we have Flora Chute with a surname of "Rees" living with son Albert Walter Chute and daughter Evelyn E. Chute and another son with the surname of Martell. GMC reports that son Robert Chute lived in Los Angeles, California, USA. More research is needed.


Notes


Note    N206         Index
Oakland, California.

Notes


Note    N13-207         Back to Index        Back to M. Stover and Ethel Marie Chute Stover.

Notes on M. Stover and Ethel Marie Chute Stover:

The family lived in West Covina, CA.

Source: Chute, George Maynard, Jr. Chute Family in America in the 20th Century. University Microfilms International, Ann Arbor, Michigan & London, 1967


Notes


Note    N208         Index
Lived in Elmsford, Westchester, New York, USA.

Notes


Note    N13-209         Back to Index        Back to Gordon Morine and Idella Mae Chute Morine.
Notes on Gordon Morine and Idella Mae Chute Morine:

GMC: "Had 10 children."

Correction: "In the family of William Minard Chute ... Idella Mae, who married Gordon Morine in 1935, had 11 children, not 10, all living and four married. One daughter was married this summer, so has no children, but the other two girls and one boy have children. The married son, Gerald, was to see me this summer and he is passionately interested in anything affecting the Chutes."

Source: Letter from Marion B. Frude McCormick of Bear River, Digby County, Nova Scotia, dated 24 OCT 1967, to George M. Chute, Jr.


Notes


Note    N13-210         Back to Index        Back to Charles Chute, M.P. and Ursula Challoner Chute.

Notes on Charles Chute, M.P. and Ursula Challoner Chute:

Charles Chute, M.P., Biographical Sketch by Chaloner William Chute

"Chaloner Chute's father, Charles Chute, was a barrister of the Middle Temple, and member of Parliament for Thetford in Norfolk, and was appointed1 to conduct one of the earliest of those experiments for the registration of titles and sales of land which have never ceased to exercise the ingenuity of law reformers down to the present time. His mother was Ursula, daughter of John Chaloner of Fulham, and cousin of Sir Thomas Chaloner, who, having been tutor to Henry, Prince of Wales, son of James I., for whom Bramshill, co. Hants, was built, is commemorated by a fine monument in Chiswick Church."

1: Calendar of State Papers (Domestic), 1619-1623, p. 537

Chute, Challoner William, A History of the Vyne in Hampshire, Jacob & Johnson, Winchester, Simpkin, Marshall & Co., London, 1888, pages 67-68.



Dates of living documents: 1606, 1614-16, 1634. Barrister of the Middle Temple, Member of Parliament, Norfolk.


May 29. 1606. Mid. Temple.51. "Ch. Chewte to Tho. Wilson. Has a cancelled bond of his. Hopes the bond of affection will rest unviolated between them."
Source: From: James I: Volume 21: May, 1606', Calendar of State Papers Domestic: James I, 1603-1610 (1857), pp. 315-19.
URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=15006&strquery=Chewte. Date accessed: 12 March 2006.
Sources: Middlesex: - Calendar to the Sessions Records, 1614-1615
Additional Baptisms.
Middlesex Sessions Records.
Jury List.
County: Middlesex
Country: England
Charles Chewte, esquire, bailiff of the liberty of the Duchy of Lancaster at Enfield.

Middlesex: - Calendar to the Sessions Records, 1615-1616
Additional Baptisms.
Middlesex Sessions Records.
Sessions Rolls.
County: Middlesex
Country: England
Charles Chewte, esquire, of the Liberty of the Duchy of Lancaster at Enfield.



Notes


Note    N13-211         Back to Index        Back to John Chaloner.

Notes on John Chaloner:

Daughter Ursula is recorded as being a cousin of Sir Thomas Challoner, tutor to Henry, Prince of Wales, son of James I, for whom Bramhill in Hants, was built, [and who] is commemorated by a fine monument in Cheswich Church.


Notes


Note    N13-212         Back to Index        Back to Challoner Chute, "The Speaker", Ann Skory Chute and Dorothy North, Lady Dacre.

Notes on Challoner Chute, "The Speaker", Ann Skory Chute and Dorothy North, Lady Dacre:

CHALLONER CHUTE, Esq., Biographical Sketch by Chaloner William Chute

"According to the inscription upon his fine marble monument in the Tomb Chamber next to the Chapel [in the Vyne], his ancestors possessed the manor of Taunton until the resign of Henry VIII; but if this be so, they must have held it under the see of Winchester, to which it belonged from Saxon times until the seventeenth century. The family was, however, of ancient standing in Sussex, Kent and Somersetshire; and can trace1 a direct male descent from Alexander Chute of Taunton, who died 1268. They are said to "carry the memorial of the third nation of the Germans that conquered the Britons, commonly called Jutes2."

[His] childhood was spent at Kensington, where his younger brother Charles was born in 1600, and his sister Dorothy in 1603, the entries of qhose births in the register of St. Mary Abbots, Kensington, were made in Latin, while those of less dignified persons are in the vulgar tongue.

Chaloner was admitted a student in the Middle Temple, November 11, 1613, as "Filius et haeres apparens Caroli Chewte de Kelvedon in comitatu Essexiae," and was called to the Bar, May 23, 1623 1Bethersden Heraldic Roll
2Manning's Lives of the Speakers, p. 356

Chute, Challoner William, A History of the Vyne in Hampshire, Jacob & Johnson, Winchester, Simpkin, Marshall & Co., London, 1888, pages 67-68.



CHALLONER CHUTE, Esq., Biographical Sketch

This ancient family derives from Alexander Chute, Lord of the Manor of Taunton, in Somersetshire, as early as 1268, at which place the Chutes continued until the sixteenth century, when they removed to Wrenham, in Suffolk, and subsequently purchased the beautiful seat of" The Vine" in Hampshire, long the residence of the noble family of Sandys. A junior branch seated at Surrenden and Appledore, in Kent, produced a gallant knight, who was standard-bearer to King Henry VIII., at the siege of Boulogne, and terminated with Sir George Chute, of Surrenden, created a baronet in 1674, who dying issueless in 1721, that title became extinct. Another branch emigrated to Ireland, where their descendants still flourish, and claim the male representation of the family. Challoner Chute, Esq., of the Vine, of whom we are about to treat as briefly as the short duration of his presidential career, was the son of Charles Chute, Esq., who, according to Anthony Wood, was also a lawyer of the Middle Temple, by Ursula, his wife, daughter of John Challoner, Esq., of Fulham, in Middlesex, and the grandson of Arthur Chute, Esq., of Wrenham, in Suffolk. The subject of our memoir being destined for the law, was entered of the Middle Temple, and in due time called to the bar. We have not discovered much information relative to his progress in that learned and laborious profession, but from the fact of his having been assigned as counsel for Archbishop Laud, we must presume that he had acquired the reputation of a sound lawyer, as the appointment would otherwise have appeared a mockery of justice in public estimation. Mr. Chute lived in very eventful periods, and although he was several times a parliament man, it does not appear that he entertained any of those violent opinions or principles, which rendered so many of his contemporaries notorious rather than memorable. In the last Parliament of Oliver Cromwell he sat for Middlesex; and in that under the short-lived protectorship of Richard, he was returned for the same county. The manner of his election to the office of Speaker is thus recorded. After all the members of the House had been sworn, " Sir Walter Erle rose, and put them in mind that their first work was to choose a Speaker, and there was amongst them a worthy gentleman of the long robe, whom he conceived was very fitly qualified for that service. He therefore proposed Challoner Chute, Esq.," who was fully approved of by a general call to the chair. Mr. Chute endeavoured to excuse himself on the ground of ill health and debility, as well as his want of experience of the rules and orders of the House, but, although the statement as to his bodily infirmities was unfortunately correct, the House insisted upon his taking the chair. It is not our intention to enter at any length into the proceedings of this Parliament, which met on the 27th of January, and was opened by a long and sensible speech from Richard Cromwell, (much more so indeed than his friends expected from him,) and a longer discourse from Mr. Commissioner Fiennes. The recognition of his title as Protector appeared to be the principal object of the former, while prayers and debates concerning the power and bounds of the House of Peers almost exclusively occupied the attention of the members until the 9th of March, when our Speaker shortly after the sitting ef the House rose and said, " that, he came to the chair with a great desire to serve the House, but their sittings had been so extraordinary, and their business such, and so requiring it, that he was utterly disabled to serve them as he would for the present. That it was a great grief of mind to him to retard the public business, though but for one half hour or more, as it had been this morning; that he found himself grow weaker and weaker, and therefore prayed that he might be totally discharged, or otherwise that he might have so much respite, at least, granted to him, as that by the blessing of God, he might recover some better measure of health, and be enabled to return again to this service." Mr. Chute's request having been complied with, he instantly left the house, the Serjeant with his mace attending him to his coach, and on returning brought the mace back and placed it below, under the table. It has been observed by some of the writers of that day, that Mr. Chute saw the danger of the times and was sensibly affected by the daily increasing difficulties of his position arising from the total incapacity of Richard Cromwell to carry on the Government; they even went so far as to hint that timidity was the cause of his wishing to be discharged from the high office which the House had conferred upon him ; but that his illness was feigned, is powerfully contradicted by the fact of his death, which happened on the 15th April, 1658-9, within a few weeks of his retirement from office. Noble says, " He was one of the most respected lawyers of his time. His last wife was Dorothy, daughter of Dudley, Lord North, the second wife and widow of Richard Lord Dacre, and sister of Francis Lord Dacre, who condescended to sit as member for Sussex, in one of Oliver's Parliaments."

Our author is a little confused in this account, as he proves to be very often in genealogical matters. Mr. Chute married first, Anne, daughter and coheir of Sir John Skorey, by whom he had issue, and secondly, Dorothy, daughter of Dudley, Lord North, by whom he had none. Challoner Chute, Esq., of the Vine, his eldest son and successor, who sat for Devizes in the same Parliament with his father, married the Hon. Catherine Lennard, daughter of Lord Dacre, by whom he had issue a daughter Elizabeth, of whom presently, and several sons who continued the male line of the family until 1776, when upon the death of John Chute, Esq. of the Vine, that estate devolved by marriage with the heiress upon Thomas Lobb, Esq., great-grandson of our Speaker, through his mother, and from his son, the Rev. Thomas Vere Chute, the estates passed to their present proprietor William Lyde Wigget Chute, Esq. of the Vine and Pickenham Hall. We now return to Elizabeth Chute, the grand-daughter of our Speaker. This lady married Sir Charles Ludowicke Cottrell, Knt., and had issue Colonel John Cottrell, Stephen Cottrell, L.L.D., (the father of Sir Stephen Cottrell, Master of the Ceremonies to the King,) and the Right Rev. William Cottrell, D.D., Lord Bishop of Leighlin and Ferns. Colonel Cottrell, the eldest of the three brothers, was the direct ancestor of Charles Herbert Cottrell, Esq. of Hadley, near Barnet, who is the lineal descendant and representative of our Speaker. The sister of this gentleman is married to the Rev. John Sloper, of West Woodhay, in Berkshire.

We cannot conclude this short memoir of the Chute family without adding a remark of Silas Taylor's, that, "the name of Chute carried the memorial of the almost forgotten third nation of the Germans that conquered the Britons, and were commonly called Jutes, and after Chutes and Wights."— Harl. MSS.

Arms.—Gu. semee of mullets or., three swords in fesse arg. pomelled gold.

Source: The Lives of the Speakers of the House of Commons, by James Alexander Manning, Esq., Publisher E. Churton, 26 Holles Street, London, 1850. Pages 334-336.


CHUTE, CHALONER (rf. 1659), speaker of the House of Commons, was the son of Chaloner Chute of the Middle Temple, by his wife Ursula, daughter of John Chaloner of Fulham in the county of Middlesex. He was admitted a member of the Middle Temple and called to the bar. In 1656 he was returned as one of the knights of the shire for Middlesex, and, on not being allowed to take his seat, he, with a number of other members who had been similarly treated, published a remonstrance. To the following parliament of 1658-9 he was again returned by the same constituency, and on the meeting of this parliament on 27 Jan. 1658-9 was chosen speaker, 'although he besought the house to think of some other person more worthy and of better health and ability to supply that place' (House of Commons' Journals, vii. 594). On 9 March 1658-9, in consequence of his failing health, Chute begged the house that 'he might be totally discharged,' or have leave of absence for a time, whereupon Sir Lislebone Long, knt., recorder of London, was chosen speaker during Chute's absence. On 21 March the members who were appointed by the house to visit him at his home in the country found him 'very infirm and weak.' He died on 14 April 1659, and on the following day Thomas Bampfield [q. v.], who, upon Long hecoming ill, had been chosen deputy-speaker, was elected to the chair. Chute acquired a great reputation at the bar and was employed in the defence of Sir Edward Herbert (the king's attorney-general), Archbishop Laud, the eleven members of the House of Commons charged by Fairfax and his army as delinquents, and James, duke of Hamilton. He was one of the counsel retained to defend the bishops when they were impeached for making canons in 1641. Two only of their counsel appeared, Serjeant Jermin, who declined to plead unless a warrant was first procured from the House of Commons, and Chute,' who, being demanded of the lords whether he would plead for the bishops, " Yea," said he, " so long as I have a tongue to plead with." Soon after this he drew up a demurrer on their behalf, that their offence in making canons could not amount to a prsemunire' (Fuller, Church History, ed. Brewer, vi. 211), and the further prosecution of the charge was abandoned. For his courageous conduct of this case he was presented with a piece of plate, which is still in possession of the family at the Vyne, bearing the following inscription: ' Viro venerabili Chalonero Chute armigo votivum John* Episc. Roffensis ob Prudentiam ejus singularem, fortitudinem heroicam, et sinceram fidem prsestitas episco" Angliaa mire periclitatis, An" 1641.' It is related of Chute that 'if he had a fancy not to have the fatigue of business, but to pass his time in pleasures after his own humour, he would say to his clerk, "Tell the people I will not practise this term;" and was as good as his word; and then no one durst come near him with business. But when his clerks signified he would take business he was in the same advanced post at the bar, fully reintegrated, as before; and his practice nothing shrunk by the discontinuance. I guess that no eminent chancery practiser ever did, or will do, the like; and it shows a transcendent genius, superior to the slavery of a gainful profession' (North, Lives, 1742, p. 13). In 1646 the commons twice approved of his name as one of the commissioners of the great seal, but, as the lords were unable to agree as to the names, the appointment was not made.

In 1649 he appears to have taken part in framing 'new rules for reformation of the proceedings in chancery' (Whitelock, p. 421). The same authority says that he was 'an excellent orator, a man of great parts and generosity, whom many doubted that he would not join with the Protector's party, but he did heartily;' while Lord-chancellor Hyde, in a letter to Mordaunt, dated 9 May 16-59, writes: 'I am very heartily sorry for the death of the speaker, whom I have known well, and am persuaded he would never have subjected himself to that place if he had not entertained some hope of being able to serve the king' (Clarendon, State Papers, 1786, pp. 464-5). In 1653 Chute purchased the ancient family mansion and estate of the Vyne, near Basingstoke, from William, sixth Lord Sandys of the Vyne. Chute married twice. His first wife was Anne, daughter and coheiress of Sir John Skory, by whom he had one son and two daughters. He married, secondly, Dorothy, daughter of Dudley, third lord North, and widow of Richard, thirteenth lord Dacre, by whom he had no children. His son Chaloner, M.P. for Devizes in Richard Cromwell's parliament, married Catherine Lennard, daughter of his stepmother by her first marriage. The speaker's great-grandson, John Chute, whose name is familiar to the readers of Walpole's letters, was the last of the male line. Upon his death in 1776 the Vyne passed through the female line to Thomas Lobb Chute, another great-grandson of the speaker. After the death of T. L. Chute's sons it passed out of the Chute blood to William Lyde Wiggett, their second cousin, who assumed the additional name of Chute, and whose eldest son, Chaloner William Chute, is the present owner. From the churchwardens' accounts it appears that the speaker was buried at Chiswick, in which parish he had a residence at Little Sutton. On the rebuilding of the church in 1882 the vaults were inspected, but his coffin could not be identified. The tomb-room adjoining the chapel at the Vyne contains an altar-tomb with his effigy sculptured by Banks, after the portrait attributed to Vandyck, which was exhibited in the loan collection of 1866, and numbered 810 in the catalogue.

[Manning's Lives of the Speakers (1851), pp. 334-6 ; Whitolock's Memorials of the English Affairs (1732), pp. 77, 234, 240, 258, 381, 421, 651-3, 676-7 ; Journals of the House of Commons, vii. 593-4, 612, 616, 640; Parliamentary Papers (1878), vol. ii. pt.i.; Warner's Hampshire (1795), pp. 206-12 ; Woodward's Hampshire, ii. 78, iii. 264-5.] G. F. R. B.

Source: Dictionary of National Biography, Volume X Chamber - Clarkson. Stephens, Sir Leslie, Editor. MacMillan & Co., (New York) and Smith, Elder & Co., (London). 1887. Pages 348-349.


"Spent his childhood in Kensington where his younger brother Charles was born in 1600, and his sister Dorothy in 1603; the entries of whose births in the register of the Mary Abbotts, Kensington, were in Latin, while those of less dignified persons were in the vulgar tongue. Was admitted student of the Middle Temple November 11, 1613 as "Caroli Chewte", and was called to the bar May 23, 1623. He was appointed to conduct ... registrations of titles and sales of land. He purchased the Vyne, a celebrated country-seat in Hants Co., between Hampshire and Berkshire, of Lord Sandys, grandson of Sir Walter Sandys in 1653. The Vyne was settled by the Romans in the 2nd or 3rd century and was held by the family of Sandys from Richard II, to 1650. Was presented a valuable silver tankard by John, Bishop of Rochester for his efforts on behalf of the bishops and the royal cause; elected Treasurer of the Middle Temple in 1655; Knight of the Shire for Middlesex 1656 and 1658, and upon the assembling of Parliament under Richard Cromwell, January 29, 1659, was unanimously chosen speaker of the House of Commons. The French ambassador, M. de Bordeaux, wrote home in February that Parliament elected its speaker "who is one of the most celebrated lawyers in the nation, and there appeared to be no opposition to his election."

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894



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