NP12: Chute Family Notes 12-176 through 12-194
Notes


Note    N176          Index
Described as a good singer.

Notes


Note    N177         Index

Died as an infant.


Notes


Note    N90-1722         Back to Index        Back to Edgar Verne ("Buddy") Chute and Rosaline Mae Pettersen Chute.

Notes on Edgar Verne ("Buddy") Chute and Rosaline Mae Pettersen Chute:


Notes


Note    N12-178         Back to Index        Back to James Chute, Elizabeth Morse Chute and Elizabeth C. (Betsey) Wright Chute.

Notes on James Chute, Elizabeth Morse Chute and Elizabeth C. (Betsey) Wright Chute:

"Son of John and Judith (Foster) Chute, born in Granville, Annapolis, Co., N.S., Jan 22, 1762; married Elizabeth, daughter of Abner and Anna (Church) Morse, 1783, and had eight children. She died April, 1798, aged thirty-seven; and he married, second, Elizabeth, dughter of John and Sylvia (Harris) Wright, by Parson Milledge, Jan 28, 1802, and had eight children. He was a farmer and jeweler, and religiously rather skeptical; died April 9, 1829. She died June 19, 1856, aged seventy-six, a good, pious woman."

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Pages 35-36.


Notes


Note    N179         Index
Died soon after birth.

Notes


Note    N180         Index
Died by drowning.

Notes


Note    N12-181         Back to Index        Back to Angus Chute.
Notes on Angus Chute:

William Edward Chute recorded that Angus "was a teacher in St. Louis in 1860."

He appears in the catalog of students enrolled at Wesleyan Seminary in Reading, Maine during the spring term of 1833, with his home residence being given as Granville, Nova Scotia. Wesleyan still exists, although it is now known as Kent's Hill School, a college preparatory school. Kents Hill is an unincorporated village in the northwest corner of the town of Readfield, Kennebec County, Maine, east of the town of Fayette.


Notes


Note    N182         Index
Died by drowning.

Notes


Note    N12-183         Back to Index        Back to Deacon James Chute and Mehitable Thurston Chute.

Notes on Deacon James Chute and Mehitable Thurston Chute:

"Born in Newbury, Mass., Feb. 16, 1751; married June 13, 1885, Mehitable, daughter of Richard Thurston of Rowley, and lived many years a farmer; he was a pious deacon of in the Congregational church in Boxford. She died Oct. 18, 1819, aged sixty-six. After that the deacon travelled among his friends and kindred in the West, and died in Madison, Ind., April 28, 1825."

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Pages 36-37.


"Mehitable Thurston4 (Richard3 Daniel3 Daniel1), sister of the preceding [David Thurston], and youngest daughter of Richard and Mehitable (Jewett) Thurston of Rowley, now Georgetown, Mass ; born there Sept. 25 1753; married, June 13, 1775, Dea. James Chute, born Feb. 16, 1751, son of Capt. Daniel and Hannah (Adams) Chute of Newbury, Mass. She died in Byfield, Mass., Oct. 18, 1819, aged 66; he died in Madison, Ind., April 28, 1825, aged 74. He was a farmer, and lived in Boxford, Mass., while his father was able to carry on the farm in Byfield, Mass., which he afterward occupied. She had an amiable disposition, and was an invalid for some years."

Source: Thurston, Brown, 1635-1892: Thurston Genealogies, Second Edition. Brown Thurston, Portland, Maine. 1892.


"196. Mehitable, born Sept. 25, 1753; married June 13, 1775, Deacon James Chute, son of Capt. Daniel and Hannah (Adams) Chute of Newbury. She died in Byfield, Mass., Oct. 18, 1819. He died in Madison, Ind., April 28, 1825, aged 74 years."

Source: Jewett, Frederic Clarke, M.D. History and Genealogy of the Jewetts of America. Volumes I and II. The Grafton Press, New York. 1908.(Volume 1, page 80)


"CHUTE, JAMES. b. 1751, d. 1828, m. 1775 Mehitable Thurston, b. 1753, d. 1819. SERVICE: Pvt. in Capt. Jacob Gerrish's Co., which marched on the alarm of 19 APR 1775 to Cambridge, service 6 days. Pvt. in Col. Pike's Regt. under command of Capt. William Harris, service from 27 Sept. 1779 to 23 Oct. 1779 at Falmouth in defense of seacoast. Pvt. in Capt. Isaac Parson's Co., Col. Prime's regt. enlisted 2 May 1780, discharged 23 Dec 1780 under Brig. Gen. Wadsworth at Eastword. CHILDREN: Hannah, b. 1780, m. John Poore.

Source: Indiana DAR, Roster of Revolutionary Ancestors, date unknown, pages 118-119.


Mar. 19, 1779. David Jewett,for £900, sold to James Chute all the real estate given by Ezekiel Jewet,, late of Boxford, to his 3 sons, Ezekiel, Stephen & Jonathan, the same being three-fifths of all the lands with the buildings thereon that he, the above Ezek Jewett died seized of, lying in Boxford & Rowley, the aboves'd Chute to come into possession at the decease of the widow Jewett of Boxford & not before
In the presense of Wm Stickney, Daniel Chute
David Jewett & seal
Nich. Pike, J. P.
John Pickering, Reg'r,
May 20, 1783

May 18, 1779. Joseph & Joanna Snow, of Wilson, N. H., for £50, sold to James Chute of Rowley one thirtyeth of the lands and salt marsh of the late Ezek.
Jewett of Boxford,
Jacob Abbot, J. P.

May 19, 1779. Amos Poor of Newbury, to James Chute of Rowley, another thirtyeth part of Ezek. Jewett's estate.
Amos Poor 3rd & seal
Sarah Poor & seal
Nich. Pike, J. P.

May 19, 1779. Enoch Jewett, of Dunstable, N. H., yeoman, for £200, sold to James Chute of Rowley, yeoman 2/3 of 1/5 of all the lands & meadow in the township of Boxford and Rowley with the buildings theron standing, which Ezek Jewett, late of Boxford, died seized of, to have after the death of the widow Martha Jewett.
Enoch Jewett & seal
Joshua Bailey, J. P., Sept. 21, 1780

April 18, 1789. Thos Smith of Newbury, cooper for £15, 6, 6, sold to Daniel Chute, Jr. of Rowley, 2 1/2 acres, bounded beginning at a white oak bounds tree between sd Smith, Daniel Chute & Richard Little, and running about 20 rods by Little's woodland to a stake and stones, from thence running twenty rods & ten feet southeast to a stake & stones, from thence running about 20 rods S W, to a stake and stones, and from thence by Daniel Chute's land to the first mentioned bounds.
Daniel Chute
Stephen Thurston
Thos Smith & Seal
Parker Cleaveland, J.P.

April 26, 1794. James Chute sold to Thos Perley, Jr. of Boxford for £336, 2, 6, 42 1/2 acres, also another piece of 17 1/2 acres, also another piece of 6 acres, and his wife Mahitable also joined & signed her right away.
P. Cleaveland, J. P.
John Pickering, Reg.

April 17, 1799. Benj. Brown of Andover, yeoman, for $3,078, sold to Daniel Chute of Reading, Middlesex Co., three pieces of land 3 acres, 61 acres & 107 acres
Benja Brown & Seal
Anna Brown & Seal
Gideon Foster, Jona Gleason
Joshua Holt, J. P.

April 19, 1799. Daniel Chute of Reading, Co. of Middlesex, gentleman, to Benjamin Brown of Andover, Co. of Essex, for $2,276, sold 171 acres of land. explained & described in a very long deed.
Daniel Chute & Seal
Polly Chute & seal
In presence of Peter Brown
Jonathan Gleason
Received and Receipted June 13, 1799,
John Pickering, Reg.

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Pages 36-37.


Notes


Note    N12-184         Back to Index        Back to John Poor and Hannah Chute Poor.

Notes on John Poor and Hannah Chute Poor:

Hannah, b. Aug. 21, 1780; m. John Poor5 (Joseph4, Samuel3, Henry2, John1), 1797, moved to Pittsburg, Pa., the awfully cold summer of 18161, and to Cincinnati O., the next year where two of her brothers, James and Daniel, lived; and in 1919. moved to a place forty miles west of Madison, Ind., where Mr. Poor d. Dec. 9, aged 44. She d. Jan. 30, 1872."

Source: A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources, William Edward Chute, Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Page 36.


"440 Hannah (Chute), b. Aug. 21, 1780; m., Nov. 30, 1707 [this date is incorrect], John Poore, b. Nov. 26, 1775, a cordwainer, of Rowley, Mass. In 1816 they went to Indiana and settled in Loogootee, Martin Co., at the head waters of the White River, on government land. As soon as the cabin was up he died suddenly, being found dead one morning. Friends offered to bring her home, which she declined to do, and the friends offered and paid for the land. She was able at the age of 91 to sew, knit and read daily. In 1867 her descendants were 10 children, 73 grandchildren, 112 great-grandchildren, and 5 great great-grandchildren. All her male grandchildren over 15 were in the army against the rebellion, most of them 3 years; 19 husbands of her grand children were in the war. One grandson fell on the battlefield, 1 badly wounded twice, 2 severely wounded, 1 a cripple for life, 1 died in hospital, 1 made the march with Sherman to the sea, 1 saw the first battle in West Virginia, and many counted their battles in large numbers. One daughter m. Brooks; one m. Dr. Merrill, a druggist in Cincinnati."

Source: Thurston, Brown, 1635-1892: Thurston Genealogies, Second Edition. Brown Thurston, Portland, Maine. 1892. Page 40.


"The second generation in America in the line of our ancestry was Henry, the third Samuel, the fourth Joseph and the fifth was John Poor who was the grandfather of Col. Lewis Brooks and others present today.

He was born at Rowley, Mass. Nov. 26, 1775, was by trade a cordwainer. He was married on Nov. 30, 1797, to Hannah Chute, a daughter of Dea. James and Mehitable Thurston Chute. Hannah Chute Poor was born in Rowley, Mass., Nov 30, 1780, being a little past seventeen at the date of her marriage. Her family was also of old Colonial stock descended from Lionel Chute, who came to America about 1634. The year following their marriage the young couple moved to Salisbury, New Hampshire and remained until 1799 when they returned to Massachusetts and resided in Reading until January, 1801, when they bought a place in Newbury, consisting of a house and six acres of land. Here they remained until 1816, which was always remembered as the cold summer1. Several frosts occurred each month and hardly any corn ripened in New England. They then decided to go west. Of their life during these yeasr we have no record. We only know they were not burdened with wealth. That nine children had been born to them (one dying in infancy) and infer that toil and sacrifice had been their portion. In the autumn of 1816 they started on their long journey to Pittsburg, Penn. They traveled as all movers had to do in those days, with wagon and team, camping out at nights, exposed to all the vicissitudes of the weather, crossing streams by primitive ferries, toiling over mountain ranges and traversing hundreds of miles of unbroken forests.2

It is hard for us to realize the difficulties and discouragements of such a trip, which must have occupied many weeks. But the promised land was before them and they toiled on with that courage and fortitude which was the inheritance of the Puritan until the beautiful Ohio was before them. In a latter from our grandfather to his brother Joseph Poor, Byfield, Mass., dated Feb. 12, 1817, he says, "On the whole we had a prosperous journey and have enjoyed our usual health since we have been hence." He speaks feelingly of his aged mother left behind and refers to the criticism of his friends who had tried to dissuade him from making the trip. He says "No undertaking of my life was ever more premeditated or more evidently a point of duty, otherwise I would never have done violence to the finest feelings in human nature in breaking away from my old connections. We thought it best and have seen no cause to regret it, on the contrary much cause of gratitude to the great dispenser of all events who has preserved us thus far." This letter gives more insight into the character and fellings of our grandfather than all the other records that have come to us.

He was a man of more than usual culture, a Christian gentleman and he possessed the courage of his convictions. Had his life been spared he would have doubtless been prominent in that new society forming in the Great West, towards which they were moving, and of which they were soon to become a part. They remained at Pittsburgh over a year. Their son John was born in February 1818 ahnd when the child was two months old they loaded all their belongings on a flatboat and floated down the Ohio past Cincinnati and finally landed at Madison, Indiana. Shortly afterwards he purchased some land in the wilds, about 40 miles west of Madison, built a rough log cabin to live in and moved the family to this place October. 2nd, 1819. ... the work of clearing the forest began immediately and all progressed well until December 9th, just two months and seven days after their establishment in the new home, when Grandfather Poor was suddenly stricken and died after only four hours' illness.

I have tried to picture in my mind the desolation and anguish of that hour. Most women would have collapsed when this cataclysm of misfortune swept across her path. She had one son with her, Alvin, sixteen years of age (the oldest son Wendell having been left in New England to finish learning his trade). The rest of the family except for the baby were girls. Friends in the east offered to send money to pay the expenses if she would return there, but she chose to remain and all her children co-operating, they attacked the forsst raised corn for bread and, as Alfred Poor records it, "her uncommon wisdom and energy with an exceedingly quiet and amiable disposition accomnpanied also with piety. enabled her to succeed in raising a family which she could look upon with pleasure, and her children and grandchildren rise up and call her blessed."

Source: Brooks and Houghton Reunion: The Brooks and Houghton Families Descended from Hannah Chute Poor and Family Reunion August 7, 1908, compiled by Thomas Jeferson Brooks. Mount Pleasant, Indiana. Article "Hannah Chute Poor", by Major Wiliam Houghton, A Grandson. Privately printed and compiled.

1: NOTE ON THE COLD SUMMER OF 1816. See the History section.

2: NOTE ON THEIR 'TRAVERSING HUNDREDS OF MILES OF UNBROKEN FORESTS': Innumerable established trade routes, trails and by-ways of various widths, and degrees of usage criss-crossed the country, already prepared for settlers by untold centuries of use by Native Americans. This was not an empty and unbroken land. To struggle through "unbroken forests" with wagons and oxen - which they couldn't have done anyway, as they would have shredded their wagons, their oxen and all their personal belongings in a matter of minutes - when they could make use of an already established indigenous trade route would have been a huge waste of their time and resourses - and we'd still be picking settlers' skeletal remains out of trees and bushes today. The Poors and the Chutes were not stupid people; we would have followed maps of existing trading routes, like everyone else.


Notes


Note    N12-185         Back to Index        Back to Jonathan Prosser, Sr. and Hannah Adams Poor Prosser.

Notes on Jonathan Prosser, Sr. and Hannah Adams Poor Prosser:

WEC: Had 8 children. Son Abram was in Company H, 2nd Minn, V.I. in Ga., late war. [Two children still unaccounted for].


Notes


Note    N186         Index
Went to California and Oregon.

Notes


Note    N12-187         Back to Index        Back to Edward Elliott.

Notes on Edward Elliott:

Emigrated from Great Britain to Salisbury, Massachusetts in 1643.

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Page 36


Notes


Note    N188         Index
Died in infancy.

Notes


Note    N189         Index
Lived in Lowell, Massachusetts.

Notes


Note    N190         Index
4 other children died young.

Notes


Note    N12-191         Back to Index        Back to James Chute Peabody and Margaret Pearson Peabody.

Notes on James Chute Peabody and Margaret Pearson Peabody:

"JAMES CHUTE PEABODY. 1828-1900, Massachusetts. Mr. Peabody was born in Georgetown, then a part of the town of Rowley, Mass., February 20, 1828, and was son of James and Hannah (Chute) Peabody. He spent his boyhood days at his birthplace, and attended the district school and Dummer Academy. He studied law in the Harvard law school, and was admitted to the Suffolk bar. He opened an office, and after a few years' practice, concluded to enter journalism, relinquishing his legal profession for which he had displayed considerable talent. He at first went abroad as a newspaper correspondent. On his return he continued his connection with the press, soon afterward becoming the editor of the Newburyport Watchtower, and subsequently was employed in the same capacity on the Newburyport Weekly Union. For several years past he has edited the Newburyport Daily Germ1*. He is also a contributor to other newspapers, and has written both prose and poetry for Harper's, and other magazines. He has made quite a number of poetical translations from German authors; and has published a translation of Dante's "Inferno." He is a ready, brilliant and interesting writer, and a natural journalist. His poetry is considered exceptionally good. He still resides in the house in which he was born in the ancient parish of Byfield.2

1Predecessor of the Newburyport Daily News.
2This would have been the old Chute farm in Newbury.

The poem which accompanied the biographical article was "The Old and the New".

THE OLD YEAR AND THE NEW

Once more old Time unbars the silent tomb,
In the past land, where his dead years are lying
All side by side, amid the eternal gloom ;
For now his last-born in the night is dying.

He bids adieu the solemn, dark-robed hours
That one by one glide by his snowy bed;
And now the great bells from a thousand towers
Toll their sad requiem, for the year is dead.

But lo, a new-born cherub, hovering near,
Whose wings shall sweep the starry circle through !
For the death struggles of the passing year
Were still the birth pangs of the coming new.

Now Janus wears a smiling face before,
Yet backward looks a sad, a long adieu;
From the same fountain doth Aquarius pour
Tears for the old, libations to the new.

Time buries his dead, and from the tomb comes forth,
Rolls to the stone, and writes above the door
Another epitaph, that all the earth
May read and ponder through the evermore.

There is the story of the bygone years,
Their joys and sorrows, and their love and hate;
And there the lachrymals of bitter tears
Stand full, forever, by the frowning gate.

There hang the scutcheons of departed nations ;
There glows the red page of their growth and strife,
There lie the ashes of the dead creations;
A world or creed, a god or mortal life.

And all the legends on those stony pages
Shall grow to oracles in coming days,
And unborn minstrels, in the unborn ages,
Shall give them voice in many sounding lays.

Then blot, O Time, the olden error still,
All jarring discords from their strains to sever,
What I have written, be it good or ill,
That I have written, and it stands forever.

There is no resurrection of the past;
Its shade may haunt thee, but it lives no more.
Yet mourn it not. Behold, the future vast,
The eternal future, stretches on before !

Take, then, the book of fate into thy hand,
And for the new year write thine own decree;
And what thou writest shall forever stand,
And what thou wiliest that the end shall be.

James Chute Peabody, 1884

Source: Perley, Sidney. The Poets of Essex County Massachusetts, published 1888 by Sidney Perley, printed at the Salem Press, Salem, Massachusetts, pages 123-125. Available from Google BooksTM.

Poem also available in Key-Notes, by J.C. Peabody, 1884. Self-published, printed at the Salem Banner offices. Available from Google BooksTM.



Notes


Note    N192         Index
One son.

Notes


Note    N193         Index

Lived on the Old Chute farm in Newbury. He was in Company H, 2nd U.S. Sharpshooters, and in nearly 30 engagements. He was a prisoner in Anderson, Georgia for 2 months and then exchanged.


Notes


Note    N12-1194         Back to Index        Back to Deacon John Chute, Sr. and Elizabeth Andrew Chute.

Notes on Deacon John Chute, Sr. and Elizabeth Andrew Chute:

"Born in Windham, Aril 25, 1767; married Elizabeth5 (John4, Nathaniel3, Joseph2, Robert1, died in Rowley 1668), of Salem, Mass., Nov. 22, 1793, and lived in Windham until 1816, when he purchased the Inn, or Elm, House at Naples, and occupied it as a Temperance House. It was burnt in 1822, but soon rebuilt, and occupied until burnt again in 1876. John Chute was a sober, industrious, Christian man, deacon of the Congregational church some thirty years; and is recorded a church clerk in Windham in 1827. Mrs. Chute, sister of Jonathan Andrew, father of Gov. John A. (1818-1867) of Mass., died Oct 22, 1843, aged seventy. He died July 15, 1857, aged ninety years, three months."

Source: Chute, William Edward. A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America: With Some Account of the Family in Great Britain and Ireland, with an Account of Forty Allied Families Gathered from the Most Authentic Sources. Salem, Massachusetts, 1894. Pages 43-44.








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