1860-1861 Marengo County Directory
Marengo County Directory for 1860-1861

All information appearing here was taken from Tharin's Marengo County Directory for 1860 -1861.    I have attempted to include all of the information contained in the original document excluding the many advertisements.  All material contained on these pages is furnished for the free use of those researching their family origins. Any commercial use, without the consent of the host/author of these pages is prohibited--Copyright is retained by the author/contributor of the material and publication to any medium, electronic or non-electronic, without consent is in violation of the law.
Carol Wood & Jeffrey A. Reed jefareed@bellsouth.net  February 1998 - March 2000.

BACK TO JEFF'S SPOT ON THE NET
BACK TO ALGENWEB - MARENGO



TO NAVIGATE USE LINKS BELOW OR SCROLL DOWN


 THIS PAGE'S LINKS AND SURNAMES

Officers of the Court in 1860

Officers of Marengo County
Magistrates in Marengo County
Marriage Statistics
Special Acts for Marengo County
Nativities of Voters
Rates of Ferriage
Mortality Statistics for 1860
Churches in Marengo in 1860
 History of Marengo County
including various towns
A - F
 G - L
M - R
 S - Z



 page 1
A
DIRECTORY
 OF
MARENGO COUNTY,
 FOR 1860-1861:
EMBRACING THE NAMES OF THE VOTERS IN THE COUNTY,
 ALPHABETICALLY ARRANGED,
OCCUPATION, POST OFFICE AND RESIDENCE;
 NUMEROUS TABLES OF STATISTICS, A SHORT SKETCH OF
 THE COUNTY, ADVERTISEMENTS, &c.
BY W. C. Tharin,
 Linden, Ala.
Mobile:
Farrow & Dennett, Printers, No. 3 North Water Street.
____
1861.

page 2 (contains an almanac calendar for 1861)

page 3

COUNTY DIRECTORY
The name following the name and occupation of citizens refer to their postoffice, the two numbers indicate the township and range of their residence.  The Directory proper, though not so accurate as could be wished, is as nearly so as the nature of the work permitted. There are so many citizens of a transient character, that it was impossible to avoid some little inaccuracy.

A.
Abernathy, Thos S. methodist preacher and planter, Spring Hill; 16, 3 e
Adams, Benjamin, planter, Linden
Adams, Thos J, clerk, Linden
Adams, Charles J, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Adams, Spencer, planter, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Adams, Homer, planter, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Adams, Felix G, planter, Linden; 15, 4 e
Adams, Jno H, planter Linden; 15, 4 e
Adams, Josephus A, shoemaker, M'Kinley
Adams, Rich H, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Alexander, J W, physican, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Alexander, Jno W, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Alexander, J M, planter, M'Kinley; 5 e
Alexander, D C, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Alexander, J D, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Allen, Robert E, hotel keeper, Linden
Allen, Jno G, planter, Spring Hill
Allen, Wm C, planter, Spring Hill
Allen, R H, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Allen, H G, planter. Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Allen, W B, teacher, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Agee, Isham A. planter, Shiloh
Agee, Z D, planter, Shiloh; 13, 4 e
Agee, J P, merchant, Hampden
Anderson, Jesse M, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Anderson, Lewis, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Anderson, J E, planter, M'Kinley; 16 5 e
Anderson, W L, physican, M'Kinley
Anderson, Issac, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Anderson, Thos, labor, Hampden; 13, 4 e

page 4

Anderson, T C, overseer, Spring Hill; 17, 2 e
Andrews, A S, methodist preacher, Dayton
Andrews, Jonathan, laborer, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Armstrong, J H, overseer, Demopolis; 18, 2 e
Armstrong, Alex, planter, Newburn; 18, 5 e
Abrahams, E W, lawyer, M'Kinley
Abrahams, W T, physican, M'Kinley
Ayres, Saml H, planter, M'Kinley
Alston, Jas Y, tanner, M'Kinley
Alston, Nathl Y, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Archa, P B, steward female academy, Dayton
Ash, W C, physican, Demopolis
Alvis, E S, overseer, Demopolis; 17, 3 e
Axom, Soloman, overseer, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Askew, M G, merchant, Dayton
Askew, H J, planter, Dayton
Autrey, R, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Autrey, Noah, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Autrey, Absolom, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
B.
Bailey, Wm L, planter, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Bailey, Wm A, planter, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Bailey, Jas W, boot and shoemaker, M'Kinley
Bailey, Ransom, overseer, M'Kinley; 16, 4 e
Bailey, C, overseer, M'Kinley; 16 4 e
Ballou, Wm H, planter, Linden; 16 3 e
Ballou, E A, overseer, Linden; 16 3 e
Baldwin, A, physican and planter, Dixon's Mills; 13 2 e
Ballard, Richard, laborer, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Ballard, Jas H, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Ballard, E, planter, Shiloh; 13, 4 e
Ballard, A L, laborer, Shiloh; 13, 4 e
Banks, Wm, physican, Newburn; 18, 5 e
Baptist, Wm H, physican, Dayton
Baptist, Ed, planter, Dayton; 17, 4 e
Barr, Robert,jr, Merchant, Clio
Barr, A W, clerk, Clio
Barr, D P, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Barr, Robt, sr, planter, Clio; 14, 1 e
Barr, Green D, planter, Clio; 14, 1 e
Barr, J M, merchant, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e

page 5

Barnes, Thos J, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Barnes, Jas L, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Barnes, L, miller, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Barley, Dickson, planter, Linden
Barley, Wm R, trader, Linden; 16, 3 e
Barley, Wm H, overseer, Linden; 16 2 e
Barker, Josiah, methodist preacher, Dayton
Barkley, Geo, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Barkley, Z W, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Barkley, G W, planter, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Barkley, Wm H, planter, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Barron, Jno C, planter, Nanafalia
Barnett, W A (no additional information)
Baker, Jas H, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Bates, Henry, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Bates, John, planter, Nanafalia, 13, 1 e
Bates, Napoleon, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Baty, Jas S, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Batton, Wm, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Batt, Thomas, planter, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Baskin, J E, overseer, Jefferson; 16 2 e
Bainbridge, John, planter, Demopolis; 18, 2 e
Bainbridge, James, planter, Demopolis; 18, 2 e
Bainbridge, Wm, overseer, Demopolis; 18, 2 e
Beasley, Leroy, overseer, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Bell, Jas M, overseer, Jefferson; 17, 1 e
Bell, Geo W, planter, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Bell, David, overseer, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Beard, Thos J, episcopal pastor, Demopolis; 18, 3 e
Bennett, Saml L, planter, Hampden; 14, 4 e
Bennett, B A, planter, Hampden; 14, 4 e
Bennett, Burgess, planter, Hampden; 14, 4 e
Bennett, T H, planter, Hampden; 14, 4 e
Bevill, Wm E, planter, M'Kinley; 14, 5 e
Beverly, James, methodist preacher and superintendant of public schools, Shiloh; 13, 4 e
Beverly, Thos A, merchant, Dixon's Mills
Beverly, J R, grocer, Dixon's Mills
Beverly, A H, planter, Shiloh; 13, 4 e
Berry, Edw, tailor, Dayton
Besteder, John, planter, Jefferson
Beyseigal, C F, gunsmith, Demopolis
Blackwell, Jas H, overseer, Nanafalia, 12, 1 w

page 6

Blackman, Homer (no additional information)
Blue, Jno W, overseer, Linden; 15, 4 e
Blanks, E, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Blake, Geo H, overseer, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Blakeney, John, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Blakeney, Robert, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Blunt, Alex P, planter, Newburn; 18, 4 e
Blunt, W T, planter, Newburn: 18, 5 e
Bishop, James, planter, Linden; 15, 3 e
Bishop, Jno C, planter, Linden; 15, 3 e
Bishop, J U, planter, Linden; 15, 3 e
Bishop, Asa, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Bishop, Stephen L, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Bickley, Wm A, trader, Clio;; 14, 1 e
Bocock, W P, planter, Macon; 17, 4 e
Bolen, Geo E, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Bolen, H M, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Bolen, Jno A, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Bonds, A D, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Bonds, W C, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Bonner, John, overseer, Demopolis; 18, 3 e
Bohannon, Coleman, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Bohannon, Jas C, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Bohannon, Thomas, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Bowler, Thomas, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Bowler, J W, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Borden, Levi, grocer, M'Kinley
Booker, Geo W, overseer, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Booth, P H, overseer, Linden; 15, 2 e
Booth, A A, overseer, Linden; 15, 2 e
Boozer, Joseph, planter, Clio; 14, 1 e
Boozer, Asa, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Boozer, Eli, planter, Linden; 14, 4 e
Brackett, Geo C, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Brackenridge, R J, planter, Clio; 14, 1 e
Brackenridge, T G, planter, Clio; 14, 1 e
Brackenridge, J N, planter, Clio; 14, 1 e
Brackenridge, James, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Brackenridge, J T, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Brackenridge, Jefferson, overseer, Clio; 15, 1 e
Brackenridge, E J, teacher, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Brackenridge, John, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Bradley, Nathan, planter, Jefferson

page 7

Bradley, J W, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Bradford, B R, planter, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Bradford, Thomas H, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Bradford, Arthur, planter, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Brame, Jas M, clerk, M'Kinley
Brame, Henry, sr, planter, Uniontown; 16, 5 e
Brame, Henry, jr, planter, Uniontown; 16, 5 e
Brame, Wm Y, planter, Uniontown; 16, 5 e
Brame, O, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Brame, Wm, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Braswell, Wm B, planter, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Braswell, Demsey, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Braswell, Allen, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Braswell, D A, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Braswell, Elias, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Braswell, Wm J, tinner, Demopolis
Brasfield, W E, vine-dresser, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Breitling, G, planter, Demopolis
Breitling, Alf, prop river hotel, Demopolis
Breitling, Frank, mill-wright, Demopolis
Breitling, John, overseer, Demopolis; 17, 2 e
Breitling, Jacob, planter, Demopolis; 17, 2 e
Breitling, Henry, planter, Demopolis; 17, 2 e
Breitling, John, blacksmith, Demopolis; 17, 2 e
Browning, J L, planter, Dayton
Browning, Wm G, planter, Dayton
Browder, Jas D, physican and planter, Macon; 18, 4 e
Brown, Wesley (no additional information)
Breton, Charles, grocer, Demopolis
Bryan, J R, planter, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Bryan, F B, planter, Jefferson; 16, 1 e
Bryan, Geo W, warehouse keeper, Griffin's Landing
Bryan, A J, grocer, Demopolis
Bruce, Henry L, clerk, Linden
Bruce, Newton, clerk, Mobile
Brooks, Geo W, mechanic, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Brislin, Daniel, cabinet-maker, M'Kinley
Brit, L, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 4 e
Brunson, Wm, miller, Linden; 16, 3 e
Buckalou, Ezekial, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Buck, Jos, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Burden, J Wesley, teacher, Linden; 15, 3 e
Burge, H T, overseer, Macon; 17, 4 e

page 8

Burwell, Lewis, planter, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Burnaette, Bryan, overseer, Linden; 15, 3 e
Bush, D B, planter, Nanafalia; 12, 1 w
Bush, Wm, planter, Demopolis; 17, 2 e
Bush, B W, physican, Sweetwater
Burton, Jno II, planter, Demopolis; 18, 3 e
Burton, Jesse L, planter, Demopolis; 18, 3 e
Boyle, P W, blacksmith, Clay Hill
C.
Cabe, Wm, overseer, Demopolis; 18, 3 e
Cabiness, Jno C, carpenter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Cabiness, Thos, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Cade, W P, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Cade, G M, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Cade, R B, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Campbell, Robt M, lawyer, Demopolis
Canterbury, Jno, overseer, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Cantey, D N, mechanic, Dayton
Cape, Isaiah, overseer, Newburn; 18, 5 e
Carter, Saml D, physican and planter, Clio; 14, 2 e
Carter, John J, planter, Clio; 14, 2 e
Carter, Wm R, Clio; 14, 2 e
Carter, Wm A, planter, Clio; 15, 1 e
Carter, D C C, overseer, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Carmichael, F J, merchant, M'Kinley
Carlton, Nath G, merchant, Hampden; 14, 4 e
Carrol, S L, overseer, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Carson, T S S, planter, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Carries, Thos B, overseer, Macon; 18, 4 e
Cato, E, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Cato, Lewis, planter, Clio; 15, 1 e
Cassey, Banj, planter, Demopolis; 18, 3 e
Carney, W R D, overseer, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Coats, John R, teacher, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Collins, John, planter, Macon; 18, 4 e
Collins, Charles W, overseer, Macon; 18, 4 e
Collins, Jno W, physican, Dixon's Mills
Collins, D R, overseer, Jefferson; 17, 1 e
Coleman, W B, hotel-keeper, Dayton
Coleman, Fleming, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Coleman, A G, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Coleman, J G P, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e

page 9

Collier, Thos W, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Collier, Jack, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Collingsworth, J C, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2
Cole, Jno W, clerk, Demopolis
Compton, C F, overseer, Pineville; 12, 1 w
Compton, David, sr, planter, Demopolis
Compton, David, jr, planter, Jefferson
Compton, Robert J, planter, Jefferson
Connor, W H, planter, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Connella, A A, baptist preacher, Spring Hill
Connell, M M (no additional information)
Cook, Mat, physican, Clio; 14, 1 e
Cooper, A W, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Cotrell, Z D, methodist preacher, Spring Hill
Cotton, Washington, overseer, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Cornish, T G, merchant, Demopolis
Cohorn, J W, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Cowan, J D, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Cowan, Jno A, teacher, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Coward, Gideon, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Coward, Newit, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Clark, Wm E, lawyer, Dayton
Cleland, Wm B, planter, Clio; 14, 1 e
Clary, James, overseer, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Chandler, Wm A, planter, Shiloh; 13, 4
Chandler, Joseph, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Chapman, Saml E, grocer, M'Kinley
Chapman, Saml D, planter, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Chapman, A J, planter, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Christian, Jas A, merchant, Nanafalia
Christian, Asa, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Christian, E W, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Christian, Thomas, overseer, Uniontown; 18, 5 e
Cherry, E B, merchant, Demopolis
Crawford, A J, tax collector and planter, Linden
Crawford, G J, overseer, Linden; 15, 3 e
Craft, Michael, boot and shoe maker, Linden
Craig, H J, planter, Hampden; 14, 4 e
Creagh, M W, planter, M'Kinley
Crocker, Wilson, planter, Hampden; 14, 4 e
Crowder, Zara, stone mason, Demopolis
Crudup, J C, lawyer, Shiloh
Crudup, Jno D, trader, Jefferson

page 10

Crouch, Nehemier, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Cumalander, Jacob, planter, Sweetwater; 12, 2 e
Cunningham, Geo, merchant, Linden
Cunningham, Gordon, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Cunningham, J L, physican, Shiloh 14, 3 e
Curtis, E, merchant, Spring Hill
Curtis, Charles, planter, Spring Hill
Curtis, J H, physican, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Curtis, Malicha, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Curry, David G, planter, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Curry, Jas M, planter, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Curry, Wm, planter, Newburn; 18, 5 e
D.
Dansby, F M, lawyer, M'Kinley
Dansby, Jno C, planter, Dayton
Daniel, John, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Danneberg, Charles, music teacher, M'Kinley
Darden, Richard W, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Darden, Jesse T, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Daughdrill, John, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Daughdrill, James, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Daughdrill, James L, merchant, Jefferson
Davidson, J H, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Davidson, W L, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Davidson, Jno II, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Davis, Thomas, grocer, Linden
Davis, Jas B, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Davis, Joseph, merchant, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Dawkins, Wm T, carpenter, M'Kinley
Dean, Robt, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 4 e
Dean, Abner, mechanic, Clay Hill; 12, 4 e
Dean, Joel, laborer, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Deans, Daniel, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 2 e
Deans, Jno W, clerk, Dayton
Devan, Benj, planter, Hampden
Devoy, Jimmy, ditcher, M'Kinley
Deloach, Wm L, physican, Dixon's Mills
Deloach, Thos C, physican, Clay Hill
Dickson, Hayne II, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Digman, James, planter, Sweetwater; 12, 2 e
Dial, Jno W, planter, M'Kinley
Dillworth, W R, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e

page 11

Dismukes, Wm T, planter, Shiloh
Dixon, Thos M, planter, Sweetwater, 12, 2 e
Dixon, James, painter, Demopolis
Dixon, Joel, miller and planter, Dixon's Mills
Dixon, N F, planter, Dixon's Mills; 12, 3 e
Dixon, Joel B, jr, planter, Dixon's Mills; 12, 3 e
Dixon, Jesse M, planter, Dixon's Mills; 12, 3 e
Doss, Wm B, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Dossett, Jas S, overseer, Jefferson, 17, 2 e
Dollins, Samuel F, mechanic, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Douglas, Jas B, carpenter, Shiloh; 13, 4 e
Douglas, Geo, planter, Sweetwater; 14, 2 e
Downey, Reuben, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Downey, Burrel, laborer, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Doyle, Wm, laborer, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Drinkard, W J, overseer, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Drinkard, Francis, overseer, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Drinkard, W G, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Drinkard, Saml R, teacher, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Drinkard, Jesse, planter, Dixon's Mills; 12, 3 e
Drinkard, David H, planter, Dixon's Mills; 12, 3 e
Drinkard, Jno D, planter, Dixon's Mills; 12, 3 e
Drummond, W F, physican, Linden
Drummond, W H, overseer, Newburn; 18, 5 e
Dubose, K C, planter, Demopolis; 17, 4 e
Dubose, Isaiah, planter, Macon; 18, 4 e
Dubose, Jas H, planter, Macon; 18, 4 e
Dugger, W W, lawyer, Macon
Dugger, R H, physican, Macon
Dunagan, John, overseer, Mt. Sterlin; 12, 1 w
Dunn, Alex, hotel keeper, Linden
Dumas, W F, planter, Hampden
Dumas, Thos, overseer, Clay Hill; 12, 4 e
Dunning, T H, miller and planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Dunning, James, planter, Dixon's Mills, 13, 3 e
Dupertius, Fred, manager steam mill, Demopolis
Dyer, Calvin C, overseer, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Dunaway, Jas M, planter, Clio; 14, 2 e
E.
Easterling, W A, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 4e
Easterwood, Gideon, overseer, Linden; 15, 3 e
Eddins, Oswell, planter, Demopolis; 17, 2 e

page 12

Edmiston, Larkin, overseer, Spring Hill; 17, 4 e
Edwards, Jesse B, merchant, M'Kinley
Elliot, Jno M, planter, Linden; 15, 3 e
Ellen, Z M, overseeer, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Ellis, Geo F, methodist prescher, Dayton
Ellis, Eijah, planter, Dayton; 1, 4 e
Ellis, Jno W, carpenter, Jefferson
Ellis, Jno, planter; Jefferson; 17, 1 e
Epps, L, overseer, superintendant r road, Demopolis
Epps, B R, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Epps, Jno H, clerk, Demopolis
Epps, Jno, laborer, Hampden; 13, 4 e
England, E C, planter, M'Kinley
England, Daniel, overseer, M'Kinley; 15, 6 e
English, D J, overseer, Uniontown; 18, 5 e
Enners, Henry A G, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 2 e
Eskridge, Burdette, planter, Demopolis; 17, 1 e
Eskridge, N A, planter, Demopolis; 17, 1 e
Espy, David, grocer, Demopolis
Estes, Jno R, merchant, Demopolis
Etheridge, Nathan, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Etheridge, Wm, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Etheridge, John, planter, planter; Pineville; 12, 1 e
Etheridge, Edmond, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Etheridge, John F, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Etheridge, Marion, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Etheridge, John, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Etheridge, Lewis, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Etheridge, Stephen S, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Etheridge, Allen, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Etheridge, A J, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Etheridge, Crawford, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Etheridge, Lewis, overseer, Clio; 14, 2 e
Etheridge, Able, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Etheridge, Jno C, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Etheridge, Wilson, overseer, Uniontown; 18, 5 e
Etheridge, Geo W, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Evans, J T, planter, Clio; 15, 1 e
Evans, L G, planter, Linden; 16, 3 e
Evans, Jno A, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 4 e
Evans, Jesse T, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 4 e

page 13

F.
Farthing, L B, wheelwright, Linden
Faulk, James, overseer, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Feibelmann, Nathan, grocer, Linden
FiFeibelman, Isado, tailor, Linden
Feibelman, Moses, grocer, Demopolis
Fees, George, silversmith, Demopolis
Finch, Wm L, planter, Jefferson
Finney, C K, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Fitz, R W, overseer, Macon; 18, 4 e
Fitts, Saml A, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Fitts, J, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Fitts, Wm F, physican, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Fitts, J, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Fitts, W, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Fisher, J D, methodist preacher, Demopolis
Fleming, Jas W, planter, Jefferson; 17, 1 e
Fluker, Edgar, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 6 e
Floyd, A J, overseer, Clio; 15, 1 e
Fontain, A T, merchant, Clay Hill
Fontain, W F, plnater, Clay Hill; 13, 3 e
Fontville, James, overseer, Linden; 15, 3 e
Ford, Henry P, planter, Shiloh; 15, 3 e
Ford, Jas W, grocer, Shiloh
Ford, J C, overseer, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Ford, W S, planter, Shiloh; 15, 3 e
Froniss, Jno D, planter, Shiloh; 15, 3 e
Fort, J A V, overseer, Newburn; 18, 5 e
Fortner, Lewis, planter, Linden; 16, 3 e
Fortner, Wm, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Fortner, James, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Foscue, A, planter, Demopolis; 18, 2 e
Foster, Jno C, baptist preacher, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Foster, Francis, planter, Sweetwater; 14, 2 e
Foster, George, laborer, Sweetwater; 14, 2 e
Foster, T J, teacher, Demopolis
Fournier, A, merchant, Demopolis
Fournier, Edmond, physician, Demopolis
Fowler, W S, teacher, Demopolis
Fowler, T G, brick mason, Demopolis
Fox, J Dwight, jeweler, Linden
Fulford, Clifford, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Fulford, Bishop, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Fulford, Jas Y, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e

page 14

Fulford, Wm, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Fulford, Stephen D, planter, Demopolis; 17, 2 e
Frasier, Chs, overseer, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Freeman, W F, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Frittz, Alfred, planter, Linden; 16, 3 e
G.                                           
To Top of This Page
Gaines, Thos B, planter, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Gamble, Jas A, planter, M'Kinley
Gamble, Wm, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Garrard, H J, teacher, Linden
Gayle, B D, methodist preacher, Linden; 15, 2 e
George, Allen, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Giles, Dennascus, overseer, Macon; 18, 4 e
Giles, Thomas B, clerk, Shiloh
Giles, Joseph, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Gibson, M G, laborer, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Gildersleve, John, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 4 e
Gilmore, W W, overseer, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Gilmore, John, planter, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Gilmore, Thos, overseer, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Gilbert, Robt D, drugist, Dayton
Gilbert, Jas L, planter, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Givins, John, blacksmith, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Glass, Jonathan, trader and planter; Shiloh; 14, 3 c
Glass, Saml, planter, Shiloh; 15, 4 e
Glass, Jas H, planter, Shiloh; 15, 4 e
Glass, Zacharia, overseer, Linden; 15, 4 e
Glass, Williamson, planter, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Glass, C H, planter, Shiloh; 15, 3 e
Glass, B F, manager, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Glover, Edw A, planter, Spring HIll
Glover, Benj N, planter, Demopolis
Glover, Geo F, planter, Demopolis
Glover, P J, student, Demopolis
Glover, Benjamin, planter, M'Kinley
Glover, N B, planter, Linden; 15, 3 e
Glover, Nat A, overseer, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Gholsen, Samuel F, county treasurer, Linden
Goodman, Chas, physican for the cure of chronic diseases, Linden

page 15

Goodloe, Robt M, saddler, Shiloh
Goodwyn, T A, planter, Linden; 15, 2 e
Goodwyn, T H, planter, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Goodwyn, W R, overseer, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Goodwyn, W J, planter, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Goodwyn, Jno C, planter, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Goodwyn, C K, planter, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Gondy, John, overseer, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Gorin, G, planter, Hampden; 14, 4 e
Grant, W H, editor and proprietor "Linden Jeffersonian," Linden
Grant, Basil, planter, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Grant, Bryan, planter, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Grantham, Campbell, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Grantham, Soloman, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Grantham, David, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Grantham, Joseph, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Grawer, George, planter, Linden; 15, 3 e
Grawer, John, overseer
Grayson, Oliver G, tax assessor, Linden; 16, 3 e
Grayson, Jas W, planter, Linden; 16, 3 e
Green, W H, overseer, Jefferson; 17, 1 e
Green, Burnett, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Green, Jacob, jr, laborer, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Greer, A M, well-borer, Macon
Grier, R M, planter, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Grier, Thomas, planter, Uniontown; 18, 5 e
Griffice, James, overseer, Uniontown; 16, 5 e
Griffin, G G, planter, Demopolis; 18, 3 e
Griffith, W J, overseer, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Griffith, J H, overseer, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Griffith, Thos W, overseer, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Gregory, Jno L, overseer, Jefferson; 17, 1 e
Gregory, Jas A, overseer, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Guerrant, B F, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
H.
Hackworth, Nick, dentist and nurseyman, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Hackworth, Jno W. planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Hackworth, Geo C, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Haigood, W A, manager steam mill, Linden 16, 3 e
Halcroft, Edward W, overseer, Uniontown; 18, 5 e

page 16

Hale, John, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Hall, John Y, druggist, Demopolis
Hall, John W, mechanic, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Hall, Jas W, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Hall, Leonard M, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Hall, Thos D, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Hamill, Hayden, harness maker, M'Kinley
Hammond, S H, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Hammons, Jas M, planter, Linden; 16, 3 e
Hand, John, mechanic, Demopolis
Hankins, J M, wagon and carriage maker, Nanafalia
Hankins, James, wheelwright, Nanafalia
Hanson, F R, episcopal pastor, Macon; 17, 4 e
Harden, Wm, laborer, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Hale, John, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Hale, John Y, druggist, Demopolis
Hall, John W, mechanic, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Hall, Jas W, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Hall, Leonard M, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Hall, Thomas D, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Hamill, Hayden, harness maker, M'Kinley
Hammond, S H, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Hammons, Jas M, planter, Linden; 16, 3 e
Hand, John, mechanic, Demopolis
Hankins, J M, waggon and carriage maker, Nanafalia
Hankins, James, wheelwright, Nanafalia
Hanson, F R, episcopal pastor, Macon; 17, 4 e
Harden, Wm, Laborer, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Harder, Wm, overseer, Jefferson; 17, 1 e
Hardesty, Geo C, saddle and harness maker, M'Kinley
Hardy, Jasper, laborer, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Hardy, Wm, laborer, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Harper, D, stage driver, Demopolis
Harper, Jas R, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Harper, James, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Harper, D C, mechanic, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Harper, Benj A (no additional information)
Harper, B G, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Harrell, Thos S, wagon and blacksmithing, Demopolis
Harrington, Jas W (no additional information)
Harris, S J, physician, M'Kinley
Harris, Jno W, medical student, M'Kinley
Harris, S L, clerk, M'Kinley
Harris, Wm B, planter, Macon; 18, 5 e
Harris, Wm, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Harris, Thos W, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Harris, W P, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Harris, Robt, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Harrison, James, grocer, Dayton
Harrison, Nathaniel, planter, Clay HIll; 12, 3 e
Hart, Robt D, lawyer and register in chancery, Linden
Hart, Jas N, planter, Jefferson; 17, 1 e
Hart, B T, planter, Jefferson; 17, 1 e
Harwell, J S, editor and proprietor "Canebrake Gazette," Demopolis
Hasty, Robt, planter, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Hasty, Benj, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e

page 17

Hatch, Alfred, planter, Demopolis; 18, 1 e
Hatch, Lemual, planter, Demopolis; 18, 1 e
Hatch, H W, merchant, Hampden
Hawke, Jesse, planter, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Hawkins, Wm H, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 4 e
Hawkins, Berry, overseer, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Hayden, Geo B, teacher, Demopolis
Hayes, Jno L, planter, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Hayes, W F, planter, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Hayes, A H, overseer, Macon; 18, 5 e
Heard, Wilks M, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Heard, Jno F M, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Heard, Thomas, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Heath, H C, overseer, Sweetwater; 12, 2 e
Hecker, F R, teacher Dayton
Heileman, John, tailor, Demopolis
Henderson, H A M, methodist preacher, Demopolis
Henderson, W B, planter, Hampden; 14, 4 e
Hendrix, Henry, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Henesee, Thomas, ditcher and planter, Dayton
Henson, Wm, planter, Spring Hill; 16, 4 e
Henson, Wm R, planter, Spring Hill; 16, 4 e
Henson, Jno G, overseer, Linden; 15, 2 e
Henson, Mathew, overseer, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Henson, Elijah, planter, Sweetwater; 13, 2 e
Herbert, Samuel, mechanic, Demopolis
Herren, Peter, chicken husker, Demopolis
Herrin, B W, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Herrin, Geo L, teacher, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Hightower, John, carpenter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Hildreth, Dr Jas, planter, Jefferson
Hildreth, L A, planter, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Hildreth, Jas M, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Hill, S A, planter, Demopolis; 18, 3 e
Hill, Sterling, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Hill, Moses, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Hill, John, planter, Shiloh; 13, 4 e
Hill, Jas R, wheelwright, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Hill, Martin, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Hill, Edw Y, jr, lawyer, Dayton; 17, 4 e
Hill, Charles S, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 4 e
Hill, Geo B, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Higgins, A W, physician, Newburn; 18, 5 e

page 18

Hinson, Aaron, overseer, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Hobbs, Lewis W, druggist, Linden
Hogan, W S, overseer, Linden; 14, 2 e
Hoggue, Cullen C, planter, Linden; 16, 3 e
Holt, Thomas, planter, Linden; 15, 4 e
Holt, Hugh C, planter, Linden; 15, 4 e
Holten, W B, overseer, Macon; 17, 4 e
Holland, W B, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Hollis, Jno T, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 4 e
Honeycut, L D, planter, Spring Hill; 16, 3 e
Horn, Alex, planter, Sweet Water; 14, 2 e
Horn, Elijah, laborer, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Horn, J A C, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Horton, W Walton, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Hosea, Thos J, merchant and planter, Shiloh
Hosea, A B, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Hosea, W T, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
House, Richd A, overseer, Dayton; 17, 4 e
House, E A, overseer, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Houston, D C, planter, Linden; 15, 3 e
Houston, A O, planter, Linden; 15, 3 e
Houston, L G, planter, Demopolis
Houston, S M, overseer, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Houston, S B, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Houston, S F, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Howell, Wiley L, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Howell, A C, planter, Nanafalia
Howell, Irvin, artist, Nanafalia
Howell, John, laborer, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Howlet, James, constable, M'Kinley
Huckabee, J C, methodist preacher, Dayton
Huckabee, Richard, sr, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Huckabee, Richard, jr, laborer, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Huckabee, Virgil A, laborer, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Huckabee, Green J, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Hudson, R H, planter, Sweet Water; 12, 2 e
Hudson, Wm, sr, planter, Dixon's Mills; 12, 2 e
Hudson, Wm, jr, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Hudson, Burrel, overseer, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Hudson, Jesse, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Huggins, W W, overseer, Dixon's Mills
Hunt, W H, planter, Hampden
Hurn, J B, planter, Shiloh; 13, 4 e

page 19

Hylton, Sterlin, planter, M'Kinley, 15, 5 e
Henry, J J, carpenter, Linden
Henry, John, mechanic, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Henry, Samuel, laborer, Hampden; 13, 4 e
I.
Irby, Charles, planter, Linden; 15, 2 e
Irvin, J A D, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Isler, Jno W, planter, M'Kinley; 14, 5 e
J.
Jackson, S B, sr, sheriff, Linden; 15, 2 e
Jackson, S B, jr, lawyer, Linden
Jackson, Jno F, clerk, Mobile
Jackson, Soloman, overseer, Linden; 14, 2 e
Jackson, D B, planter, Linden; 15, 2 e
Jackson, F B, planter, Linden
Jackson, George, cabinet-maker, Demopolis
Jackson, E B, planter, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Jackson, M H, planter, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Jackson, Andrew, blacksmith, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Jackson, James F, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Jackson, Jas R, overseer, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Jackson, John C, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Jackson, Cary, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Jackson, James, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Jackson, Wm, ditcher
Jacoby, Jacob, merchant, Linden
Jernigan, J H, boot and shoe maker, M'Kinley
Johnson, W M, merchant, Linden
Johnson, Thomas, clerk, Sweet Water
Johnson, Thomas C, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Johnson, Marion, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Johnson, John A, blacksmith, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Johnson, Jno H, planter, Macon; 18, 4 e
Jolly, Wm, laborer, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Jones, Joel S, planter, Linden
Jones, Richard, sr, planter, Linden; 15, 4 e
Jones, R A, physician and planter, Dayton
Jones, Wm B, teacher, Linden; 15, 4 e
Jones, Green E, planter, Dixon's Mills; 12, 3 e
Jones, Osburn L, planter, Dixon's Mills; 12, 3 e
Jones, John W, overseer, Macon; 18, 4 e

page 20

Jones, Claiborne J, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Jones, W P, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Jones, Leonard L, overseer, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Jones, James R, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Jones, Wm F, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Jones, Eugene, student at law, Demopolis
Jones, James T, lawyer, Demopolis
Jones, Richard W, physician, Jefferson
Jones, W H H, planter, Jefferson; 16, 1 e
Jones, F A, planter, Jefferson; 16, 1 e
Jones, Benjamin, overseer, Macon; 18, 5 e
Jones, John G, overseer, Macon; 18, 5 e
Jones, A M, methodist preacher, Macon; 18, 4 e
Jordan, Thos A, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Jordan, Sebron, overseer, Macon; 18, 3 e
K.
Kahn, Simson, tailor, Linden
Kane, R L, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Keller, George, proprietor of "Planter's hotel," Linden
Keller, John G, merchant, Linden
Kelley, Wm L, planter, Jefferson
Kelley, John, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Keese, Elijah W, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Kervin, P E, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 4 e
Killingsworth, Joseph, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
King, William, planter, Linden
King, John T, lawyer, Linden
King, Willis P, planter, Dixon's Mills; 12, 2 e
King, S S, planter and physician, M"Kinley
King, Wm E, overseer, Uniontown; 18, 5 e
Kinnard, Franklin, laborer, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Kimbrough, F H, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Kimbrough, Wm T, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Kirker, F R, grocer, Demopolis
Kirker, Wm, printer, Demopolis
Kirker, Jaret, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Kirkland, Jesse V, carpenter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Kirkum, Benjamin, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Kirkum, Geo, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Kirkum, John N, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Kirkum, J A, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e

page 21

Kitchell, F M, dentist, Dayton
Knapp, Adam, boot and shoe maker, Demopolis
Knight, W C, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Knight, Joseph B, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 2 e
Kornegay, Robt, planter, Demopolis
Kornegay, James H, clerk, Mobile
Kornegay, Charles, planter, Demopolis; 18, 3 e
L.
Lacy, Wm B, M'Kinley
Lambert, Irvin, planter, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Landrum, Samuel, sr, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Landrum, Samuel, jr, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Landrum, Thomas, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Lane, L B, sr, planter, Spring Hill
Lane, L B, jr, planter, Spring Hill
Langford, William, planter, Dayton: 16, 4 e
Langhorn, Jno M, physician, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Lavender, Willis, overseer, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Lavender, Wm G, overseer, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Lavender, John D, overseer
Law, Joseph E, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Law, James A, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Lawson, James W, planter, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Lee, Samuel Y, gin maker, Dayton
Lee, John J, overseer, Shiloh; 15, 4 e
Lee, Bryant, teacher, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Lee, James, mechanic, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Leflore, Bryant, carpenter, Linden
Leighton, W S, stone mason, Demopolis
Leisenbe, Holden S, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Lewis, Thomas J, planter, Dixon's Mills
Lewis, M, planter, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Lewis, James, laborer
Lewis, G W, clerk, Demopolis
Lewis, Wm H, overseer, Demopolis; 18, 3 e
Lewis, Ivey F, planter, Macon; 18, 4 e
Ligon, Edwin T, dentist, Demopolis
Lilly, Thomas M, overseer, Macon; 18, 3 e
Lindsy, Jacob, old settler, Sweet Water
Lipscomb, Lee, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Lipscomb, Nathan, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Lipscomb, N Z, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e

page 22

Lipscomb, Wm, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Lipscomb, J Q, planter, Jefferson; 17, 1 e
Lipscomb, Sidney, warehouse keeper, Pace's Landing
Litchfield, Charles P, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Little, Adin, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Little, James, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Little, Gray, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Little, Frank, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Little, J M, planter,Pineville; 12, 1 e
Livingston, James P, overseer, Hampden; 14, 4 e
Lloyd, Robt G, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Lloyd, Thos F, tanner, Shiloh
Lloyd, N C, planter, Linden; 16, 2 e
Locke, Thos S, grocer, Dayton
Locket, H N, overseer, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Locket, Thomas, merchant, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Lockhart, R H, merchant, M'Kinley
Lockhart, Edwin, planter, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Loftin, W H, planter, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Loftin, Virgil A, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Lomax, J T, lawyer, Demopolis

Longest, H A, overseer, Demopolis; 18, 2 e
Longest, Harrison, overseer, Macon; 17, 4 e
Lowry, F C, baptist preacher and planter, M'Kinley
Lowry, C B, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Lucus, George, carpenter, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Lucy, Gideon, physician, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Luker, E R, planter, Sweet Water; 12, 2 e
Luther, John, physician, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Lynum, Wm, overseer, Jefferson; 17, 1 e
Lyon, F S, planter, and member of house of representatives, state legislature, to fill the unexpired term of N B Lesueur, esq
Lyon, George G, lawyer and planter, Demopolis
Lyon, Wm H, sr, warehouse keeper, Demopolis
Lyon, Wm H, jr, lawyer, Demopolis
M.                                           To Top of This Page
Macon, Gideon, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Madison, Strother, prop'r of madison house, Demopolis
Madison, W G, clerk, madison house, Demopolis
Madison, J H, overseer, Clio; 15, 1 e
Madison, Alex, overseer, Macon; 17, 4 e

page 23

Mahoney, Cain, tailor, M'Kinley
Mahoney, Eugene, saddler and harness-maker. Demopolis
Mahr, Frank C H, music teacher, Demopolis
Maness, Joel, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Maness, Isham, grocer, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Maness, Bayley, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Maness, John, laborer, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Maness, T H, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Maness, Wm, shoemaker, Shiloh
Maness, W F, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Mangon, Peter, wheelwright, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Manley, Funny, overseer, Spring Hill; 16, 3 e
Mann, John, planter and tax assessor 1860, Clio; 14, 1 e
Mann, James, planter, Clio; 14, 1 e
Manning, R J, nurseryman, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Manning, James, planter, Macon; 18, 4 e
Mannix, J W, saddler, M'Kinley
Marion, Robt, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Marion, James L, laborer, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Markham, Geo E, book-keeper, Demopolis
Markham, George S, teacher, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Martin, Hiram, planter, Shiloh
Martin, John, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Marshall, R D, merchant, Sweet Water
Marx, Isaac, merchant, Demopolis
Marr, Wm B, overseer, Linden; 15, 4 e
Mask, Dudley, planter, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Mask, Phillip, planter, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Mason, Charles B, county surveyor, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Mason, John T, druggist, Spring Hill
Mason, Benjamin H, planter, Spring Hill
Massey, Wm O, overseer, M'Kinley; 15, 4 e
Mathews, James, planter, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Mathews, Hugh T, planter, Demopolis
Matkins, Thos C, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Matkins, Marion, physician, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Maulding, L planter, M'Kinley; 14, 5 e
Maxey, H J, overseer, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Maxey, Merritt, overseer, M'Kinley; 15, 4 e
May, B F, physician, M'Kinley
May, P D, planter, Hampden; 14, 4 e
Mayton, Jenkins, wheelwright, M'Kinley
Mayton, John, planter, Clio; 13, 2 e

page 24

M'Alhany, Reese B, planter
M'Caa, Eugene, lawyer, Demopolis
M'Carty, Lewis B, register in land office, Demopolis
M'Cay, Andrew, overseer, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
M'Clinton, James C, planter, Clio; 14, 1 e
M'Clinton, Joseph A, planter, Clio; 14, 1 e
M'Connell, John, carpenter, Sweet Water; 12, 2 e
M'Corkle, John J, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
M'Clure, Wm G, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
M'Clure, J H, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
M'Clure, H A, constable and collector, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
M'Clure, Samuel, laborer, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
M'Clure, Ivey, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
M'Daniel, Augustus, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
M'Dowell, A M, civil engineer, Demopolis
M'Farland, D C, merchant, Demopolis
M'Farland, Wm S, merchant Demopolis
M'Farland, Alex, laborer, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
M'Farland, Walton, laborer, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
M'Farland, John C, Demopolis
M'Gaw, William, mechanic, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
M'Intire, Richard, laborer, Pineville; 12, 1 e
M'Intosh, John M, trader, Shiloh
M'Intosh, Wm A, planter, Shiloh
M'Kee, G H, teacher, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
M'Kinley, John H, stone mason and dealer in marble, Demopolis
M'Knight, S W, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
M'Leod, Neil, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
M'Millan, Henry, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
M'Millan, John, sr, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
M'Millan, John, jr, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
M'Millan, Hasting, planter, Pineville; 15, 1 e
M'Millan, S, overseer, Bashi; 12, 2 e
M'Millan, Neal, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
M'Millian, A, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
M'Millan, Jno L, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
M'Millan, F O, waggon and carriage maker, Demopolis
M'Neil, M H, planter, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
M'Neil, F A, planter, Linden; 15, 3 e
M'Neil, Charles, lawyer, Linden
M'Neil, Dan, overseer, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Medley, Edward N, overseer, Uniontown; 17, 5 e

page 25

Megginson, Edward T, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Mellville, Thomas H, clerk, Mobile
Merchant, Thomas, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Methers, John, planter, Clio; 14, 2 e
Methers, Joseph, teacher, Clio; 14, 2 e
Methers, E B, planter, Clio; 14, 2 e
Metlock, Strother, carpenter, Spring Hill; 17, 2 e
Michael, Jacob, butcher, Demopolis
Miles, C J, planter and baptist preacher, Sweet Water;  12, 2 e
Miller, G B, professor of mathmatics, Demopolis
Millstead, Wm J, planter, Clio; 14, 2
Millton, Sheppard, overseer, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Minge, Geo W H, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Minge, George W, jr, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Minge, David, planter, Uniontown; 17, 4 e
Mixon, A W, mechanic, M'Kinley; 15, 6 e
Mobly, Allen, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Mobly, Alex, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Modawell, W B, lawyer, M'Kinley
Monaghan, J D, M'Kinley; 16, 5
Monaghan, D S, overseer, M'Kinley; 14, 5
Monaghan, A J, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Monier, James, old settler, Demopolis
Montegre, Edward, grocer, Demopolis
Moody, Y M, circuit clerk, Linden
Moody, A E, lawyer, Linden
Moody, E C, planter, Linden; 15, 3 e
Moore, Cornelius A, planter, Dixon's Mills; 12, 3 e
Moore, W B, planter, Shiloh; 13, 4 e
Moore, James S, planter, Linden; 15, 4 e
Moore, John D, planter, Linden; 15, 4 e
Moore, J A, overseer, Linden; 15, 4 e
Moore, Edward, overseer, Linden; 15, 4 e
Moore, James A, physician, Uniontown; 18, 5 e
Moore, Moses D, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Moore, J N, saddler, Demopolis
Moore, Joseph, physician, Jefferson
Moore, J A, overseer, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Moore, Willis, negro hunter, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Morgan, Robt A, overseer, Macon; 17, 4 e
Morgan, John, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Morgan, Thomas J, planter, Shiloh; 14, 4 e

page 26

Morgan, Perry, overseer, shiloh; 14, 4 e
Morgan, J A, overseer, Demopolis; 18, 3 e
Morgan, Merritt, planter, Clio; 14, 1 e
Morgan, W C, carpenter, Clio; 14, 1 e
Morgan, William, herdsman, Clio; 15, 1 e
Moring, H B, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Moring, J W, overseer, M'Kinley; 15, 4 e
Morrisette, George W, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Morrisette, Wm B, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Morrisette, Jesse C, clerk, Mobile
Morrison, Robert C, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 4 e
Morrison, John G, gin maker, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Morrow, Phineas, planter, Jefferson; 16, 1 e
Moss, Joseph, planter, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Mulligan, Felix, brick mason, Demopolis
Murff, Daniel, overseer, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Muse, Thomas M, overseer, Demopolis; 18, 2 e
N.
Nabas, A W (no additional information)
Napier, John W S, planter, Nanafalia
Napier, Lemual, planter, Nanafalia
Napier, John, planter, Nanafalia
Napier, Richard G, planter, and warehouse keeper, Bickley's Landing
Napier, Robert R, planter, Bickley's Landing
Neely, John M, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Neetes, W A, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Neetes, H, physician, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Nelms, S A, mechanic, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Nelson, William, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Newton, Wesley, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Nichols, W N, planter, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Nichols, James, planter, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Nichols, Jno L, planter, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Nichols, W T, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Nichols, William, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Nichols, Thomas, laborer, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Nicholson, W F, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Nobles, Jeremiah, planter, Linden; 15, 2 e
Nobles, Calvin, grocer, Nanafalia
Nored, S M, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Nored, Marshall, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e

page 27

Nored, Wesley, wheelwright, Spring Hill
Nored, James, artist, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Norris, Rial, planter; Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Northrup, George B, overseer, Hampden; 14, 4 e
Norwood, Wm S, planter, Sweet Water
Norwood, A L, planter, Sweet Water
Norwood, John A, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Norwood, Jesse, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
O.
Oakley, Jordan H, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 2 e
Oakley, Wm A, planter, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Obering, F W, boot and shoe maker, Demopolis
Obering, E F, boot and shoe maker, Demopolis
Residences in Perry Co; citizens of Marengo, by an act of the Legislature
**************************************
Ogletree, William, planter, M'Kinley
Ogletree, P B, planter, M'Kinley
Ogletree, James L, planter, M'Kinley
**************************************
Oppenheimer, Ben, artist, Demopolis
Ormand, J J, jr, planter, Newburn; 18, 5 e
Orr, Samuel, hotel keeper, M'Kinley
P.
Painter, Robt, planter, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Painter, Richard, student, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Parker, W Jacob, baptist preacher, Jefferson
Parker, Richard H, mechanic, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Parker, Williamson, clerk, M'Kinley
Parker, E H, mechanic, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Parten, Henry, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Parten, Mark, laborer, Sweet Water; 12, 1 e
Parten, John, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Parten, Robt J, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Parten, Manley, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Parten, Asa J, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Parten, W J, blacksmith, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Parsons, B F, architect and builder, Dayton
Pasley, W H, planter, Linden; 16, 3 e
Patterson, Ira, planter, Demopolis; 17, 2 e
Patterson, R A, planter, Demopolis; 17, 2 e
Patterson, Thomas, laborer, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Paulding, Wm K, planter, Uniontown; 16, 5 e

page 28

Paulding, Robt, planter, Uniontown; 16, 5 e
Payne, Saml, carpenter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Pearl, James, carpenter, Linden
Pearl, Stephen, cabinet maker, Linden
Pearson, James M, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 c
Pearson, James, jr, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Pearson, Wm, teacher, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Pearson, P W, town marshall, Demopolis
Peden, Wm, sr, overseer, Demopolis; 18, 2 e
Peden, Wm, jr, laborer, Demopolis; 18, 2 e
Peden, Allen, laborer, Demopolis; 18, 2 e
Pegram, W E, physician, Dayton
Pegues, Jas B, planter, Spring Hill; 16, 3 e
Peibles, Wm E, wheelwright, Spring Hill
Penee, David, planter, Linden; 16, 4 e
Percelle, A L, overseer, McKinley; 15, 5 e
Perkins, Saml F, planter and physician, McKinley
Perkins, Wm F, planter, McKinley; 15, 6 e
Perkins, Joseph M, McKinley
Perkins, Henry A, overseer, McKinley; 15, 5 e
Perkins, James, miller, McKinley; 15, 6 e
Perkins, Wm A, planter, McKinley; 15, 5 e
Perkins, D A, McKinley
Perry, W H, overseer, McKinley; 15, 5 e
Perry, Jno C, laborer, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Peteete, Willis, planter, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Philfer, Michael, carpenter, Demopolis
Philfer, Wm B, brick-mason, McKinley
Philfer, John H, brick-mason, McKinley
Phillips, Geo W, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Phillips, H T, planter, McKinley; 15, 5 e
Phillips, Charles J, overseer, Macon; 17, 4 e
Phillips, John, planter, Hampton; 13, 4 e
Phillips, D B, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Phillips, Nehemiah, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Phillips, B F (no additional information)
Pickens, W H, miller, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Pickens, James M, planter and miller, McKinley; 16, 5 e
Pickering, R R, planter, Dayton
Pickering, Saml, planter, Dayton
Pickett, Reuben, planter, Shiloh; 14, 4
Piper, J J, overseer, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Pitman, Thos, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 4 e

page 29

Poellnitz, Charles A, planter, Linden; 15, 2 e
Poellnitz, Julius, planter, Linden; 15, 2 e
Poellnitz, J E, planter, Linden; 15, 2 e
Poellnitz, B B, planter, Linden; 15, 2 e
Poellnitz, Edwin A, planter, Linden; 15, 1 e
Poellnitz, J R, planter, Linden; 15, 1 e
Pope, Thos, sr, planter, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Pope, Thos, jr, laborer, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Pope, S A, carpenter, Sweet Water; 12, 2 e
Pope, Wm C, laborer, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Pope, J W, mechanic, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Pope, Wm H, mechanic, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Porter, John S, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Porter, Mark, planter, Linden; 15, 3 e
Pounds, J J, overseer, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Powe, Wm E, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Powers, Wm L, overseer, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Powers, John L, overseer, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Pratt, A Y, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Price, Robt W, planter and trader, McKinley; 16, 5 e
Prim, James, carpenter, Demopolis
Prince, O H, lawyer, Demopolis
Prince, John H, planter, Macon; 17, 4 e
Prince, E A L, teacher, Spring Hill; 17, 4 e
Pritchett, M G, planter and physician, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Pritchett, R H, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Pritchett, Robt, sr, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Pritchett, Robt, jr, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Pritchett, Jeremiah, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Pritchett, J J, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Pritchett, D J, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Pritchett, Wm, overseer, Hammpden; 14, 4 e
Proctor, Soloman, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Prout, D F, planter, Demopolis; 18, 3 e
Prowell, David, planter, Dayton; 16, 5 e
Pruitt, Saml, physician, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Pruitt, Jesse F, overseer, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Pruitt, Meshack, planter, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Pugh, R, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Privitt, Mathew, planter, Sweet Water; 14, 2 e
Privitt, John W, planter, Sweet Water; 14, 2 e
Privitt, Wm, planter, Sweet Water; 14, 2 e

page 30

Q.
Quinney, Jas A R, planter, Spring Hill; 16, 4 e
Quinney, E W, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Quinney, John L, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Quinney, W R, dentist, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Quinney, James, jr, planter, Spring Hill; 16, 4 e
R.
Rabia, K, overseer, Linden; 15, 3 e
Rabia, Wm T, planter, Linden; 16, 3 e
Raburn, Richard, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Raburn, Jacob, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Rains, J B, lawyer and clerk in the Probate Office, Linden
Raley, Jackson, keeper of the poor-houses, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Raley, Charles, miller, Shiloh; 13, 4 e
Raley, Green, planter, Shiloh; 15, 3 e
Ramey, Jno W, overseer, Newburn; 18, 5 e
Rawles, Elijah, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Rawles, S H, overseer, Demopolis; 17, 2 e
Rawles, Thos, overseer, Linden; 15, 3 e
Ray, N T, overseer, Dixon's Mills; 12, 2 e
Ray, Benjamin H, overseer, McKinley; 14, 5 e
Ray, W C, planter, McKinley; 15, 6 e
Reed, B W, planter, Demopolis; 17, 2 e
Reed, W H, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Reese, H W, planter, Demopolis; 18, 3 e
Reeves, Levi W, planter, Dayton
Reeves, J W, manager, Clay Hill; 12, 4 e
Rembert, James M, planter, Linden; 15, 2 e
Rentz, J F, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Rentz, John G, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Rentz, Jacob F, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Rentz, John Jacob, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Rentz, Washington, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Rentz, William, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Rentz, Benjamin, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Rice, D F, overseer, Demopolis; 17, 2 e
Rice, Geo, overseer, Demopolis; 18, 3 e
Richardson, F A, blacksmith, Demopolis
Richardson, Wm B, overseer, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Rickard, John, overseer, Linden; 15, 4 e
Riddle, N W, planter and physician, Linden
Riddle, A A J, planter, Linden

page 31

Riggins, Carter, planter, Linden; 16, 3 e
Riggins, James, clerk, Linden
Rivers, Joseph, clerk, Gay's Landing
Rhodes, E T, manufacturer of corn mills, Demopolis
Roane, Curtis, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 4 e
Roane, J F, overseer, Demopolis; 18, 3 e
Roberds, A C, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Roberds, Rila A, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Roberds, Rila, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Roberds, Wm, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Roberds, John L, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Roberson, Alex, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Roberson, Wm, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Roberts, Wm T, planter, Sweet Water; 12, 2 e
Roberts, Geo H, manager, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Robertson, R M, druggist, Demopolis
Robertson, John, druggist, Demopolis
Robertson, Jesse J, millwright, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Robinson, James W W, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Robinson, Andrew J, overseer, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Robison, Sherwood T, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Robison, Thomas R, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Rogers, Jonah, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Rogers, Jonah M, planter, Nanfalia; 13, 1 e
Rogers, Joseph A, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Rogers, John D, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Rogers, Jesse C, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Rogers, Frank A, planter, Clio; 14, 2 e
Rogers, Thomas W, planter, Clio; 14, 2 e
Rogers, Enos, merchant, Dayton
Rogers, Benjamin, overseer, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Rogers, Marion, mechanic, Linden
Royl, F A, teacher, Linden; 16, 4 e
Roland, James, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Root, John, carpenter
Rosenbaum, Lewis, saddler, Demopolis
Ross, Andrew D, planter and tanner, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Ross, Thos S, planter, Nanafalia; 1 e
Ross, Allison, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Rowell, W T, overseer, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Rudisill, A L, carpenter, Demopolis
Rudisill, David, carpenter, Demopolis
Ruffin, J S, physician, Demopolis

page 32

Russell, R D, presbyterian pastor, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Russell, William, blacksmith, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Russell, Richard, planter, Demopolis; 18, 2 e
Russell, John T, planter, Demopolis; 18, 2 e
Russell, A R, carpenter, Demopolis
Rutledge, T J, methodist preacher, Jefferson
S.                                               To Top of This Page
Sammons, E H, overseer, Macon; 18, 3 e
Sammons, Wm A, clerk, Demopolis
Sanders, Joseph H, planter, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Sanders, Wm R, planter, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Sangrouber, Edward, restautrant, Demopolis
Saully, Seabron S, planter, Clio; 14, 1 e
Saunders, John J, planter, Linden; 15, 4 e
Saunders, Richard A, lawyer, Linden
Sayre, George H, clerk, Dayton
Shuter, John, overseer, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Schmidt, Augustus, tailor, Demopolis
Scott, James W, planter, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Scranage, J W, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 2 e
Scranage, Charles, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 2 e
Seabrook, Abner, planter, Jefferson
Seabrook, Bowen, merchant, Kate's Ridge
Seal, R L, physician, Nanafalia
Seers, Charles, teacher, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Seinshermers, Joseph, clerk, Demopolis
Sellers, William, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Shannon, D J, planter, Shiloh; 13, 4 e
Shaw, Alexander, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Shaw, Sion R, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Shaw, Jesse H C, planter, Spring Hill; 16, 3 e
Sharp, A Y, merchant, Demopolis
Sheeler, O, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Sheeler, Wm F, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Sherman, A, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Shields, Theo C, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Shields, Thomas W, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Shields, Samuel F, planter, Linden; 15, 3 e
Shields, Benjamin T, clerk, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Shoaf, Henderson, tailor, M'Kinley
Sims, H H, carpenter, Clay Hill
Sims, Joel, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e

page 33

Sims, Charles G, laborer, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Sims, Gresham, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Sims, Warren, laborer, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Simmons, William, planter, Jefferson
Simmons, Lewis, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Simmons, Lewis L, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Simmons, James, overseer, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Simmons, William, overseer, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Simmons, William, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Simmons, Jesse, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Singleton, John M, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Singleton, James, planter, Clio; 14, 2 e
Skinner, E D, merchant, Shiloh
Skinner, Thos J, cabinet-maker, Shiloh
Skinner, Thomas H, clerk, Mobile
Skinner, George, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Skinner, James L, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Shipper, Bryant, mechanic, Shiloh; 13, 4 e
Slater, O P, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Sledge, Lemual, planter, Spring Hill, 17, 3 e
Sledge, A M, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Sledge, L A, planter, Demopolis; 17, 3 e
Sledge, Alexander, sr, planter, Newburn; 18, 5 e
Sledge, Alexander, jr, planter, Newburn; 18, 5 e
Small, Richard, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Smith, Jno W, merchant, and tanner, Jefferson
Smith, James R, clerk, Jefferson
Smith, John, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Smith, Levi, overseer, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Smith, William, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Smith, Issac, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Smith, J W, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Smith, J D, planter, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Smith, Harman, planter, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Smith, William, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Smith, Christopher, overseer, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Smith, Read, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Smith, Julius, overseer, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Smith, Martin H, planter, M'Kinley
Smith, Thomas B, clerk, Mobile
Smith, John P, physician, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Smith, D H, overseer, Macon; 17, 4 e
Smith, James M, overseer, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e

page 34

Smith, S D, physician, Jefferson
Smith, R N, physician, M'Kinley
Smithie, Robert, overseer, Linden
Smoot, Edward F, brick mason, Linden; 16, 3 e
Smyly, Joseph E, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Smyly, James, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Smyly, Charles N, manager, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Smyth, W M, presbyterian pastor, Dayton
Southall, Robert F, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Speed, James Mc, planter, Jefferson; 16, 1 e
Spink, L L, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Spiva, C D, planter, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Spiva, Jacob, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Springfield, Anson, lawyer and teacher, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Springle, William, silversmith, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Springle, Robert, clerk, Spring Hill
Squires, A M, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Stacea, Andrew J, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Stanford, John B, physician, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Stanton, John B, overseer, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Stedman, Jesse H, overseer, M'Kinley; 15, 4 e
Steed, Thos G, overseer, Macon; 18, 3 e
Steel, E A, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Steel, Robt L, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Steel, S N, merchant, Macon
Stephenson, F C, overseer, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Stephenson, David H, carpenter, M'Kinley
Stephenson, Joshua, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Stewart, W A, planter, Nanafalia
Stewart, Larkin, planter, Demopolis; 18, 3 e
Stewart, L J, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Stewart, Jacob, overseer, Spring Hill; 17, 2 e
Stigall, Griffin, planter, Linden; 15, 4 e
Stigall, Ralph, planter, Linden; 15, 4 e
Stigall, Samuel, planter, Linden; 15, 4 e
Stigall, James, overseer, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Stockman, William, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Stockman, George, laborer, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Stone, John, overseer, Shiloh; 15, 3 e
Stone, Moses M, overseer, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Storter, George, tin merchant, Demopolis
Strudwick, Edmond, physician, Dayton
Strudwick, Samuel, planter, Demopolis; 18, 3 e

page 35

Strudwick, Sheppard, planter, Demopolis; 18, 3 e
Strudwick, James W, physician, Macon; 18, 3 e
Strudwick, William F, planter, Macon; 18, 3 e
Stubbs, Zara, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Stubbs, E B, overseer, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Styron, A D, carpenter, Dayton
Suddith, Marshall, overseer, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Suddith, John, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Sulivan, Robert, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Sulivan, James, overseer, Macon; 18, 4 e
Summerlin, Fred, overseer, M'Kinley; 14, 5 e
Surginer, Wyat, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Swearenger, Eli, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
T.
Talbert, John, baptist preacher, M'Kinley, residence in
       Perry, citizen by an act of the Legislature
Talbert, E G, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 6 e
Tall, J H, buggy builder, M'Kinley
Talley, W R P, overseer, Macon; 17, 4 e
Tanner, Robt E, overseer, Macon; 18, 4 e
Tate, James, planter, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Tayloe, Henry A, planter, Macon; 17, 4 e
Tayloe, J W, planter, Macon; 17, 4 e
Tayloe, G E, planter, Macon; 18, 3 e
Tayloe, William H, planter, Macon; 17, 4 e
Taylor, Thomas, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 6 e
Taylor, William, miller, M'KInley; 15, 6 e
Taylor, John, clerk, Pace's Landing
Taylor, J M, overseer, Linden; 15, 2 e
Taylor, E A, merchant, Demopolis
Terrell, James T, planter, Dayton
Terrell, James L, planter, Dayton
Terrell, Wm F, lawyer, Dayton
Terry, Benjamin W, planter, Clio; 14, 1 e
Tharin, William C, agent and collector, Linden
Thomas, E C J, principal of female academy, M'Kinley
Thomas, John M, planter, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Thomas, John, planter, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Thomason, O D, planter, Hampden; 14, 4 e
Thomason, M F, overseer, Hampden; 14, 4 e
Thomason, John, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Thompson, Thomas, overseer, Demopolis; 17, 2 e

page 36

Thompson, Joel, overseer, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Thompson, A, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Thompson, Edward W, druggist, M'KInley
Thompson, T B, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Thompson, D S P, planter, Macon; 18, 4 e
Thompson, Abraham, blacksmith, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Thornhill, James R, overseer, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Thrast, David, physician, M'Kinley; 15, 4 e
Threadgill, Samuel, planter, 13, 4 e
Threadgill, Samuel J, physician, Hampden
Threadgill, George, mechanic, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Threadgill, Thomas, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Threadgill, T D C, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Thurmond, Robert P, planter, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Tice, Daniel, laborer, Linden
Tompkins, J J, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Torbert, S M, lawyer and receiver in land office, Demopolis
Torbert, J A, jr, planter, Spring Hill
Torbert, Thomas J, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Treadwell, Wm F, overseer, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Trippe, William F, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Trull, Jackson, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Tucker, John G, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Tucker, James, laborer, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Tucker, J L, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Tucker, L T, planter, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Tucker, D L, planter, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Tucker, William, mechanic, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Tucker, Wm P, overseer, Linden; 17, 4 e
Tucker, Wm H, planter, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Tucker, Charles, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Tucker, James, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Tucker, R H, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Tucker, W T, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Tucker, John D, planter, Clio; 14, 1 e
Tucker, P M, planter, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Turner, Thomas H, physician, Linden
Turner, David B, physician, Linden
Turner, William, clerk, Demopolis
Twilley, John B, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
U.
Ulmer, John M, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Updike, W J, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e

page 37

V.
Vandyke, J C, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Varnell, Ranson, overseer, M'Kinley; 15, 6 e
Varner, Benton, mechanic, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Varner, Ransom, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Varner, James, planter, (deaf and dumb), M'Kinley; 14 5 e
Vassor, George, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 6 e
Vaughan, Henry C, planter, Linden; 15, 2 e
Vaughan, C L, planter, Linden; 16, 3 e
Vaughan, Giles N, planter, Linden; 16, 3 e
Vaughan, Lemual, planter, Linden; 16, 3 e
Vaughan, A S, physician and planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Vaughan, Asa, law student
Vaughan, James, physician, Macon; 18, 4 e
Vawter, Alexander, miller, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Vick, Edward M, wheelwright, Dixon's Mills
Vick, E R, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Vick, G W, planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Vise, John R, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
W.
Waddle, R S, planter and trader, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
Wade, James W, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Wade, W T, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Wade, Thomas, overseer, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Wade, John C, clerk, Clay Hill
Wade, William, planter, Sweet Water; 14, 2 e
Walker, N R, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Walker, J A, planter, Linden; 16, 3 e
Walker, J P, Linden; 16, 3 e
Walker, Anderson, overseer, Uniontown; 18, 5 e
Walker, John M, overseer, Macon; 18, 4 e
Walker, Charles, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Walker, D S, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Walker, Morris, planter, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Walker, Andrew, overseer, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Walker, James, presbyterian pastor, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Walker, Orvill, planter, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Walker, Alexander, laborer, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Wall, Edward B, druggist, Jefferson
Wall, L P, clerk, Bickley's Landing
Waller, Frank, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Waller, William E, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e

page 38

Walston, Wm, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Walston, Thomas L, overseer, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Walston, William L, overseer, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Walston, G W, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Walston, Samuel A, overseer, Spring Hill; 16, 4 e
Walston, John, overseer, M'KInley; 15, 5 e
Walthall, L B, overseer, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Walton, John T, planter, Dayton
Ward, John, mechanic, M'Kinley; 14, 4 e
Ward, C S, overseer, Uniontown; 18, 5 e
Ware, H B, planter, Hampden; 14, 4 e
Watkins, C H, planter, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Watlington, E T, planter, Dayton
Weatherly, Abner, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Weatherly, F, planter, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Webb, Caloway, planter, Bashi; 12, 2 e
Webb, Seabron, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Welch, James, carpenter, Jefferson
Wells, Wiley L, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
West, F W, clerk, Macon
West, Willis, overseer, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
West, J M, overseer, Demopolis; 17, 2 e
Westbrook, John Ivey, baptist preacher and planter, Jefferson
Westbrook, James, planter, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
Westbrook, E, planter, Kate's Ridge
Whately, James, planter, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Wheeler, S, planter, Demopolis
Wheeling, William, mechanic, Dayton
White, Andrew, planter, Jefferson; 16, 2 e
White, William, planter, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
White, Henry, planter, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
White, Coleman, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
White, Cam C, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
White, Hyram, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
White, William J, planter, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
White, Henry F, laborer, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Whitfield, Gaius, sr, planter, Demopolis
Whitfield, Gaius, jr, planter, Demopolis
Whitfield, Boaz, planter, Demopolis
Whitfield, Nathan B, planter, Demopolis
Whitfield, Bryan, planter, Demopolis; 18, 2 e
Whitfield, George, physician, Spring Hill

page 39

Whitfield, H S, planter, M'Kinley; 16, 5 e
Whitlow, Alfred J, clerk, Spring Hill
Wilburn, John D, planter, Macon; 18, 4 e
Wilkerson, J W, physician and planter, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Wilkerson, Franklin, miller, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Wilkerson, Wm, overseer, Shiloh; 14, 3 e
Williams, John G, baptist preacher and planter, Nanafalia;  13, 1 e
Williams, Jacob B, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Williams, Richard M, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Williams, Wm G, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Williams, Abb, planter, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Williams, W J, teacher, Nanafalia; 13, 1 e
Williams, Sion, millwright, Linden; 16, 3 e
Williams, William, overseer, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Williams, Charles W, keeper of ten pin alley, Demopolis
Williams, John, herdman, Demopolis; 18, 2 e
Williams, James M, planter, Jefferson
Williams, John H, planter, Jefferson; 16, 1 e
Williams, Ashley, planter, Clio; 14, 2 e
Williams, Nathan, overseer, Spring Hill; 17, 3 e
Williams, W N, overseer, Uniontown; 17, 5 e
Williams, William J, overseer, Hampden; 12, 4 e
Williams, C B, brick mason, Shiloh; 13, 3 e
Williams, John P, overseer, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Williamson, John, overseer, Hampden; 14, 4 e
Williamson, Edward, planter, Dixon's Mills; 13, 3 e
Winn, Walter E, lawyer, Demopolis
Winn, John, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Witherspoon, A J, presbyterian pastor and planter, Linden; 14, 3 e
Witherspoon, J M, planter, Linden; 15, 1 e
Witherspoon, W D, planter, Linden; 15, 1 e
Witherspoon, Thomas M, planter, Linden; 15, 1 e
Wood, Josiah, overseer, M'Kinley; 15, 4 e
Wood, W, overseer, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Wood, Julius A, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Wood, Charles (no additional information)
Wood, L Mc, planter, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Wood, James H, overseer, M'Kinley; 15, 5 e
Woodard, T C, laborer, Clay Hill; 12, 3 e
Woodward, John H, planter, Jefferson; 17, 1 e
Woolf, Henry A, lawyer, Linden

page 40

Woolf, James B, planter, Dayton
Woolf, Thos J. planter, Dayton
Woolf, Winfield, planter and physician, Dayton
Wooten, William H., planter, Hampden; 13, 4 e
Worl, Jacob, dentist, Dixon's Mills
Worthy, William, planter, Pineville; 12, 1 e
Worthington, Noah, planter, Nanafalia; 14, 1 e
Wright, B H, blacksmith, Clio
Wright, John F, planter, Sweet Water; 13, 2 e
Wright, A N, planter, Shiloh; 14, 4 e
Wright, John, planter, M'Kinley; 14, 5 e
Wright, George B, planter, M'Kinley; 14, 5 e
Wright, E D, teacher, M'Kinley
Wyat, E, overseer, Jefferson; 17, 1 e
Y.
Young, James A, judge of probate court, Linden
Young, John W, planter, Sweet Water; 12 , 2 e
Young, Callendar, planter, M'Kinley
Young, Mathew H, planter, Macon; 18, 4 e
Yarbrough, Robert, overseer, Jefferson; 17, 2 e
You, Spencer, planter, Dayton; 16, 4 e
Z.
Zaiser, A, book-keeper, Demopolis

page 41

COURTS OF MARENGO COUNTY. To Top of This Page
OFFICERS AND TERMS.
 

CHANCERY COURT.- 5th Dist. (composed of Marengo,)
Southern Chancery Division.
N. W. Cocke, Chancellor.
Robert D. Hart, Register and Master
Terms.- 4th Monday in March.

 

CIRCUIT COURT.- 7th Judicial Circuit.
Porter King, Judge.
Y. M. Moody, Clerk.
S. B. Jackson, Sr., Sheriff.
(no name listed), Coroner
Terms.- 3rd Mondays in March and September

 

  COMMISSIONERS' COURT.
James A. Young, Judge.
W. P. King, Commissioner
Wm. Simmons, Commissioner
Thomas J. Woolf, Commissioner
Charles Irby, Commissioner
Terms- 2nd Monday in February and August, and 1st
            Mondays in April and November.

 

PROBATE COURT.
 
James A. Young, Judge.
Terms.- (nothing entered)

 

page 42

OFFICERS OF MARENGO COUNTY, AND THEIR  To Top of This Page
TERMS OF OFFICE.
 
 
NAME POSITION TERM
Allen C. Jones State Senator from 12th Senatorial Dist. (composed of Marengo and Greene.) 2 years
F. S. Lyon Member of the House of Represenatives. Elected to fill the unexpired term of N. B. Lesueur, Esq.
James A. Young Judge Probate Court.  6 years
Robt D. Hart Register and Master in Chancery, 5th Dist., Southern Division. 4 years
Y. M. Moody Circuit Clerk. 4 years
S. B. Jackson, Sr. Sheriff. 3 years
Oliver G. Grayson Tax Assessor. 1 year
Andrew J. Crawford Tax Collector. 2 years
Willis P. King Commissioner of Roads and Revenues. 4 years
Thos. J. Woolf Commissioner of Roads and Revenues.  4 years
Wm. Simmons Commissioner of Roads and Revenues.  4 years
Charles Irby Commissioner of Roads and Revenues.  4 years
Samuel F. Gholson County Treasurer.  3 years
Charles B. Mason County Surveyor. 3 years
James Beverly Superintendent Public Schools. 2 years
Jackson Raley Keeper of Poor House. during faithful performance
George Keller Jailor. no information

MAGISTRATES IN MARENGO COUNTY  To Top of This Page
 
Name of Precinct. Magistrates
Linden W. H. Grant & A. E. Moody.
Demopolis Robert M. Campbell & E. A. Taylor.
Macon W. W. Dugger & John H. Prince.
Dayton Wm. F. Terrell & Anson Springfield.
McKinley J. P. Jones & E. W. Abrahams.
Hampden H. W. Hatch & John A. Cowan.
Shiloh George Barkley & Thomas J. Skinner.
Dixon's Mills E. M. Vick and W. S. Norwood.
Horse Creek John C. Dumas.
Nanafalia W. G. Williams and D. P. Barr.
Hills D. B. Jackson.
Jefferson John W. Smith & John Besteder.
Spring Hill Charles B. Mason.

MARRIAGES IN MARENGO COUNTY SINCE 1850.  To Top of This Page

1851-60
1852-66
1853-73
1854-69
1855-63
1856-78
1857-75
1858-64
1859-65
1860-73

page 43

SPECIAL ACTS FOR MARENGO COUNTY.  To Top of This Page

     An Act approved February 17, 1854, provides that Trustees, Constables and the Sheriff in the County of Marengo may sell, as now provided for by law, all real estate and negroes- ans as to the Sheriff- all personal property they may respectively levy on in the discharge of the duties of their office, or otherwise have occasion to sell from that part of the County lying north of the Chickasabogue Creek, at the Town of Demopolis, on the 3rd Monday in each month, any law now in force shall remain unaltered as to all that part of the County lying north and east of the Chickasabogue Creek.

     An Act approved February 13, 1856, makes it unlawful for any person or persons to hunt wild hogs without first giving notice to three householders living nearest the field, woods or swamp in which the hunt is to made.  Any person violating the above Act, shall be quilty of a misdemeanor, and, on conviction, be fined not less than twenty or more than fifty dollars.

     An Act approved December 18, 1857, provides that the December term of the Chancery Court for Marengo County be abolished.

     An Act approved January 27, 1858, provides that, in civil cases, when cause is not decided at the first term, witnesses must be summoned by the Clerk, by the issue of a subpoena to each term, until the cause is determined, unless otherwise directed by the parties.

     An Act approved January 10, 1845, and an Act to repeal in part the aforesaid Act, approved February 5, 1858, provides that Apportioners in Marengo County hold their office for 2 years, and at the expiration of their term, are entitled, if such term is served out, to a certicate of exemption from road service for the next 2 years.

     An Act approved February 21, 1860, provides that the Circuit Court of Marengo County be holden on the 3rd Mondays in March and September, and may continue in session two weeks.

page 44

     An Act approved February 9, 1860, provides that the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Marengo County be, and he is hereby required, and it is made part of his official duty to complete the final records of said Court, left unfinished by his predecessors in office, for which he shall be entitled to such compensation as the Court of Commissioners may allow, not to exceed the fees now allowed by law for making final records, to be paid out of any moneys in the county treasury, not otherwise appropriated.

NATIVITIES OF VOTERS OF MARENGO COUNTY.  To Top of This Page
 
Alabama 557
North Carolina 294
South Carolina 213
Georgia 150
Virginia 139
Tennessee 54
Germany 26
Ireland 21
Kentucky 15
Mississippi 12
New York 6
Pennsylvania 6
Switzerland 6
Massachusetts 5
France 5
Bavaria 4
Prussia 3
Delaware 3
Maryland 3
Maine 2
New Jersey 2
Connecticut 2
Baden 2
District Columbia 1
Illinois 1
New Hampshire 1
Arkansas 1
Louisiana 1
Wales 1
England 1
Poland 1
Scotland 1
Holland 1
TOTAL-   1540

page 45

RATES OF FERRIAGE.  To Top of This Page

The State of Alabama, Marengo County - Commissioners' Court, August Term, 1855.
Ordered by the Court that the following rates of Ferriage be and are hereby established to all ferries in Marengo County, from and after this date.
 
FERRIAGE CENTS
For man and horse 10
For man or horse 5
For carriage or waggon with four or more horses 75
For pleasure carriage with two horses 50
For any one horse pleasure carriage or cart 25
For an ox-cart or waggon with two oxen 35
For an ox-cart or waggon with more than two oxen 60
For a dearborn, or waggon with three horses or more 35
For cattle, sheep, hogs, goats, &c., each 2 1/2
The drivers, Superintendents, and in-riders of any vechicle to cross free of charge, though they get out and cross in the flat. 0
   Attest:     JAMES A. YOUNG, Judge.

STATISTICS OF MORTALITY FOR THE YEAR ENDING 1st JUNE, 1860  To Top of This Page
 
Unknown 74
Pneumonia 49
Teething 48
Typhoid Fever 35
Hooping Cough  32
Bilious Fever  26
Consumption  20
Accidental  18
Dropsy  15
Diarrhea  14
Old Age  11
Smothered  12
Spasms  12
Worms  10
Burnt  (accidental)  10
Croup  9
Puerperal Fever  9
Congestion of Brain  9
Congestive Chill  7
Cholera Infantum  7
Diphtheria  7
Bilious Cholic  6
Inflammation Bowels  6
Lock Jaw  5
Quinsey  5
Influenza  4
Hives  4
Apoplexy  4
Scrofula  4
Flux  4
Brain Fever  3
Cancer of Womb 3
Ulcers  3
Disease of Liver 3
Scarlet Fever  3
Poisoned  (accidental) 2
Drowned  2
Disease of Heart 2
Roseola  2
Congestive Fever 1
Thrash  1
Carbuncle  1
Sun Stroke  1
Rheumatism  1
Gout  1
Bronchitis  1
Neuralgia  1
Constipation  1
Snake Bite  1
Gastritis  1
Epilepsy 1
Putrid Sore Throat  1
Asthma  1
Jaundice  1
Gravel  1
Eating Dirt  1
TOTAL 517*

 *Of the above number, 86 are Whites.

page 46

Recapitulation of taxes of Marengo County for the year 1860
Total Taxes Real Estate: $16,091.45
Total Taxes Personal Property: $20,503.60 (of which $14,577.25 was taxes on slaves.)
Total Military Tax: $1829.75
Total County Tax: $12,198.35

Total of Taxes Collected for Marengo County in 1860: $50,623.15

Newspapers.

"The Linden Jeffersonian," published weekly at Linden.
Walter H. Grant, Editor and Proprietor.

"Canebrake Gazette," published weekly at Demopolis.
I. S. Harwell, Editor and Proprietor.

page 47

MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCHES IN MARENGO COUNTYTo Top of This Page
 
NAMES   LOCATION PASTOR PASTOR'S Post Office MEMBERS
Union Sweet Water J. G. Williams Nanafalia 170
Bethel  McKinley F. C. Lowry McKinley 164
Dayton  Dayton Do Do 40
Nanafalia Nanafalia J.C. Foster Nanafalia 167
Forest Spring  T12,R1E Do Do 107
Friendship  no information J. Reeves Liberty Hill 96
Shiloh T13,R3E Do Do 198
Liberty no information L. L. Dewitt Choctaw Corner 100
Mt. Pleasant Jefferson John Ivey Westbrook Jefferson 103
Providence T16,R3E Do Do 87
Fellowship no information W. Jacob Parker Do 78
Spring Hill Spring Hill Do Do 227

Total         1537
The colored membership is included in the above numbers.



EPISCOPAL CHURCHES IN MARENGO COUNTY
 
 
NAMES LOCATION PASTOR PASTOR'S P.O. MEMBERS
Trinity Demopolis Thos. J. Beard Demopolis 26
St. Andrew's Macon F.R. Hanson Macon 46*
St. Michael's no information John Y. Gholson Union Town 20

*Colored communicants included.



page 48

METHODIST CHURCHES IN MARENGO COUNTY.
 
NAMES LOCATION PASTOR PASTOR'S P.O. WHITE COLORED TOTAL
Dayton Dayton Geo. F. Ellis Dayton 65 115 180
McKinley McKinley Do Do 25 40 65
Linden Linden L. M. Wilson Jefferson 34 27 61
Jefferson Jefferson Do Do 55 111 166
Spring Hill Spring Hill Do Do 65 131 196
Macon Macon Do Do 21 50 71
Sand Hills Sand Hills Charles Strider Linden 14 89 103
Camp Ground T14,R1E Do Do 23 30 53
Wesley Chapel no information Do Do 57 0 57
Magnolia Magnolia Do Do 70 92 162
Hampden Hampden Do Do 73 67 140
Demopolis Demopolis H. Henderson Demopolis 76 100 176
Evan's Chapel T15,R1E Charles Strider Linden 5 12 17



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCHES IN MARENGO COUNTY.
 
NAMES LOCATION PASTOR PASTOR'S P.O. WHITE COLORED TOTAL
Montpelier Sand Hills A.J. Witherspoon Linden 20 8 28
Geneva T14,R1E Do Do 70 27 97
Demopolis Demopolis Do Do 30 5 35



page 49

RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS IN MARENGO COUNTY.

     For assistance in obtaining the information to compile the foregoing tables of Religious Statistics, I am indebted to the following persons: For Statistics of the Baptist Church, to Capt. R. D. Marshall, especially, and to Rev. John C. Foster;  of the Methodist Church, to each of the Preachers in the County belonging to the Conference;  of the Presbyterian Church, to Rev. A. J. Witherspoon, whose churches only are reported; of the Episcopal Church, to Rev. John Y. Gholson and W. W. Dugger, Esq., of Macon.
     There are two Primative Baptist Churches in Marengo.  One located at Dayton, Rev. Elijah Bell, Pastor; the other at Jefferson, the returns of which failed to come in, in time for publication.


page 50 (BLANK)

page 51

HISTORY OF MARENGO COUNTY, & C.  To Top of This Page
 
LINDEN
DEMOPOLIS
SPRINGHILL
JEFFERSON
DAYTON
MCKINLEY

MARENGO COUNTY
     In January, 1818, Marengo County was established- the republic of Alabama then being in its territorial pupilage in the old Union; and thereafter the Superior Courts of law and equity, two County Courts, and one intermediate Court were annually holden.  At the suggestion of Judge Lipscomb a name was given to the county, complimentary to the French refugees who were settling at or near the present site of the town of Demopolis.  Hence the name Marengo; that being the name of a village in the plains, between Alexandria and Tortona, in the royal Sardinian Duchy of Montferrat, celebrated for the battle of June 14th, 1800, between Bonaparte and Melas, the Austrian general, in which the latter was signally defeated.
     Under an Act of Congress passed March 2nd, 1819, authorizing the people of the Alabama Territory to form a State Constitution, Washington Thompson was elected a delegate from the County of Marengo to the convention holden in Huntsville on the 5th of July, 1819, for the purpose of framing a State Government.
     There seems to have been no regular established place for the holding of the Courts of the County till the year 1827.  Among the imperfect records of that early day is found a resolution of the "Court of Marengo," dated March 22nd, 1820, to petition the Legislature for the "sum of fifty dollars to be appropriated to the payment of Samuel Easley for a house to hold Court in."  This state of things continued till the 5th of September, 1827, when the board of County Commissioners, having previously contracted therefore, re-

page 52

ceived and adopted as the future court house of the County, a two story wooden structure situated in the village of Linden, and built by Smith and Warner at a cost of thirty-five hundred dollars.  This continued to be the Court House of the County till it was destroyed by fire, when the present brick building was erected in its stead (NOTE: This second, brick courthouse building still stands in Linden on the Jefferson Road.).   The boundaries of Marengo County are as follows: beginning at the Choctaw Corner, thence running east to the range-line dividing ranges four and five; thence north with said range-line to the northwest corner of township thirteen in range five; thence east with the line dividing the thirteenth and fourteenth townships, to the range-line diving five and six; thence north with said range-line to the northern boundary of township eighteen; thence west with the line dividing the eighteenth and nineteenth townships, to the Tuscaloosa (NOTE: now the Black Warrior River)  river; thence down Tuscaloosa to its junction with the Tombeckbee (Tombigbee) river; thence down Tombeckbee river to the northern boundary line of Clarke county; thence with said line to the beginning.  This describes the boundaries of Marengo County except about nine sections in the north-east corner of township fifteen, range six east, taken from Dallas and added to Marengo County.
     Its territorial area is ten hundred and eighty square miles.  It contains a variety of soils.  In it may be found the rich black land of the canebrake region, the still post oak, sandy lands, both rich and poor, and creek and river bottoms.  The sandy lands of good quality are perhaps the most uniform in the production of the great Southern staple.  The black lands are the best grain soils.  The post oak varies very much as to quality and productions; in drouthy seasons they are considered most reliable.
     The figures to be found in this little publication will probably prove to be more satisfactory to our readers than anything we could say as to the health, the population, the material wealth, and the moral, social, and intellectual status of the County.  To

page 53

them, therefore, we beg to refer our readers.



LINDEN.- We item the following, gleaned mostly from a musty book entitled" Proceedings of the Commissioners of the town of Linden"  and the Record of the old County Court.
August 22nd, 1823, met at the site of the present village of Linden, then called the "Town of Marengo," John Spinks, Bowen Bennett, Allen Glover and Wm. Irions, commissioners, whose duty it was, in pursuance of an act of the Legislature, dated September 6th, 1820, to select a site for a Court House.  By resolution the south-east quarter of section 32, township 16, range 3 east, was chosen.  Allen Glover was required to apply to the County treasury for funds, and to invest the same in the purchase of said land.  A certificate of the Board's action was furnished Israel Pickens, then Governor of the State; and a like certificate furnished Allen Glover.
December 19th, 1823, which, we presume, is the birthday, at least in name, of the present village of Linden, as now is the first mention made of the place by that name, the Board of Commissioners met.  Morgan G. Brown was elected Treasurer, and George N. Stewart, Secretary.  Allen Glover reporting that the County had failed to furnish the funds to purchase the site for a Court House theretofore selected, and that he had advanced the money for a purchase out of his own pocket, it was ordered that A. Glover be entitled to receive from the County treasury the money thus advanced by him.  Ordered that a survey be made, and that a sale of lots take place.  George N. Stewart performed the survey and laid out the future town.
May 10th, 1824, a sale of town lots took place- lots selling at prices ranging from $25 to $50.  May 25th, 1825, a new Board of Commissioners consisting of Thos. Ringgold,

page 54

Bowen Bennett, Morgan G. Brown, and Shelby Corzine, met and resolved to build a Court House.
November 7th, 1825,  Proposals to build from Jacob Lindsay, Smith & Warner, were received and adopted.
September 25th, 1827, The Court House was completed by Smith & Warner and received by the Board of Commissioners.
    Thus was the breath of life breathed into the infant village, which, though it had a name, was scarcely an existing fact.  The village is indebted to the French refugees for its christening.  Its full and proper name is Hohenlinden, in memory of a victory gained by the French under Moreau over the Austrians, December 3d, 1800, at a village in Bavaria of that name.  Linden once contained double its present population; but owing to the sad reverses following the "flush times" of Alabama, and unhealthiness caused by the felling of the surrounding forests, it received a shock from which it has shown, till recently, but little signs of recovery.  Evidences of improvement are now visible; and as it boasts of health, it is hoped that not a distant day may witness a large and flourishing village, distinguished alike for its intelligence, refinement and good morals.  Linden contains four stores-- three dry goods and one drug; three groceries; two hotels; a church; a Masonic lodge; an Academy, male and female; blacksmith, wheelwright, shoemaker and carpenter shops; a Court House and Jail.  Another noticeable feature is a company of horsemen, volunteers, numbering about sixty and commanded by Captain Joel S. Jones.  This company is the offspring of the sectional feud between the North and the South, and we doubt not, that in the "deadly breach" each man will be found at his post, and if falling in battle, he will fall with his feet to his foe, and "Look proudly to heaven from the death-bed of fame."  Linden has a population of about two hundred and fifty inhabitants.  A certain de'gage' air of cortiality, frankness of

page 55

intercourse, and abstinence from all slanderous gossip has been generally characteristic of its people, imparting the charm of confidence, good will and good fellowship to society.  "Long may it wave!"



FIRST SETTLING OF DEMOPOLIS.- The Vine and Olive Company.-- A colony of French sought Marengo, Alabama, as an asylum from Bourbon persecution.  The winter of 1816 and 1817, found many distinguished refugees from Philadelphia.  An ordinance of Louis XVIII had forced them from France, on account of their attachment to Napoleon, who was then an exile upon St. Helena.
    The refugees despatched Nicholas S. Parmentier to the Federal city to obtain from Congress a tract of land in the wild domain of the West, upon which they had resolved to establish a colony.  On the 4th March, 1817, Congress authorized the sale of four townships to them, at two dollars per acre, on a credit of fourteen years, upon condition that they cultivated the vine and olive.  In the meantime, the refugees had entered into correspondence with intelligent persons of the West, in regard to the soil and climate of different regions.  Dr. Brown of Kentucky, who had travelled in France, and had become much interested in these unhappy people, advised them to settle near the confluence of the Warrior and Tombigby, which they determined to do.  Organizing in Philidephia, the company was found to consist of three hundred and forty allottees, and the land was divided among them; some acquiring a full share of four hundred and eighty acres, and others half and quarter shares, and some not more than eighty acres.  To each man was also assigned a lot in the town which they were to establish, and also one in the suburds.  Associated with them as assistants were Prosper Baltard, A. Mocquart, and J. LeFrancois.  George N. Stewart, then a youth of eighteen, and now a distinguished lawyer of Mobile, was their secretary.

page 56

    The schooner "McDonough" was chartered, and the commissioners, with many French emigrants, set sail from Philidephia.  Late one evening, in the month of May, this vessel, bearing many romantic voyagers, was seen approaching Mobile Point, in the midst of a heavy gale.  Governed by an obsolete chart, the captain was fast guiding her into danger.  Lieutenant Beal, commanding at Fort Bowyer, perceiving her perilous situation, fired an alarm gun.  Night coming on, and overshadowing both sea and land with darkness, he caused lights to be raised along the shore as guides to the distressed vessel.  The wind continuing to increase, she was thrown among the breakers, and immediately struck.  Signals of distress being made, the noble lieutenant threw himself into a boat, with five resolute men, and with Captain Bourke, formerly an officer.  Mounting wave after wave, they reached the wreck about one o'clock in the morning.  The wind had somewhat abated, and Beal crowded the women and children into his boat, and conducted them safely to shore.  The larger number of the colonists remained on board the schooner, which was ultimately saved, by being washed into deeper water.  Bestowing upon the refugees every attention while they remained at the Point, Beal accompanied them to Mobile, and partook of a public dinner, which they gave him, in token of their gratitude.
    The commissioners remained a few days at Mobile, which was then a small place, with but one wharf, and proceeded up the river in a large barge, furnished by Addin Lewis, the collector of the port.  Stopping at Fort Stoddart, they were received with hospitality by Judge Toulmin, to whom they bore letters.  They next visited General Gaines, then in command of a large force at Fort Montgomery, and the barge then cut across to the Tombigby, and landed at St. Stephens-- a place of some size, with refined and lively inhabitants.  Discharging the government boat, and procuring another barge, the refugees once more began their voyage up the

page 57

winding and rapid current.  Camping upon the banks occasionally, and exploring the country around, they at length established themselves, temporarily, at the Ecor Blanc (White Bluff).  A portion of them proceeded to old Fort "Tombecbee," and near there, visited Mr. George S. Gaines, who was still United States Choctaw Factor, whose table fed the hungry, and whose roof sheltered the distressed.  He advised them to make their location in the neighborhood of White Bluff.  John A. Peniers and Basil Meslier, whom the association had disbatched to explore the Red river country, now arrived.  Receiving favorable reports of the country in the Alabama Territory, the association at Philidelphia took measures to colonize it.  The west side of the Tombigby belonged to the Choctaws, and the east had recently been in possession of the Creeks.  The region where the French emigrants had resolved to establish themselves was an immense forest of trees and cane, interspersed with prarie; and near the present town of Greensboro was Russell's settlement of Tennesseans, and some distance below the White Bluff, were a few inhabitants.  However, the French continued to arrive in boats, by way of Mobile, and cabins were erected about the White Bluff, in a rude and scattering manner.  Having been accustomed to Parisian life, these people were very indifferent pioneers.  Unprovided with wagons and teams, and unacquainted with the shifts to which pioneer people are often compelled to resort, they made but slow progress in subduing the wilds.  Provisions of all kinds were remarkably high.  They, however, slowly struggled against these difficulties, and endeavored to raise provisions upon small patches, without knowing what tract, in the grant, they were to live in the future.
    The meridian line was established, and the grant divided into townships and sections.  A town was formed at the White Bluff, which, according to the request of Count Real, of Philidelphia, was called Demopolis-- the city of the people.

page 58

To secure the riverfront, two fractional townships were chosen by the commissioners, instead of two entire townships.  Emigrants continuing to arrive, great confusion and controversy arose in the selection of lots and tracts of land, while the association at Philidelphia, unaquainted with the localities, were unwisely and arbitrarily planning their own forms of location.  By a new contract, made between Mr. Crawford, Secretary of the Treasury, and Charles Villar, agent of the Association, the lands were sold, and the tracts of each person designated.  The allotments made at Philadelphia, and ratified by Mr. Crawford, being different from those already made by the settlers, forced the latter to abandon many of their hard-earned improvements, and to retire further into the forest.  This wretched state of things caused General Lefebvre Desnoettes, who had opened a farm on his Tombigby allotment, to proceed to Philadelphia to adjust these conflicting interests.  He suceeded only in securing his own improvements, while the claims of the others were disregarded, and the contract made at Washington was ordered to be enforced.  The settlers were then forced to retire upon the lands assigned them in townships Eighteen, Nighteen, and Twenty, in range four east.
    Among the French emigrants were many distinguished characters.  Count Lefebvre Desnoettes had been a cavalry officer, under Bonaparte, with the rank of lieutenant-general.  Accompanying Napoleon, in his march to Russia, he rode with him in his carriage in his disastous retreat over the snows of that country.  He had served in Spain in many bloody engagments, and was an active participator in the dreadful battle at Saragossa,  Vivacious and active, handsome in person and graceful in carriage, he was the most spendid rider of the age in which he lived.  His imperial master was

page 59

so much attached to him, that when forced to abdicate the throne, and about to depart for Elba, and while addressing his weeping and sorrowing officers at Fontainbleau, said, "I cannot take leave of you all, but will embrace General Desnoettes in behalf of you all."  He then pressed him to his bosom in the most affectionate manner.  Napoleon frequently made him valuable presents, and influenced his, the sister of the celebrated banker, La Fitte, to espouse him.  While he was at Demopolis, that lady made an attempt to join him in exile, but being shipwrecked on the coast of England, was forced to return to France.  At length, she negotiated with the French government for his return, and, through the influence of her family, suceeded in obtaining permission for him to reside in Belgium.  this induced Count Desnoettes, in 1823, to leave Alabama in the ship Albion, which was wrecked upon the coast of Ireland, at Old Kinsale, in view of an immense number of people, who were standing on the cliffs.  The distinguished refugee was washed overboard, and the ocean became his grave.  While in Marengo county, he often received large sums of money from France, and was the wealthiest of the emigrants.  Near his main dwelling he had a log cabin, which he called his sanctuary, in the centre of which stood a bronze statue of Napoleon.  Around its feet were swords and pistols, which Desnoettes had taken in battle, together with beautiful flags, tastefully hung around the walls.
    M. Peniers, another distinguished emigrant, was a republican member of the National Assembly, and voted for the death of the amiable Louis XVI.  He remained about Demopolis, engaged in agriculture, but procuring an appointment of Sub-Agent for the Seminoles, died in Florida, in 1823.  Distinguished in France, and honored with many civil appointments, he was at last expatriated for his adherence to the fortunes of Napoleon.
    Colonel Nicholas Raoul, a remarkable personage, had been

page 60

a colonel under Bonaparte, and had accompanied him in his banishment to Elba.  When his imperial master left that island, Raoul commanded his advanced guard of two hundred grenadiers upon the march from Caenes to Paris.  When this small band was preparing to fire upon the king's troops, under Marshal Ney, who had come to capture the emperor, Bonaparte advanced to the front of the lines, and gave the command to "order arms."  Bearing his breast to Ney's division, he exclaimed, "if I have ever injured a French soldier, fire upon me."  The troops of Ney shouted "vive la Empereur!" and Bonaparte marched at their head, through the gates of Paris.  Colonel Raoul lived several years upon his grant, and becoming much reduced in his circumstances, was forced to keep a ferry at French Creek, three miles from Demopolis- being accustomed to ferry over passengers himself.  Often would the American traveler gaze upon his foreign countenance, martial air and splendid form, and wonder what order of man it was who conducted him over the swollen stream.  At this time, Raoul being in the prime of life, was a large fine looking man.  He was firm and irascible in his disposition, and was a dangerous competitor in any controversy in which he might engage.  His wife was a handsome woman, of the Italian style of beauty.  She was a native of Naples, and had been Marchioness of Sinabaldi, and maid of honor to Queen Caroline, when Murat was king of that country.  She brought with her to Alabama two children by a former husband.  In 1824, she left her lonely cabin upon French Creek, and followed Colonel Raoul to Mexico, where he engaged in the revolution, and fought with his accustomed fierceness and impetuosity.  At length, once more reaching his beloved France, he there for a long time held an honorable commission in the French army.
    J.J. Cluis, one of the refugees, cultivated a farm near Greensboro.  He had been an aid to Marshal Lefebvre, the Duke of Rivigo, who was afterwards at the head of the police

page 61

department of Paris.  Colonel Cluis was then his secretary.  At another time, Cluis had the custody of Ferdinand VII., King of Spain, while he was imprisoned by Napoleon near the Spanish frontiers.  Like all the other refugees, he found that planting the vine and olive a poor business in Alabama, and, having become much reduced in fortune, kept a tavern in Greensboro.  He died in Mobile not many years since.
    Simon Chaudron, one of the Tombigby settlers, formerly a resident of Philadelphia, where his house was a centre of elegance and wit, was distinguished for his literary attainments.  He had been the editor of the "Abeille Americaine," and was a poet of considerable reputation.  He delivered a eulogy upon the life and career of Washington, before the Grand Lodge of Philadelphia, which was pronounced a splendid effort, both in Europe and in America.  He died in Mobile, in 1846, at a very advanced age, leaving behind him interesting works, which were published in France.
    General Count Bertand Clausel had been an officer of merit throughout Bonaparte's campaigns.  During the Hundred Days, he commanded at Bordaeux, and making the Duchess of Anglouleme prisoner, released her, for some unknown cause.  The general did not occupy his grant, but became a citizen of Mobile in 1821, living on the bay, furnishing the market with vegetables, and driving the cart himself.  Returning to France in 1825, he was subsequently made by Louis Phillippe governor and marshal of Algeria.
    Henry L'Allemand who had been lieutenant-general, commanding the artillery of the imperial guard, was an officer of great merit, and a man of high character.  He married the niece of Stephen Girard.  General Charles L'Allemand, his brother, had also been an officer of distinction in France.  Filled with daring and ambitious projects, he employed the following language in writing to his brother: "I have more ambition than can be gratified by the colony on the Tombigby."  This was literally true, for he soon made a hazardous

page 62

expedition to Texas, collecting followers at Philadelphia and in Alabama.  Arriving at Galveston island, which was shortly afterwards submerged, his people suffered greatly for provisions, and were generously relieved by the pirate, La Fitte.  Annoyed by the indians, and prosrated by disease, in a short time most of the colonists perished, and the establishment failed.
    The celebrated Marshal Grouchy was one of the Philadelphia associates.  He was a man of middle stature, and had very little, apparently, of the military about him.  Not being popular with the refugees, in consequence of his conduct at Waterloo, to which they imputed the loss of the day, he became involved in controversies with them in the American Gazettes.  He never came to Alabama, but one of his sons, who had been a captain in the French army, settled his grant near Demopolis.  The marshal afterwards returned to France, and enjoyed honors under the Bourbons.
    M. Lackanal, a savant, and member of the academy, at the head of the department of public education, under the Emperor, settled on the bay near Mobile, in 1819.  He was one of those members of the National Assembly of France, who voted for the death of Louis XVI.  After a long residence in Mobile, he went to France, and there died in 1843.
    Among all the refugees who sought homes in Alabama, none had passed through more stirring and brillant scenes, than General Juan Rico, a native of Valencia, in Spain, who had been proscribed in that country upon the return of Ferdinand VII because he was a republican and a supporter of the constitution of 1812.  An elegant member of the Cortes and a distinguished officer of the Spanish army, he resisted to the last the invasion of Napoleon.  One day, an interesting scene occurred between General Rico and the elegant Desnouettes.  Both being invited to dine at Demopolis, the conversation turned upon the campaigns in Spain, when allusion was made to the obstinate and sanguinary siege of Saragossa,

page 63

where one of them had commanded the troops of France and the other those of Spain.  They were now assembled at a hospitable table, in a humble cottage, in the wilds of Alabama.  They had met before, amid the din of arms, arraying their troops against each other, and pouring out rivers of blood, at the head of the best trained troops of Europe, who had figured in the most eventful times of France and Spain.  Each had been expelled from his native country, and each had been blasted in his ambitious hopes.  Nevertheless, good humor prevailed in the cabin, and the sorrows of all were drowned in wine, amid merry peals of laughter.  In 1825, General Rico was recalled to Spain, and arriving there, again became a member of the Cortes, under his favorite constitution.  He met with singular reverses of fortune, was expelled from Spain the second time, became an inhabitant of England, and was again recalled to assist in the government of his country.  When he lived in Alabama, he was fifty years of age, and was of a dark complexion.  He possessed great energy and decision of character, and was a most excellent farmer.  If our limits would permit it, many other interesting persons among the French emigrants might be described.
    The priciple portion of the French grant lay in Marengo County.  This name was proposed by Judge Lipscomb, while a member of the legislature at St. Stephens, in honor of the great battle fought during the French Republic.  It also extended into the county of Greene, embracing some of the best lands in the vicinity of Greensboro.  It has been seen that much difficulty arose among the French about their respective locations, and that three times they lost their improvements.  Forced to abandon their settlements in Demopolis, they laid off the town of Aigleville, and erected cabins, but the drawing at Philadelphia not embracing this place, they were once more forced to go deeper into the forest.  The want of waggons and teams, and the great scarcity of water

page 64

in the cane-brake, induced them to dwell on small allotments, while their more valuable tracts were unoccupied.  Owning no slaves, a number of German redemptioners were imported, through the enterprise of Desnoettes, but these people proved a burden and expense, and also disregarded their obligations.  The French were less calculated than any other people upon earth, to bring a forest into cultivation.  The provisions which they had raised, were made at the expense of extravagant hire, and Desnoettes expended over twenty-five thousand dollars in opening and cultivating his farm.  In this manner the whole colony, after a few years,  became poor and were forced to sell their claims to Americans, who soon opened large plantations, and made the earth smile with abundant products.  However, a majority of the French still held onto their grants, and in good faith to the government, entered into cultivation of the grape and olive.  Importations of plants were often made from Bordeaux, but the newness of the land, and ignorance of the colony in regard to their cultivation, were among the reasons why the experiment failed.  The importations frequently arrived out of season, when the vines withered away and the olive seeds became defective.  At length, with difficulty, grapes were grown, but they failed to produce even tolerable wine, because the fruit ripened in the heat of summer.  Before the vinous fermentation was completed the acetic had commenced.  In 1821, the French planted three hundred and eighty-three olive trees upon the grant, and a large number in 1824.  Every winter the frosts killed them down to the ground, but new shoots, putting up, were again killed by the succeeding winter.  The usual mode of planting the grape was at the distance of ten feet in one direction and twenty in the other.  They were trained to stakes, and cultivated with cotton.
    In addition to the ruinous failure of the vine and olive, the French were continually annoyed by unpricipled American

page 65

squatters.  Occupying their lands without a shadow of title, they insultingly told the French that they intended to maintain their footing at all hazards.  Several lawsuits arose, and although our Supreme Court decided in favor of the grantees, the latter became worn out with controversies and allowed the intruders, in many cases, to retain possession for a small remuneration.  On the other hand, many honorable American purchased their grants, for fair consideratios, and thus the French refugees were gradually rooted from the soil.
    But, in the midst of all their trials and vicissitudes, the French refugees were happy.  Immured in the depths of the Tombigby forest, where, for several years, want pressed them on all sides,-- cut off from their friends in France, surrounded by the Choctaws on one side, and the unpricipled squatters and land-thieves on the other-- assailed by the venom of insects and prostrating fevers-- nevertheless, their naive gaiety prevailed.  Being in thehabit of much social intercourse, their evenings were spent in conversation, music, and dancing.  The larger portion were well educated, while all had seen much of the world, and such materials were ample to afford an elevated society.  Sometimes their distant friends sent them rich wines and other luxuries, and upon such occasions, parties were given, and the foreign delicacies brought back many interesting associations.  Well cultivated gardens, and the abundance of wild game rendered the common living of the French quite respectable.  The female circle was highly interesting.  They had brought with them their books, guitars, silks, parasols, and ribbons, and the village in which they dwelt resembled, at night, a minature French town.  And then, farther in the forest, others lived, the imprints of whose beautiful Parisan shoes on the wild prarie occasionally arrested the glance of the solitary traveler.  And then, again, when the old imperial heroes talked of their emperor, their hearts warmed with sympathy, their eyes kindled with enthusiasm, and tears stole down their furrowed cheeks.

page 66

    Demopolis now ranks first in importance of any town in the county, having to support it a wealthy region and a thickly populated one.  It contains a population of about 1200; has seven dry goods. two drug, and several grocery and confectionery stores; two hotels; two livery stables; gin, mill, carriage, waggon, harness, saddle, shoe, boot, tin and jewelry establishments; numerous smith and wood shops; one Methodist, one Episcopal, and one Presbyterian church; one Masonic Lodge; one printing establishment, publishing the "Canebrake Gazette," several male and female schools.  The Cedar Hill Institute, under the immediate charge of Mrs. C.E. Truehart, as principle, with a corps of teachers, makes it one of the best schools for females in the country.



SPRINGHILL.- This place is located about six miles from Demopolis, in a high sandy ridge in the midst of the prarie and black land country, and affording situations for pleasant residences to the wealthy planters round.  Here they have two good schools, male and female, which is seldom the case among large plantations.  It has one dry goods store, one drug store, two churches, one Methodist and one Baptist, one waggon and one blacksmith shop, and a Masonic hall.


JEFFERSON.- This village is situated in the northwestern part of the county.  The immediate neighborhood was settled in the year 1810, by Reubin Hildreth, Lewis Hildreth, John Gilmore,sr., John Visand and some others.  the first settlers of the village were Dr. James Hildreth, John Besteder and Daniel Finch.  These formed the nucleus around which the town has grown.  It has a population of about 200; has two dry goods and one drug store, three churches, Methodist, Missionary and Primative Baptist, male and female academies, one Masonic lodge, one hotel, two tan yards, shoe shops, waggon, blacksmithing, carpentering, &c., is carried on profitably.

page 67

The people are remarkable and praiseworthy for the interest they are taking in raising choice fruit.  The grape is receiving much attention; and especially is Dr. N. Hackworth entitled to the meed of praise for his zeal and enterprise in demonstrating the practicality of that, on the sandy lands of Jefferson neighborhood, which proved a failure with the French on the black lands of Demopolis; the culture of the grape the past season having yielded many gallons of wine, for which the Doctor found ready sale.



DAYTON.-  A village built up pricipally of wealthy planters, in a pleasant region, has a population of about 300; two dry goods, one drug, one grocery store, one hotel, one livery stable, three churches, Methodist, Missionary and Primative Baptist, and Presbyterian, one Masonic hall, gin, waggon, carriage, and blacksmith shops; male and female academies.  The Dayton Female Institute, assisted by teachers well qualified for the duties assigned them, guarantees the highest wants of the community in the education of females.


McKINLEY.-  This place was settled by one Lunchford Perkins; afterwards came Dr. Fields, Joseph Moore, Rev. F. C. Lowry and others.  It has a population of about 250; two dry goods and one drug store, several groceries, one hotel, one livery stable, one Masonic lodge, two churches, Baptist and Methodist, male and female academies.  One of the best schools for female in the county is located here, Rev. E.C.J.B. Thomas, principle.  Establishments of almost every mechanical art are caried on profitably.


    The other villages and Post Offices in the County are as follows:
MACON
NANAFALIA
SWEET WATER
HAMPDEN
CLIO
PINEVILLE P.O.
SHILOH
CLAY HILL
DIXON'S MILLS

F I N I S H



 
 

TO TOP OF THIS PAGE

BACK TO JEFF"S SPOT ON THE NET

Please report any broken links or direct any questions to: jefareed@bellsouth.net
 Jeffrey A. Reed 2000