WILFRED WATT GILDROY.
  
WILFRED WATT GILDROY.
Wilfred Watt Gildroy, who has been permanently located in Wyoming since 1907, is now well known as the president of District No. 22 of the United Mine Workers and makes his home in Cheyenne. He was born in Monmouth, Illinois, on the 29th of July, 1873, a son of James and Elizabeth (Watt) Gildroy. The father was connected with British exploration work for many years and occupied the position of government statistician and also that of state mine inspector for Iowa for a number of years. He has departed this life but his widow still survives. They reared a family of six sons who are yet living, Wilfred Watt being the youngest of these. There were also three daughters in the family but one has passed away.
In his early boyhood Wilfred Watt Gildroy accompanied his parents on their removal to Iowa and acquired his education in the public schools of What Cheer, completing his studies in the high school there with the class of 1892. He afterward took up the profession of teaching and later turned his attention to mining. After practical experience in that line he became connected with the organized effort for the benefit of the miners. He also pursued a course of study in university extension work and continued his studies through the International Correspondence Schools at Scranton, Pennsylvania. He traveled extensively, gaining broad knowledge and experience wherever he went, and in 1897 he came to Wyoming for the first time but afterward returned to the east. A decade later he located permanently in this state and has since made his home in Cheyenne. He has been active in mining and labor organizations and was traveling auditor for the international organization in 1912. For two terms he served as president of the State Federation of Labor and he is now president of the United Mine Workers of the twenty-second district, his term expiring on the 1st of April, 1918. In this connection he maintains his office in Cheyenne but makes his home in Thermopolis.
On the 19th of February, 1901, Mr. Gildroy was united in marriage to Miss Grace E. Fisher, whose brother is general manager of the coast division of the Western Union. There were three children of that marriage: Clarence, Gladys and Bernice. Following the death of the wife and mother Mr. Gildroy was again married in 1915, his second union being with Miss Wrena R. Fitzwater.
The family are adherents of the Episcopal church and fraternally Mr. Gildroy is connected with the Knights of The Maccabees and the Eagles. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he served as judge at Carneyville. He has not been a politician, however, in the sense of office seeking, preferring to give his time and attention to other interests. When leisure permits he indulges in fishing and hunting and greatly enjoys various phases of outdoor life. He has been a close student of many of the sociological and economic questions which are vital factors in American affairs and his work in behalf of the labor unions has been farreaching and effective. He has based his efforts upon a thorough understanding of existing conditions and his labors have brought excellent results in the achievement of his purpose.