HENRY STEPHEN PARKER.
  
HENRY STEPHEN PARKER.
Henry Stephen Parker is now identified with the blacksmithing department of the Union Pacific Coal Company at Rock Springs. He was born in Bristol. England, February 17, 1856, a son of the late George Parker, who was also a native of that country but who came to America in February, 1870, settling in Ohio, where he engaged in general farming. He made his home in Trumbull county, there residing up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1899, when he had reached the age of sixty-nine years. He was deeply interested in political questions and in civic affairs and cooperated heartily in all plans and movements for the development and general improvement of the section in which he lived. His business affairs were carefully and wisely directed and thus he won a fair measure of success. He was married in England to Miss Jane Nichols, who was there born and who passed away at the old Ohio home in December, 1913. after reaching the very advanced age of eighty-four years. The family numbered ten children, nine of whom survive, Henry S. having been the third in order of birth.
At the usual age Henry S. Parker became a pupil in the public schools of Ohio but is largely self-educated, having learned many valuable lessons in the school of experience. He was reared to farm life, early becoming familiar with the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist as he assisted his father in the work of the fields and the care of the crops. He remained upon the home farm until he had attained his majority and then sought employment along other lines. He secured work in the coal mines, became familiar with the business and was employed as a prospector by the Union Pacific Railway Company, prospecting for coal fields for three years in Utah and Wyoming. He also served as outside foreman for No. 1 Mine at Rock Springs for a period of thirteen years, bringing him to his appointment to the position of superintendent, of the Wyoming State Hospital on the 1st of March, 1917, as the successor of H. F. Menough. This office he filled until January 1, 1918, when he resigned. In that connection he fully met the responsibilities that devolved upon him. He possesses the executive ability necessary to directing the interests of an institution of that character, at the same time recognized its needs and met every requirement that was placed upon him. He made a most creditable record by the businesslike manner in which he took up his duties and directed the interests of the institution, recognizing its needs in relation to the patients and at the same time wisely and economically caring for the various interests of the hospital. At length he resigned to enter upon his present business connection.
On the 5th of February, 1877, Mr. Parker was united in marriage in Trumbull county, Ohio, to Miss Lucy Williams, a native of England and a daughter of the late Joseph W. Williams. Mr. and Mrs. Parker are now the parents of four living children: Ada, the wife of Samuel Ramsey, living at Rock Springs; Eva, the widow of William Kellogg, also a resident of Rock Springs; H. G., who is engaged in the hay, grain and produce business in Rock Springs; and Blanche, who is still with her parents.
Mr. Parker votes with the republican party and is a stalwart defender of its interests. He served as a member of the police force of Rock Springs for two years and has been a member of the school board for three years, the cause of education finding in him a stalwart champion. Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias. It has only been through genuine worth and devotion to duty that Mr. Parker has made advancement. He has had no outside aid or influence, but persistency of purpose has enabled him to overcome obstacles in his path and fidelity to duty has won him recognition, bringing him at length to his present appointment.