THOMAS OSBORNE.

    Evanston has grown with notable rapidity and has been developed along the most progressive lines in keeping with the ideas of modern city building. Its business houses are substantial and attractive and its commercial enterprises would be a credit to a city of still greater size. Active in this connection is Thomas Osborne, the secretary and treasurer of the Evanston Drug Company.
    He was born in New Brunswick, July 8, 1874, and in 1911 he arrived in Evanston, Wyoming, where he took charge of the business of the Evanston Drug Company. A year later he purchased an interest in the business and afterward became half owner of the Evanston Drug Company, of which he is now secretary and treasurer, with F. H. Harrison as the president. They have a large and well appointed store, tastefully and neatly arranged, and they carry an excellent stock of drugs and druggists' sundries. Their business methods are thoroughly reliable and their enterprise has brought to them a constantly growing success.
    On the 1st of June, 1914, Mr. Osborne was united in marriage to Miss Julia M. Foght, of Evanston, a daughter of Emil J. Foght, of Washington, D. C.
    In his political views Mr. Osborne is independent and does not wish to be bound by party ties but exercises his right of franchise in support of men and measures that he believes are most beneficial to the community. He does not seek nor desire office, preferring to concentrate his efforts and attention upon his business interests, and the Evanston Drug Company, of which he is the manager, secretary and treasurer, has become one of the foremost corporations operating in this line in western Wyoming. In the undertaking he is associated with Dr. F. H. Harrison. They have a splendid store–one of the cleanest and best kept pharmacies to be found anywhere in the western country. It is a credit to its manager and is a business enterprise of value to the community in which it is located.
    Mr. Osborne is a thorough believer in the opportunities that Wyoming offers to young men and says that the state holds out greater possibilities for the man with determination and enterprise than can be found in any other section of the country. He believes that the work of utilizing its natural resources has scarcely been begun and that with their development the state will continue to grow and expand in its trade relations. With this belief he has accordingly identified his interests with those of Evanston and ranks with the valued and representative merchants of western Wyoming.


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