100SuccessfulVermontersWGROUT  

 
 

 

      GROUT, W. W., son of Josiah and Sophronia, became one of the most prominent men in Vermont. When a boy he attended the district school and afterward the Poughkeepsie Law school, graduating therefrom in 1857, then went into the law office of Hon. Thomas Bartlett, at Lyndon; was admitted to the Caledonia county bar soon after. The next year he established an office at Barton. In 1862 he enlisted in the Fifteenth Vermont regiment and was chosen lieutenant colonel; served during the term of the regiment and was mustered out August, 1863. In 1864 the state militia was organized and Colonel Grout was made General Grout. 

      In 1865 he was elected state's attorney for Orleans county, and reelected in 1866. He represented Barton in the legislature in 1868, 1869, 1870, and 1874. In 1876 he was elected senator from Orleans county and was chosen president pro tempore of the senate. 

     
      In 1880 General Grout was elected to the Forty-seventh congress from the third district. He was elected, from the second district, to the Fiftieth, Fifty-first, Fifty-second, Fifty-third, Fifty-fourth, Fifty-fifth, and Fifty-sixth congresses, always with large majorities, and during his service in congress he was one of the most active and useful members of that body. He was always in touch and sympathy with the people, and when their interests were at stake General Grout always came to their aid, and came with a purpose and zeal that rarely failed. He was the originator and main champion of the oleomargarine bill, was especially helpful in pension claims, as many an old soldier, widow, or orphan well know. In 1900 he retired from active public life and spent the most of his time upon the old farm.

      General Grout married in 1860 Loraine M. Smith of Glover. Two children were born to them, both of whom died soon after, and their mother died in 1868. The general was never married again. In 1902 he was stricken with sickness which resulted fatally. He died October 7th, 1902, aged sixty- six years. 
 

Source:  Successful Vermonters, William H. Jeffrey, E. Burke, Vermont, The Historical Publishing Company, 1904, page 125-127.

Prepared by Tom Dunn, April 2006