Obituaries - Page 5
 

Obituaries from
Navarro County, Texas


HOME


Previous Page || Obituary Index || Next Page

 

Thelma Forshaw 
Aug 11, 1921 - Dec 11, 1921

Little Girl Died At Purdon Sunday
PURDON, Dec 15, - (Sol.) - On Sunday morning, Dec 11, at 10 minutes after 2 o'clock death invaded the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Forshaw and took their daughter Telma [Thelma]. She was born August 11, 1921. She had been ill three weeks. Funeral services were held at the home by Rev. Woods, and her body was laid to rest in the Younger cemetery. Surviving are her parents Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Forshaw; one sister Mrs. Loretta Fraley, and two brothers Nolan and W. M. Forshaw, and one step-sister, Lucille Hagle; a grandmother, Mrs Emma Peden, and several other relatives and a host of friends.

Notes: 


Billy Dwane Forshaw 
Sep 13, 1935 - Sep 13, 1935

[OBITUARY - Corsicana Daily Sun]
Purden Infant Was Buried in Younger
Cemetery Saturday
Funeral rites for the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Nolan Forshaw of  the Purdon Community, who died Friday, were held Saturday Morning at 10 o'clock with Interment in the Younger cemetery. Surviving are the parents and grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Forshaw of Purdon and Mr. and Mrs. D. Z. Springer of the Pursley Community. Sutherland-McCammon Funeral Home had charge.

Card of Thanks
We with to take this method of thanking our many friends who were so kind to us in our hours of sadness in the death of our darling baby, also during the illness of our wife and daughter.  We wish to thank Bro. Johnson for his comforting words in our time of grief and thank each one for the beautiful flowers. God's richest blessings rest upon each and every one is our prayer. Mr. and Mrs. Nolan Forshaw, Mr. and Mrs. D. Z. Springer and Family.

Notes:


Alphonso Pierce Chapman, Jr.
Aft. 1920 - Sep 19, 1944

Killed in Action - Pfc. Alphonso Pierce Chapman, Jr., U.S. Army, Infantry, was killed in action in France, September 19, according to information received by his parents Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Chapman, 400 Barber street, Dallas, and his wife, Mrs. Joyce Chapman, Frost. A former resident of Frost route one, Chapman had been decorated with the Purple Heart and the Combat Infantryman's Badge. He received his training at Camp Wheeler, Ga. Other survivors include a brother and four sisters.

Notes:


Ernest W. Watkins

Killed in Action - Pfc. Ernest W. Watkins, 23, U.S. Army Infantry was killed in action in Belgium January 6, according to information from the war department received by his parents Mr. and Mrs. R. I. Watkins, Corsicana, route two. Previously wounded in action in Germany November 24, he entered the services Nov 28, 1942, and had been overseas six months. He attended the Emhouse high school and prior to entering the service was employed by Air Activities of Texas at Corsicana Field. A brother, Cpl. Robert W. Watkins now in France has been overseas 28 months.

Notes:

  • WWII
  • A copy of article with picture printed pg 417 of the Navarro County History Volume III.
  • Added 8/20/1997

Tom Conn

Staff Sgt. Tom Conn, 26, U.S. Army Infantry, was killed in action in France September 2, according to a telegram from the war department received by his wife, Mrs. Katherine Conn, Corsicana, Route No. 3. A Veteran of three years and ten months in the service, Sgt. Conn was a member of the invasion forces landing on the beaches of the Cherbourg Peninsula June 7. He had previously been stationed at Ft. Sam Houston and Camp McCoy, Wis. Prior to entering the service he resided at Wortham where he attended the Wortham high school. In addition to his wife he is survived by a daughter, Virginia Ann, aged six months; his father, Jack Conn, Wortham; a brother Julius Conn, Houston. Sgt. Conn had never seen his baby daughter.

Notes:


Linnie Evelyn Anderson

Mrs. Linne Anderson Dies At Home of Daughter
Mrs. Linnie Evelyn Anderson, 78, the mother of Mrs. R. L. Cox of 118 Branard, died at the home of her daughter at 8 a.m. Friday. Mrs. Anderson, who has been a resident of Houston for 23 years, was born in Corsicana September 8, 1849. She is survived by her daughter and a grandson, Lavey Carter Cox both of Houston. Mrs. Anderson was a lifelong member of the Presbyterian Church. Funeral services will be held at the Central Presbyterian Church at 3 p.m. Saturday. Rev. J. Elmer Ferguson and Bishop Hayes officiating. The body will lie in state at the church until time for services. Burial will be in Glenwood Cemetery under the direction of the Fogle-West Company.

Notes: 

  • Added 9/14/1997

Thomas Mitchell Anderson III 
May 11, 1856 - Feb 12, 1922

T. M. Anderson

T. M. Anderson, an old resident and highly esteemed citizen of the Pursley community, died Sunday morning at his home. Mr. Anderson had been in bad health for some time and while he was not confined to his bed until a short time before his death, those near him were aware that the end would come soon. Mr. Anderson was born at Mount Pisgah, only a short distance from Pursley, May 11, 1856, spending his entire life at these two places. He is survived by his wife and eight children, one of whom is Mrs. A. B. Worsham of our city, and all of whom were present at the funeral. Mr. Anderson being one of the pioneers of his vicinity, had much to do with the advancement, both socially and morally, of his community, and was a true friend of his fellowmen, especially when assistance of any kind was needed. Truly, a good man who will not only be missed by his loved ones, but by his entire community. The funeral service was held Monday morning at 10: o'clock at Pursley, conducted by Rev. J. T. McKown, assisted by Rev H. B. Clark, both of Dawson. Many friends were present at the funeral to pay a last tribute of respect to this good man.

Notes: 

  • Added 9/14/1997
  • Old Pursley Cemetery, Navarro Co., TX
  • Married Emma Josphine "Jo" Pursley on 16 February 1888 in Navarro Co., TX

--


T. M. Anderson Dead.

T. M. Anderson, an old resident and highly esteemed citizen of the Pursley community, died Sunday morning at his home. Mr. Anderson had been in bad health some time, and while he was not confined to his bed until a short time before his death, those near him were aware that the end would come soon.

Mr. Anderson was born at Mount Pisgah, only a short distance from Pursley, May 11, 1856, spending his entire life at these two places. He is survived by his wife and eight children, one of whom is Mrs. A. B. Worsham of our city, and all of whom were present at the funeral. Mr. Anderson being one of the pioneers of his vicinity, had much to do with the advancement, both socially and morally, of his community, and was a true friend of his fellowmen, especially when assistance of any kind was needed. Truly a good man has gone to his reward, a man who will not only be missed by his loved ones, but by his entire community.

The funeral service was held Monday at 10 o’clock at Pursley, conducted by Rev. J. T. McKown, assisted by Rev. H. B. Clark, both of Dawson. Many friends were present at the funeral to pay a last tribute of respect to this good man.

Notes:


Mary Page (Pannill) Hodge
May 6, 1865 - Oct 25, 1945

FUNERAL SERVICES FRIDAY AFTERNOON FOR MRS. R. L. HODGE Pioneer Resident of Navarro County Died at Chatfield Thursday.

Mrs. R. L. Hodge, aged 80 years, died at the family home in Chatfield Thursday afternoon. Funeral services were held from the family residence Friday afternoon with interment in the Chatfield cemetery. [note: actually buried in the Hodge Family Cemetery which joins the Old Chatfield Cemetery]

The services were conducted by Rev. Robert Kennaugh, rector of St. John's Episcopal Church, Corsicana, and Rev. Leslie Seymore of Ennis.

Born Mary Page Pannill, May 6, 1865 on the old Battasea Plantation near Telico, Ellis County, she was married to the late R. L. Hodge Feb. 12, 1884 and immediately moved to the home in which she passed away. She was the daughter of Major Henry Pannill of Petersburg, Va.

Notes:

---

FUNERAL SERVICES FRIDAY AFTERNOON FOR MRS. R. L. HODGE PIONEER RESIDENT OF NAVARRO COUNTY DIED AT CHATFIELD THURSDAY

Mrs. R. L. Hodge, aged 80 years died at the family home in Chatfield Thursday afternoon. Funeral services were held from the family residence Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock with interment in the Chatfield cemetery.
[note: actually buried in the Hodge Family Cemetery which joins the Old Chatfield Cemetery]

The services were conducted by Rev. Robert Kennaugh, rector of St. John's Episcopal Church, Corsicana, and Rev. Leslie Seymore of Ennis.

Born Mary Page Pannill, May 6. 1865, on the old Battasea Plantation hear Telico, Ellis county, she was married to the late R.L. Hodge, Feb. 12, 1884 and immediately
moved to the home in which she passed away. She was the daughter of Major Henry Pannill who had left Petersburg, Va., at the outbreak of the Civil War when the blockade ruined his business and went to Louisiana where he was supply and salt man for the Confederate government. When
the Mississippi river's control passed to the Federals, Major Pannill came to Texas and with Judge Ira Perkins, confederate Senator from Louisiana established the Battasea
Plantation.

Eleven Children Survive

Surviving are eleven children, F. P. Hodge, Electra; H. P. Hodge Wichita Falls; Mrs. J. B. Harper, Gilmer; L. P. Hodge, Goose Creek; J. M. Hodge, J. P. Hodge and
Mrs. O. B. Peterson, all of Chatfield; O. S. Hodge, Electra, R. F. Hodge, Brownfield; G. H. Hodge
Amarillo. and Mrs. Louise Burkhead, Dallas; and a large number of other realties, including Mrs. W. H. Hastings and Mrs. C. H. Highnote, both of Corsicana : nieces; R. H. Witherspoon and B. F. Marchbanks, both of Chatfield, and Judge William Pannill Fort Worth, nephews. Two children preceded their mother in death.

Mrs. Hodge was a public spirited and charitable woman and was a sister of the late Dr. William Pannill and late Mrs. M. S. Clayton, both of Corsicana.

Pallbearers

Pallbearers were H. R. Stewart. H. B. Bomar, Jules Kelt. William Thorp, Earl Eastering and Rod Kenner. Honorary pallbearers included Hon. William Pannill,Paine Pannill,
N. W. Pannill, F.C. Pannill, C. H. Highnote,
B. K. Marchbanks, W. H. Marchbanks, R. H. Witherspoon, Dr. Homer Bond and friends of the family.

McCammon Funeral Home directed.

Notes:

  • Submitted by Tim Childress

Robert Lewis "Dink" Hodge Sr
Dec 3, 1857 - Nov 5, 1929

PROMINENT NAVARRO COUNTY CITIZEN IS BURIED CHATFIELD

R. L. (Dink) Hodge, age 72, died at his home in Chatfield Tuesday night at 9:35 and funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the home, conducted
by Rev. A. C. Carraway, pastor of the Methodist church at Chatfield, assisted by Rev. C.B. Knight of Ennis. Burial was in the Chatfield cemetery. 
[note: actually buried in the Hodge Family Cemetery, which joins the Old Chatfield Cemetery]

Surviving are his wife, the following children, F.P. Hodge, Wichita Falls; H.P. Hodge, Wichita Falls: Mrs. J. B. Harper, Corsicana; L. P. Hodge, Barry; J. M. Hodge, Chatfield; O. S. Hodge, Archer City; J.P. Hodge, Chatfield; Mrs. O. B. Peterson, Megargel, Texas; R.F. Hodge, Pampa, Texas; G.H. Hodge, Italy; Mrs. Mack Burkhead, Chatfield, and other relatives which include Col. B. F. Marchbanks, a brother-in-law.

Waxahachie; W. H. Marchbanks. Dallas; B.F. Marchbanks, Jr., Chatfield; R. H. Witherspoon, Chatfield, nephews and Mrs. S. H. Bond, Chickasha, Okla., a niece.

Mr. Hodge was born at Chatfield in 1857 in the same house in which he died. He came from an old slave holding southern family and honored and revered the old traditions of the South. His life stamped him a true Southerner, a man of sterling character who was ever ready to do his best for the advancement of his community. He was an active worker in church and civic affairs and was well known throughout this section.

His father. Capt. Hodges came from Kentucky and purchased the old home at Chatfield and sent back for his family after the house had been built and quarters for his slaves constructed.

His family came to Chatfield In 1852. R.L. Hodge was married to Mary Page Pannil at Chatfield in 1884. Active pallbearers were, Charles Highnote, Robert Montfort, B.F. Marchbanks, W.H. Marchbanks,R.H. Witherspoon and W.P. Thorp.
All friends were honorary pallbearers.

Notes:

  • Corsicana Semi-Weekly Light
  • November 8, 1929
  • Submitted by Tim Childress

---

Robert Lewis “Dink” Hodge
Dec. 3, 1857 - Nov. 5, 1929

PROMINENT NAVARRO COUNTY CITIZEN IS BURIED CHATFIELD

R. L. (DINK) HODGE DIED AT HIS ANCESTRAL HOME TUESDAY EVENING

R. L. (Dink) Hodge, age 72, died at his home in Chatfield Tuesday night at 9:55 and funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 3 o’clock from the home, conducted by Rev. A. C. Carraway, pastor of the Methodist church at Chatfield, assisted by Rev. C. B. Knight of Ennis. Burial was in the Chatfield cemetery.

Surviving are his wife, the following children, F. P. Hodge, Wichita Falls; H. P. Hodge, Wichita Falls; Mrs. J. B. Harper, Corsicana; L. P. Hodge, Barry; J. M. Hodge, Chatfield; O. S. Hodge, Archer City; J. P. Hodge, Chatfield; Mrs. O. B. Peterson, Megargel, Texas; R. F. Hodge, Pampa, Texas; G. H. Hodge, Italy; Mrs. Mack Burkhead, Chatfield, and other relatives, which include, Col. B. F. Marchbanks, a brother-in-law, Waxahachie; W. H. Marchbanks, Dallas; B. F. Marchbanks, Jr., Chatfield; R. H. Witherspoon, Chatfield, Nephews and Mrs. S. H. Bond, Chickasha, Okla., a niece.

Mr. Hodge was born at Chatfield in 1857 in the same house in which he died. He came from an old slave holding southern family and honored and revered the old traditions of the South. His life stamped him a true Southerner, a man of sterling character who was ever ready to do his best for the advancement of his community. He was an active worker in church and civic affairs and was well known throughout this section.

His father, Capt. Hodges came from Kentucky and purchased the old home at Chatfield and sent back for his family after the house had been built and quarters for his slaves constructed. His family came to Chatfield in 1852.

R. L. Hodge was married to Mary Page Pannil at Chatfield in 1884.

Active pallbearers were, Charles Highnote, Robert Montfort, B. F. Marchbanks, W. H. Marchbanks, R. H. Witherspoon and W. P. Thorp.

All friends were honorary pallbearers.

Notes:


Catherine "Kate" (Persons) Talley
Nov 14, 1845 - Mar 21, 1933

MRS. KATE TALLEY DIED EARLY TODAY HOME MRS. PRINCE Pioneer Corsicana Resident will be buried Wednesday Afternoon. Mrs. Kate P. Talley, aged 87 years, widow of the late James Talley Confederate veteran, pioneer resident of Corsicana, died at the home of her daughter Mrs. R. E. Prince, 420 West Seventh Avenue, Tuesday morning at 7:30 o'clock, Funeral services will be conducted by Rev. P. Martin Baker, pastor of the Third Avenue Presbyterian church. Mrs. Talley had resided in Corsicana for more than 55 years, and was active in the Daughters of the Confederacy organization. Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Prince, Corsicana and Mrs. Annie Hood, Wichita Falls; a son Harold Talley, Corsicana; three grandchildren, three great-grandchildren and other relatives. Pallbearers will be J. S. Simkins, Ralph Steel, Will Elliott, J. N. Garitty, C. J. Knox and H. G. Gribble. The funeral will be directed by the Sutherland-McCammon Funeral Home. with burial in Oakwood Cemetery.

Notes:

  • Added 9/27/1997
  • 28 Feb 1928 Corsicana Sun Kerens Tribune
  • Her husband, James T. Talley, served in the Civil War

Lee Allison Denbow
1907 - Jul 4, 1944

KILLED IN ACTION
Pvt. Lee A. Denbow, 36, U.S. Army, infantry 90th Division, was killed in action in France July 4, according to a telegram received from the war department by his wife, Mrs. Lucile H. Denbow, 1701 1-2 Maplewood avenue. Prior to entering the service October 21, 1942, he had been employed by A. T. Smith for 14 years. A brother , Cpl. Vernon Denbow, is serving with the 5th Army in Italy.

PVT LEE A. DENBOW KILLED IN ACTION FRENCH INVASION
Pvt. Lee A Denbow, 36, U.S. Infantry 90th Division, was killed in action in France on July 4, according to a message received by his wife, Mrs. Lucile H. Denbow, 170 1-2 Maplewood avenue, from the war department. Pvt. Denbow entered the service October 31, 1942. He had been employed by A. T. Smith for 14 years prior to entering the army. A brother, Corp. Vernon Denbow, is with the Fifth army in Italy.

Notes:


Samuel Thomas Bridges, Jr.
Sept 17, 1921 - July 29, 1944

KILLED IN ACTION - Pfc. Samuel Thomas Bridges, Jr., 22, U.S. Marine, was killed in action July 28, on Guam, according to information received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. S.T. Bridges, Sr., 722 West Tenth avenue, from the war department and from another son, Pfc. Orville Clayton Bridges, U.S. Marines, also on Guam. Bridges enlisted in the Marines, Jan. 22, 1942, and went overseas, January, 1943. Surviving are his parents, Corsicana; three brothers, Pfc. Orville Clayton Bridges, U.S. Marines; Charles and Loyd Bridges, Corsicana; two half-sisters, Mrs. Mellie May, Hillsboro, and Pfc. Ora Belle Bridges, U.S. Marines El Centro, Calif.; and five half brothers, Jesse Bridges, Oakland Calif.; Allen Bridges, U.S. Navy, Maryland; S.T. Bridges, Dallas; Odell Bridges, Fort Worth and Richard Bridges, Luling.

See Also:

-----

TEXAS PFC 3 REGT. USMC WWII
RE-BURIAL SERVICE FOR PFC. BRIDGES SUNDAY AFTERNOON
Funeral services for Pfc. Samuel Thomas Bridges, 26, U. S. Marine, killed in action at Guam, July 28, 1944, are slated Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the Corley Chapel. Burial will be in Oakwood Cemetery. The rites will be conducted by Major William Carter of the Salvation Army.
Surviving are the parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. T. Bridges, Corsicana; three brothers, Clayton, Charles and Lloyd Bridges, all of Corsicana; five half-brothers, Jesse L. Bridges, Oakland, Calif.; S.T. Bridges, Kingsville; Richard Bridges, Luling and Alan Bridges, Fort Worth; two sisters, Mrs. Lona Hines and Mrs. Dorothy Whitaker, both of Corsicana; two half-sisters, Mrs. Mellie May, Hillsboro, and Mrs. Ora B. Langhlear, Lynn, Mass., and other relatives.

Notes:

  • Corsicana Daily Sun - Saturday, April 17, 1948
  • Submitted by Karen Rost
  • Death records and his headstone show his death as July 29 - Reburial in Oakwood Cem. was April 18, 1948

John Claud Willis

KILLED IN ACTION - T-Sgt. Claud Willis, 23, U.S. Army, 23rd infantry, Second Division, Third Army, was killed in action in France August 31, according to information from the war department received by his parents Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Willis, 101 South Thirty-fifth street. First reported missing on August 31, he was later confirmed dead on the same date. Entering the service October 17, 1940, Sgt. Willis was stationed at Ft. Sam Houston for two years and later transferred to Camp McCoy, Wis. in Nov. 1942. His division was shipped overseas to Northern Ireland in Sept. 1943, later transferred to England from where his division took part in the invasion of France on D-Day. Two brothers in the service are Scott Willis now home on furlough from overseas duty and Howard Willis stationed in New Guinea.

Notes:


Sgt. David Clifton McNeel
Apr 3, 1914 - Sep 16, 1944

KILLED IN ACTION - Sgt. David C. McNee, 31, U.S. Marine Corps, was killed in action Sept 16, in the Pacific Theater of Operations, according to information received from the Navy by his father, C. H. McNeel, Emhouse. Participating in many of the major engagements in the Pacific area,g Sgt. McNeel entered the service Nov 17, 1942, and went overseas in March 1943. His wife Mrs. Maye McNeel resides at Albuquerque, N. M. He attended Pettys Chapel school and was an oil worker when he joined the Marines.

Notes:

  • Added 9/17/1997

----

Funeral Services For Sgt. McNeel Sunday Afternoon

Reburial services for Sgt. David Clifton McNeel, 30, killed in action, Sep. 16, 1944, with the first U. S. Marines in the South Pacific, were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock from the North Side Baptist Church. The rites were conducted by Rev. Jack Goff, pastor of the church. A military service by the American Legion and the Marine Reserves from Dallas was held at the grave in Oakwood cemetery.

McNeel entered the service, Nov. 17, 1942, and was awarded the Silver Star for heroism against the Japanese.

Surviving are his father and step-mother, Mr. and Mrs. C. H. McNeel, Emhouse; two brothers, Arthur McNeel, Corsicana, and Paul E. McNeel, Midland; a half-brother, Walton McNeel, Dallas; two sisters, Mrs. H. S. Crawford, Dresden, and Mrs. Woodrow Watson, Mertens; two half-sisters, Mrs. George Fields, Port Sulphur, La, and Miss Charlie Sue McNeel, Emhouse; two step-sisters, Mrs. H. P. Vyers, Emhouse, and Mrs. J. T. Carl, Houston, and other relatives.

American Legion members were pallbearers.

Corley Funeral Home directed.

Notes:


Bill Baldwin

Died of Wounds - Staff Sgt. Bill Baldwin, 30, U.S. Army, Infantry, died June 21 [1944] of wounds received in action June 19 in France.

Notes:


Pfc. James Ellis McMillan
Jan 17, 1925 - Jan 2, 1944

GRAVE OF A MARINE - Pictured above is the grave of Pvt. James E. McMillan, 19, son of Mrs. Alma Womack, 501 North Commerce Street, killed in combat somewhere in the Southwest Pacific, January 2, 1944. He volunteered for service October 20, 1942, while a senior in the Corsicana High School. The picture was sent [to] the Marine's mother by Capt. James G. Triebel, U.S.M.C. and shows only a small part of the well cared for cemetery. The name of the Corsicana Marine shows plainly in the photograph on the cross in the foreground at the left of the guard.

Notes:

  • A copy of article with picture printed pg 391 of the Navarro County History Volume III
  • Added Feb 20, 1998

----

Pfc. J.E. McMillan Body Is En Route Home For Burial
The body of Pfc. James Ellis McMillan, 19, son of Mrs. Alma Womack, 501 North Commerce street, is en route home for reburial from the Pacific area, according to a telegram received by the mother.
McMillan enlisted in the U.S. Marines Oct. 21, 1942, and was killed in action Jan. 2, 1944, at Cape Gloucester, New Britain. He was a senior in Corsicana High school when he enlisted and was in combat duty from Oct 9, 1943 until his death, engaging in campaigns in New Guinea and Cape Gloucester. He received the Purple Heart, Asiatic-Pacific campaign medal, World War II Victory medal decorations.
Surviving are his mother, a half-brother, Gene Allen Womack, Corsicana; grandfather, G.E. Ewing, Sr., Corsicana; and four uncles, G.W., H.J. and J.F. Ewing, all of Corsicana, and G.E. Ewing, Jr., Burbank, Calif., and other relatives.
Funeral rites will be conducted from the Corley Funeral chapel with burial in the Hamilton cemetery but definite time has not been determined pending arrival of the body.
Corsicana Semi-Weekly Light - Friday, Jan 14, 1949
Submitted by Karen Rost

James E. McMillan Funeral Services Tuesday P. M.
Funeral rites were held at Corley chapel here Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 for Marine Pvt. James Ellis McMillan, 19, son of Mrs. Alma Womack, 501 North Commerce, who was killed on Jan. 2, 1944, in the first Marine drive in the Southwest Pacific.
Burial was in the Hamilton cemetery, with James A. Bease, minister of the Tenth Avenue Church of Christ, conducting the rites. The National Guard and American Legion conducted full military honors, with Legionnaires acting as
pallbearers.
McMillan entered the service on Oct 21, 1942. He had been awarded the Purple Heart, World War II Victory Medal, and the Asiatic-Pacific medal.
Survivors, in addition to his mother, include a half-brother, Jean Allen Womack; grandfather, G. E. Ewing, Sr.; four uncles, G. W., H. J., J. F. Ewing, all of Corsicana, and G. E. Ewing, Jr., Burbank, Calif., and other relatives.

Notes:


William David Loftis
Nov 3, 1923 - Oct 7, 1944

KILLED IN ACTION - Sgt. William D. Loftis, 20, tail gunner B-17 Flying Fortress, was killed in action over Germany October 7, according to a telegram received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Loftis of Pursley, formerly of Corsicana, Tuesday. The telegram stated: "Report now received from German government through the International Red Cross states your son Sergeant William D. Loftis who was previously reported missing in action was killed in action seven October over Germany. The Secretary of War extends deepest sympathy Letter follows" Two brothers are in the service, Lt. Marcus Loftis, B-24 pilot, Tucson, Ariz., and Seaman First Class Chester R. Loftis, U.S. Navy, Air Forces ground crew, San Francisco, Calif. A letter was recently received by Mrs. Loftis from Mrs W. E. Hopkins, Kingsville, Texas, stating she had received a letter from another crew member that the plane in which Sgt. Loftis and her son had been seen to catch afire, but that it appeared the pilot had the craft under control. A graduate of Corsicana High School, Sgt. Loftis entered the armed forces in February 1943 and had been overseas since August 1, 1944.

Notes:


Marvin O & Wilmer H. Brinkley

Cost of War Brought Home To City With Bodies Of Soldier Brothers Laid To Rest With Full Duty Done
by Bob Campbell - Daily Sun Staff

Soldier rest! thy warfare is o'er - Sir Walter Scott.

There came back Sunday to the only sod they knew, the bodies of the Brinkley boys. Soldier brothers, these. Dead soldier brothers.

The came back home four years after. They came in bronze coffins warmed down by the American Flag. Came back for the final rites; back for a funeral service among those good people they had known, their friends; back for burial in the soil from which they came.

"The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. He maketh me to lie down in green pastures; He leadeth me beside still waters."

Marvin O. Brinkley, 31, the corporal in the air force. Wilmer H. Brinkley, 19, the private first class of that hard driving infantry that tested the soul of man. Soldier brothers, soldier sons of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Brinkley, 1817 West Collin St.

The United States Government - that's the one they died for - their family and their friends paid them final tribute Sunday afternoon on a cold, crisp day. They crowded the capacity of the Missionary Baptist Church. Here rested the flagdraped caskets banked with lovely flowers. Here stood two American soldiers, Staff Sergeant James T. Barrett and Cpl. J. T. Bybee, the guard of honor.

There was slow piano music, and then the choir in muted voices. The Rev. Jack Bell, pastor of the Corbet Baptist church, walked to the pulpit.

He read the 23 Psalm, that message of David. Velvety words read slowly for two of the Cotton Mill boys who weren't in long enough to accomplish the step into eternity.

"He restoreth my soul; He guideth me in the paths of righteousness for his name's sake."

The Rev. A. J. Kirkland, pastor of the Missionary Baptist church, arose. He prayed. Twelve members of Johnson-Wiggins Post No. 22, American Legion, removed their navy blue and gold caps and held them in their laps.

"We come in the humblest [mannor] we know how..." said the pastor. The Legionaries replaced their little caps. The choir sang "God Will Take Care of You."

"These were our own boys," the pastor said. "They went to the war from our church. They were just like other ordinary American boys. Yet they gave the supreme gift for our [liberty]. They gave their lives for their friends. 'May the time never come when we cease to remember them and what they did for us ...

"Look upon Old Glory. Remember the price we have paid for the liberty, love and happiness it symbolizes. "God grant that we will never forget ...."

The choir sang "In the Sweet Bye and Bye." There to the right of the pulpit rested all that was left of the infantryman. D-Day on Normandy was death day for Wilmer. On that blood soaked, mine bristling, windswept, lead-swept and death swept beach that tore the heart out of the American soldier, Pfc. Brinkley got His. He died two days later on Aug 15, 1944.

To the left was the casket with the Remains of the Air Force corporal. He didn't see much of foreign lands. A month after he landed in Italy he was down for keeps. On Nov 20, 1944, this gunner on a bomber died over the sunny land. To the left and to the right of the pastor were two of "our boys".

"Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil; for thou are with me. Thy rod and thy staff, they comfort me ...."

The Rev. Obie Barton, pastor of the Fellowship Baptist Church, faced the crowd.

"Here," he said, "we did not see the war. But in the last two years we have seen the price paid for it." This pastor picked up the message of the 23rd Psalm again.

"They wanted not for His nearness in the time of battle," he said. "And they wanted not for it in time of death."

The pastor added: "Sin is to blame for this scene here this afternoon...." "We call this a reburial," he said. "But I am saying to you that they never died. Though they fell in battle and their bodies were laid to rest, the soul cried out: "Though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil; for thou art with me/"

He looked down upon the flags. "They, too fought the good fight, They finished a course. They kept the faith." He turned to the family - a large family occupying several pews. There sat the mother and the father. A brother, Chester Brinkley of Henderson; a sister, Mrs. Cecil Bondurant, of Corsicana; three little daughters of Cpl. Brinkley, Claudia, LaVerne and Nancy Ann. "They gave their lives for Democracy. They gave their lives for Old Glory that covers their caskets today. They gave it gladly." He paused for just a few seconds. "This war," he said, "did not take the rose that had blossomed and was ready to fall. It took the buds of young America from the bush before they were in full bloom. May we never forget this scene nor the price we paid to allow it to happen."

"Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies; Thou anointed my head with oil. My cup runneth over."

The two soldiers arose and took their places at attention, flanking the caskets. Down the aisles came the friends of the soldier brothers who knew nothing about draft evasion, or deferments, or political commissions or discharges brought about by this and that. They came and said a final and silent farewell to boys who knew something else - - how to die.

"Surley goodness and loving kindness shall follow me all the days of my life; And I shall dwell in the house of Jehova for ever."

The cortege moved up Fifteenth St. to Oakwood Cemetery. Down the lane came two Corley Funeral Home hearses as the 12 Legionnaires stood at attention. The caskets were removed placed beneath the burial tent.

There came thru that tune of finality. The notes of "taps" glided out of the bugle. The guard of honor was at a salute. The Legionnaires stood with the flags in their hands. There came the echo, far away Overhead there soared a plane, its motors blending into the notes - the last notes - played for the Brinkley brothers.

Sgt. Barrett and Cpl. Bybee took the flags and marched to the front of the mother and the father. The sergeant, his blouse a collection of service bars and ribbons, said a few words. Just a few kind words to a mother and a father whose sons were there in front of them, dead soldiers.

Each took a flag and fondled his just a little. The soldiers saluted ad returned to their posts. The Rev. Mr. Kirkland said a final prayer. The Brinkley boys were back home.

The cemetery lost is on a little knoll Down below there runs a little creek. In the summer the redbud flourishes there. It is a flame that red bud. Year in and year out, down by the little creek just below the little knoll, the redbud splashes color.

As red as Omaha Beach was when the infantry stormed ashore to gain even so much as six inches. For the Cherbourgh peninsula was red with blood that terrible day in history. As red perhaps as the sun over Italy that fatal hour in November when the flames of war reached out and touched the corporal and completed his mission - death.

Notes:

  • A copy of article with picture printed pg 424 of the Navarro County History Volume III.
  • Nov 20, 1944 & Aug 15, 1944 - Corsicana Daily Sun
  • Added Feb 20, 1998

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Fatally Wounded - Pvt. Wilmer H. Brinkley, 19, infantry died August 15, as the result of wounds received in action in France August 13, according to information received from the war department by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Brinkley, Corsicana route No. 2.  Awarded the Combat Infantry man's Badge and Bronze Star, he participated in the storming of the beaches of the Cherbourg Peninsular June 6.  A graduate of the Powell high school he entered the service Aug 11, 1943 and had been overseas since April 1944.

See Also:

--------------

Marvin O. Brinkley
Died 1944

December 9, 1944
Killed in Italy
CORSICANA, Texas. Dec. 9 - Cpl. Marvin O. Binkley, 31, engineer-gunner on a bomber, was killed in action in Italy November 20, according to information received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Brinkley, Corsicana, Route 2. A brother, Pvt. Wilmer H. Brinkley, 19, in the infantry, was fatally wounded in France Aug. 13.

Notes:


James Henry Hope

Mr. Hope died on Dec. 11, 1935. Pioneer Citizen of Blooming Grove is Buried Thursday James Henry Hope, age 70, died suddenly at his home Wednesday morning at 9:30 o'clock. Funeral services were held at the Central Baptist church Thursday at 2 p.m. with Rev. Monroe Gardner officiating. Burial was made in the Rose Hill cemetery. Mr. Hope was born August 16, 1865 in Indiana and came to Texas when 16 years old. On Christmas Day, 1889, he was married to Lula Dorsey. To this union seven children were born, five with his wife survive: Mrs. A. J. Crocker, Blooming Grove: Mrs. John Martin, Itasca; Aubrey Hope, Dallas; Gordan Hope, Blooming Grove; J. D. Hope of Oklahoma.

Mr. Hope had been one of our leading farmers for many years. He was a loving husband and father, and a loyal member of the Baptist church. The Times extends sincere sympathy to his loved ones. Pallbearers were: Jim Carroll, Ed Glenn, Will Reid, Roy Langston, Harry Dillingham and R.D. George. The funeral services were directed by McCarmick Funeral Service.

Notes:

  • Blooming Grove Times, Friday, December 13, 1935
  • Mr. Hope was my great-grandfather, his son Gordon Hope being my paternal Grandfather. My Grandmother, Mamie Thompson Hope was also from a early family in your area. Her parents were William (Bill) Thompson and Sudie Reynolds Thompson. The lived in the country outside of Blooming Grove. Mrs. Arthur Crocker (Katie) mentioned in the above obituary, lived in Blooming Grove until her death about 1980. Submitted by Brenda Hope Dahlberg

Leander Levalcus "Valkie" English
Sep 14, 1868 - Jun 13, 1928

Dallas Times Herald - Thursday, June 14, 1928 pg ELEVEN
Leander L. English
The body of Leander L. English, 39, a resident of Frost, who died at a hospital here Wednesday was sent to Hillsboro Thursday for burial. He is survived by his wife and a son, C.O. English of Dallas.

Notes:



FROST RESIDENT DIED WEDNESDAY DALLAS HOSPITAL

FROST, June 14. (Spl.)—Funeral services for L. L. English, age 60, who died in the Baptist Sanitarium in Dallas following an operation Wednesday, were held at Frost at 4 o'clock Thursday afternoon in the Methodist church, with Rev. C. E. Diltz conducting the rites.

The deceased is survived by a wife and six children.

He was a resident of Frost for many years, residing about three miles south of the town. He became ill last Friday and was taken to Dallas and underwent an operation.

Notes:


Laura Paralee (Sessions) McGee
Jul 25, 1856 - Dec 20, 1942

Mrs. J. A. McGee died Sunday night; burial be in Rice

Mother Mrs. J. B. Fortson was native of Navarro County. Mrs. J. A. McGee, age 86 years, died at 10 o'clock Sunday night at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. B. Fortson, 220 North Fourteenth Street. Funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the Methodist church in Rice. Rev. E. F. Bohmfaulk, assisted by Rev. C. O. Hightower, will conduct the rites. Burial will be in the Rice cemetery.

Mrs. McGee was a native of Navarro County. She was the daughter of Isaac Boone and Rachel Minerva Hammonds Sessions and was born July 25, 1856, in the Sessions community near Rice. She attended school at Chatfield and later at Marvin College in Waxahachie. Joining the Methodist church at Chatfield at the age of 12 years, she had been an active member of that denomination since that time and had also taken an active interest in civic and social affairs of Rice and Corsicana.

She married Dr. J. A. McGee of Rice on January 24, 1878, and made her home in Rice until 1928 when she moved to Corsicana to make her home with her daughter. Dr. McGee died in 1905. Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Lyda McGee Fortson, Corsicana; Mrs. Roxie McGee Collins, Ennis; two sisters, Mrs. J. A. Lackey of Rice and Mrs. H.P. Barkley, Ennis; a brother, Dr. I.P. Sessions, Rockdale; seven grandchildren, John Murray McGee, Beaumont; Joe B. Fortson Jr., Corsicana; Mrs. Eliot a. Johnston, Corsicana; James Edwin Fortson, student at the University of Texas, Austin; Mrs. Arley McCarson, Ferris; James McGee Collins, aviation cadet at Hondo; Virgil A. Sanders, Lexington, Ky.; five great grandchildren, Marylyn and Natalie McGee, Beaumont; Judith Johnston, Corsicana; Lyda Gayle Fortson, Corsicana; Joe B. Fortson III, Corsicana; a number of nephews and nieces and other relatives. Pallbearers will be Hiram Bartley, Claude Hervey, Tom Queen, Tom Fortson, Clarence Mahaley, Byron South, Scott Swafford, Arthur Caldwell, B. H. Clark and A. R. Jackson. Honorary pallbearers will be friends of the family. Sutherland-McCammon is directing the arrangements.

Notes:

  • Added March 4, 1998
  • Date of death: 20 Dec 1942, Corsicana, TX

----

RITES ON TUESDAY FOR MRS. J. A. M’GEE FROM RICE CHURCH

Funeral services for Mrs. J. A. McGee, age 86 years, who died Sunday night at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Joe B. Fortson, here, were held Tuesday afternoon at 3 o’clock from the Methodist church at Rice. Rev. E. F. Bohmfalk assisted by Rev. C. O. Hightower, conducted the rites. Burial was in the Rice cemetery.

Mrs. McGee was a native of Navarro county, having been born in the Sessions community near Rice. She was one of the leaders in church, social and civic affairs in Corsicana and Rice for many years.

Surviving are two daughters, two sisters, a brother, seven grandchildren, five great grandchildren a number of nephews, nieces and other relatives.

Sutherland McCammon directed the arrangements.

Notes:


John Titus Fortson 
Feb 4, 1870 - Aug 1, 1938

John T. Fortson, financial leader, died here Monday Funeral services scheduled Wednesday morning at 10:30 o'clock John T. Fortson, aged 68 years, life-long resident of Navarro County, financial leader, died at his home, 1914 West Third avenue Monday night at 8:30 o'clock after a short illness. He had been in ill health for some time.

Mr. Fortson was a member of the firm Fortson Brothers, owners of the extensive Fortson ranch along Chambers creek between Corsicana and Rice and other real estate, bank stock and other properties. He was a director of the Trinity River Canalization organization and was connected with many corporations and organizations.

He was born near Rice and made his home in Rice until he moved to Corsicana about 15 years ago. He was married to Miss Viola Haynie of Rice in 1903. Surviving are his wife, Corsicana; two brothers, Joe B. Fortson, Corsicana, and Tom Fortson, Rice; five sisters, Mrs. John Matthews, Athens; Mrs. T. D. Queen, Rice; Mrs. R.F. Bartlett, Rice; Mrs. Ida Harper, Rice; and Mrs. W. S. Hollister, Dallas, and a number of nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will be conducted Wednesday morning at 10:30 o'clock from the First Methodist Church. Rev. Roy A. Langston, pastor of the church, will conduct the rites. Interment will be in Oakwood Cemetery. The first National Bank will be closed during the funeral hour. Pallbearers will be Odie Burke, Arthur Elliott, Wesley Edens, Arthur Caldwell, Hiram Bartlett, Billy Murchison, Claude Hervey and John Murchison.

Sutherland-McCammon Funeral Home is directing the arrangements.

Notes:

  • Added March 4, 1998

Fannie Charity (Walker) Loop 
Nov 2, 1868 - Oct 4, 1942

MRS. FANNIE LOOP DIED RICE SUNDAY; BURIAL MONDAY

Mrs. Fannie Walker Loop, aged 73 years, widow of the late D. M. [David Marion]

Loop, died at the family home in Rice Sunday morning [4 Oct 1942] following a short illness. Funeral services weer [sic] held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the First Baptist church in Rice with burial in the Rice cemetery. The rites were conducted by Rev. W. H. Day and Rev. C. O. Hightower. Surviving are four daughters, Mrs. Carl [Fay] Heather, Rice; Miss Kellie Loop, librarian, Dallas; Mrs. R. F. [Dorothy] Bartlett, Jr., Fort Knox, Ky., and Mrs. Hugh [Hazel] Gallemore, Fort Worth; three grand children, and two brothers, E. B. [Ethelbert Barksdale] Walker, Ennis, and H. S. [Hiram Street] Walker, Mobile, Ala., and other relatives. Pallbearers were T. D. Queen, Bob Mahaley, W. C. Mahaley, Byron Harwell, Jeff Harwell, M. E. Cummings. Corley directed arrangements.

Notes:


Navarro County TXGenWeb
© Copyright March, 2009
Edward L. Williams & Barbara Knox