John Gore Pension from Revolutionary War

John Gore Pension from Revolutionary War

Transcribed by Paula Swallows Stover

(spelling and punctuation as it appears in original)

 

Declaration

In order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress of the 7th of June 1832

State of Tennessee

Overton County

 

On this _______day of _____ 1833 personally appeared before the county court and court of pleas and quarter sessions for said County of Overton in said state of Tennessee John Gore Esq. ages seventy two years on the 18th day of March last (1833) having been born on the 18th day of March 1761 in Shanandoah County in the State of Virginia who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832 in that he enlisted in the Army of the United States on the 26th day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy nine (1779) for three years in the first Virginia Regiment of light dragoons then under the command of Colonel Headrick Bland as a private soldier and which Regiment was afterwards commanded by one Colonel White. Lieutenant (afterwards Captain) Green commanded the company in which he enlisted at Albemarl Barracks in the State of Virginia. He was acquainted with Col. Headrick Bland Col White Col Washington Major Jimmeson Captain Belfield Captain Watts Captain Yancy Captain Greene Captain ___ Col Bluford L___ Col Haws besides others not now remembered after he enlisted he was marched from Albemarl Barracks to Wenchester where they wintered  in the spring they set out for the south and were marched from place to place untill they arrived at Laneas Ferry on the Santee River in South Carolina on the march they were near Monks Corner when some of the men met with a ___ defeat from the enemy at Laneas Ferry we found Col Bluford and Lieut Col Haws Bluford ordered Col Whites command to cross the river in search of the enemy he Bluford promising to send to our aid over the river 500 men and some artillery if needed  when we crossed the river we could hear no intelligence of the enemy untill Col White and Major Jimmeson  with servants in disguise went among the tories where they received information of the British they were thereby enabled to surprise a foraging party

of the British at the house of one Harris which was commandeered by a British Col named Ash or Nash the Col with sixteen privates and Sergeant & Harris(?) were taken. The Sergeant and Harris made their escape and went and informed Col Tarleton of British Army the sequel may be regrouped as we retreated to the ferry with all the haste we could; when we got to the ferry we could not obtain a boat for some hours when the boat came the prisoners and a Sergeant was put in it to cross the river and as they were putting off from the shore the British came up shot the Sergeant in the head and took the prisoners a battle ensued in which we were sorely defeated after losing all our horses with thirteen men killed and wounded I with five others secured ourselves in a swamp close by the battle ground untill covered by the night we made our way up the river in the nighttime to a house some distance off on the river at which we called and obtained some refreshments there we found Captain Mamay and some men from Col Washingtons regiment as well as now remembered here we obtained an old frail canoe and crossed the river being thirteen in number when we crossed we went to Georgetown in South Carolina some twenty miles from where we crossed the river where we met with Col White and Major Jemmison who saved their lives at the time of the defeat by swimming the river with others of our regiment we remained here some days it being in the month of May 1780 I  ___ a report said at the time that Col Haws ___ to his ___ to Col Bluford beging him to send us boats on the river but which Bluford refused to do from some  ___ at the time believed to be a bad one so it was from the damage and exposure there or elsewhere I very nearly lost my life by sickness---from Georgetown we were marched to Halifax in North Carolina where we arrived in the month of July 1780.  Here I was taken to my bed sick on the 25th day of July and there remained confined until the 13th day of January 1781—on which day I set out in a wagon for Staunton in the state of Virginia, where I remained untill the month of May 1781—at which time I was wholly unable to perform duty of any kind when it was believed by all to be the best to send me home to my fathers upon furlough until I would be able for duty.  I accordingly was sent home from Staunton where I remained for two years after the term of my enlistment had expired wholly unable to do a thing—I felt willing at all times upon the restoration of my health to return to the service and considered myself a private soldier in the Army of the United States liable to be called in at any time when able to do duty until the term for which I enlisted expired and which expired the 26th day of October (1782) seventeen hundred and eighty two, I never received a discharge from the proper officer being still unable to see any thing about it. This decl__ now and for many years past has laid in the County of Overton in the State of Tennessee. He respectfully wishes every claim cohation to a pension or an annuity except the present and he declares that his name is not on the Pension Roll of any agency in any state or country.

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

 

 

 

Elizabeth Gore Widow’s Pension Application

 

Declaration

 

In order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress of the 4th July 1836

State of Tennessee

Overton County    

On this 3rd day of May 1838 personally appeared before the county court of said county being a court of __ and Elizabeth Gore resident of the United States in the County of Overton and State of Tennessee aged abut seventy eight who being first duly sworn according to law doth on her oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provisions made by the Act of Congress July 1836 that she is the widow of John Gore that her husband the said John Gore enlisted in the Army of the United States on the 26th day of October in the year of our lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy nine (1779) for three years in the first Virginia Regiment of light dragoons then under the command of Colonel Headrick Bland as a private soldier and which regiment was afterwards commanded by one Colonel White Lieutenant (afterwards Captain) Green commanded the company in which he enlisted it being the third troop called the enlisted at Albemarle Barracks in the State of Virginia he was acquainted with Col Bluford  Col White Col Washington Maj Jemmeson Captain Belfield Capt Watts and a number of other officers after he enlisted he was marched from Albemarle Barracks to Wenchester where they wintered  in the spring they set out from the south and were marched from place to place until they assisted at Lan__ Ferry they found Col Bluford and Lieutenant Col Haws   Bluford ordered Col Whites command to cross the river in __of the enemy he Bluford promising to send to them aid ___  the ___ 500 men and some artillery if needed & when they crossed no intelligence could be had of the enemy until Col White and Maj Jemmison with servants in disguise went among the tories where they received information of the British at the house of one Harris which was commanded by British Col __ Ash or Nash  The Col with sixteen privates a sergeant & Harris were taken the sergeant & Harris made their escape and went and informed Col Tarleton of the British Army  The American Army retreated to the ferry with all the haste they could when they got to the ferry they could not obtain a boat for some time when the boat came the prisoners were put in it to cross and as they were putting off from the shore the British came and took the prisoners  a battle ensued in which the Americans were defeated  The said John Gore with few others ___ themselves in a swamp until covered by the night they made their way up the river to a house there they found some men from Col Washington Regiment here they got a canoe & crossed the river they went to Georgetown in South Carolina twenty miles from where they crossed the river here they met with Col White & Maj Jemmison  They remained there several days it being in the month of May 1780. The said John Gore very nearly lost his life by sickness from Georgetown They went to Halifax in North Carolina where they arrived in the month of July 1780 here the said Gore was taken to his bed sick on the 26th day of July and thence remained confined until the 13th day of January 1781 on which day he __ in a wagon from Staunton in the State of Virginia where he remained until the month of May 1781 at which time he was wholly unable to perform duty of any kind when it was believed by all to be best to send him home to his father  upon furlough until he would be able for duty and accordingly he was sent home where he remained two years after the term of his enlistment had expired wholly unable to do anything—He felt willing at all times upon the restoration of his health to return to service and considered himself a private soldier in the Army of the United States able to be called on at any time when able to do duty until the time for which he enlisted expired and which expired on the 26th day of October 1782 Seventeen hundred and eighty two  He never received any discharge from the proper officers being unable to do anything about it – this declorant states that personally before her said husband died he got General John B. Rogers(? to prepare his declaration for a pension which he done but before he could be sworn to it he departed this life

The above statement of the enlistment and service of her said husband is copied from said declaration that together with what she has always heard him say about his enlistment and service in the Army of the Revolution are the facts and reasons upon which she makes the foregoing statement. She unhesitatingly believes every word of it to be true

She further declares that she was married to the said John Gore on or about the 25th day of December 1781

That her husband the said John Gore died on the 7th day of April 1834 and that she has remained a widow even since that period as well