Drumore news

November 11, 1762 The Pennsylvania Gazette

RUN away, on the 27th of last Month, from the Constable of Drumore Township, Lancaster County, one John Black, who was committed on Suspicion of feloniously stealing a Mare, the Property of a certain James Wallace: Had on when he went away, a Snuff coloured Thickset Coat, brown Jacket, and coarse Trowsers; about 22 Years of Age, wears his own Hair, of a light brown Colour, and fair Complexion. Whoever takes up and secures said John Black, in any of his MajestyGoals, or so as the Subscriber may have him again, shall have Five Pounds Reward, and reasonable Charges, paid by DAVID CHIRRY.


February 14, 1760 The Pennsylvania Gazette

To be LETT, A LOT of Ground, lying in Drumore Township, Lancaster County, containing 25 Acres, with a good Dwelling house, and Office houses, lying on the Great Road leading from NelsonFerry to Christeen, and the Great Road from Maryland, and divers other Places, to Lancaster, goes by said Horse: And as it is now under License, it is thought to be one of the best Places for that Occupation, and Store keeping, that can be had in that Part of the Country. Any Person inclining to view the said Lot, by applying to the Subscriber, living near the Premises, may know the Terms. WILLIAM MOORE. N.B. The House is clear, and ready to be entered on.


October 9, 1755 The Pennsylvania Gazette

TO be SOLD, A Plantation, containing 300 acres of land, well timber, situated on the western branch of Octerara creek, in Drumore township, Lancaster county, forty acres of said land cleared, sixteen of which is now under wheat, sixteen acres of very good meadow made, and upwards of an hundred acres more may be made, with a good dwelling house, barn, stable, and other outhouses, and a fine merchant mill, with two pair of stones, and all other things thereto belonging, in good repair; she has a strong stream of water, and a good dam; there is great custom either to buy or boult, being within twenty eight miles if Christeen landing, and only five miles from either Presbyterian or Quaker meetings. Any person inclining to purchase said premises, may apply to the subscriber, living on the same, and my expect to be dealt with on reasonable terms. MATTHEW BROWN.


July 20, 1796 The Pennsylvania Gazette

ALL persons having any legal demands against the estate of JAMES GAMBLE, late of Drumore township, Lancaster county, and state of Pennsylvania, deceased, are requested to produce them for payment; and any persons indebted to said estate are requested to ake payment of their respective debts. JAMES MORRISON, Administrat. ROBERT MAXWELL, Jan. 26, 1796.


October 10, 1865 VILLAGE RECORD

Marriage On Fifth day evening, 10th Month 5th, at the house of the bridefather, by Friends'ceremony, WILLIAM M. HAYES, Esq., of West Chester, Pa., to RACHEL H. RUSSELL, daughter of John N. Russell, of Drumore township, Lancaster county, Pa.


July 17, 1860 VILLAGE RECORD

Marriage On the 26th ult., by the same, Mr. WM. McCONNEL, of Upper Oxford, Chester county, to Miss LIZZIE JANE AITLER, of Drumore, Lancaster county.


September 14, 1858 VILLAGE RECORD

Death Notice At her residence in Drumore township, Lancaster county, on the 15th of 8th month, ESTHER T. STUBBS, (formerly of Oxford, Chester county) wife of Ellwood Stubbs, aged 40 years.


March 2, 1858 VILLAGE RECORD

Death Notice On the 15th ult., after a severe attack of inflamation of the brain, HADLEY PENNOCK, of Drumore, Lancaster county, aged 47 years.


March 3, 1857 VILLAGE RECORD

Marriage Sept. 30. by Elder J. Perry Hall, Mr. DAVID WILKINSON, of West Nottingham, Chester county, to Miss SARAH RUSSEL WATSON, of Drumore, Lancaster county.


February 26, 1856 VILLAGE RECORD

Marriage By Friends'Ceremony, at the house of Daniel Kent, on the evening of the 24th ult., ISAAC B. SHOEMAKER, of Drumore township, Lancaster county, to ANN ELIZABETH KENT, of West Fallowfield township, Chester county.


March 4, 1856 VILLAGE RECORD

Marriage By Friends Ceremony, at the house of Daniel Kent, on the evening of the 24th ult., ISAAC B. SHOEMAKER, of Drumore township, Lancaster county, to ANN ELIZABETH KENT, of West Fallowfield township, Chester county.


May 5, 1855 VILLAGE RECORD

Death Notice On Fifth-day (Thursday,) evening, 4th month, 26thg, of bronchitis, ELIZABETH C. WELLS, wife of Hughes Wells, of West Philadelphia, and daughter of Joseph and Achsah Cox, formerly of Drumore, Lancaster county, in the 37th year of her age.


October 1, 1844 VILLAGE RECORD

Marriage On Thursday the 12th inst., by Mitchel Carpenter, Mayor, Mr. GEO. T. CLARK, of Drumore township, Lancaster county, to Miss HANANH E. BAILEY, of West Marlborough township, Chester county.


March 28, 1843 VILLAGE RECORD

Marriage On Tuesday evening, the 14th inst., by the Rev. A. Babbit, Rev. JAMES LATTA, of Octorara, Chester county, to Miss ELIZABETH SHIPPEN, daughter of the late Robert Shippen, Esq. of Drumore, Lancaster county.


May 2, 1827 VILLAGE RECORD

Marriage On Thursday the 19th ult. by the Rev. Mr. Groff, Mr. GEORGE LEWIS, of Little Britain, to Miss MARGARET KING, daughter of Joshua King of Drumore, Lancaster county.


February 28, 1827 VILLAGE RECORD

Marriage On the 22d inst. by Wm. F. Van Amridge, Esq. Mr. LEWIS BAILEY, of Upper Oxford township, Chester County, to Miss MARIA PUSEY, of Drumore township, Lancaster county.


January 24, 1821 VILLAGE RECORD

Marriage At West Chester, on the 16th ult. by the Rev. Mr. Todd Mr. JOHN PUSEY to Miss HANNAH H. HOUSEKEEPER, both of Drumore township, Lancaster county.


October 18, 1780 The Pennsylvania Gazette

WHEREAS AGNES PATTERSON, wife of John Patterson, in Drumore township, Lancaster county, has, without any kind of provocation, left her said husband, and probably may contract debts, imagining that I will pay them; I do hereby forewarn all persons from t sting her on my account, as I am determined to pay no debts of her contracting; as witness my hand, this first day of October, 1780.JOHN PATTERSON.


September 27, 1780 The Pennsylvania Gazette

Drumore township, Lancaster county, Sept. 23. Three Hundred Dollars Reward. STOLEN from the subscriber, living at Fishing Creek, in Chesnut Level, on the night of the 14th instant, A SORREL MARE, about 9 years old, and about 15 hands high, white mane and tail, bald face, single or wall eyes, slit in the off ear, her nose is raw ike, and is commonly scabbed, her hind feet and part of her legs white, is high in the shoulder, and seems to gloom when a stranger comes near her: She commonly trots, and has a lofty carriage, and supposed to be with colt. Whoever secures said mare and hief shall have the above reward, and for the mare only, TWO HUNDRED DOLLARS, and reasonable charges, if brought home, paid by me, JOHN DENNIS.


October 25, 1775 The Pennsylvania Gazette

RUN away from the subscriber, living in Drumore township, Lancaster county, on the 5th of September last, an Irish servant lad, named Donald Shields, a chunky, well set fellow, of a dark complexion, down look, about 5 feet 5 or 6 inches high, his hair c short before, and about 18 or 19 years of age; he had no wearing apparel on, when he went away, except an old felt hat, and a coarse shirt and trowsers. Whoever takes up and secures said servant, so that his master may get him again, shall have TWENTY ILLINGS reward, and reasonable charges, if brought home, paid by JOHN McCULLOUGH.


August 30, 1775 The Pennsylvania Gazette

CAME to the Subscriber, in Drumore Township, Lancaster County, a couple of large BULLOCKS, one ear marked, the other with a Bell on. The Owner is desired to come, prove his Property, and take said Cattle away, by WILLIAM REED.May 10, 1775.


June 29, 1774 The Pennsylvania Gazette

THREE DOLLARS Reward. RUN away from the subscriber, living in Drumore township, Lancaster county, on the 17th of June, 1774, a native Irish man, named EDWARD O HARAH, about 5 feet 6 or 7 inches high, of a redish complexion, with black curly hair, about 19 years of age, and h the brogue on his tongue; it is supposed he will change his name, as he is almost 4 years in the country, and has ran away often; but that none be deceived with him, there is on him two remarkable scars, the one on the small of his back, the other on h haunch, which he received in New Castle goal, by rolling on [ ] loft, when in the convulsion fits; had on, when he went away, a new felt hat, coarse shirt, and a new striped linen jacket, [ ] sleeves, the stripe of it a lye colour, with buttons made of he same cloth, also coarse trowsers, and half worn shoes, with copper buckles; also took with him a wallet, made of coarse cloth, with 3 pair of patched trowsers, 3 old shirts, one pair of new shoes, with two out soles on them, one coarse twilled blanke jacket, double breasted, the waft or wool blue, Whoever takes up and secures said boy, so as his master may have him again, shall have the above reward, and all reasonable charges, paid by WILLIAM McPHERSON.


July 28, 1773 The Pennsylvania Gazette

WHEREAS MARY ANTHONY, otherwise COFFEE, wife of PHILIP ANTHONY, of Drumore township, in Lancaster county, yeoman, hath eloped from her said husband (without any provocation given her) and refuseth to cohabit or live with him, but threatens to run him in ebt; and as her said husband has found her in idle and bad company, I do hereby caution all persons from crediting her on my account, as I will not pay any debt she shall contract from the day of the date hereof. As witness my hand, this 20th of July, 1 3. PHILIP ANTHONY.


June 22, 1774 The Pennsylvania Gazette

WHEREAS in pursuance of an act of general Assembly of the province of Pennsylvania, intituled, An Act for granting the sum of Sixty Thousand Pounds for the Kinguse, and for striking Fifty five Thousand Pounds thereof in bills of credit, and to provide a und for sinking the same, and by three subsequent acts for granting to his Majesty the additional sum of Three Hundred Thousand Pounds, the following tracts of located and unimproved lands have been duly rated and valued by the Assessors for the county Lancaster, the property of the persons herein after named; and whereas the owners of said tracts of land have neglected to pay the Collectors of the different townships the several undermentioned sums, which, according to the proportion thereof for sev al years past, for said tax, by the acts imposed: We, the Commissioners of the county of Lancaster aforesaid, in pursuance of said acts, do give notice to all persons that may have purchased any of the following recited tracts of land since the time of rvey, as well as the first owners of said lands, that on the 15th day of September next, at the house of Christopher Reigart, in the Borough of Lancaster, will be exposed to sale by public vendue, the following tracts of located unimproved lands, or suc part as will be sufficient to answer the said tax, and all charges accruing by reason of the nonpayment thereof, to the highest bidder. The sale to begin at ten oin the forenoon, and continue from day to day until all are sold. Given under our hands, at ancaster, the 19th day of May, Anno Domini 1774. THOMAS CLARK, SAMUEL BEAR, and ALEXANDER MARTIN, Commissioners.


Thomas McKee, 200 acres of land, in Upper Paxton township, rated at 15s. John Miller, 200 acres, in ditto, 15s. John Myer, 100 acres, in ditto, 15s. John Sippet, 150 acres, in ditto, l. 126; Jacob Shearman, 100 acres, in ditto, 15s. George Riddle, 100 a es, in ditto, 15s. William Stewart, 300 acres, in ditto, l. 126; Benjamin Speaker, 600 acres, in ditto, 4 l. 10s. Henry Young, 75 acres, in Drumore township, 5s. 7d. George Stephenson, 100 acres, in Derry township, l. 126. Christian Hershe, 200 acres, i Upper Paxton township, l l. 10s. Isaac and John Long, 150 acres, in ditto, 11s. 3d. Simon Snyder, 200 acres, in ditto, 15s. Henry Heans, 500 acres, l. 1 17 6; William Peters, 600 acres, in ditto, 2 l. 5s. John Clark, 200 acres, in ditto, 15s. Bartram Ga rath, 400 acres, in ditto, l. 3 7 6; John Snock, 150 acres, in ditto, 11s. 3d. Richard Peters, 200 acres, in ditto. 15s. David Etting, 150 acres, in ditto, 11s. 3d. Abraham Rigg, 600 acres, in ditto, l. 5 12 6; Jacob Weaver, 150 acres, in ditto, 11s. 3d Michael Miller, 200 acres, in ditto, 15s. Dennis Dougherty, 100 acres, in ditto, 15s. Ephraim Moore, 170 acres, in ditto, 13s. 6d. John Little, 150 acres, in ditto, 11s. 3d. Ludwick Brand, 200 acres, in ditto, 15s. Samuel Scott, 400 acres, in ditto, 30s Andrew Boggs, 200 acres, in ditto, 15s. Elijah Wickersham, 100 acres, in ditto, 7s. 6d. James Tilghman, 600 acres, in ditto, 45s. Frederick Pickel, 100 acres, in ditto, 7s. 6d. John Ludwick, 300 acres, in ditto, 22s. 6d. Reuben Haines, 4200 acres, in di o, 15 l. 15s. Albright Swinfort, 600 acres, in ditto, 2 l. 5s. John Kline, 1300 acres, in ditto, l. 4 17 6; George Fry, 300 acres, in ditto, 22s. 6d. Patrick Work, 200 acres, in ditto, 15s. Ludwick Vallentine, 200 acres, in ditto, 15s. John Walter, 100 res, in ditto, 7s. 6d. Caleb Way, 300 acres, in ditto, 22s. 6d.


September 20, 1786 The Pennsylvania Gazette

PHILADELPHIA. An ACT for altering and amending an Act, entituled "An Act to regulate the General Elections of this Commonwealth, and to prevent frauds therein."


WHEREAS it was enacted and provided, in and by an act of General Assembly of this commonwealth, published on the 13th day of September last, entituled "An Act to regulate the general elections of this commonwealth, and to prevent frauds therein," with d ign to prevent the commanding of irregularities and abuses during the night time, "that the general elections of this commonwealth shall begin on the second Tuesday in the month of October annually, between the hours of ten of the clock in the forenoon d one of the clock in the afternoon of the same day, and the poll whereof shall be carried on, without interruption or adjournment, until the hour of seven of the clock in the afternoon of the same day, other than the elections to be holden for the city nd county of Philadelphia, the poll whereof shall be carried on, without interruption or adjournment, until eight of the clock of the same day, and no votes shall be received afterwards:" And whereas divers freemen of the city of Philadelphia have, by their petition to this General Assembly, represented, that at the last general election which was holden for the said city, on the second Tuesday which was in the month of October last, the our so as aforesaid limitted for closing the poll of the same election was found to be very prejudicial to the rights of the legal electors, and that many of the same electors, by the shortness of the time so as aforesaid allowed for the holding of the me election, were excluded from giving their votes, and thereby greatly aggrieved: And whereas the limitting of the elections aforesaid to any hour whatever, at which time the poll thereof shall be closed, and after which no more votes shall be taken, has a tendency to abuse, by tempting the officers who may be employed in holding suc elections to misspend the time so allotted for holding the same: And whereas divers other alterations in the aforesaid act are deemed expedient: Be it therefore enacted, and it is hereby enacted by the Representatives of the freemen of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, in General Assembly met, and by the authority of the same, That from and after the publication of this act, at every of the gene l elections aforesaid or at any special election to be holden for electing a Representative or Representatives, to sit in the General Assembly, or of a Counsellor, the same election shall be holden and continue, without interruption or adjournment, unti the qualified electors who shall come to the same election shall have full opportunity to give in their respective votes. And whereas it was also enacted and provided by the said recited act, "that the justices of the peace of the city of Philadelphia, and the several counties, at their general quarter sessions, shall nominate three able and intelligent freeholders, residi within the district of any county which is divided into districts for the purpose of holding elections, or otherwise residing within the county, as judges of elections to be holden in each district or place as aforesaid; And whereas it is expedient that the appointment of the judges of the election should be by inspectors legally chosen: Be it therefore enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the inspectors who shall be chosen, in pursuance of the said act, for the city of Philadelphia, or a majority of them, shall, on the morning of the day of any election, at their meeting in the pla appointed for holding the election in the said city, choose and take to their assistance six respectable and discreet freeholders, who shall be the judges of the election for the said city: And the inspectors chosen in any other district, or a majority f them, at their meeting on the morning of the day of any election, shall choose three reputable and discreet freeholders, who shall be the judges of the election in the respective districts. And be it further enacted, &c. That from and after the passing of this act, one inspector only shall be chosen for each township, ward or district, within the several counties of this commonwealth, except for the township of the Northern Liberties, in t county of Philadelphia, for which two inspectors shall be chosen, as heretofore. And whereas doubts have arisen upon the construction of the 31st section of the act, entituled "An act for furnishing the quota of this state towards paying the annual interest of the debts of the United States, and for funding and paying the public deb of this state," passed on the 16th day of March, in the year of our Lord 1785, whether ministers of the gospel, mechanics, manufacturers and schoolmasters, who are not possessed of taxable property, agreeably to the enumerations in the said act, shall entitled to vote at any general election: In order therefore to remove any doubts or misconstructions on that subject, Be it enacted, &c. That no minister of the gospel, mechanic, manufacturer or schoolmaster, shall be considered as disqualified from giving their votes at any general election, account of nay exemption from taxes in the said act. And whereas the election districts by law established in the counties of Philadelphia, Chester, Lancaster, York, Cumberland, Bedford, Northumberland, Westmoreland and Dauphin, are found to be inconvenient: Therefore be it enacted by the authority afores d, That the elections for the county of Philadelphia, exclusive of the city of Philadelphia, shall hereafter be holden in three districts, viz. The freemen of the district of Southwark, and of the townships of the Northern Liberties, Moyamensing, Passyu , Blockley and Kingsessing, shall hold their elections at the State-House in the city of Philadelphia: The freemen of the townships of Germantown, Roxborough and Bristol, shall hold their elections at the Union School-house in Germantown: And the freeme of the other townships in the said county shall hod their elections at the house of John Barnefly, in Bustletown, in the township of Lower Dublin. And be it further enacted, &c. That the elections for the county of Chester, which for that purpose shall be divided into four districts, shall be holden at four places, viz. the freemen of the townships of Goshen, East Bradford, West Bradford, West Tow Concord, Thornbury, Birmingham, Edgemont, East Town, Kennet, Pennsbury, Newlin, East Fallowfield, Willistown, and Bethel, being the first district, shall hold their elections at the Court-house in the township of Goshen; the freemen of the townships of redyffrin, West Whiteland, East Caln, West Caln, West Nantmill, East Nantmill, Charlestown, Uwchland, Pikeland, Vincent, Coventry and East Whiteland, being the second district, shall hold their elections at the sign of the Red Lyon, in the township of U hland; the freemen of the townships of Londongrove, London Britain, Londonderry, New London, New Garden, East Marlborough, West Marlborough, East Nottingham, West Nottingham, West Fallowfield, Oxford and Sadsbury, being the third district, shall hold th r elections at Chatham, formerly called the Half-way House: The freemen of the townships of Chester, Upper Chichester, Lower Chichester, Ashtown, Middletown, Upper and Nether Providence, Ridgely, Marple, Springfield, Darby, Haverford, Radnor, Tinicum an Newtown, being the fourth district, shall hold their elections at the house of Mary Withy, in the town of Chester. And whereas there has not been any courts held at the new courthouse in the township of Goshen, in the county of Chester, and it may be doubtful where to make the returns of the district elections in and for the said county: Be it therefore enacted, &c. That the returns of the district elections in and for the county of Chester shall be made at the new Courthouse in the township of Goshen, in said county. And be it further enacted, &c. That from the henceforth the elections for the county of Lancaster, which for that purpose shall be divided into four districts, shall be holden at the four following places, viz. the freemen of the borough of Lancaster, a of the townships of Lancaster, Strasburg, Warwick, Elizabeth, Manheim, Hempfield, Manor, Conestogoe, Cocalicoe and Lampeter, being the first district, shall hold their elections at the Courthouse in the borough of Lancaster; the freemen of the township of Little Britain, Drumore, Bart, Colerain, Martick and Sadsbury, being the second district, shall hole their elections at the house of Col. James Porter, in Drumore township; the freemen of the townships of Raphoe, Donegal and Mountjoy, being the third istrict, shall hold their elections at the house of Michael Nicholas, at the Cross Roads, in Donegal township; and the freemen of the townships of Carnarvon, Brecknock, Earl, Leacock and Salisbury, being the fourth district, shall hold their elections a the house of Thomas Henderson, in New Holland. And be it further enacted, &c. That the freemen of the townships of Paradise, in the county of York, shall hold their election, at the Court-house, in the town of York, in the said county. And be it further enacted, &c. That the townships of Newtown, Hopewell and Shippensburg, in the county of Cumberland, shall be the fifth district, and the freemen of the said townships shall hold their annual election at the public school-house, in the wn of Shippensburg. And be it further enacted, &c. That the freemen of the second district in the county of Bedford shall henceforth meet and hold their annual election at the house of William Kerney, in said district; and that the freemen of the townships of Franks town a Morrison's Cove shall be henceforth the sixth district in the said county, and shall meet and hold their annual elections at the house of Lazarus Lowry, at Franks town; any law or custom to the contrary notwithstanding. And be it further enacted, &c. That the freemen of Potter's township, in the county of Northumberland, shall henceforth hold their annual elections at the house of George McCormick, in Penn's Valley, in Potter's township, and be called the fifth distric of the county aforesaid. And whereas the commissioners who were appointed to ascertain and fix the proper place for holding the Courts of justice in and for the county of Westmoreland, have fixed that the same courts be hereafter holden at Greensburg, otherwise Newtown: Be it t refore enacted, &c. That Greensburg shall hereafter be the place of election of the fifth district of Westmoreland county, and that at all future elections for the same county, the electors residing within the same district shall attend and vote at the urthouse in Greensburg aforesaid; and that the returns to be made of inspectors elect be made at the said courthouse in Greensburg, and not at Hanna's town, the act of assembly for regulating general elections notwithstanding: Provided nevertheless, Tha as the said electors may not be duly informed of the alteration of the place for holding the next ensuing election, the same be holden at Hanna's Town, as heretofore. And whereas the next courts of quarter sessions of the peace and common pleas for the county of Westmoreland happen to begin this year on the day which is appointed for holding the general election: Be it therefore enacted, &c. That all freemen of the c nty of Westmoreland, who be duly qualified to vote at the general elections of the same county, and who shall be called to attend at the same courts, as justices, jurors, attornies, witnesses or parties in any action or prosecution therein depending, sh l be allowed at the next election to deliver in their votes at Hanna's Town, to any inspector of the fifth district of the said county, the act of General Assembly for regulating general elections notwithstanding. And be it further enacted, &c. That the freemen of the fourth district of the county of Dauphin shall henceforth meet, and hold their annual election at Cline's mill, in said district; and that the freemen of East Hanover and Bethel townships, being par of the first district in said county, shall hold their annual election at the house of Matthias Henings, in Williamsburg, in Bethel township, being the fifth district. And be it further enacted, &c. That so much of the act, entituled "An Act to regulate the General elections of this Commonwealth, and to prevent frauds therein," enacted the 13th day of September, 1785, as is by this act altered, amended or supplied, sh l be and the same is hereby repealed, and made null and void. Signed, by order of the House, THOMAS MIFFLIN, Speaker. Enacted into a law, at Philadelphia on Tuesday, the 19th day of September, Anno Domini, One Thousand Seven Hundred Eighty and Six. SAMUEL BRYAN, Clerk of the General Assembly.


September 1, 1784 The Pennsylvania Gazette

For the PENNSYLVANIA GAZETTE. "The Judges of the Supreme Court shall not be allowed to sit as members of the Continental Congress, Executive Council or General Assembly, nor hold any other office; civil or military: Constitution of Pennsylvania, section 23d. To GEORGE BRYAN, Esq; one of the JUDGES of the Supreme Court, and MEMBER of the Council of Censors of the state of Pennsylvania: THE moot prefixed to this address, and your titles which follow it, will naturally prepare the reader for a train of contradictions in your conduct and character. The report of the committee of the Council of Censors, appointed to enquire whether the constitution has been preserved inviolate, to which you have subscribed your name, it is generally said was drawn up by your hand. Strange, that a man should consent o sit in judgment upon himself! That you, who held the executive power of the state for three years, should be appointed to enquire wherein the constitution was violated by the Executive Council! Where was shame? where was common decency, when you took ur seat in the above committee? If the constitution had no other defect than to permit so gross a folly, it would be sufficient to render a convention necessary, to alter it. In the preamble to your report, you have given us a laboured eulogium upon the constitution. Here, Sir, you have contradicted not only your knowledge, but your declarations upon former occasions. When the constitution was framing, you were then, I am to , vociferous in declaiming against it. You pointed out its defects, I have repeatedly heard, in all companies. You stopped your friends in the streets, and strove, by quotations from history, to excite in them a dislike of the proposed constitution. The , Sir, are facts. If you dare to deny them; I shall produce testimony that will establish them beyond the possibility of contradiction. Now, Sir, how can you reconcile this shameful prostitution of your confidence to your fears of right or wrong? Do you uppose that the Supreme being is an indifferent spectator of political good and evil? Did not your hand tremble when you composed those words, that "the frame of government established by the Convention was clear in its principles, Accurate in its form, nd consistent in its several parts?" IF this is the case, why has it been so often violated? Have the several Legislatures had an interest in making so many breaches in it? No, Sir, it is because it is not clear, accurate or consistent, that it is an im acticable system of government. It is full of contradictions and obscurities. It is deficient in accuracy, and wants even grammatical precision. Its very form is defective. Scarcely two sections that follow each other are related. All this you know full ell. You have acknowledged it over and over. Nay - you know more - you know that there is not a defect in any system of government that ever existed in the world, but what is to be found in the constitution of Pennsylvania. There is a general disposition in illiterate men to give up their judgments to men of education. Your rank too as a Judge has helped to impose your opinions upon the State. While we absolve your followers in the Committee for joining you in the report, consider you as criminal in a high degree for deceiving and seducing them. Those Gentlemen, I dare say, understand the principles of liberty perfectly, for they are matters of feeling only; but it can be no reflection upon them to say, that they are un quainted with the forms of Government. These are to be known only from books. You, Sir, have a knowledge equal to most men, of every form of Government. You know Tahiti the form of the constitution of Pennsylvania is the worst in the world. You know tha it contains in it slavery and misery. Do not recoil at those words. They were your own, I have been credibly informed, in the year 1776. If those testimonies of your former abhorrence of the constitution were not at hand, I would ask you - is it probable that a body of men assembled in a hurry, sitting amidst the distraction of war, just emerging from British habits, and as yet infants i the new science of Government, could have hit off a constitution in three or four weeks, so clear, so accurate, and so consistent, as that it could not be mended? - Does anything human carry with it such marks of perfection? Is there a single law passed ince the revolution, with all the advantages of long deliberation, that has not required, or that does not require amendments? Our constitution is an experiment in Government. Now, Sir, did you ever hear of a discovery that was complete at its birth? Re llect the progress of all our arts. Which of them came forth perfect from the hands of its inventors? these things are notorious to common sense, and the sensible part of the state believe no more in your panegyric upon the constitution, than you believ in it yourself. Hear the truth. Your triumphs, Sir, will be momentary. The people of Pennsylvania have as much good sense as their neighbors. Time and experience will soon open their eyes to see the defects of their Government. Hundreds and Thousands, who once admired e constitution, now wish to see it amended. It has made no one convert but your self, in seven years. This fact is so singular, that nobody believes you sincere in your professions of attachment to it. I should as soon believe that you had adopted all t errors of the Mahometan religion, as the absurdities of our constitution. However much you may prostitute your conscience, I maintain that you cannot prostitute your understanding. You say the "Constitution is worthy of the veneration of the good people of Pennsylvania, and of all the attachment they have formerly, and during this session of the Council of Censors, shewn to it." In what manner has this veneration and attachment be expressed? You know, Sir, the manner in which subscriptions against a Convention have been obtained. - It was not by holding up to the state the perfections of our constitution, but he evils of a worse one. The people were in some instances first infla d and deceived, and then led on to sign any thing. Many hundreds signed, under the actual command of their militia officers. Many of your remonstrances have been signed by minors, servants, and even school boys. Can remonstrances obtained in this way be fair proof of the sense of the state? Would you trust the great question of a Convention to be decided by a vote of the state, after all your success in collecting subscriptions? No, you would not. - Why then do you boast of the veneration and attachme of the people to the constitution? And further - Who are these people? Are they the most enlightened part of the state? Do they live in parts open to information on the subject of Government? However just their feelings may be to the principles of libe y held out in the constitution, do you suppose them to be qualified to judge of forms of Government? Do you suppose there is a single man in Drumore township, or any other township that has protested against the new plan of Government, that has ever rea Montesquieu, De Losme, Locke, Adams, or any of the celebrated writers upon Government? No, Sir, they are as unfit to judge of forms of Government, as you are to judge of the mechanism of a watch. But, Sir, beware how you lean upon your remonstrances, as he sense of the state. Even the people whom you have deceived are beginning to see their error. Hundreds of them have called for counter-petitions, to recant their folly. The tide is only rising; when it has reached its full height, you will hear from t m, under new and honest guides, the language of truth and common sense. Your remarks upon the overgrown and dangerous power of the late Proprietaries of Pennsylvania, however just, furnish another instance of your inconsistency. Have you forgot how many days and nights you spent in writing in defence of their Government, wh the Quakers petitioned for a Royal Charter? Hereafter (if necessary) I shall present the public with extracts from some of your publications in favor of the late Proprietary Government. How will you blush, or rather how will your adherents blush for yo when they perceive that you have been as lavish in praise of the Proprietaries, as you now are of the constitution of Pennsylvania. The various parts of the report, and all the falshoods, and contradictions contained in it, shall be the subject of some future papers. I shall only remark at present, that the amazing number of deviations you have pointed out, that have been made from the constitution, all tend only to prove that the Government is an impracticable one. It will not do to lay the blame upon designing men who violated the constitution on purpose to shew its imperfections. It has been violated oftener by its friends than its enemies. The fault is not in the state, but in the constitution. You have proved that the machine therefore will not work. When you find men perfect enough to conform in every thing to the constitution of Pennsylvania, you will find them perfect enough to live w hout any government. You have proved that the constitution is too streight for the people, or the state too crooked for the constitution. Take which side you will, and you establish the necessity of a convention.* I shall conclude this address to you, by asking you a few questions. Do you think a government is safe or perfect with only one legislature? - You do not. Do you think a government safe or free, where judges hold their commissions at the will of an Assembly? - You do not** Do you think a government safe, where foreigners of every description, even British soldiers and deserters, may elect and be elected, after one and two years residence? - You do not. Do you think a government perfect, where the executive power is lodged in thirteen hands, unequally chosen, who must be maintained at an immense expence for doing nothing? - You do not. Do you think the Council of Censors an useful, necessary or consistent body of men? Do they possess any power to do good? Is the legislature bound to obey them? Are they not an expensive and ridiculous burthen upon the state? - Yes, you know they are. Is a government a good one, that establishes or risques a convulsion by its constitution once every seven years? - You know it is not. Is a government a good one, that costs fifty thousand pounds a year, when one half, or two thirds of that sum might be saved by a few changes in the constitution? - You know it is not. Did you swear, when you accepted of the office of a judge, that you would do nothing contrary to the constitution? - Yes, you did. Do you not hold a seat in the Council of Censors, directly contrary to the 23d section of the constitution? Yes, you know you do. Will it afford you any pleasure to reflect, on your death bed, that you have gratified your revenge upon the honest men of the state, who wished for a convention, by opposing their wishes, and thereby distracting the state, contrary to your judgment, yo former declarations, your conscience, and your oath? ONE OF THE MINORITY. ----- * It is somewhat remarkable, that Mr. Bryan has neglected to point out the flagrant breeches of the constitution that were made during his administration. They were all sanctioned by the usual plea of tyrants, state necessity. In complaining of money be g ranted by resolves of the Assembly, he enumerates a great many cases that are on record in the Journals of the House, but omits two of the most capital ones, viz. a Present to Joseph Reed, of 100 l. and his own salary as a Judge, both of which were gr ted by simple resolves. ** It is to be hoped the present Assembly will act so far in conformity to their oaths, and as guardians of the constitution, as to dismiss Mr. Bryan from his seat on the bench, agreeable to the exclusive power vested in them by the constitution for tha purpose.


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