Obituaries from the Orangeville Banner for 1889

OBITUARIES FROM THE ORANGEVILLE BANNER FOR THE YEAR 1889

Source: Dufferin County Archives- N258

This page is still under construction. More obituaries will be added as I pull them out of the paper. If you have any obituaries to contribute, please email me and I will add them to this page.

STEWART

February 10,p.?:John (William) Stewart - These lines are written in memory of the late John Stewart, father of Mrs. Richard S. Younge, R.R. 1, Athlone, Ont. Mr. Stewart landed at Quegec on the ship Unicorn on the 12th of July, 1847, and was 21 year of age on the day he landed. Another passenger was Mr. Matthew Lockhart, whose grandson is now the proprietor of the former Besse Creamery in Orangeville. Also aboard the vessel was Mrs. Lamey and her family. Mrs. Robet Dunn, of Hockley, was her daughter and the latters's daughter, Mrs. Robert Parker, is now living in Toronto. Also the Anderson family, on whose farm near Relessey, the fifth generation is living at the present time. Mrs. Younge's father died at Relessey in 1889 at the age of 69 years. They all came from Six Mile Cross, County of Tyrone, Ireland. Mrs. Younge's mother's people also came to Canada in 1849 from Strabane Town and the late Henry Caldwell setted at Bandon in Adjala on the farm on which his great-grandson, Eli Pettit, now lives. Mrs. Younge has five grandsons who served in the great war - three of the Ewing family and two of the Joe Pettit family, also a granddaughter's husband, Geo. Wilson, who was a German prisoner for five months. Mrs. Younge, who is the last member of her generation of the Stewart family, celebrated her 84th birthday on May 24th, in company with Mrs. Foucar and Mrs. (Rev.) G.H. Purchase of Tottenham, whose birthdays were on May 23rd and May 25th.
These few lines are written in memory and honor of our brave settlers, who had so many hard days and nights that present day Canadains know nothing about. Peace to their ashes!

[top of page] [Dufferin County GenWeb]

Last updated: June 26, 2000
©1999-2000 Amy Menary