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Your Guide To LeFlore County Oklahoma Genealogy
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Towns and Communities - Past and Present

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Do you know of other towns or communities that were in LeFlore County, OK? If so, please email the name and location and Iíll add it to the list as soon as possible. Thanks.

  • Adkins
    Adkins was the railroad name for Farmers.1

  • Apukshunnubbee
    One of the Three districts of the Choctaw Nation. Presided over by a district chief. Named for a prominent Choctaw tribal chief.1  Capitol was Alikchi. District was located in present day counties of Latimer, LeFlore, Pushmataha, McCurtain and Choctaw.

  • Arkoma
    In northeastern LeFlore county, 1 mile southwest of Fort Smith. Post office established April 8, 1914. The name was coined from Arkansas and Oklahoma.1

  • Avakni Achukma
    Capital of Moshulatubbee District.  Name changed to Latham.3

  • Baird
    In LeFlore County near Heavener. A post office from January 28, 1892 to August 25, 1898. Named for Wilson D. Baird, first postmaster.1

  • Bell
    In LeFlore County, 12 miles south of Wister. A post office from April 13, 1891, to September 23, 1897. No longer in existence, it was named fro George W. Bell, county judge of Jack's Fork County, Choctaw Nation.1

  • Bigcedar - Big Cedar
    In LeFlore County, 15 miles south of Heavener. Post office established April 3, 1903 and discontinued Oct 15, 1943. On December 1, 1929, the offical spelling of the post office name was changed to Big Cedar.1

  • Bokoshe
    In western LeFlore County, 7 miles west of Panama. Post office established Septeber 29, 1886. The word is Choctaw for "little creek." 1

  • Bordeaux
    In northwestern LeFlore County near Milton. A post office from March 3, 1910 to February 28, 1911. Its name comes from Bordeaux, France.1

  • Braden
    In northern LeFlore County, 7 miles northeast of Spiro. A post office from September 1, 1890 to June 15, 1939.1

  • Braidwood
    In LeFlore County, 3 miles west of Wister. Post office established July 11, 1891, and named changed to Pocahontas , May 11, 1895.1

  • Brazil - Brazil Station
    In western LeFlore County, 3 miles south of Bokoshe. Post office established April 11, 1879, name changed to Brazil, May 15, 1895 and discontinued May 31, 1913. Took its name from nearby Brazil Creek.1

  • Bryan
    In LeFlore County near Victor. A post office from December 12, 1889 to October 7, 1893. Named for Luke W. Bryan, first postmaster.1

  • Bugshuffle
    Located about 8 miles east of Heavener.  [may have been just inside AR]

  • Buck Creek
    Described as being 2 miles west of Panama also as being 10 miles west of Skulleyville. The Buck Creek community had a school, but no record is found that it was ever a post office.

  • Burgevin
    In northwestern LeFlore County, 17 miles northwest of Spiro. A post office from January 31, 1890 to November 3, 1898. named for John T. Burgevin, first postmaster.1

  •  Burkhart
    In extreme southwestern LeFlore County near Ludlow. A post office from October 4, 1910 to March 31, 1927. Named for William Burkhart, early settler.1

  • Cache
    In northwestern LeFlore County near Cowlington. A post office from March 10, 1881 to October 27, 1898. It took its name from nearby Cache Creek a tributary of the Arkansas River.1

  • Calhoun
    Formerly Sutter. In LeFlore County, 8 miles northwest of Poteau. Post office name changed to Calhoun, March 7, 1914, and discontinued November 30, 1934.1

  • Cameron
    In LeFlore County, 8 miles northeast of Poteau. Post office established January 31, 1888. Named for William Cameron, mining superintendent.1 Cameron was from Scotland and was a government coal supervisor in the Choctaw Nation. Cameron was one of the earliest established towns in LeFlore County and had its beginning at the coming of the Frisco about 1886. It was the stopping point of many emigrants from Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama and Missouri. From 1896-1898 Cameron became a Federal Court Town until the court was removed to Poteau as a result of the Indian Territory Court in Fort Smith being closed. 

    Some of the oldest settlers were the Pilgreens, Boozmans, Stewart Green, Jim Gibson, John E. Smith, Sherman Chronister, father of J. S. Chronister, Hub King, Miller, Hills, Tuckers, Quay Smith, McDow, Pattersons, Hortons, Hugh Howard, Ben Spencer.4

  • Caston
    Formerly Maxey. In LeFlore County, 3 miles west of Wister. Post office name changed to Caston, November 5, 1887 and discontinued October 8, 1891. On April 18, 1898, a nearby post office named Pocahontas, at Caston Switch, changed its name to Caston; this post office was discontinued August 26, 1898.1

  • Cavanal
    In LeFlore County, 3 miles northeast of Wister. A post office from October 10, 1887 to July 15, 1901. It took its name from nearby Mount Caranal. The word is French, meaning cavernous.1

  • Cedar County
    A county of Apukshunnubee District, Choctaw Nation. Cedar County was the English equivalent of Chuala County.1

  • Choctaw Agency
    Indian agency established 1832 by Francis Armstrong at Skullyville, near present Spiro, LeFlore County. Post office established Jun 26, 1833. Agency moved to Fort Washita [Bryan County] in 1858-1859. Location of Walker's Station, a stop on the Butterfield Overland Mail route prior to the Civil War. Because of the removal of the agency, the post office name was changed to Scullyville [sic] on August 16, 1860, but was changed back to Choctaw Agency on December 14, 1860, and discontinued October 10, 1871. On December 22, 1871, a post office named Oak Lodge was established at this approximate location.1

  • Conser
    In LeFlore County, 6 miles southwest of Heavener. A post office from July 7, 1894 to July 15, 1919. Named for Jane Conser, first postmaster.1  Named for Peter Conser.3

  • Cow Creek
    In extreme northeastern corner of LeFlore County. A post office from September 14, 1912 to July 31, 1913. It took its name from nearby Cow Creek, a tributary of Mountain Fork River.1

  • Cowlington
    In northwestern LeFlore County, 12 miles northwest of Spiro. A post office from August 27, 1884 to October 31, 1953, it was named for A. F. Cowling, prominent early-day settler.1

  • Eagle County
    A county in Apukshunnubee District, Choctaw Nation.1

  • Elkins
    In LeFlore County, 6 miles east of Keota, Haskell Co. A post office from June 16, 1904 to May 31, 1912. No longer in existence, it was named for Anderson R. Elkins, first postmaster.1

  • Eureka
    In LeFlore County, 3 miles north of Poteau. A post office from March 11, 1899 to November 30, 1916.1

  • Excelsior3 -- see Tahona

  • Fanshawe
    In western LeFlore County, 10 miles west of Wister. Post office established March 13, 1891.1

  • Farmers
    In LeFlore County, 3 miles east of Shady Point. Railroad name for this town was Adkins. A post office from August 3, 1894 to November 15, 1909, it was named for P. M. Farmers, local resident.1

  • Fogel
    Formerly Howard. In extreme eastern LeFlore County, 6 miles east of Page. Post office name changed to Fogel, February 25, 1914 and discontinued February 15, 1923. Named for Carrie L. Fogel, first postmaster.1

  • Forrester
    In LeFlore County, 5 miles east of Heavener. A post office from June 8, 1915 to February 14, 1922.1

  • Fort Coffee
    Site in LeFlore County, 8 miles north of Spiro. A military post estabished in 1834 at Swallow Rock on the Arkansas River and abandoned in 1838. A post office from April 20, 1835 to September 20, 1898. The Buidings were thereafter used as a Choctaw school for boys. Named for General John Coffee of Tennessee.1

  • Gilmore
    In LeFlore County, 6 miles east of Poteau. A post office from June 30, 1890 to January 15, 1918, it was named fro Rad Gilmore, local mill operator.1

  • Glendale
    East of Wister and the site of the Mountain View Baptist Church and cemetery. Church established in 1890. Source: William Hunt

  • Green Hill
    In northern LeFlore County. Post office established February 15, 1881 and name changed to Grover, February 12, 1886.1

  • Grover
    Formerly Green Hill. In northern LeFlore County. Post office name changed to Grover, February 12, 1886 and discontinued February 25, 1888.1

  • Harrison
    Present Shady Point, in LeFlore County. Post office established September 17, 1891 and name changed to Shady Point, December 11, 1894. Named for William H. Harrison, attorney and Choctaw leader.1

  • Heavener
    In LeFlore County, 12 miles south of Poteau. Post office established May 12, 1896. Named for Joseph Heavener, local merchant.1

  • Henry
    In western LeFlore County near Walls. A post office from June 4, 1915 to December 15, 1919. Named for Henry Anderson, long-time local resident.1   Named for Amos Henry, District School Trustee, Choctaw Nation.3

  • Hill1   Hill Town3
    In eastern LeFlore County, 9 miles northeast of Poteau. A post office from April 7, 1909 to December 14, 1929. Named for Elmer E. Hill, first postmaster.1

  • Hix
    In eastern LeFlore County, 8 miles southeast of Heavener. A post office from May 1, 1915 to March 31, 1920.1

  • Hochubee
    In LeFlore County, probably in the vicinity of Poteau. A post office from January 12, 1858 to January 6, 1860. No longer in existence. The name is from the Choctaw hockukbi, meaning "cave" or "cavern," which had reference to nearby site named Cavanal, a French word with a similar meaning.1

  • Hodgen
    Formerly Houston. In LeFlore County, 4 miles south of Heavener. Post office name changed to Hodgen, April 25, 1910. Named for J. W. Hodgens, timber buyer for the Kansas City Southern Railway.1

  • Hontubby
    East of Heavener and east of Loving.3  LStacey sqaw@ipa.net writes "the small community, Hontubby was named after the Choctaw Hontubby family who had their name changed to Jefferson. Henry Jefferson, a Choctaw whose name was Hontubby. The name translates to "wait and kill" in Choctaw.

  • Houston

    Present Hodgen in LeFlore County. Post office established August 14, 1896, and name changed to Hodgen, April 25, 1910. Named for General Sam Houston, Texas patriot.1
    Probably named after Houston McCurtain.3
  • Howard
    In eastern LeFlore County, 6 miles east of Page. Post office established March 11, 1911 and name changed to Fogel, February 25, 1914.1

  • Howe
    In LeFlore County, 5 miles north of Heavener. First known locally as Klondike. Post office established May 5, 1898. Named for Dr. Herbert M. Howe of Philadelphia, director of the Kansas City, Pittsburg and Gulf Railway, now the Kansas City Southern.1

  • Kavanaugh
    In LeFlore County, 5 miles north of Wister. Post office established November 11, 1885 and named changed to Kennady, May 16, 1889. Took its name from nearby Mount Cavanal.1

  • Kennady
    Formerly Kavanaugh. In LeFlore County, 5 miles north of Wister. Post office name changed to Kennady, May 16, 1889 and discontinued July 20, 1915.1

  • Klondike

  • Kolb
    In LeFlore County, 8 miles south of Wister. Post office established February 5, 1892 and name changed to Reichert, May 7, 1892. Named for Philip Kolb, first postmaster.1

  • Kully Chaha
    In LeFlore County, 3 miles south of Cameron. A post office from February 15, 1881 to November 15, 1913. The name is the Choctaw word meaning "hot spring" and had reference to a spring high on Sugar Loaf Mountain.1  The name is the Choctaw word meaning "high spring" or "big ditch".  3

  • Latham
    Original name Avakni Achukma (Good Ground).3 In LeFlore County, 10 miles west of Shady Point. A post office from May 10, 1901 to February 15, 1918. Site of Trahern's Station on the Butterfield Overland Mail route. In 1882 a post office name Opossum had been discontinued at this same site. Named for Thomas B. Latham, United States commissioner.1 Site of Moshulatubbe District Council House.3

  • LeFlore
    A post office in western LeFlore county, established August 26, 1887. Named for the LeFlore family.1 Named for Mack LeFlore.3  Originally named Springfield.3

  • Lenox
    In LeFlore County, 5 miles east of Whitesboro. A post office from October 2, 1896 to April 15, 1913. Its name comes from Lenox, Kentucky.1

  • Lone Dove
    located about 8 miles southeast of Cowlington-Tucker junctions off of Highway 59 [DELMARHARRIS@aol.com Jan 2003] 

  • Loving
    In LeFlore County, 6 miles east of Heavener. A post office from December 2, 1908 to June 15, 1922.1Named for Loving Family.3

  • Ludlow
    In extreme southwestern LeFlore County. A post office from April 22, 1901 to November 15, 1954. Named for Edwin N. Ludlow of New York, mining engineer.1

  • Maxey
    In LeFlore County, 3 miles west of Wister. Post office established June 4, 1884 and named changed to Caston, November 5, 1887. Named for N. B. Maxey, later a Muskogee attorney.1

  • Milton
    In northwestern LeFlore County, 5 miles east of McCurtain County. A post office from June 20, 1890 to November 10, 1942. 1 Socialist Community.3  At first locally known as Needmore.2Needmore-nickname - stores never had enough supplies.3

  • Monroe
    In LeFlore County, 10 miles northeast of Heavener. Post office established February 25, 1881. Named for Simon Monroe Griffith, first postmaster.1

  • Morning Dove
    located about 3 miles due east of Cowlington-Tucker junctions off of Highway 59 [DELMARHARRIS@aol.com Jan 2003]

  • Moshulatubbee District
    One of the three districts of the Choctaw Nation. Presided over by a district chief. Named for a well known tribal chief. District was located in present day counties of Latimer, Pittsburg, Haskell and LeFlore.1   Capital was at Avakni Achukma (Latham).3

  • Mountain
    In northern LeFlore County, 6 miles northeast of Spiro. A post office from December 21, 1896 to December 31, 1907. No longer in existence. Took its name from nearby Mount Cavanal.1  Ref 'took it's name from' Barkley's states not true, it is not near Mount Cavanal.3

  • Murry Spur
    Located 4 miles east of Spiro.  Located in section 10 1N 26E.

  • Muse
    In LeFlore County, 6 miles west of Big Cedar. First post office established October 1, 1896 and named changed to Pine Valley on December 16, 1926. On May 11, 1927, another post office named Muse was established at a slightly different location.1   Named for Reverend Joseph Muse, Baptist minister.2

  • Nashoba County
    A county in Apukshunnubbee District, Choctaw Nation. The name is a Choctaw word meaning "wolf," and the county was often referred to as Wolf County. County Court was located at Nashoba. Nashoba is located in current day Pushmataha Co., OK. Nashoba County was located in current day counties of Pushmataha, LeFlore and McCurtain.1

  • Needmore - see Milton

  • New Home
    In LeFlore County, 5 miles east of Big Cedar. A post office from January 12, 1924 to February 28, 1934.1

  • Oak Lodge
    At Skullyville, 2 miles northeast of Spiro in LeFlore County. A post office from December 22, 1871 to March 31, 1917. On October 10, 1871, a post office named Choctaw Agency had been discontinued at this same site.1

  • Octavia
    In southern LeFlore County, 5 miles northwest of Smithville. A post office from October 29, 1898 to September 30, 1953. Named for Octavia Lewis, first post master.1

  • Opossum - Opposum
    In western LeFlore County, 10 miles west of Shady Point. A post office from June 23, 1881 to February 20, 1882. In 1901 a post office named Latham was established at this approximate site. Took its name from nearby Opossum Creek, a tributary of Brazil Creek, but postal records made it "Opposum."1

  • Page
    In LeFlore County, 12 miles south of Heavener. Post office established April 6, 1896. Named for William C. Page, prominent Choctaw.1

  • Panama
    In LeFlore County, 9 miles north of Poteau. Post office established January 14, 1898. Its name comes from the Panama Canal.1

  • Peno1    Peno Bottom3
    In northeastern LeFlore County, 4 miles southwest of Fort Smith, AR. A post office from March 27, 1916 to June 15, 1932. No longer in existence, it was named for a local resident of Mexican extration always known as Penocho.1  Penocha means candy in Spanish.3

  • Petros - Petros Cut
    In LeFlore County, 2 miles south of Heavener. A post office from January 21, 1898 to March 30, 1901. First known locally as Petros Cut. The name is Greek for rock, and came from the circumstance that it was Greek immigrants working on the Kansas City Southern Railway who cut solid rock for the railroad right of way.1

  • Pine Valley
    Formerly Muse. In LeFlore County, 5 miles west of Big Cedar. A post office from December 16, 1926 to August 15, 1942. Took it's name from the Oklahoma, Rich Mountain and Pine Valley Railroad.1 Pine Valley is now a ghost town.

  • Pocahontas
    Formerly Braidwood. In LeFlore County, 3 miles west of Wister. Post office name changed to Pocahontas, May 11, 1895 and name changed to Caston, April 18, 1898. Ponahontas, the young daughter of Chief Powhatan, married John Rolfe in 1614. The word is usually considered to mean playful.1

  • Pocola 
    In northeastern LeFlore County, 9 miles east of Spiro. A post office from February 15, 1881 to February 29, 1916. The name is the Choctaw word for "ten miles", the site being 10 miles from Fort Smith, AR.1 Pocola is the old home settlement of the well known Indian family of Pages. The well known Indian Burying ground known as the Page Cemetery is in this community where many prominent Indians and white pioneers are buried.4

  • Poker Bend3

  • Poteau
    County seat of LeFlore County. Record Town for Recording District No. 14, Indian Territory. Post office established October 27, 1887. Took its name from nearby Poteau River, a tributary of the Arkansas River. The word is French, meaning"post."1

  • Reichert 
    Formerly Kolb. In LeFlore County, 8 miles south of Wister. Post office named changed to Reichert, May 7, 1892 and discontinued February 15, 1927. Named for William Reichert, first postmaster.1

  • Rock Island
    In northeastern LeFlore County, 2 miles northeast of Cameron. A post office from February 1, 1905 to May 12, 1961. Presumably named for Rock Island, Illinois.1Rock Island Railroad.3

  • Sam
    In LeFlore County, 3 miles north of Heavener. A post office from July 22, 1903 to December 15, 1908. Named for Samuel Wilson, early day resident.1

  • Shady Point
    Formerly Harrison. In LeFlore County, 6 miles north of Poteau. Post office name changed to Shadypoint, [sic] December 11, 1894.1

  • Short Mountain
    Named after the mountain and was located along Highway 59 extending from the Cowlington-Tucker Junction to about 1 mile north along the highway. [DELMARHARRIS@aol.com Jan 2003]

  • Skullyville
    In LeFlore County, 2 miles northeast of Spiro. An important trade and political center among the early Choctaws. The name is a Choctaw word meaning "money town" and comes from the circumstances that annuities were paid out at the nearby Choctaw Agency. Former capital of the Choctaw Nation.1

  • Skullyville County
    Scullyville. [sic] A county in Moshulatubbe District, Choctaw Nation. Former capital of the Choctaw Nation. The post office name for the Choctaw agency from August 16, 1860 to December 14, 1860, located at Skullyville.1  more

  • Smithville -- see Octavia

  • Spiro
    In northern LeFlore County. Post office established September 21, 1898. Although there are several versions of the origin of the name, it is generally believed to have been named for Spiro Nicodemus, wife of prominent early day resident.1

  • Spiro Mound
    Famous Indian mounds located in northern LeFlore County. Partially excavated, the mounds have revealed artifacts indicating a high culture existing about 1000 A.D. Took its name from nearby Spiro.1

  • Springfield -- see LeFlore

  • Stapp
    In LeFlore County, 10 miles south of Heavener. A post office from January 16, 1918 to January 31, 1944.1

  • Stony Point
    A community about 1/2 north of Sunset Corner.  [DELMARHARRIS@aol.com Jan 2003]

  • Sugar Loaf County
    County in Conser. Located in what is now the counties of LeFlore and Latimer.1

  • Summerfield
    In western LeFlore county, 6 miles east of LeFlore. Post office established October 13, 1888. Named for local sawmill operator, whose full name appears lost.1

  • Superior -- see Tahona

  • Sutter
    In LeFlore County, 8 miles northwest of Poteau. Post office established October 18, 1899, and name changed to Calhoun, March 7, 1914.1

  • Tahona1   Excelsior3  Superior3
    In LeFlore County, 3 miles east of Panama. A post office from December 21, 1918 to December 30, 1951. Named for Hatona Morris, wife of A. G. Morris, prominent early day resident.1

  • Talihina
    In western LeFlore County. Post office established November 30, 1887. The name is the Choctaw word for railroad.1  meaning 'iron road'.3

  • Tarby Prairie
    Located one mile North of Poteau. Named for William Tarby.3

  • Thomasville
    In LeFlore County, 9 miles south of Heavener. Post office established January 25, 1896 and named changed to Zoe, June 14, 1915. Named for Marcus L. Thomas, first postmaster.1

  • Trahern's Station1   Avakni Achukma3
    Site at Latham, in LeFlore County. A stage stop on the Butterfield Overland Mail route to California which crossed southeastern Oklahoma, 1858-1861. Named for Judge3James N. Trahern, merchant and stage agent.1

  • Tucker
    In northwestern LeFlore County, 9 miles northwest of Spiro. A post office from March 30, 1895 to June 15, 1922. named for Rev. Hartwell Tucker, Presbyterian minster to the Choctaw Indians.1

  • Twilight
    A community 7 miles east of Keota and 3 miles south of Cowlington. [DELMARHARRIS@aol.com Jan 2003]

  • Victor
    In LeFlore County, 5 miles west of Wister. A post office from May 1, 1901 to October 15, 1925.1

  • Wade County
    A county in Apukshunnubbee District, Choctaw Nation. Named for Alfred Wade, prominent Choctaw. County Court was located at Lenox. Wade County was in located in present day counties of Latimer, LeFlore and Pushmataha.1

  • Wadeville
    In southwestern LeFlore County, several miles east of Talihina. A post office from November 19, 1877 to January 2, 1884. No longer in existence, it was named for Chief3 Alfred Wade, first postmaster.1

  • Walker's Station
    Site at Skullyville in LeFlore County. A stage stop on the Butterfield Overland Mail route to California, which crossed southeastern Oklahoma, 1858-1861. Named for Tandy Walker, Choctaw Chief.1

  • Wallburg
    Located in eastern LeFlore Coounty. Now Jenson, AR. Named for Thomas J. Wall.3

  • Walls
    In western LeFlore County, 7 miles north of Fanshawe. A post office from April 17, 1894 to March 15, 1934. Named for Benjamin F. Wall, first postmaster.1

  • Ward Flower Hill3
    In northern LeFlore County, 4 miles west of Spiro. A post office from June 20, 1892 to July 31, 1909. Named for a prominent Choctaw family of Spiro. Jefferson B. Ward was town mayor and J. H. Ward was county judge of Skullyville County.1 Barkley differs slightly - Jefferson D..Ward...  J. R. H. Ward.  Named for father, Jeremiah Ward.  Now named Flower Hill.3

  • White
    In LeFlore County, 11 miles west of Heavener. A post office from August 27, 1906 to April 30, 1921. Named for Livingston B. White, local resident.1

  • Whitesboro
    In western LeFlore County, 10 miles southeast of Talihina. Post office established April 14, 1909. Named for Paul White, early day settler.1

  • Williams
    In LeFlore County, 3 miles east of Panama. A post office from October 14, 1904 to July 31, 1954. Named for Rev. Alexander S. Williams, prominent Choctaw.1

  • Wilscot
    In LeFlore County, 13 miles south of Heavener. A post office from August 19, 1930 to March 31, 1934. The name was coined from the name of William T. Scott, first postmaster.1

  • Wister1   Wister Junction3
    In LeFlore County, 9 miles southwest of Poteau. Post office established June 30, 1890. Named for an official of the Choctaw, Oklahoma and Gulf Railroad.1

  • Witteville
    In LeFlore County, 4 miles northwest of Poteau. A post office from August 22, 1894 to April 30, 1908. No longer in existence, it was named for Gerhard H. Witte, first postmaster.1

  • Young
    In LeFlore County, 5 miles south of Heavener. A post office from September 7, 1911 to November 15, 1915. Named for Clarence Young, first postmaster.1

  • Zafra
    In extreme southeastern LeFlore County. A post office from June 9, 1917 to March 431, 1942.1

  • Zoe
    Formerly Thomasville. In LeFlore County, 9 miles south of Heavener. Post office name changed to Zoe, June 14, 1915 and discontinued May 31, 1956. Named for Zoe Thomason, local resident.1


  • Skullyville [more]

  • Post office: Choctaw Agency, June 26, 1833-August 16, 1860; Scullyville, August 16, 1860-December 14, 1860; Choctaw Agency, December 14, 1860-October 10, 1981; Oak Lodge, December 22, 1871- March 31, 1917.

    The site for Skullyville was selected in 1831 when Major Francis W. Armstrong, an Indian Agent, was instructed to "establish an agency in the new country in the vicinity of Fort Smith, AR." The site chosen was about fourteen miles southwest of Fort Smith and five miles from the Swallow rock boat landing on the Arkansas River. The town was established in 1832 when the Choctaw Indians began arriving from Alabama and Mississippi. Skullyville was to serve as a center where annuities due the Choctaws were to be paid. The name is derived from the Chotaw word iskuli, meaning "money."

    The site selected was an attractive and healthful location with a number of perennial springs. The agency building was erected on a hill near one of the larget springs. It wasbuilt with a stone foundation and hewn logs, none of which were less than twelve inches in diameter when cut. The main building had three large rooms, a wide hallway, and a full length porch. The Choctaws built log houses chinked with small pieces of wood and plastered with mud. The roofs were made of river oak shingles. The houses were strong, warm in winter, and durable. (Several stood for more than a hundred years.)

    The government activities attracted commercial interest to the town. Stores with extensive stocks from eastern markedt were established by licensed traders. Gold was the chief medium of exchange, but the traders bartered for Indian blankets, handicrafts, and pelts and furs. Frequently livestock was taken in exchange. Payments to the Indians were in gold coins shipped by boat in wooden kegs. It has been related that those kegs "were often left in the yard or on the front porch of the Agency, day and night without guard."

    Skullyville also became a political and educational center. About 1845 the Methodist Church established two mission boarding schools. New Hope School for Girls was located one mile east of the town, and the Fort Coffee Academy for Boys was near the Arkansas River. Both schools progressed until the Civil War, when they were closed. New Hope School opened again in 1871 but closed permanently in 1896. In 1857 a convention for Choctaws was held in Skullyville. There the Skullyville Constitution was written and adopted; it united the different factions of the Choctaws and established a stable government for the Choctaw Nation.

    Skullyville served as an early gateway to the west for both Indian and white migrants. In 1838 a large number of Chickasaw Indians passed through the town on their way to new western homes. After1848 a few Seminole groups used the Fort Smith-Boggy Depot road which passed through Skullyville. Large numbers of forty-niners used the same road on their way to California. The Butterfield Overland Main Rout, established in 1858, made Skullyville the first stage stop out of Fort Smith.

    The town grew in importance until the Civil War. During the last part of the conflict Skullyville was an outpost for the Confederates. The union forces captured the town and destroyed many of the buildings and homes. The place never fully recovered from the ravages of way. It did, however, continue as a stage stop for a number of years. The post office at Scullyville [sic] was listed as Choctaw Agency when it was established in 1833, but changed to Scullyville [sic] in 1860. The Oak Lodge post office was closed in 1917. When the Kansas City Southern Railroad was built through the area, it passed to the west of Oak Lodge, and Skullyville-Oak Lodge became a ghost town. About all that is left of Skullyville is its cemetery.2
     



     

    SOURCES:
    1George H. Shirk, Oklahoma Place Names (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1965).
    2John W. Morris, Ghost Towns of Oklahoma (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press).
    3Douglas R. Barkley, Genealogy Research Service, PO Box 998, Panama, OK 74951; 918-963-2230.
    4Henry L. Peck, The Proud Heritage of LeFlore County, A History of An Oklahoma County, 1963.

     

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Updated: 
Marti Graham, County Coordinator & Webmaster