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Hotel Earle.

unkirk Fires.

Firemen and volunteers of Dunkirk were forced to battle for more than four hours to extinguish flames which destroyed the stock in the W.C. Augsburger store, and caused considerable loss in the Ed Ewing electrical shop and the Dunkirk Standard offices, all located in the old two story brick business building located on Main street.

About 2 a.m. in the morning on 2 Oct 1892 a fire was discovered in a frame building south of the depot. Within a few minutes the whole block, including the McCaskey brick building was in flames. Efforts were made to get the fire controlled but in vain. About $25,000 worth of property was destroyed; the Standard printing office, the express and telephone offices, the mayor and clerk's offices, and two saloons. Little contents of any office was saved. All village recordss were destroyed. The fire was thought to be arson.

Townsend Jackson married a ">correspondence" bride, Martha Johnson of South Bend, Indiana only one day after seeing her. They had corresponded for exactly one year previous to their marriage of August 27, 1892, the day upon which they met. Jackson had been a private in Co. C, 12th Regt., U.S. Army (Colored) from 28 Aug 1864 until 8 Jun 1865 serving 9 months and 15 days. He'd not been disabled during his service.

J.M. Hutchinson of south West street owned one of the business blocks destroyed by fire in Dunkirk in September, 1892. He estimated his loss above insurance at $1,500.

The Earle hotel fire occurred in 1893. Not much is known about the Earle. Townsend Jackson was the manager in 1892. He was born about 1847 in Virginia and was married to Susan _. In 1880 he had been living in Ohio for about 10 years. Susan probably died before the 1893 fire. She and Townsend had three children with Susan; Elizabeth, Allen, and Charles Foster, all born in Ohio. Being born in Virginia and living in Ohio, could he have been an escaped slave or one who bought his freedom, or was he one of the free blacks living in Virginia at the time, later moving to Ohio? After the fire of 28 Apr 1893, the hotel may not have been restored. It is unknown if Jackson was the manager at that time.

Shortly after midnight, fire was discovered in the rear of Mahan & Son's department store, and before it could be controlled business blocks and residences were destroyed to the value of $100,000. The heaviest losers were the Dunkirk Telephone Co., the exchange being completely destroyed; Mahan & Son's, Lydick Bros. livery, McMillen Implement Co., and the First National Bank. The Forest fire company was called, and through courtesy of the Pennsylvania R.R., the run was made in six minutes, a distance of six miles. It is impossible at this time to ascertain the amount of insurance on destroyed property.

Shortly after a crowd from Forest had reached Dunkirk in August, 1908 and band had finished a march to town, there was a cry of "fire." A fire had started in the Owl Theater located in a room of a cluster of frame building where fire would cause great damage if left unattended. A defective wire on the front of the building set fire to some bunting & decorating and awnings adjoining. The fire was put out just after the wood work began to burn. The fire department was not contacted and they did not respond.

One of the most disastrous fires in the history of Dunkirk occurred on October 27, 1917 when the buildings owned by C.E. Wharton, of Kenton, and W.S. Shadley, of Alger, were completely gutted by fire. The fire, probably started from a defective flue in the cream station. The cream station was operated by James Miller in the Wharton Building on Main street. Valiant efforts of the volunteer fire department of the village saved the day, but three stores lost; the J.W. Lehmen Grocery, the Miller Cream Station, and the barber shop operated by George Ray in the Shadley Building.

Dunkirk Hotel Destroyed. The new hotel Earle, at Dunkirk, owned by H.A. Baughman, was completely gutted by fire this morning. The house was crowded with guests, who narrowly escaped with their lives and lost most of their clothes.

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Livery.

By 1900 Townsend Jackson was dead and a Hannah Jackson, widow, was claiming his survivor rights. The hotel was built of brick and, in 1900, owned by H.A. Baughman who may have been Hattie A. Baughman, wife of John Baughman, who was the postmaster of Dunkirk in 1900.

A massive fire destroyed most of the business section of Dunkirk 21 May 1903. Shortly after the fire, Mrs. T.D. Robb, who lived in Lima visited her mother in Dunkirk. On the 23rd Hutchinson settled with the insurance company.

The village of Dunkirk had a disastrous fire early this morning.

Fire occurred on October 11, 1903 in the Livery stable of Jno. Fry. The stable was located on Main street across from the Dunkirk Standard, near the center of town. It burned the barn to the ground. It also burned the nearby residence of Dr. Kehler.

At an early hour Thursday morning, Dunkirk, a small station located east of here on the Pennsylvania railroad, was visited with a conflagration which threatened for a time to wipe out the entire business section of the town. The entire east side was burned and the loss will amount to something like $100,000. Keiper Bros., well known in Delphos, as operators for the Penna. Co., lost their stock of furniture which was valued over $5,000.

Later another fire by arson burned the residence of Walter Teegardin, a farmer living one mile northeast of Dunkirk. Walter Teegarden [sic] (dob: 4 Oct 1850) died April 4, 1913 in Dunkirk.

J.M. Hutchinson of 546 S. West street was home from Dunkirk where he settled with the insurance companies for his loss of property a recent fire. He also sold the lot upon which the fired building was situated.

THIS AND THAT. Crisp Items of Information From Every Clime. Fire which swept over the business portion of Dunkirk, O., caused $100,000 loss.

A Big Fire at Dunkirk. Findlay, May 21.'Fire at Dunkirk early this morning completely gutted three squares in the business section lying between the post office and the Pennsylvania railway. The fire is supposed to have started in Johnson's saloon, ' the cause is unknown. Most of the buildings were frame and although the burnt district includes half the business section of the village the loss will not exceed $60,000, with $25,000 insurance.

By June 16, the town must have been back in fairly good shape, the fire department participated in the Delphos' parade along with the Fire Department and Band of Forest.

The business portion of Dunkirk was reported on fire in May 1903. The department at Kenton was summoned. The loss was $60,000.

The business portion of Dunkirk, O., was practically wiped out by fire early Thursday. Eleven business blocks and three residences were burned.

WIPED OUT BY FIRE.
Ohio Town Suffers Loss Aggregating $100,000. Lima, Ohio, May 21—The business portion of Dunkirk, twenty-five miles east of here, was practically wiped out by fire early today. Eleven business blocks and three residences were burned and the loss is $100,000.

DISASTROUS Fire Gutted Business Section of Dunkirk, Ohio. Findlay, Ohio, May 21'Fire at Dunkirk early this morning completely gutted three squares in the business section lying between the post office and Pennsylvania railway. The fire is supposed to have started in Johnson's saloon ' the cause is unknown. Most of the buildings were frame and although the burnt district includes half the business section of the village, the loss will not exceed $60,000 with $25,000 insurance.

Sixty Thousand Fire Loss. Findlay, O., May 21'The business portion of Dunkirk is reported on fire. The department at Kenton was summoned. The loss was $60,000.

BUSINESS BLOCKS. Lima, O., May 21.'The business portion of Dunkirk, twenty-five miles east of here, was practically wiped out by fire early today. Eleven business blocks and three residences were burned. The loss is estimated at $100,000, partially covered by insurance.

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Red Wing House-Trailer Co.

Ohio Village Gutted. Lima, O., May 21.'  The business portion of Dunkirk, O., 25 miles east of here, was practically wiped out by fire. Eleven business blocks and three residences were burned. The heaviest losers were Mahon & Company, the First National bank, Lydock Brothers and the Dunkirk Telephone company. Loss estimated at $100,000, partially covered by insurance.

Dunkirk Fire. Advocate Telegram. Findlay, Ohio, May 21'Fire at Dunkirk this morning completely gutted three squares in the business section lying between the post office and the Pennsylvania railway. The fire is supposed to have started in Johnson's saloon ' the cause is unknown. Most of the buildings were frame and although the burned district includes half the business section of the village, the loss will not exceed $60,000 with $25,000 insurance.

One of the most disastrous fires in the history of Dunkirk occurred October 26, 1917 when the building owned by C.E. Wharton and W.S. Shadley were completely gutted by fire. The fire started in a defective flue in James Miller's Cream Station in the Wharton building. Heavy losers in the fire were George Ray's Barber Shop,, J.W. Lehman's Grocery, and the Miller Cream Station.

Housed in a two-story, pre Civil War building just north of Dunkirk and originally purchased by J. Adam Orth for the lumber business, the Red Wing Trailer Co. plant was destroyed, 3 Dec 1954, by a 9 a.m. fire believed to have started in a flue of the coal furnace. Orth's son, Jabe Orth, sold the building to Lowell Wykes. The plant was owned by George T. Kocher of Lima, Ohio. There were four regularly employed workers managed by R.E. Van Scoit. Kocher was the owner of the Kocher Lumber Co. in Lima. Chief Don Mayhorn and Dunkirk's volunteer firemen battled the fire for over an hour. $27,000 of materials and equipment were destroyed which included the 35x80 foot building. Five completed trailers were saved by moving them away from the fire. Included in the damage was a $15,000 trailer which had been completed and $12,000 of materials in the plant building. No people were injured. At the time of the fire, Van Scoit and the other four workers were at work when they saw flames shooting through the ceiling of the first floor."

The Red Wing plant was originally owned by Van Scoit who sold it to Kocher. Kocher had owned the company from only a few months. The plant had previously been owned by Van Scoit and Lee Carpenter. During and after World War II, the plant was operated by Russell & Lowell Wykes for defense work. The factory was never rebuilt though rebuilding was considered at the time of the fire.

On December 19, 1963 the two-story building at the intersection of Main & Wayne streets in Dunkirk was destroyed by fire. In the building was the Grand theater had operated for approximately 29 years, nine under Douglas' ownership.

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Forest Volunteer Fire Department

It had previously been a hotel. In the building with the theater was also an appliance store. Lewis Douglas, theater owner, operated the theater with his sons, Robert Douglas and William Douglas. Though undetermined at the time, electrical wiring was considered to be the cause of the fire. Firemen arrived from Dunkirk including the departments of Forest, Ada, and Kenton. Damages were estimated to be $10,000.

Ice covered just about everything, including the firemen, in the very low temperatures. Some of the icicles caused by the near sub-zero temperatures can be seen in the photograph.