19th CENTURY MARCELLUS BIOGRAPHIES

Submitted by John Curtin


RICHARD WARREN ALVORD

Richard Warren Alvord, Marcellus, was born in Edinburgh, Saratoga Co., January 26, 1926, a son of Calvin and Rebecca (Gibson)Alvord. Calvin was a tanner and shoe manufacturer, and also conducted a farm. Our subject was educated in Edinburgh, worked for his father for a time, then came to Borodino, and then to Marcellus, where he engaged in staging, running a line from Borodino to Marcellus, and also to Marietta and Amber, for a period of thirty years. He also conducted the Alvord House. Selling his stage line, Mr. Alvord has since engaged exclusively in the hotel and livery business, of which he has the largest patronage in town. Our subject married first Esther Cleveland, and had two children: Frank C. and Lucina. Mrs. Alvord died in 1865, and he married second Eliza Chadfield, by whom he has one daughter, Flora. Frank C. Alvord is engaged in the business of supplying skins for glove manufacture in Gloversville. Lucina married Purdy Case and lives in New York City. Flora resides at home. Our subject is one of ten children, the youngest being 55 and the oldest 83, all now living.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce, Volume II. The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 203
 

ALANSON J. ANDERSON

Alanson J. Anderson, Marcellus, was born in Clayville, March 12, 1868, a son of James Anderson, a veteran of the Civil War, who participated in many of its principal battles, and a sketch of whose career appears elsewhere. Alanson J. was educated in the public schools of this town, then engaged in the woolen business, having been employed for the past eight years as foreman in the spinning department of the Crown Mills, a position occupied by his father before him. He married Nellie A. Sarr, daughter of James Sarr, the builder and merchant, a sketch of whose life is noticed elsewhere.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce, Volume II. The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 203.
 

LEWIS J. AVERY

Lewis J. Avery, Marcellus, was born July 2, 1865, a son of Jared and Sarah Avery. he was educated in the public schools and first worked in the Empire Mills at Clayville, then went to Woonsocket, R. I., having had considerable experience in the woolen business before he came to this town (1889). He went into the weaving room at the Crown Mills, soon being promoted foreman of that department, which position he now holds. He married Anna Manwaring.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce, Volume II. The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 203.
 

CHARLES H. BAKER

Charles H. Baker, Marcellus, has charge of the finishing for the upper Crown Mills.  Came to Marcellus, October 24, 1891, as finisher for same.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce, Volume II. The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 203
 
 

EDWARD V. BAKER

Edward V. Baker, Marcellus,  was born in 1841 in Onondaga, son of George B. and Harriet (Clark) Baker. George B. was born in Marcellus in 1816, then moved to West Onondaga where he carried on a blacksmith business until 1854, when he moved to Onondaga Hill. He was a prominent anti-slavery Whig, and died in 1870. Our subject was educated in Marcellus, then carried on the blacksmith business here for seventeen years. He then went into the drug business, and then removed from the village to the homestead farm one mile west of the village, where he now resides. Mr. Baker enlisted in the late Civil War as a private and came home as a sergeant. He went to the front with Co. F., 122d N.Y. Vols., and served till the close of the war. He was in seventeen battles and skirmishes, was wounded at Cold Harbor, also at Fisher’s Hill and in the valley under Sheridan. Mr. Baker served on county and town committee, and three years as county treasurer. He has served two years as supervisor and is now serving his second term. He married in 1866 Julia DeCourdres of Marcellus, by whom he has three sons, Thomas B., Charles D., and Edward V., Jr.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce, Volume II. The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 282.
 

WARREN BAKER

Warren Baker, Marcellus, was born in Marcellus October 12, 1836, a son of Benjamin and Sylvia Baker. Benjamin was born in Amherst, Mass., in 1778, came to Marcellus in 1801 and in 1806 settled on the homestead, where he remained until his death in 1864 at the age of 86. Warren Baker was educated in Marcellus, Onondaga Valley and in Cortland; he taught school in the town of Van Buren, and has since followed farming, conducting his farm in Marcellus. He married Ellen M., daughter of George W. Maxon of Jefferson Co., and has one child, Lizzie E., who is living at home with her parents.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce, Volume II. The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 203
 

WILLIAM BISHOP

William Bishop was born in Marcellus, March 19, 1840, son of Ira and Sarah (Stage) Bishop. Ira came to the homestead where his family have since resided when he was nine years old. He was educated in Marcellus, and was supervisor of the town several terms. Our subject was educated in Marcellus, and has always followed farming on the homestead. Mr. Bishop married Martha M. Sedeker, by whom he has two children, Charles and Carolaine, both living at home.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce, Volume II. The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 282.
 

SELAH M. BRONSON

Selah M. Bronson, Marcellus, was born in Navarino, this county, June 13, 1852, a son of Hiram and Alvina (Rosier) Bronson. Hiram was born in Oswego Co., and came to this town when a boy, starting at farming. He conducted a farm here up to the time of his death. Mrs. Bronson was the daughter of Worthy Rosier of Marcellus. Selah M. was educated in both Marcellus and Syracuse, after which he engaged in milling, which he continued seventeen years, when ill health compelled him to retire from active business. Mr. Bronson owns the chief business block in the village, known as the Gallup block, and consisting of stores, offices, lodge rooms, etc. He married Cynthia L. daughter of Daniel and Joanna Jenison, of Lockboro, Wayne Co. Mr. Bronson’s family is among the oldest settlers of the town, and his great-grandfather, Joel Camp, was among the very first.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce, Volume II. The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 282.
 

WILLIAM COBB

William Cobb, Marcellus, came from Shatsfbury, Vt., and settled in this town in 1794, taking up a full section of land, where he was the first settler. He had three sons, Daniel, Stephen and William. The former, Daniel, married Betsey Tinkham, in Vermont, whom he brought here after he had erected a log cabin, he and his wife making the journey on horseback. He was born in 1776 and died 1852. He had two sons, one dying in infancy, and supposed to have been the first white child born in the town. The other son was Stephen, born April 29, 1799, who bought his father’s farm and cared for his parents until their death. His father died in 1852 and the mother in 1856. Stephen Cobb was married to Temperance, daughter of Rev. David Holmes, in 1818. To them were born ten children, five sons and five daughters, seven of whom grew to adult age, four sons and three daughters. The eldest, Rev. Daniel Cobb, D.D., after more than fifty years of active and successful labors in the ministry in New York, Minnesota and California, died in Los Angeles, December 25, 1894. Belus S. became a successful physician and died in New Jersey in 1890. William R., the third son, also became a minister, and with Daniel belonged to the Methodist itinerary, in which he preached thirty-eight years. Ill health compelled him to retire in 1888, and he settled on a farm adjoining the old homestead farm. The fourth son, D. Holmes Cobb, died in his twenty-first year. The daughters, Mary and Lucretia, married two brothers, John and Corydon North. Mary is still a resident of this town; Lucretia died in 1887. The third grown-up daughter died in 1857, in young womanhood. Stephen Cobb was a local preacher in addition to farming. William R., son of the preceding, was born on the old homestead farm and educated at Cazenovia Seminary and began preaching in 1850. In 1855, he married Rhoda J., daughter of Mr. John Stillman, one of the earliest settlers of Cortland, N.Y. He has three children living: Jennie F., who married Prof. W. H. North, now of Skaneateles; Hattie M., wife of Prof. C. H. Smith, of Chicago; and Rev. Stephen S. Cobb, pastor of the M. E. Church, Newport, Herkimer Co., N.Y. He has also a grandson, William R. North. Stephen Cobb at the time of his death was the oldest resident born in the town.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce, Volume II. The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, pp. 204-205.
 

DANIEL DE FOREST COON

Daniel De Forest Coon, Marcellus, was born in Marcellus, May 30, 1848, son of Daniel G. and Betsey C. Coon. Daniel was born September 5, 1814, in Adams, Jefferson Co., where he was educated and lived till 1841. He then moved to Skaneateles, and after one year to Marcellus. He rented for a few years a distillery at Marcellus Falls, forming a company composed of Norton, Parker, Coon & Olney, afterward buying out Norton and Parker. The firm of Cool & Olney did business for several years. Here he was located for nearly twenty-five years. Mr. Coon’s business was a large one, and the distributing point of his product was Syracuse. After selling out his distillery he retired from active business and devoted his time to cultivating a fine homestead farm that he owned, on which he resided in the village of Marcellus until his death, March 4, 1893. He married in 1839 Betsey C., daughter of Zenas and Polly (Gore) Barney, of Gilford, Windham Co., Vt., where Mrs. Coon was born. Zenas Barney was a salesman by occupation and at the time of the gold excitement went to California, where he died. Mrs. Betsey C. Coon is still living on the family homestead and in good health. Our subject was educated in Marcellus and Cazenovia, and after leaving school went into the cheese business, then engaged in the drug business for two years, and then engaged in farming. Mr. Coon’s farm consists of 130 acres under a good state of cultivation. He married April 6, 1871, Adelle Rhodes of Camillus, by whom he had two children, Bertha C., and Daniel Rhodes. Mrs. Coon died February 16, 1892. On October 3, 1895, he married Josephine Woodford of Marcellus.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce, Volume II. The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, pp. 203-204.
 

JAMES L. CURTIS

James L. Curtis, Marcellus, was born in Marcellus, November 20, 1825, son of Jason and Polly Curtis. Jason Curtis was born in Connecticut and came to Marcellus in 1811, where he resided until his death in 1856, at the age of 79 years. Our subject was educated in Marcellus and has always following farming. Mr. Curtis takes an active interest in all political affairs. He married Esther J., daughter of William Webber, of Marcellus, by whom he has had two children: Katie, who died, aged 18, and Ward R., who was born in 1867, educated in Marcellus and operates the homestead farm for his father. He married Mary, daughter of George Eggleston, of  Marcellus.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce, Volume II. The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 204.
 

MAURICE H. DONOHUE

Maurice H. Donohue, Marcellus, was born in the town of Onondaga, September 13, 1848, a son of Michael and Catherine Donahue, the former a farmer of Onondaga until his retirement in 1880. He was born in 1796, and is now living at the age of 98 years, a vigorous man yet for his age. He has had eleven children, of whom six sons and three daughters are now living. Maurice H. was educated in the town of Onondaga and assisted his father on the farm, then taught winter school, farming during the summer. This he continued in all for twenty-three terms, then went into the woolen mill, where he remained twelve years, resigning to take charge of the post office in this town, in which position he is universally liked for his gentlemanly bearing and business efficiency. Our subject married Anna, daughter of William Dolan, of Marcellus, and they have three children: Ida, James, and Cora.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce, Volume II. The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 205.
 

SAMUEL H. EDWARDS

Samuel H. Edwards, Marcellus was born in Madison Co., August 24, 1851, son of John and Jane Edwards, who came from Wales and settled in Eaton, Madison Co., where he was engaged in manufacturing, and in 1861 moved to Marcellus and bought a farm which he conducted to the time of his death, January 22, 1889. S. H. Edwards was educated in Marcellus and Waterloo, and is engaged in farming on he old homestead. Mr. Edwards has been elected tax collector and is now serving as assessor. He married Lizzie, daughter of Nathan Batton, of Rome, by whom he has two children, Samuel Le Roy and Clarence Nathan, aged three and one respectively.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce, Volume II. The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 205.
 
 

WILLIAM H. GALLUP

Hon. William H. Gallup, Syracuse, was born in Marcellus, May 27, 1858. His father, George Gallup, came from England to America in 1850, at the age of seventeen, and settled in Marcellus, where he was long a teasel merchant. He died February 1, 1882, and his wife’s death occurred January 20, 1884. George Gallup was a citizen highly respected, influential and esteemed, and possessed sterling principles of head and heart which his children inherited. William H. was educated in the schools of his native town, read law with Judge Vann in Syracuse, and was graduated and admitted from the Albany Law School in June, 1879. After practicing his profession three years in Marcellus, he succeeded to his father’s business, which he still carries on. He was elected member of assembly in 1888 and 1889, his plurality in ‘89 being 2,015,  the largest ever given to any candidate in that district. In 1892 he came to Syracuse and organized the Syracuse Improvement Co., with a capital of $120,000 and has since been its secretary, treasurer and general manager, making it emphatically successful.  September 2, 1880, he married Emma Sweet of Marcellus and has two children, Mary and Bessie.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce, Volume II. The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 66.
 

JOHN E. GRIFFIN

John E. Griffin, Marcellus, was  born in Montezuma, Cayuga Co., April 2, 1865, a son of Stores M., and Lucy (Ebbon) Griffin. Mrs.. Lucy (Ebbon) Griffin died in Marcellus May 9, 1891. Stores M. Griffin still resides in the village. John E. Griffin came to Marcellus with his parents, at the age of three years, where he was educated, and later began work in the woolen mills, serving as apprentice five years. He has since been employed by the Crown Mills, and has worked his way up in the woolen business until he now has charge of the wool sorting department in the Crown Mills. He takes a prominent part in politics, and ran for trustee of the village on a ticket pledged for general improvements, sidewalks, streets, etc. How well Mr. Griffin discharged his trust is shown by the fact that the sidewalks of Marcellus are superior to those found in any other place of equal size in the county. After serving four years as trustee, Mr. Griffin was elected in 1894 President of the Village.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce, Volume II. The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 205.
 

SAMUEL C. HOOPER

Samuel C. Hooper, Marcellus, is the son of Charles and Esther Hooper,  of Stroud, Gloucestershire, England, and was born January 23, 1819. He was educated in England and learned cabinetmaking. In 1848 Mr. Hooper came to this country and direct to Marcellus, where he has since resided, conducting during this period cabinet making and the manufacture of coffins and caskets. He has seen many changes in the business, in the early days he made all his goods himself, but now much of it is purchased from large factories. His business has taken in Marcellus, and the bordering towns. There is only one man living in the corporation now who was an adult at the time Mr. Hooper came here. Our subject married Clara Gallup, by whom he had four children: Charles, James, Henry, who died aged eight, and one who died in infancy. Charles is a cabinetmaker in Norfolk, Va., and James is a carpenter and joiner, also raises fruit, being located in San Diego, California. Our subject married Adelphi Balcombe, a native of the town of Onondaga.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce, Volume II. The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, pp. 205-206.
 

JOHN C. KENNEDY

John C. Kennedy, Marcellus, was born in Syracuse March 6, 1846, a son of John and Catherine Kennedy. The family moved to Marcellus in 1861, when our subject began work in the woolen mills. He has been engaged in farming, railroading, and teaming, in addition to his experience in the woolen business. He is now foreman in the finishing room of the lower mills of the Crown plant.  Mr. Kennedy married Catherine Conry, by whom he has five children: Charles J., Mary E., Catherine J., William F. and George H.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p 206.
 

RICHARD B. MAY

Richard B. May, Marcellus, was born in Marcellus, July 11, 1849, a son of Sayles R. and Louisa May. 'The former was born in Cazenovia, Feb. 4, 1805, where he followed farming; he afterwards moved to Marcellus and died Oct. 2, 1876.  Richard B. May was educated in Marcellus and Onondaga Valley, then engaged in farming at which he has worked ever since. The homestead has been in the family for three generations and is in a good state of cultivation. Mr. May is prominent in local politics and takes great interest in the events of the day. He married Susan Edwards of Marcellus, by whom he has two children, Lucina, aged 16, and Sayles R., aged 16

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p 206.
 

GEORGE C. MILLS

George C. Mills, Marcellus. is a son of Timothy and Polly (Wilsie) Mills and was born in Marcellus, where he has always lived, April 51, 1843. Timothy, son of Isaac Mills, was a native of Saratoga Co., N. Y., and came to Marcellus with his parents when a mere child. He died here Dec. 4, 1888; his wife's death occurred in Feb. 1892. Isaac Mills was a soldier in the War of 1812. All were farmers and representative men of their time. George C. Mills married Eliza J.Finch and had born to him three children: Frank 13., whose portrait and biography appears elsewhere in this volume; William E., who is now postmaster at Rose Hill; and George, who died  infancy.  Mr. Mills is a substantial farmer at Rose Hill in the southern part of the town of Marcellus.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p 206.
 

ANDREW J. MERRILL

Andrew J. Merrill, Marcellus, born Sept. 11, 1864, in Marcellus, son of Jason and Lovina Merrill.  Jason Merrill was born in Otisco, Aug. 20, 1828, and died July 29, 1891. He was a resident of Marcellus forty-one years. He w as always interested in church work, was ordained deacon in the Presbyterian Church in 1876, and held that office until his death in 1891, and was also Sunday school superintendent or teacher during his entire residence in Marcellus. He was justice of the peace and noted as a sheep raiser in addition to conducting a large farm, raising the Spanish merino full blood, registered. These sheep were a very valuable grade and Mr. Merrill  was known throughout the State for the value of his product. Andrew J. Merrill was educated m Marcellus and Canandaigua and finished in Munro Collegiate lnstitute in Elbridge. He now conducts the farm which his father  made noted for fine sheep.  He is also raising some good cows in full blood Jersey stock. Mr. Merrill married Maud F. Armstrong, of Syracuse, by whom he has two children: Ethel Maud and Henry Jason

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, pp. 206- 207
 

JAMES WATSON MERRILL

James Watson Merrill, Marcellus, was born in New Hartford, Litchfield Co., Conn., Dec. 21, 1823, son of Andrew Merrill and Amanda Dowd. Andrew was born in New Hartford Co., Conn., where he lived until he was twenty-eight years old, when he removed to Syracuse and was burned out, losing all his effects. He then began selling fanning mills at which he was very successful and also conducted a farm at the same time. He was justice of the peace and also associate judge. He died Feb. 9, 1875, aged 75. James M. Merrill was educated in Onondaga Valley and Homer, and then went to manufacturing fanning mills, at which he continued ten years. He then engaged in farming, purchasing the farm where he now resides. Mr. Merrill raises some fine stock in Jersey and Guernsey cows, and his farm is a fine one, all under a good state of cultivation. He married Mary Celestia. daughter of Clark Bentley. Mr. Merrill was married in the village of Fayetteville by President Cleveland’s father. He has three children: Emma, Clark, and May.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p 207.
 

LEVI N. MOGG

Levi N. Mogg was born in Clay, August 10, 1849, a son of Cornelius and Lovina (Andrews) Mogg. Cornelius operated a steam saw mill and conducted a farm at Euclid. He was born in Clay, December 20, 1820, and is now retired from active business. Our subject was educated in Clay and at Falley Seminary, Fulton, and began teaching in Clay. He next taught in Howlett Hill, then at Brewerton, and then became principal of the school in Marcellus, which position he occupied seven years. Resigning in 1881, he entered the manufacturing business, and the same year engaged with the Crown Mills, as bookkeeper and paymaster. Mr. Mogg had a long experience in this village as an educator, becoming widely and favorably known as such, and has been equally successful in his business life. He married Marie, daughter of John Strong, of Turin, and they have one daughter, Elizabeth Lovina.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p 207.
 

HUGH MORTON

Hugh Morton, Marcellus, was born in Darwell, Scotland, Dec. 5, 1842, and came to Waterloo at the age of about four years. Arriving at maturity he learned the trade of dresser, and worked in Seneca Falls, Skaneateles Falls, Waverly, Skaneateles, and Marcellus. Later he went to Vedersville, Va., where he followed farming for a short time. For the past fifteen years he has worked in the Marcellus Woolen Mills as dresser. He also owns a farm, which he conducts in addition to his business. Our subject has one son, Adelbert S. aged 21, and one daughter, Gertrude, aged 17.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p 207.
 

JOEL G. NORTHRUP

Joel G. Northrup, of Marcellus, is one of the most prominent mechanics and a highly respectable citizen. He was born Feb. 8, 1807, in Woodbridge, New Haven Co., Conn., and is descended through Benjamin, Job, John, Daniel, to Ester, on the maternal side from Samuel Sherman, who came from England in 1634 and was the ancestor also of the late General Sherman and his brother, United States Senator Sherman. By trade Mr. Northrup was shoemaker, but had a taste for mechanics also. He came from his native place to Cortland Co., this State, in April, 1828, where he pursued his trade for about sixteen years. ln 1844 he removed to Syracuse, and thereafter engaged in mechanical pursuits. In 1851 his attention was called to an offer by Mr. Bruce of a prize of $1,000 for the construction of a printing press. Our subject had previously invented a press while working at his trade in Cortland. He determined to enter the lists being convinced that he could do so successfully and the result proved his conviction good. His press more than equaled the conditions of the offer, printing 1000 copies per hour instead of the 500 specified in the paper and Mr. Nortrup received the certificate, which was signed by many of the leading men of the time and appeared in full in the New York Tribune with editorial comments by Horace Greeley. The result of this was that before our subject could get a company and one press built, he had thirty offers for presses. After continuing the manufacture of this press in Oneida until 1855, he went to Bridgeport, Conn. and began the same manufacture remaining three years selling his presses to the most prominent newspaper offices in the country, his trade extending also to Canada. In 1858 Mr. Northrup bought a farm Marcellus where he has since lived and where in 1885 he built his web perfecting press. Mr. Northrup has one daughter, Mrs. James D. Mather.  Mr. Northrup’s father was Hezekiah, son of Joel, whose father was Joel a captain in the Revolution. This carries the family back to 1691.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, pp. 207-208.
 

CURTIS L. RICH

Curtis L. Rich, Marcellus, was born in Medina Co. Ohio Sept. 2, 1838 son of Edward and Lorette A. Rich. Edward came from England when eighteen years of age. Lorette A. Rice was the daughter of Col. Dorastus Lawrence. Edward Rich settled on the town line west of Marcellus and continued to reside in the county till his death. Curtis L., the subject, was educated in Marcellus and Skaneateles and Jordan Academies, then volunteered in the late  Civil war and went to the front with Co. F 122d Regiment and served till the close of the war. Mr. Rich was in twenty four engagements and skirmishes among others being Antietam Fredericksburg Gettysburg and in the valley under Sheridan taking in many of the principal battles of the war. Mr. Rich was wounded but once. After the war he engaged in farming. He married Celia daughter of Joel Dunbar by whom he has two children,  Edward D. and Amlie M. Edward is at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute at Troy and Annie is living at home.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 208.
 

THOMAS RHODES

Thomas Rhodes, Marcellus, was born in Cambridge, Washington Co. Feb. 4 1807 a son of John and Hester (Jackson) Rhodes. The former was a manufacturer and conducted a woolen mill in Marcellus. He was born in 1760 and died in 1826. Thomas our subject came to this town at the age of nine years, went to Cazenovia to school and supported himself, paying his own way through school. He first went to work in the woolen factory at Marcellus after completing his studies and later bought a half interest in a mill at Marcellus Falls. This he conducted four years, sold out and bought a farm in Jordan. Here he remained twenty-eight years, then sold his farm at a profit of  $11,000. He has speculated largely in real estate especially farming lands, and also operated in railroad stock. For the past twenty-five years Mr. Rhodes has been out of active work though he enjoys fair health and a mind of unimpaired vigor. April 17, 1831, he married Emily, daughter of Andrew and Charity Shepard, by whom he has six children: Thomas W. of Milwaukee; Antoinette, who married Albert Howland; Frances who married Cyrus Sweet,  a former surrogate of Syracuse since deceased; Theodore F. who is president of the Citizens Bank of Frankfort Kan.;  Mary who married Dr. John Coles of Cambridge, Neb.; and J. Edson, a Methodist clergyman, of Skaneateles. His father died April 4, 1895, of apoplexy within one hour from the time he was taken. Just before the stroke he had written a business letter and the address on the envelope gave no sign of sudden dissolution, his mind being good till stricken. He was 88 years 2 months old.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, pp. 208-209
 

WILLIAM RUTHERFORD

William Rutherford, Marcellus, was born in Galashiels, Selkirkshire, Scotland, in May, 1852, a son of James Rutherford. He learned the trade of dyeing in his native town, celebrated for its woolen manufactures, and passed through the various grades up to that of head dyer. This district of Scotland has supplied to the woolen manufacture of this country some of its principal artisans. Mr. Rutherford now conducts and has sole charge of the dyeing department of the celebrated Crown Mills of Marcellus. He married Mary Ann Grant, and they have six children living James Charles, Elizabeth, Ann Ethel, Austin Grant, Mabel Scott, and Mary Beatrice.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 209.
 

FRANK L. SARR

Frank L. Sarr, Marcellus, was born in Marcellus, March 31, 1860, a son of James Sarr, the retired builder, and one of the chief merchants of this town, whose sketch appears elsewhere. Frank L., as educated in Marcellus, then began work at carpentry. Leaving this line, he engaged in the woolen mill, where he remained ten years. He is foreman of the carding department of the lower mills of the Crown plant. Mr. Sarr married Belle, daughter of James Anderson one of the veterans of the late war,  who participated in many of its principal battles, and a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work . Mr. and Mrs. Sarr have two children: Fred J. and Edna.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 210
 

JAMES SARR

James Sarr was born in Cayuga County, May 2, 1831, a son of William and Sarah (Van Waggoner) Sarr. William was born in 1803 in Sullivan County, went to Skaneateles in 1822, and from there to Otisco, later removing to Marcellus, where he died in 1882.  His father, John, was a Revolutionary soldier. Our subject was educated in the public schools and at the age of fifteen came to Marcellus, where he learned the carpenter’s trade, at which he worked for several years, then began building. He built the Methodist church at Marcellus, the Episcopal church (since burned), the large grist mills, located at the Falls, also the Crown Mills, a fine brick edifice which will rank among the largest in the county, and has also put up many structures in different parts of the county. After building for about twenty-five years, he retired and engaged in the sale of general merchandise, which he has followed for the past sixteen years, having the largest and oldest business in the town of Marcellus. Mr. Sarr has served on the School Board for sixteen years, and also as justice of the peace. He has been deeply interested in education  and it was largely through his efforts that the new school building and high school department were established. The structure is a fine one, and the school is graded into eleven departments. Mr. Sarr’s efforts in behalf of this school are highly appreciated by his townspeople, and he has been elected president of the Board of Trustees. He married first Alice Carr, and had four children: William H. Robert J. Frank L., and Nellie A.  Mrs. Sarr died in 1885 and he married second Mrs. Julia Jackson. (Note: James Sarr died in 1901).

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, pp. 210-211
 

SIDNEY SLOCOMBE

Sidney Slocombe, Marcellus, was born in England, Dec. 18, 1856, son of Samuel and Elizabeth Slocombe. Subject came to Marcellus in the spring of 1873, began as an apprentice and spent three and one-half years as an apprentice and journeyman at his trade of tinsmith. He then started in business in Marcellus for himself, and his business has gradually increased every year. He has a large store containing a fine line of stoves, agricultural implements and hardware, also has large store rooms in addition to his large store. Mr. Slocombe's trade is a large one and extends all through the town. He married Urena Nettleton, daughter of Samuel Stafford Nettleton, of Arnprior province of Ontario, Canada. They have four children: Chester A., Blanche, Frederick S. and Mary E.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 209
 

GEORGE T. SEELEY

George T. Seeley, Marcellus, was born in Skaneateles, November 8, 1832, a son of Anson and Mary (Talbot) Seeley, aunt of Charles Thomas Talbot of Lowell, Mass. Anson Seeley was born in Dutchess Co., then moved to the town of Skaneateles where he always lived, and owned and conducted  a farm in that town until the time of his death, May 18, 1856. His wife died April 11, 1881. George T. Seeley was educated in Skaneateles and came to reside in Marcellus in 1864, where he bought the farm on which he has since resided. Mr. Seeley's farm consists of fine land under a high state of cultivation, but it may more properly be called a stock farm, as he raises Percheron horses and also French coach. There is nothing finer in this line than the stock Mr. Seeley raises, of which he sells a considerable number each year. He married Sarah, daughter of John Davey of Skaneateles, and they have had four children: Edward Anson, a graduate from Harvard College, who was born in Marcellus in 1863 and died March 10, 1891, in South Dakota, aged 28; Ida E., who is living at Rose Hill; Frank Talbot and Hattie M., who are living at home.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 209
 

ISAAC A. SHARE

I. A. Share, Marcellus, was born in La Fayette, Dec. 13, 1846,  son of J. D. Share. The latter is a farmer, residing on a farm one mile west of the village. Our subject began life at farming and then went into the furniture business, and was superintendent of Hooper's furniture factory, located first at Marcellus and afterward removed to Fort Edward. He married Nellie F. Jones, and has two children, Minnie May and Mabel L. Mrs. Share died in Feb. 1883, and Mr. Share married Nellie Burlington of Marcellus. In 1891 he gave up the furniture business and returned to Marcellus and engaged as machinist in the Crown Mills No. 2.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 209
 

JOHN N. STEARNS

John N. Stearns, Marcellus, was born in Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vt. April 13, 1856, son of George H., who was born in Sheldon in 1826 and died in 1860. John N. Stearns came to Marcellus in 1880 and commenced business in a small drug store. This business has gradually increased, until at the present time Mr. Stearns occupies the two largest stores in Marcellus. He carries a full line of drugs, paints, oils, etc., while adjoining and communicating with this store is another equal in size, where Mr. Stearns carries a full line of dry goods, groceries, hardware, etc. This business, among the largest to be found in any village of Onondaga Co., has been built up by our subject in the comparatively short time of fourteen years. He has been twice elected to the office of town clerk and is now serving his second term. He is also treasurer of the corporation. He married Emma C., daughter of B. D. Bacon of Essex Co., and has two children Jessie B. and J. Maxwell.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 210.
 

GEORGE STUCKEY

George Stuckey, Marcellus, was born in Keinton, Somersetshire, England, Sept. 17,1829, son of William and  Mary Stuckey. The family came to Skaneateles in 1842 and engaged in farming. The following year they removed to Onondaga Valley and lived two years, then returned to Skaneateles, where they remained for three years, and then settled in Marcellus where William Stuckey died. Subject was educated in Onondaga Valley and Skaneateles, then went to farming and finally purchased his present homestead in 1854. By additional purchases he has increased the size of his farm to over 200 acres, most all under a good state of cultivation. He married Fidelia Royce of Marcellus, who died in Jan. 1892. He has three children: Ida, who married J. F. DeCoudres of Syracuse; William W., who is conducting a a farm for his father, and Lewis S., who assists his father on the homestead.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 210
 

FRANK A. WILTSIE

Frank A. Wiltsie, Marcellus, was born in Marcellus Aug. 26, 1845, son of Marsh and Julia S. Wiltsie. John Wiltsie, father of Marsh, was among the first settlers in the county, before there were any roads, when every farmer carried his grain on his back and blazed the trees to mark paths. He cleared the farm on which his son Marsh resided and cultivated to the time of his death. One-half of his farm is now owned and conducted by the grandson of John Wiltsie. Our subject was educated in Skaneateles and Homer Academy, and then engaged in farming. Mr. Wiltsie has a fine farm under excellent cultivation. The family is among the oldest and best known in the county.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 211
 

JUSTUS MONROE WOODFORD

Justus Monroe Woodford, Marcellus, was born in Pompey, July 17, 1820, son of Hervey M. and Candace (Beach) Woodford. Hervey M. was born in Connecticut and moved to Pompey when he was sixteen years of age, where he resided till his death in 1876, aged 82. Subject was educated in Pompey and removed to Marcellus in 1844, and has always followed farming. Mr. Woodford's farm consists of 193 acres, under a fine state of cultivation. He married Almeda, daughter of Oliver Hovey of Marcellus, by whom he has five children: Henrietta, Josephine, Dwight B., who is in the real estate business in Syracuse; Alice, who married Homer Austin of Onondaga, since deceased; and Hervey M. Mr. Woodford is very active in Republican political affairs, and works very hard for the success of his party.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 211
 

WILLIAM B. WHITE

William B. White, Marcellus, was born in Marcellus, April 14, 1826, a son of Jeremiah G. B. and Lois White. The former was a native of Washington Co. and was a hatter and also a farmer in this town. He was born in 1794, came to the town of Marcellus about 1818, and died here Nov. 23, 1873. William B. was educated at Marcellus, and at the academy in Jordan, and started in the stove and tin business in this town in January, 1848, which he has ever since conducted, being the oldest merchant in Marcellus. He married Catherine daughter of David Bonta, of Syracuse, and has three children: Harry B., Fred G.,  and Howard, all now in school.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 211.
 

ROBERT WELSH

Robert Welsh, Marcellus, was born in Galashiels, Selkirkshire, Scotland, June 22, 1861. He went into the woolen manufacturing business in the world renowned manufacturing center of Galashiels, working his way through all the departments of the woolen manufacturing business up to designer, in which he had a large experience in some of the principal manufactories in the south of Scotland. In Sept., 1888, he came to Marcellus and went to work in the Crown mills, as designer and assistant superintendent. He married in the old country Mary Scott, also a native of Scotland, and has four children, James, Henry, Agnes Helen and Mary Roberta. Mrs. Welsh is a daughter of Henry Scott of The Burn, Lilliesleaf, Selkirkshire, Scotland.  Mr. Welsh takes an interest in religious matters, and is superintendent of the Presbyterian Sunday school in Marcellus.

    from Onondaga’s Centennial, Gleanings of a Century, edited by Dwight H. Bruce (Volume II). The Boston History Company, Publishers, 1896, p. 211


Submitted 5 March 1999
Updated 3 January 2000