Gossip, News and a Little Politics
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Gossip, News and a Little Politics

Newspaper extractions by Vivian Karen Bush

1866

J. Henry Arnout, Undertaker.
Cuba, N.Y.
Has always on hand a large and splendid assortment of
READY-MADE COFFINS.
Splendid Rosewood Caskets, Also Mahogany, Oak, Chestnut, Cherry & Soft Wood Coffins
Of all sizes, Constantly on hand.
A GOOD HEARSE
With personal attendance on funeral occasions Cuba October 25, 1865
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 27, January 5, 1866]

Alex Houden, the efficient and gentlemanly clerk of the Walker House, is we understand, soon to leave us. He is to make his future home in Louisville, KY.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 28, January 12, 1866

MarriedLong-Marsh.  At the residence of the bride's father in Kane, McKean county, Pa., on January 2d, 1866 by Rev. A. S. Goodrich, Mr. Wm. C. Long formerly of Huntington Pa. and Miss Abbie L. Marsh.  Long may they wave!
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 28, January 12, 1866]

Webster-Hastings.  In Wellsville, at the residence of Frank Rathbun, on Saturday morning, the 30th ult., by Rev. C. M. Livingston, Mr. Sydney S. Webster to Miss Mary E. Hastings, both of this village.[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 28, January 12, 1866]

Out Again.  It was with pleasure what we noticed on our streets, one day this week, O. W. Dayton, Esq., who has been confined to his house with sickness the past four months.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 29, January 19, 1866]

At Home Again.  By reference to advertisement, it will be seen that Albert B. Cosby is again at his old place of business, ready to do all work in the line of shop carpenter work, &c.[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 29, January 19, 1866]

Dentistry.  Those who need anything done to their teeth--from the extracting of a grumblin, old grinder to the putting in of a nice set of artificial masticators--should call on T. M. Talbot.  Mr. T. has had a long experience in the business and his work is all done in the most approved manner.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 29, January 19, 1866]

Coming Here.  We understand the Mr. H. Pelton, who is probably one of the best tailors in Western New York, is about to locate himself in business in this village.
--Since the above was in type, Mr. Pelton has located himself here.  His shop, for the present will be found two doors east of the Walker House, where he will not only do all kinds of cutting and making to order, but will also keep on hand an elegant assortment of Cloths, Cassimeres, and Gent's Furnishing Goods.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 29, January 19, 1866]

Rathbun's Saloon -- Should any of our citizens visit Wellsville, they should not fail to call on F. D. Rathbun, at his Restaurant.  If a “good square meal” is wanted, there it can be got.  And if a good flavored segar is required, or an after dinner exercise, round a good billiard table, it can be found there.  Rathbun keeps everything in “apple pie order” Give him a call.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 30, January 26, 1866]

DischargedChas Hyde, [ ]was arrested for shooting a brakeman, an account of which we gave at the time, has, we understand been discharged.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 30, January, 1866]

In Town.  Our genial friend and former townsman, John W. Webster, Esq. is at present stopping in town visiting among his friends.  He is hale and hearty and his jovial as ever.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 30, January 26, 1866]


Donation Party.  The friends of Rev. F. M. Alford, are respectfully invited to attend a donation party, at the Reservoir House, North Cuba, on the evening of Tuesday, the 30 of Jan 1866 --

Music by Brooks' Cotillion Band.
Committee of arrangements.
Conly Morgan and Lady.
Carter Morgan.
Harvey Conant and Lady.
Able Scott.
Freeman Sibley.
George Baldwin.
Simon Vreeland.
Charles Wales.
Milo Baldwin.
Adelbert Wilson.
Young Perry.
Daniel Comfort.v Ulysses Bradley and Lady.
John C. Adams.
Charles Guilford.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 30, January 26, 1866]

Located in Meadville.  Our old friend E. S. Griswold, well and favorably known to all Gowandians, has located himself in Meadville, Pa., where we understand he is doing a thriving business.  “Ed” is an enterprising fellow and is worthy of the patronage of the citizens of that place.  Success to him.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 31, February 2, 1866]

MarriedPark-Hills.  Int his village, on the 24th ult., by Rev. C.B. Gardner, Mr. G. W. Park and Miss Sarah Hills, all of Cuba.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 31, February 2, 1866]

Something of a Mishap.  A young gentleman from this village who was taking a sleighride with his Dulcina on Sunday last, met with quite a mishap.  While driving along between here and Black Creek, the horse shied, and he and his "ladye fayre" were capsized down an embankment.  Fortunately, however, “nobody was hurt on our side,” but the horse kept “capering along” leaving the couple to get home the best they could.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 32, February 9, 1866]

Concert.  We understand that Capt. A. S. Cole's music class is to give a concert the latter part of the present month.  We have had the pleasure of listening to one of their rehearsals, and can assure our readers of a rare musical treat.[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 33, February 16, 1866]

Farm for Sale - J. R. Johnson, of New Hudson, advertises a farm for sale.  A rare opportunity is offered to those wanting farms.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 33, February 16, 1866]

Lafayette House.  "Vet." Fay has bought the Lafayette House in this village, and will take possession on the first of April.  Substantial repairs will be made upon that time.  Maj. Reynolds & Son we learn will continue the business at the Railroad House.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 3, February 16, 1866]

Runaway.  A span of black horses, owned by Quincey Vaughn, Esq. Supervisor of New Hudson, ran away on Monday last.  They started from the residence of John Brooks, and ran to the store of Crosby & Halleck, where, after leaping a pile of boxes, one of the horses was violently thrown upon the ground. And the other was caught a few steps off.  The falling horse went with force enough to break off an oak post, 4X6.  The buggy got off with a broken axletree and tongue.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 33, February 16, 1866]

Another.  A young man by the name of Wales was run away with on Wednesday.  His horse took fright at some object, and ran a little ways up Main Street, throwing Mr. W. and a young lady who was with him to the ground, but strange to say, neither was injured.  The buggy was considerably smashed.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 33, February 16, 1866]

Editor Patriot:  I wonder if Mr. Champlain is satisfied with the effect of his silly blarney with which he tried to be-slaver the young men, to induce them to vote the democratic ticket Tuesday?  The young men of Cuba -- at least the Republican portion of them -- have sense and patriotism enough not to be caught with his chaff.  -- We propose to have our choice of candidates in the great Union party, but when disappointed in that, we do not necessarily go into the copperhead ranks and give the lie to our political professions by voting for men who were boasting of buying greenbacks as waste paper and government bonds as cheaper than wall paper, to paper their houses.  When will the honorable M. B. C. learn that what will be swallowed by his own rabble, will not go down with people of intelligence and principle, or ONE OF THE YOUNG MEN.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 34, February 24?, 1866]

Court Proceedings -- Circuit Court and Court of Oyer and Terminer held at Angelica last week and this.... the great feature of the Court was the trial of Jerome Curtiss, charged with murdering his wife, by poison.  There was a host of people in attendance during the trial which occupied three days.  Some are anxious that the prisoner should be condemned regardless of evidence; others equally anxious for an opposite result, whether innocent of guilty; while the more considerate and unprejudiced awaited calmly the result of the trial.  All the evidenced was received that could possibly have a bearing either for or against the prisoner, counsel argued the case fully, and Judge Marvin charged the jury with his usual clearness and impartiality.  The jury composed of intelligent and candid men, retired and considered the evidence for about an hour and a half, when they returned into court with a verdict of “not guilty.”  On taking the first vote, after retiring the jury were unanimous.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 34, February 24?, 1866]

MarriedTaylor-Streeter.  On Friday the 2d inst. 1866 by L. A. Reynolds, Esq. at his residence in Cuba, Mr. Barnard H. Taylor of Bangor, Me., to Miss Clara J. Streeter, of Clarksville, N.Y.
Chamberlain-Castiline. By the same, March 3d, 1866, Mr. Melvin Chamberlain of Madison, Wis., to Miss Sarah Jane Castiline of Elmira, NY.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 34, February 24?, 1866]

In Town.  A.C. Bishop, formerly of this village, who has been staying the past year in Idaho, is at present stopping in town.  We understand he is going into business in New York.[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 38, March 23, 1866]

Morg. Addison, of Wellsville, a short time since made a run of 117 points in a game of billards.  Frank Rathbun offers a purse of $25 to any man in the county who can beat Addison 1000 points up.  Where's “California” Adams?
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 38, March 23, 1866]

Back Again.  “Cal.” Reynolds who has so long been connected with the Brandreth House, New York, as Clerk, has returned to this village.  We understand that he goes into the Railroad House with his father this spring.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 39, March 30, 1866]

Also, a boy by the name of Cartwright aged about 14 years, came very near losing his life on the same day [Monday, last], by boring a hole in a log and charging it with powder, and then placing a coal of fire upon the same.  This failing to ignite the powder, he got down and commenced blowing the coal-- succeeded to his satisfaction in blowing up the log, and himself too. -- Free Press.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 39, March 30, 1866]

Carrying the Mail.  We understand the Mr. Geo. Keller has received the contract for carrying the mail from this village to the depot.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 39, March 30, 1866]

We regret to learn that M. H. Green has been extremely ill with congestion of the lungs since his removal to Rochester.  He is now convalescent.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 39, March 30, 1866]

MarriedFletcher - Gordon.  In this town, on the evening of the 20th inst., by Rev. J. C. Nobles, Mr. Wm. A. Fletcher of Virginia City, Montana Territory, and Miss Nellie L. Gordon, of Cuba.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 39, March 30, 1866]

NoticeWm. S. Johnson, has been requested by some of his customers to close his barber shop on Sunday, but for various reasons he declines to do so at present.  He gives notice, however, that after May first he will charge five cents extra for all work done on Sunday.  In due time he intends to close his shop entirely on that day.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 41, April 13, 1866]

Going West.  G. Benjamin, one of the old veteran Republicans of Friendship, has disposed of his property in that town, and is soon to remove to the West.  Mr. G. has a twelfth interest in some 2,000 acres of the best coal and mineral lands in Indiana.  These lands are located in Fountain County, and are extremely rich.  A company has been formed which is now engaged in mining.  At a regular meeting of the Board on the 20th ult. Mr. Benjamin was elected one of the Directors of the Company.  Mr. B. Will take with him to his Western home the well wishes of a host of friends from old Allegany.  May prosperity attend him.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 41, April 13, 1866]

Thanks.  We are under obligations to W. B. Colson Jr., of Central City, Colorado, for the late papers from that territory.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 44, May 4, 1866]

Sidewalks.  The sidewalk on the North side of Spring street, is in a most dilapidated condition.  It is dangerous to pass over it after dark.  How long is it to remain so?
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 44, May 4, 1866]

Base Ball.  We shall see that clubs are forming all over the state, for the purpose of enjoying the vigorous pastime.  The young men of Cuba should not be behind hand in such matters.  A meeting will be held at the Lafayette House, on Saturday evening next, for the purpose of organizing for the season.  Turn out.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 44, May 4, 1866]

Truth and Poetry.  E. K. Jenkins & Co., who have just started a new grocery, provision and Yankee notion store in No. 2 Railroad Block, appear before our readers with a half column advertisement this week.  Their stock of good is all new and fresh, and they guarantee to sell at the bottom prices.  Read their advertisement.  In it you will find the poetry, and by calling at their store, you will find the truth of what they say.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 44, May 4, 1866]

Thieves About.  One day last week two shawls were stolen from the wagon of W. W. Everts, while it was standing under the Baptist shed.  We also learn of several clothes-lines being robbed in this village.  – Our citizens should be on the look out for these light-fingered gentry.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 44, May 4, 1866]


We are under obligations to J. Hallack, of the firm of Crosby & Hallack, druggists for the present of a package of excellent old Java Coffee.  Bye-the-way, see Crosby & Hallack's new advertisement.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 44, May 4, 1866]

Our thanks also due R. Hills, Esq., for a pound of the one dollar tea which he speaks about in another column.  We have tested the article and pronounce it excellent.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 44, May 4, 1866]

Temperance and Literary Society.  The young people of the town of Cuba, are requested to meet at Empire Hall on Saturday evening, for the purpose of organizing a Temperance and Literary Society.  A full attendance is requested.  It is proposed to secure the services of some of the popular lecturers of the State, and also to open a reading room under the supervision of the members.  It is hoped that every young person in town will take and active part, as it is an organization that will prove not only interesting but very beneficial to all.  Many Young Men.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 44, May 4, 1866]

Gordon's Column.  The attention of every reader of The True Patriot is directed to Gordon's column advertisement, which appears in our paper to-day.  Gordon is doing a thriving business at the old Banner Store, and he is bound to still increase his trade.  His reputation as a fair and honorable dealer is wide-spread, and from the fact the he sells goods at a small profit from the first cost secure him a constant throng of customers.  His store is always well filled notwithstanding the drain on his stock, as he secures goods almost daily from New York.  If you want to get dry goods cheap, give Gordon a call.  You will always find what you want there.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 44, May 4, 1866]

The Small Pox Case.  The case of small pox, one mile south of this village, is progressing favorably, and no new cases have, or probably will occur.  The case is under the treatment of Dr. C. J. Reynolds, one of the most skillful physicians in this section, who has taken every precaution necessary in the premises; while the service of Mr. Conner, a careful and discreet nurse have been secured for the patient.  We understand that exaggerated stories are afloat to the effect that the case alluded to above is in this village.  Such is not the case.  Cuba is free from all infectious diseases, and is at present as it ever has been, one of the most healthy villages in Western New York.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 44, May 4, 1866]

Erratum.  In speaking of the sidewalks on Spring street, last week, we mentioned that on the North side.  We take back what we said, as this walk is far superior to the South side, which we intended to mention.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 45, May 11, 1866]

Emigration.  On Monday of last week, twenty-one left our village for Sunrise City, Minnesota, expecting thereby to better their condition in life.  The number emigrating West this spring is quite unparalleled in the history of our village.  Springville Tribune.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 45, May 11, 1866]

Something New!  Gordon of the Banner store has for sale the new silver hoop skirt, which is superior in all respects to any other skirt manufactured.  The steel springs are wound with a fine plated wire (in place of a cotton covering) which will not wear off or become soiled, and the whole skirt may be washed without injury or fear of rusting, and will be as good as new.  These skirts Mr. Gordon is selling at extremely low prices, and in fact he has marked down all his goods to the lowest market prices.  Give him a call.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 45, May 11, 1866]

MarriedReynolds-Webster.  At the residence of the bride's father in Black Creek on Wednesday May 2d Mr. E. P. Reynolds of this village, and Miss Sarah Webster of the former place. No cards.
...d, what have you done? Did you stop to consider the “responsibilities?”  Here's a tear for your departed bachelorhood.--
Gallup-Nash.  At the residence of the bride's father, in this village, on the -th inst. by the Rev. C. B. Gardner, Mr. Gerdon Gallup and Miss Hannah Nash, all of this village. [crease in paper] 
We would return our thanks to the happy pair for kindly remembering the printers.  May their lives be long and prosperous.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 45, May 11, 1866]

Returned.  Mr. Geo. H. Swift, so well known in this vicinity, who has been stopped for the past year in Corry, Pa., has returned to this village.  We understand he intends to take up his residence among us again.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 48, June 1, 1866]

Runaway.  On Monday afternoon last, a horse owned by a Mr. LeBarr, of Clarksville, took fright and dashed down Main street and up Spring to Chamberlain's Mills.  here the animal became detached from the buggy, after which he ran up one of the newly laid out streets to the woods, some half a mile south west of this village, where he was at length caught.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 48, June 1, 1866]

Brevetted.  It is with pleasure that we announced that Col. Rufus Scott, of this county, has been brevetted Brigadier General.  The brevetting of Col. Scott is but an act of justice to one of the most gallant and meritorious officers of the late war.
Col. Scott, at the commencement of the rebellion, enlisted as a private, and by gallant conduct worked himself up step by step to the position which he held at the close of the rebellion.  During the war he was seven times wounded.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 48, June 1, 1866]

Fire in Andover.  A most destructive file occurred in the village of Andover in this county on the 24th ult., which broke out in Ford's hotel and before the flames could be checked, the following business places were destroyed: Ford's hotel, Bynes' Hotel, J. C. Dyer's store, Van Sickle & Burrow's store, P. Swiink's store, M. J. Ellis' store, L. H. Mason's hotel, J. H. Elwell's cabinet shop, H. P. Benton's drug store and Higgenbottom's store -- Loss $22,100 Insurance $12, 900.  Besides the above the old Congregational church, two dwellings, two barns, and a number of small buildings were burned.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 48, June 1, 1866]

Notice.  Notice is hereby given that my wife Pluma A. Frost having left my bed and board without any just cause or provocation all persons are forbid harboring or trusting her on my account, as I shall pay no debts of her contracting after this date.  Alvin Frost.  New Hudson, May 28th, 1866.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 48, June 1, 1866]

To Leave Town.  We learn that Prof. Vosburg is intending to leave town after the close of the present term of his school.  While we deeply regret the loss of so good a citizen, we wish him success wherever he may cast his lot.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 50, June 15, 1866]

Decidedly Cool.  Mrs. W. H. Johnston will open an ice cream room at her residence one door east of the Walker House, about the 20th of June, and those who are partial to that delicious and cooling dish will always find her in readiness to wait upon them.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 50, June 15, 1866]

Gale.  Quite a heavy gale passed over our village on Monday, unroofing one barn and tearing shade-trees to quite an extent.  The wind is getting to be quite unruly of late.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 52, June 29, 1866]

Accident.  On Thursday evening of last week, David Randolph, son of S. Randolph, of this village, while clambering around on one of the sheds attached to the Depot, fell and dislocated his shoulder.  He was attended to by Dr. Parker and Ashley, and is at present doing well.[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 52, June 29, 1866]

Hunting Match.  We understand that the young men of New Hudson are to have a hunting match on July 3d.  Two parties are to start out, and the one returning with the least game, is to furnish a dinner for the Nimrods on the “Fourth.”  The dinner will be given in this village, we learn.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 52, June 29, 1866]

Police.  The following is a list of those who have been appointed to act as special police on the 4th:  H .J. Swift, Geo. W. Pratt, Geo. W. Baldwin, Chas. Bigelow, Edwin C. Brandley, Gilbert S. Boos, William Keller, H. E. Stanley, Henry C. Hendricks, C. H. Phelps, Ira B. Wells, William Roberts, Robt. G. Hermance, Lyman S. Scott, John J. Helper.[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 52, June 29, 1866]

Ischua Aqueduct.  The Ischua Aqueduct, at Hinsdale, which gave way, under the supervision of the division Superintendent H. H. Wakely, Esq., of Black Creek, is being rapidly repaired.  We are assured that it soon will be in far better condition than it was before.  Mr. Wakely is one of the best Superintendents on the Genesee Valley Canal and whenever any repairs are needed on his section, the necessary work is promptly done.
[CTP, Vol. IV, No. 52, June 29, 1866]

Accident.  We understand that Mrs. Rowley, mother of J. W. Rowley, Esq., Cashier of Cuba National Bank, was thrown from a carriage and seriously injured on Friday last.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 1, July 6, 1866]

Something of a Tornado.  On Tuesday evening of last week, quite a tornado passed through the town of New Hudson, about six miles northwest of this village.  Buildings were unroofed and trees uprooted or twisted off and prostrated to the ground.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 1, July 6, 1866]

Accident.  While Mr. Conley Campbell, of New Hudson, was returning home from the Celebration in this village, on Wednesday, his horses became frightened, and jumping suddenly, threw a young lady by the name of Beckwith out of the wagon, injuring her badly.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 1, July 6, 1866]

Personal.  We were honored, on the “Fourth” by a call from Major W. H. Withey, of Richburg.  The major enlisted at the outbreak of the rebellion, as a private, and was promoted for meritorious conduct.  He is one of the men that Allegany has reason to be proud of.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 1, July 6, 1866]

Fire.  At about half past twelve o'clock on Wednesday morning, in the midst of the ringing of church bells, and crackling of bon-fires, the alarm of fire was given.  It was soon discovered that the barn belonging to R. D. Charles was burning.  Although every effort was used to extinguish the flames, it was impossible to do so, before this barn, and another one belonging to J. W. Rowley, was destroyed.  The residence of both gentlemen were in danger, but the greatest efforts on the part of the citizens, they were saved.  Although suspicion rests upon no particular person, it is generally supposed that this was the work of incendiarism, and it will become our citizens to look out for their property in the future.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 1, July 6, 1866]

Lieut. Springer did good service in defense of “the old flag”, and we were glad to chronicle the fact that he has now enlisted “for better or for worse.”  That the gallant Lieutenant and his beautiful bride will live prosperous and happy is evident by the quantity and quality of cake, etc., sent to the printers.  May health, wealth, and-- posterity attend them.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 1, July 6, 1866]

The Hay Crop.  Farmers are at present busily engaged in securing the hay crop.  We understand that grass in this section is remarkably heavy and of excellent quality.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 2, July 13, 1866]

To the Sick.  Dr. Jackson can be consulted at his Office, in the Charles Hotel, Angelica, N. Y., until August 11th– the sick should bear this in mind.  Recollect he is at home until August 11th.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 2, July 13, 1866]

Layfayette House Billiard Rooms.  _. B. Fay of the Lafayette House, has now in running order the Billard Rooms connected with his very excellent Hotel.– the rooms are under the direct supervision of “Ad” Stiles, who knows just how to keep everything in “apple-pie” order.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 2, July 13, 1866]

Personal.“” Prof. H. Vosburg, formerly of this village, has been here for a few days past, paying his friends a brief visit.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 2, July 13, 1866]

Coal Depot.  The McKean Co. Bituminous Coal Company have made this village a depot for shipping coal to all points on the Genesee Valley Canal and Erie Canal. A “shute” will soon be built at the depot, so that the coal can be immediately unloaded from the cars, and transferred down into the boats.  A side-track is also to be laid by the company for the accommodation of their business.  At present the coal is taken from the cars and drawn to the canal by teams.  The agents, Messrs. Jasper Palmer & Bro., we notice, are busily engaged in superintending the shipping of the “black diamonds,” and the new enterprise in Cuba adds still more life to our already lively town.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 2, July 13, 1866]

Married.  Tracy-Orton.  At the residence of the bride's father, in this village, on the 6th of last month, by the Rev. C. B. Gardiner, Mr. Frank E. Tracy and Miss Mary E. Orton.
Adams-Chapman.  In this village, July 4th inst. by Rev. S. W. Titus, Mr. Warren G. Adams, of Farmersville, and Miss Abbie J. Chapman, of Lyndon.[CTP, Vol. V, No. 2, July 13, 1866]

As a Matter of Course.  We had the pleasure on Tuesday last, of an introduction to, and conversation with, Capt. Levi Curtiss, of Oramel.  Capt. Curtiss went out early in the rebellion, to assist in vindicating the stars and stripes.  At that time he was, to use his own language, a rabid pro-slavery Democrat.  Such he remained, and though rebel property should be guarded and runaway negroes should be returned to their masters, and he assisted in guarding such property and returning such runaway negroes, until Banks' famous retreat.  That opened his eyes.– “Those same d–d cusses, whom we had befriended– over whose preoperty we had placed guards for its protection– whose niggers we had returned– when we were, with some five thousand men, ‘digging out' of the away of Jackson's twenty-five thousand rebels, stood at their windows and shot our men down as they passed by! That cured me!”  It is needless to say that Capt. Curtiss, like most of those who took up arms in defense of our country, is a Republican now– “to the backbone.”
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 2, July 13, 1866]

Dr. Sellen.  By reference to the Supplement which we send out in our paper this week, it will be seen that Dr. Sellen, of Ithaca, an honorable member of the Philadelphia Hahneman Association, will be at the Lafayette House, in this village on the 31st inst., where he can be consulted by those afflicted with Catarrh, Consumption, diseases of the Liver, and all Nervous and Rheumatic difficulties.  Dr. Sellen is a physician of experience in all diseases which the human flesh is heir to, but he makes the above specified a specialty, and the many cures which he effects are the strongest of arguments in favor of his Tar Compounds.  The Ithaca Journal says of him: “Not being a physician we refrain from prouncing an opinion on subjects purely medical and therefore do not attempt to decide the merits of Dr. Sellen's Prepared Tar, for the cure of the throat and lungs. But this we say, as every one can see for themselves, that Dr. Sellen is certainly performing many v ery surprising cures, or else people are woefully self deluded, as the certificates he publishes from time to time are from persons entirely honest, and who can have no motive in stating anything but the truth as they understand it.  We certainly congratulate the Dr. and his success, and expect to see him prosper still more as the merits of his medicine become better understood and appreciated.”
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 2, July 13, 1866]

Of-fish-al.  We tender our thanks to Mrs. T. Lancster and Miss Stone for some most excellent fish, caught in Lime Lake.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 3, July 20, 1866]

Lettuce Tell!  Collins Bradley Esq., of this village, has a superior kind of lettuce.  We have tested it, and know it to be so.  Fact!
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 3, July 20, 1866]

We've Got it.  We've got the cigar.  “Cal” Reynolds called us in the other evening, and went through with the presentation ceremonies, and then we took off our hat and made an eloquent (?) Speech, after which we came off full of glee and with a “choice Havana” in our pocket.  A thousand thanks, “Cal.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 3, July 20, 1866]

Ira ClizbeIra Clizbe, who is well-known in this section as the former proprietor of the Banner Store, is doing a thriving business at West Greenville, Pa., judging from his mammoth advertisement in the village paper there.  Clizbe is one of the most sensible and thorough-going business men in the world.  He goes at it in the right way– by using printers ink– and is bound to succeed.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 3, July 20, 1866]

Runaway.  On Tuesday last, a team belonging to Mr. Amsden, who resides east of this village, took quite a lively run through Main Street.  They soon became detached from the wagon, but continued, their headlong course to the lower end of the street.  A son of Mr. A, who was driving was slightly injured.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 3, July 20, 1866]

Alfred University.  The reputation that this institution is so justly acquiring, and the benefit that it is bestowing on surrounding communities render it an object of interest and not only to those interested directly in the great work of education, but to individuals engaged in every business or avocation in which man gains a livelihood.

It is with pride that we notice the number of students which Cuba has afforded to this institution, and the creditable manner in which they have conducted themselves. We believe that nine have been in attendance the past year from our town, six of whom were appointed to position on different Anniversary Programmes of the Lyceums.  R. A. Waterbury delivered the Salutatory of the Orophilean Lyceum– subject, “Our Country's Strength.”  G. W. Haight delivered the Valedictory, having for his subject “The Grandeur of Mind.”  Cuba was represented on the programme of the Ladies' Atheneum Society by the Oration of Miss Adelia Freeborn, on “Thought and Action,”  and also the Valedictory Address by Miss M. E. Setchell– subject, “What is Dark on Earth is bright in Heaven.”  Miss Sarah L. Waterbury, together with Miss Florence A. Bard, of New Hudson, represented the Atheneum Society on the Anniversary Programme on Commencement day.  H. J. Swift, formerly on Alfred student, read a poem before the Orophileants, entitled “Footprints on the Shore,” which elicited commendation.  Miss Mary M. Campbell, a former graduate, was on the programme of the Ladies' Alfredian Society, and delivered a very interesting oration.
Although a few other towns may rival Cuba in the number of representation, yet we think none can boast of a better stray of talent than is here presented.  May this reputation be sustained, and as Cuba now surpasses any other town in the county in the amount and activity of its business, so may it be celebrated for the moral and intellectual superiority of its society.  C.L.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 3, July 20, 1866]

Personal.  Jasper Palmer has gone to Pithole, and will resume his old position in the drug store of Dr. Acomb.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 5, August 3, 1866]

“Ad” Stevens -- the genial, jovial “Ad” -- was in town on a visit a few days since.  He is in an extensive hardware store at Titusville.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 5, August 3, 1866]

Wm. Ormiston has gone west looking for a business location.  May he “wax fat” and grow rich in his prairie home.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 5, August 3, 1866]

Leander Richardson, who has been rusticating in Wisconsin for some time past, returned last week.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 5, August 3, 1866]

Prof. Kenyon has resigned the Presidency of Alfred University.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 5, August 3, 1866]

Cuba Select School.  J. B. Foot, Esq., will open a select school in the district school rooms, in this village, on Monday, August 20.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 6, August 9, 1866]

List of letters remaining in the Postoffice at Cuba, August 9, 1866:  Miss Sue Alexander, John Allen, Wessley Ballard (3) Mrs J. J. Briggs, John Blossom, Anson Clement, John Coon, Mrs. Elisna Clark, John Dymond, John Hill, Jas Hide, P. W. Johnson, Enos Karn, James M Martin, Curtis Root, Moses Samuel, Miss Marie Strong, Wm. M Smith, Mrs. Clementine S. Whitney, R. Whitman, Mildey Whitmore
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 6, August 9, 1866]

Personal.  Hon. Martin Grover of Angelica was in town Tuesday.  If true, as is reported, that he is liking for Gubernatorial honors this fall, we kindly warn him that a disting'shed citizen of this town -- an ancientival of the Judge -- has an old promise which must first be fulfilled.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 6, August 9, 1866]

W. H. Bradford was in town one day this week.  He is in business in Tidiout.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 6, August 9, 1866]

Herman Dickinson, Esq., is extremely ill at his residence in this village.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 6, August 9, 1866]

A fallen angel -- W. P. Angel, delegate elect to the Philadelphia Convention.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 6, August 9, 1866]

Accidents At Belmont.   Two men fell from a new building in Belmont, one day last week, and a heavy beam fell upon them, injuring one of the men, a Mr. Barritt, severely if not fatally.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 7, August 17, 1866]

A man by the name of Austin, while drawing in a load of hay, had his horses run away, and he was thrown from the load receiving serious injuries.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 7, August 17, 1866]

The Rising Man.  We notice that Ira Cutler, of Almond was appointed at Saratoga as one of the delegates to the Philadelphia Convention from this Congressional district.
We are inclined to think Mr. Cutler is now a rising man of the county.  “Up like a rocket, down like a stick.”  This week his course is upward.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 7, August 17, 1866]

New School building.  We are glad to notice the erection of a new school building in our village, and J. H. Waterbury, himself a graduate of Dartmouth College, has procured as his assistant the services of a graduate of our State Normal School.  He intends to open about the 1st of September a first-class English and Classical School.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 7, August 17, 1866]

Dr. Jackson informs us that he will remain at his office in the Charles Hotel, Angelica, until Sept. 1st and that during court week he will attend strictly to all calls from the sick.  All persons wishing to consult him should do so during this month, as he must be absent during most of September.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 7, August 17, 1866]

Cuba Banking Co.  We are authorized by Mr. L. F. Lawton to say that this Company will commence business Sept. 1, with ample facilities for the transaction of general banking business.  Office in Empire Block, over Story's Store.  Asher W. Miner is President, and L. F. Lawton, Cashier.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 7, August 17, 1866]

Sewing Machines.  Wm. M. Roberts, of this village is agent for two different Sewing Machines -- the Bartlett and the AEtna.  These Machines are cheap, and are said to do excellent work.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 7, August 17, 1866]

Married:  Lawton-Marshall.  At Auburn, on the 31st ult., by the Rev. John Brainard, Rector of St. Peter's Church, Mr. L. F. Lawton, of Cuba and Miss Helen M. Marshall, of Auburn.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 7, August 17, 1866]

Found!  In this village, on Saturday last, a lady's CAMEO BREAST PIN.  The owner, can have the same by calling at R. Charles' Harness Shop, and paying charges.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 7, August 17, 1866]

CUBA SELECT SCHOOL
Miss E. Culver's Select School will open on Monday, September 3, 1863
Terms of Tuition -- $2.00
No scholars are taken for less than half a term.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 7, August 17, 1866]

Lost!  In this village, on Wednesday last, a Gent's Scarf Pin.  The finder will confer a favor by returning it to B. Franklin.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 7, August 17, 1866]

Sign and Ornamental Painting.  J. F. Parker, of Ellicottville, having located himself in this village is prepared to do all kinds of sign and ornamental painting.  At present he can be found over Bruce's carriage shop.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 8, August 24, 1866]

List of Letters remaining in the Postoffice at Cuba, August 23, 1866:  Bowers, James M 2; Bostwick, Miss Annie; Compton, Sarah J.; Clark, Henry; Mills, M.; McHuff, Miss Mary; Perry, Jewitt C.; Smith, Ruben; Wilkinson, Livonia; Waterbury, Florance
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 8, August 24, 1866]

Taking the Grease out of his Stomach.  On Wednesday morning last, Henry Simms, "“ge'm'n of color,” of this village, feeling the want of his regular toddy, concluded to take some of the “critter.” He took down a bottle, and took a long deep swig.  By mistake he drank from a bottle containing a mixture of benzene and ammonia, which he used for cleaning clothes.  The consequence was he succeeded in taking the grease out of his stomach, but the experiment nearly cost him his life.
P.S. Simms is better.  He threw up three copies of the Democratic Era, of a late date, and a copy of one of Hon. M. B. Champlain's temperance circulars which he issued when running for Senator.[CTP, Vol. V, No. 8, August 24, 1866]

Don't' “Wash his Hands”.  The following “card” was intended for the Era, but as the True Patriot is issued first, it is handed to us.  We publish it through courtesy:

	Editor Era: "Having not discontinued my connection with the True Patriot, I consider it due to my numerous Democratic friends, throughout the Unites States, to state that although I am the "Printer's Devil' of that office, " such connection is merely nominal!  While I have been connected with the office, I have never written a political article!"  And as I shall be a voter in about nine years, "I would have it distinctly understood that I am strongly in favor of the President's policy."  "I would also say in this connection" that I admire the gentlemanly and considerate course your paper has taken -- its candid manly views and its "high-toned ennobling" editorials, so free form "persona" attacks on its "political opponents!"  Knowing that this statement will have a great effect on the forth-coming election.  I am
	   Yours &c., Master Willie Edwards,
				"Printer's Devil."
P.S. -- I don't “wash my hands,” literally or figuratively.  It's a prerogative of the Democratic party to be “unwashed and unterrified.” W. E.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 8, August 24, 1866]

CHRIST CHURCH SCHOOL

The subscriber will open an English and classical school in the village of Cuba, on Monday, Sept. 10th, in the new building erected for that purpose. He will teach and give personal attention to every scholar committed to his care.
Miss Florence Carde,
a graduate of the State Normal School, also having an experience of several years in the public schools of Oswego, NY, will have charge of the primary department.
Terms $4 $5 and $6, according to grade.
Books sold and rented of the Rector.  Discipline and morality will have due attention.  Parents and guardians, are requested to confer with  J. H. Waterbury, A.M. Rector.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 10, September 7, 1866]

FurnitureMr. Colson will sell furniture for the next sixty days cheaper than ever.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 10, September 7, 1866]

Sold out.  Milo F. Baldwin, the genial proprietor of the Reservoir House, has disposed of his hotel property to a gentleman from the east.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 10, September 7, 1866]

A Delegate.  The Loyal League of Patterson, N. J., sent a delegation of fifty of its members to the Southern Loyal Convention.  Among the names of those sent we notice that of our friend J. M. Merritt, formerly of this village.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 10, September 7, 1866]

Jumping Match.  A jumping match for $1,000 a side is to take place in Olean on Monday, October 1st, between Bob Way, of this village, and a gentleman from Detroit.  “Tall jumping” can be expected on the occasion, as Way has never yet been beaten, while the friends of the Detroit man are confident of success.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 10, September 7, 1866]

Angelica Academy.  This institution will be opened on Thursday, the 13th inst.  The Principle (sic), C. S. Richardson, A. B. of Geneva.  Music Teacher, Miss M. E. Westcot, of Elmira College.  Angelica, Sept. 3, 1866.  L. Thibou, Pres.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 10, September 7, 1866]

For Sale. At a Bargain! Ward's Hotel, Allegany, NY.

A first-class Hotel, situated on the line of the Erie R., in a nice village of one thousand inhabitants, and a good framing country surrounding it.  The village contains a first class college, seminary, and a tannery.  This hotel has all the modern improvements, very convenient and well furnished, and only a few steps from the depot.  Being the only hotel in town, there is no opposition, and the house is doing a good paying business.  The proprietor desires to sell on account of declining health.  Apply by letter or at Ward's Hotel.  (5-9m6) M. A. Ward, Allegany, N.Y.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 10, September 7, 1866]

New Boot and Shoe Store.  Mr. Ryan, of Belmont is soon to open a large boot and shoe establishment, one door east of Mead's hardware store, in this village.  In connection with the manufacture of work to order, he will keep at extensive assortment of Eastern work.  Mr. Ryan is an enterprising business man, and we are glad that he has decided to establish himself here and thus add with his business still greater thrift to our village.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 12, September 21, 1866]

List of Letters remaining in the Post office Sept 21, 1866.  Franklin Austin, G B Atwater, Mr R Baker, Daniel Britton, Mr W H Browning, Wm W Burton, Miss Ida C. Benson, Mrs. Anna Davis, Harry DeForest, Samuel C Drew, Augustus G Eaton, Mrs P A Frost, Benjamin H. Gardner, John Hill 2, Miss S M Hildreth, Edwards Hogard, Isaac Libbee, John Maxwell, Delivan Morse, Mrs Riley Merrill, James McGrath, C D Noyes, J M Paul, Clara Russell, Benjamin Snyder, Charles D Smith, Rodgers & Smith, Edgar Tufts, Mrs E A Vosburg, Mrs R Van Vleck, Stewart R Valentine, John Welch, Rev L. L. Wellman, Hiram, Warner, Jeremiah Willdey, Myron Watson, J H Young, Theodon F Young.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 12, September 21, 1866]

Married.  Dillingham-Weast.  At the Cuba House September 4, by Rev. S. W. Titus, Mr. A. R. Dillingham, of Machias, and Miss Kate West, of Ashford.
Ludwig-Talcott.   At the residence of the bride's father, Sept 17, by Rev. S. W. Titus, Mr. Edwin F. Ludwig, of Augusta, Ga., and Miss Laura E. Talcott, of Cuba, N.Y.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 12, September 21, 1866]

Accident.  On Tuesday night last, Mr. Ben. Baldwin, of Rushford, was thrown from his sulky near Smith's mills in this village, and considerably bruised.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 13, September 28, 1866]

Horses Stolen.  We understand that Chamberlain and Whitcomb, of Belmont, had a team, wagon and harness run off to Pennsylvania lately, by a man whose virtue is not above suspicion.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 13, September 28, 1866]

Acknowledgments.  Our thanks are due to D. H. Willard, Esq., Zanesville, Ohio, for late Western papers.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 13, September 28, 1866]

Union Meeting at Belmont.  A large and enthusiastic Union Republican meeting was held in the Court House, in Belmont, on Wednesday evening of last week.  The meeting was addressed by Hon. Hamilton Ward, Wilkes Angel and General Rufus Scott.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 13, September 28, 1866]

An Aspirant.  We understand that a young man named Mapes, or Mopes, of Belmont, aspires to be the Copperhead candidate for School Commissioner in this district.  On that ticket he would be “the right man in the right place.”  Should he be nominated he will certainly be elected -- to stay at home!
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 13, September 28, 1866]

Fatal Accident in Friendship.  We learn that an accident, resulting in the death of a young man whose name we did not learn, occurred at Friendship on Saturday afternoon last.  A number of young men were target-shooting, when the target becoming disarranged, the victim of the sad occurrence handed his rifle to one of his friends, and went to fix it.  While doing so, the gun was discharged, the ball taking effect, in the body of the unfortunate man, producing wounds from which he died soon after.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 13, September 28, 1866]

New Branch of Business in Cuba.  It is with pleasure we announce that in the course of ten days an extensive tobacco and cigar manufactory will be opened in this village, by Messrs. Grant and Worthington.  Messrs G.& W. are old and experienced tobacconists from Connecticut Valley, and after looking all through Western New York for a place to locate, have fixed upon Cuba as the best point for their business.  They are both enterprising men, and their success in business here is certain.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 13, September 28, 1866]

The “Great” Jumping Match.  The great jumping match came off at Olean on Tuesday last, and proved to be a great humbug.  Bob Way, who has heretofore claimed to be the champion jumper of the United States was beaten by Norm Bartol, of Canandagua.  The farthest jump was only 12 feet 5 inches, and that was made on slightly descending ground.  It would look as though Bob “sold” his friends.  At any rate, he can't get a man in this section to bet a picayune on his head hereafter.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 14, October 5, 1866]

Cuba Depot.  A few weeks since we noticed that the Erie Railway Depot at this place was being materially enlarged and made more convenient in order to accommodate the rapidly increasing business at this point. Since then the repairs have been completed, and the Cuba depot is now conceded to be the best arranged and most convenient of any on the line.  The telegraph office, in particular, is deserving of mention. Under the supervision of the operator, Mr. R. Talcott, it has been fitted up and furnished, and the walls embellished with numerous beautiful engravings, until it presents more the appearance of a young lady's boudoir than a telegraph office, were it not for the incessant “click, click” of the instruments.
--In this connection we would say that nowhere on the line of the road can more gentlemanly and efficient employees be found than at this station.  Mr. Maxon, the Agent, has held the position for a number of years, with credit to himself and honor to the Company; Mr. Briggs, the Baggageman, is always on hand; while Mr. Talcott, as an Operator, has no superior.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 15, October 12, 1866]

Married:  Briggs-Boon. In this village, Oct. 9, by Rev. S. W. Titus, Mr. N. H. Briggs and Miss B. B. Boon, all of this village.

  "No greater Boon is craved
  From angel hands above,
Than that most precious thing,
  True-hearted woman's love."

[CTP, Vol. V, No. 15, October 12, 1866]

Hillside Saloon.  Kinney Loomis has disposed of the Hillside Saloon and Restaurant to Mr. C. Balcom.  Mr. B. is an enterprising man; and will keep everything in “apple-pie order.”
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 16, October 19, 1866]

Musical Convention.  A Musical Convention, under the direction of Prof. J.D. Towner, will commence at Belfast on Tuesday, the 30th inst., and continue four days, closing with a grand concert.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 16, October 19, 1866]

Appointment.  We understand that Col. A. J. McNett, formerly commanding the 141st New York Volunteers, has received the appointment of a Captaincy in the regular army.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 16, October 19, 1866]

Sold Out.  A. K. Walker has disposed of his interest in the Walker House, in this village, to a gentleman from Cattaraugus.  Mr. W. will hereafter be found officiating as Clerk at the Lafayette House.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 16, October 19, 1866]

Select School.  The second term of Miss Emma Setchell's Select School will commence on Monday next, in the building formerly occupied by Miss M. Dickinson.  Terms of tuition:  Primery (sic) Department $3.  high branches $4.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 16, October 19, 1866]


New Dry-Goods Store  Mr. G. D. Swift and Mr. A. D. Crosby are about to open a dry-goods store, in Swift's Building, on South st., in this village.  Both of these gentlemen are well and favorably known in this section, and they will receive their share of trade from the people of this section.  Success to them.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 16, October 19, 1866]

Railroad Accident - Cubans Injured.  An express train on the Atlantic & Great Western Railway ran off the track and went down an embankment forty feet on Wednesday last, seriously injuring thirty passengers.  No one was killed.  Among those injured were Mr. and Mrs. Geo. H. Swift, of this village.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 16, October 19, 1866]

RemovedThomas Orton, a son of Deacon Orton of this village, has been removed form the office of U.S. Assessor for the Sixth District of Illinois, because he refused to eat dirt with Andrew Johnson....
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 16, October 19, 1866]

Kerosene Lamp explosion.  On Wednesday morning last Winslow Wilkinson was attempting to extinguish a kerosene lamp which had been kept burning in the hall all night, it exploded with a loud report, scattering the oil and glass in all directions, and knocking “William Winslow” down.  Wilkinson's face was considerably cut by the flying glass, and he was well covered with oil, but beyond this nothing serious resulted.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 16, October 19, 1866]

Nile Cheese Factory.  We have received by the hands of our friend, J. J. Barker, Esq., a mammoth “hunk” of cheese from the Nile Factory, which for creamy richness and excellence of flavor cannot be surpassed.  We are indebted to the Maker, Mr. W. H. Wells, for the present...
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 16, October 19, 1866]

Fenian Circle.  A circle of the Fenian brotherhood was organized in this village on Wednesday evening last, by Mr. P. O'Connell, of Whitesville.  The meeting, for the first evening, was well attending, quite a number coming forward and joining, both Irish and American citizens...
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 16, October 19, 1866]

First Snow.  The first snow of the season fell in this vicinity on Wednesday morning last.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 17, October 26, 1866]

Got His Price.  W. F. Bement has been appointed Postmaster in this village, in place of L. A. Butts, resigned.  He didn't expect it. (?)
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 17, October 26, 1866]

Select School.  Miss Nellie M. Rice will open a select school for Masters & Misses in rooms at her home, first dwelling north of Foot bridge, on Monday Nov. 5th 1866.  Terms of tuition, two dollars if paid in advance.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 17, October 26, 1866]

Kicked by a Horse!  Edwin Boss, the driver of the Omnibus to and from the Depot, in this village, was kicked in the breast by one of his horses on Tuesday last, and badly injured.  The iron corks of the horse's shoe struck Mr. B.'s watch, (a heavy cased hunter) or the results would undoubtedly have been worse.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 18, November 2, 1866]

Union Meeting at Black Creek.  A rousing Union Meeting was held at Black Creek on Wednesday evening, which was addressed by the Hon Hamilton Ward.  The church was packed by the sturdy Republican farmers of New Hudson, and Mr. Ward made one of the most eloquent addresses that we have listened to during the campaign.  The Cuba Cornet Band and Cuba Glee Club were on hand and discoursed elegant music. Great credit is due to those sterling old Republicans, J. Truax and H. H. Wakely, and many others, for the interest taken in getting up the meeting.  New Hudson, on Tuesday, like Cuba, will poll her entire Republican vote.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 18, November 2, 1866]

Married:  Hendrix-Fox.  At the Parsonage, by Rev. S. W. Titus, Oct 30, Mr. Jas. E. Hendryx and Miss Alice Fox, all of Cuba.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 18, November 2, 1866]
Brant-Washburn.  At the same place, Oct 31, by the same, Mr. Jas. M. Brant and Miss Ann E. Washburn, both Portville.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 18, November 2, 1866]

The New Store -- Under the firm of Langley & Eason, on Main street, nearly opposite the Cuba Nation Bank, will be opened about the 1st of Nov. and we call the attention of the public to our large and well selected stock of goods including CROCKERY WARE of a very desirable pattern.  We shall be prepared to offer our goods cheap for cash.  Langley & Eason.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 19, November 9, 1866]

New Hudson.  New Hudson, like many other of her sister towns, did nobly on Tuesday last.  She gave a majority of 173 -- an increase of 71 over last year.  Had John G. Collins made one more 'Johnsing speech there, he would have carried the town--for the Republicans by 200 majority. New Hudson can be depended on every time.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 19, November 9, 1866]

Election in Cuba.  The election in this village passed off very quietly, considering the circumstances that Reisdorph's old saloon was open all day.  Notwithstanding the money expended by the Copper-Johnsonites, notwithstanding the strenuous exertions of the “Bread and Butter” officials, Cuba gave 93 Republican majority-- a loss of three from last year.  This loss can be accounted for.  It was the effect of the influence of 'Squire Bement, and Bill Wilkinson, (Fay's hostler).  They carried own votes!
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 19, November 9, 1866]

Bishop Coxe will administer the rite of confirmation, and address the Sunday School children, on Wednesday, at 2 p.m., Nov. 21, in Christ Church, this village.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 20, November 16, 1866]

Cuba PostofficeW. F. Bement took formal possession of the postoffice in this village on Monday last.  The office has been removed to the little brick building east of Ryans' boot and shoe store.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 20, November 16, 1866]

News Office.  Winfield Ashley has opened a news room in one part of the building occupied by the Postoffice, and will keep constantly on hand all the daily papers, late publications, magazines, &c.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 20, November 16, 1866]

Runaway.  On Monday last as Mr. Marsden Rude, of the firm of Snyder & Rude, of this village, was driving from the Depot, his horse became frightened and ran, stringing the wagon to pieces generally.  No other damage was done.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 20, November 16, 1866]

Property Changes.  Vance & Howell have disposed of the Corner Grocery and Provision store, in this village, to Messrs. Pierce & Reccord, who will take possession on the 1st of February.  Mr. Vance, we learn, is to remove to the West.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 20, November 16, 1866]

Dr. J. J. Ashley has disposed of a one-half interest in his drug store to W. Fobes, M.D., late of Michigan.  Mr. F. is an old practitioner, both in medicine and surgery, and will hold himself in readiness to answer all calls in his line.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 20, November 16, 1866]

Jubilant.  Friday last was a day of general jubilee among the Republicans of this town.  The day before, the cannon which we spoke of two weeks since, arrived , and a salute of fifteen guns was fired on the afternoon by Capt. Geo. Ormiston.  On Friday, Capt. Ormiston and his brother, both of whom have been in the artillery service, organized a company, and the old “Thunderer” belched forth at intervals all the afternoon, waking the echoes of the hills with its brazen throat, and heralding the glad news of Fenton's re-election in tones that were heard at Olean, on the west, and Scio, on the east.  Just at night Capt. Ormiston and his company marched through the principal streets giving rousing cheers for Fenton, Ward, and others.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 20, November 16, 1866]

Bear Seen.  A bear was seen on Wolf Creek on Monday last.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 20, November 16, 1866]

Rushford Academy.  The Winter term of this Institution commences on January 2d next, under the supervision of Prof. Ira Sayles, Principal, and an able corps of assistants.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 20, November 16, 1866]

Runaway.  On Wednesday night of last week, while Mr. Boon was driving a horse owned by Mr. Chase, on the Western Hotel, in this village, the animal became frightened near the residence of J. W. Rowley, Esq., and ran.  Mr. B. was thrown from the buggy, but received no injuries.  The buggy, however, was stove to pieces.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 20, November 16, 1866]

Clark Wier, formerly of this village, has been stopping here for a few days the past week.  He is at present an agent for the sale of Dr. Brandreth's medicines.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 21, November 23, 1866]

Married:  Hoag-Vincent.  At the Cuba House, Nov. 15th by Rev. S. W. Titus, Mr. John O. Hoag, of Lyndon, and Miss Harriet L. Vincent, of Ischua, NY.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 21, November 23, 1866]

For Sale!  A good seven year old bay HORSE.  Inquire of Russell Smith.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 21, November 23, 1866]

Deer Shot.  A son of Wm. German, Esq., shot a large buck, about 7 miles south of this village, on Friday last.  We are under obligations to Mr. G. for a liberal “hunk” of the same.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 22, November 30, 1866]

Mite Society.  The Mite Society will meet at the residence of J. B. Bigelow this (Friday) afternoon and evening.  The proceeds will be devoted to procuring presents for the Church Christmas Tree.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 22, November 30, 1866]

Improvement.  Lottridge & Eldridge have taken down the old and weatherbeaten awning which was in front of their place of business, and have erected a new one, which adds greatly to the appearance of their stores.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 22, November 30, 1866]

A.C. Bishop.  We neglected last week to notice the arrival among his numerous friends here, Mr. A. C. Bishop, formerly Teller in the old Cuba Bank, now Chief Engineer of the Lac La Belle Ship Canal.  Mr. B. the past summer has been busy with the many duties attendant upon his office, in the Lake Superior country, and has given universal satisfaction to the Company by which he was employed for the highly creditable manner in which all his labors were performed.  He left here on Monday evening to spend the holidays among his friends in the Eastern part of the state, but we understand he will make Cuba his home during the winter months.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 24, December 21, 1866]

Silver Mines in Allegany County.  An Angelica Reporter, states that Mr. Otis Marsh, residing on Crawford Creek, about four miles from Oramel, has discovered a silver mine on his premises.  It says: “Mr. Marsh was led to the belief of the presence of some kind of mineral by finding a spring which emitted a tarnish appearing water. The first impression was that the water flowed over copper, but on excavating a few feet, he came to the sulphate of silver, and when he had penetrated forty feet below the surface, he came to a rich strata of silver quartz, (a bluish rock filled with particles of silver) and on digging a few feet deeper, he discovered the pure metal-- a vein the thickness of a case-knife blade, and about three feet wide.  Mr. Marsh has had some specimens of the quartz assayed by a New York chemist, who valued them at from $1,500 to $1800 per ton.  He can quarry several tons per day.”
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 24, December 21, 1866]

Donation Party and Dance.  The friends of Rev. Mr. Goudy are invited to attend a Donation Party and Dance at Palmer's Hall, in this village, on Friday evening, December 28.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 26, December 28, 1866]

The late Fire.  It is now pretty generally believed that the fire in this village on Tuesday morning last was the work of an incendiary.  When first discovered, the flames had not got under much headway, and were confined to one corner of Mr. Bruce's Carriage shop, quite a distance from the stove, and almost directly under a window that was unfastened.  The door of the shop was locked, but it would look as though the window had been raised and the building fired by throwing in lighted matches, or something of that kind.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 26, December 28, 1866]

We learn that it is now known who robbed Mr. Russell Adams of Scio, a short time since, of some $1,000.  The parties were a man by the name of Hathaway, son in law of Mr. Adam's housekeeper and a young man, her son.  There is no doubt of the guilt of these men, who, finding they were discovered have eloped.  Efforts are being made for their arrest.  [Free Press.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 26, December 28, 1866]


Sufferers by the fire.Olive & Chamberlain, Blacksmiths, have commenced business again just in the rear of their former stand.
W. H. Bartholomew has commenced putting up a temporary building on the site of his old one, and will be ready to receive orders for anything in the line of marble by the 30th inst.
Miss M. Kirkpatrick, as we stated in our last, has established herself in the new store of Langley & Eason.  We have [ ] learned whether or no Mr. Bruce intends to rebuild his Carriage Shop.
Among the [ ] by the fire were J. R. Parker, Pain[ ] who occupied the upper rooms of Mr. Bruce's shop, and J. B. Bigelow, a partner of Mr. B. in the carriage business.
[CTP, Vol. V, No. 26, December 28, 1866]



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