NSGS - NE Ancestree, Vol 9, no 3
NSGS Ancestree

 

NEBRASKA STATE GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY
WINTER 1987
VOLUME 9, NO. 3


NOTE: No page 50 in Vol. 9 no 3 at NSHS Library, Lincoln, NE.

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Submitted by Benjamin N. Wall, Omaha NE.

"NEBRASKA COURIER"

PUBLISHERS-NEUMANN & BRANDT
    GRAND ISLAND, NEBRASKA

Translator's notes: The Courier was a German language newspaper with circulation broader than the State of Nebraska. Subscription prices for German subscribers are listed. The front page is taken up with international and national news in most cases, with the international representing about 60%. At the time, interest was centered on the war in South Africa.

Names: Where an umlaut appears in the original, I have dropped it and added the traditional "e" This could result in spelling variations, since some families could have just dropped the umlaut. Vide: Koenig, Konig; Koehler, Kohler, or a traditional mispronunciation "Keeler". On the basis of external evidence, I have translated "nerve fever" as "typhus".

______________________________

Year 5 Friday, 10 August 1900 No. 10

Page 1. Omaha, 8 August: Solicitor General Smith filed an antitrust complaint against the Nebraska Grain Dealers' Assn. E. H. Brewer, Secretary of the Assn. was arrested.

Adv: Grand Island Banking Co. S.A Peterson, Pres. A. B. Bell, Cashier, J. W. Thompson, V. P., W. A. Heimberger, Asst Cashier. Adv: First National Bank S. N. Wolbach, Pres., C. F. Bentby, Cashier. Adv: Dr. Sumner Davis, specialist eye, ear, nose and throat.

Adv: T. O. G. Harrison - W. S. Pearne, Attys.

Adv: W. A. Prince, Attorney. H. F. Clifford, Attorney. Adv: $17.15 excursion fare to Chicago. W. H. Loucks, Agent.

Page 2. Ex-Governor Boyd, Nebraska's only Democratic Governor, has declared against Bryan and for McKinley.

W. H. Weeks owner of the "Omaha Liquor Dealer" was in town Wednesday and yesterday for the funeral of his mother in law, Mrs. Bulger.

Tramps James Nolan and James Conley were found guilty of resisting arrest and fined $100.00. Since they lacked $99.95 to pay the fine, they were jailed for three months.

Shoemaker Woodworth loaned his bicycle to a young man named Johnson who promised to bring it back shortly. When he did not return, the bicycle was found at Mr. Kremenschuck's place of business.

In Endicott, a tramp named Richard Smith broke into the home of F. C. Griffin, hoping to find Mrs. Griffin alone to rape her. Mrs. Griffin escaped and Smith was arrested. The enraged townspeople put a rope around his neck and strung him up to a tree. However, reason prevailed, and Smith was taken down before he could die and given into the hands of the police.

On Saturday evening, policemen Partridge, Koeplin & Harrison found a dozen tramps in the East end of town. They arrested five. Before they could be put in a cell, the men began a hand to hand fight, and officer Koeplin was hit over the eye by one man who had a crutch. The officers were finally victorious, however, and the men were locked up.

On Thursday, two colored1 tramps broke into the house of Mr. Noyes and stole several gold pieces. Railway worker Rice saw them and pursued, but they got away.

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1. In original, "farbende", lit. "colored". German put-down for Blacks is "Schwarze", lit. "black".

On Monday morning, John L. Houck attempted to start his coal stove with coal-oil. The result was an explosion and fire. Even though the fire was put out, Mr. Houck suffered severe chest and arm burns.

Mrs. Mary Carolina Sanders, wife of Dr. A.F. Sanders, died early Saturday morning, aged 54 years. The deceased was born on 5 March 1846 at Letort Falls, Ohio. She was married to Dr. Sanders on 13 November 1866 and lived in Grand Island since 1882. She leaves beside her husband, six children to mourn her passing.

Adv: L. Neumayer's Grocery.

Adv: Henry J. Doss, cigar maker.

Adv: Allen Craig, dealer in coal and feed.

Page 3. Adv: Dr. H. D. Bonden, Specialist

(Cont'd on Next Page)


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Nebraska Courier Cont'd.

in Female Disorders.

Adv: Buchheit's German Pharmacy.

Adv: Dr. Finch, Painless Dentist. Adv: Sondermann's Fine Bedding.

Adv: If you need glasses, see Dr. Sumner Davis.

G. H. Thummel of Omaha visited relatives in Grand Island.

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Egge returned to their home in Omaha on Tuesday.

Marie A. Filsinger, who has been seriously ill, is on her way to recovery.

Gustav Neumann his wife and children, left to visit with relatives in Ravenna.

The daughter of John Schwyn from Doniphan came up to the circus Thursday.

William Nickle sold his Eighth St. property to Mrs. Mary E. Smith.

Claus Sothman left for Chapman, to take over the management of the club he organized.

Will Hatcher, who had been bitten on the hand by a dog, is recovering.

County Judge Mullin conducted the marriage ceremony for A. W. Marsh and Erma Kumler at his home.

Adv: Drink Grand Island's own beer.

Mrs. Lester Rice was hit by a bicycle rider and thrown to the ground.

The 14 year old son of William Williams of Ainsworth was buried by a collapsing earthen wall and suffocated before help could arrive.

Captain Ralph Platt and Miss Myrtle Fry were married yesterday. They will leave soon for Manilla, where the Captain is assigned.

On Saturday morning the gas stove in the bathroom of George Loan, Jr. blew up. The fire was quickly put out and there was little damage.

The Ringling Bros. circus performance in Central City was sold out, and all who attended said it was a fine show.

Adv: Parts and safety-plates for all kinds of small machinery. Hehnke & Co.

Adv: Dr. J. Lue Sutherland, German Doctor, office above Tucker and Farnsworth's Pharmacy.

Theodor Boehm and his wife visited Hardy Saturday.

Mr. and Mrs. E. Brittina of Wood River had a baby daughter last week.

Claus Sothmann has been replaced by Peter Jensen in the shop of A. v.d. Heyde.

Mr. and Mrs. Coates who own the Koehler Hotel, returned from their Colorado trip.

Adv: Visit William Schlichting's tavern on Locust St. Free Lunch. Grand Island beer.

Ott's trouser shop had a picnic for the employees and their families on Sunday.

Carpenter Henry Reckmeyer of Fremont was overcome by heat Thursday and had to be taken to his home.

Tomorrow tailor Rask will leave for a visit to his native Denmark, and will then visit the Paris Exposition.

The two sick children of August Schwenk, Karl 9, and Martha 7, were taken to the hospital on Saturday suffering from typhus.

Seventy year old Ed Kent of Cairo, was convicted of assault before the local Justice of the Peace and turned over to the Sheriff to serve his sentence.

There is an outbreak of Hog Cholera in Columbus.

Herman Oelrich last week lost half his hogs.

Last week Ralph Platt donated to the city collection a Spanish made gun which he had found on his property.

About five o'clock Saturday morning a fire broke out in the building of Owen & Lyons at Sutherland The building was a total loss of $5000 but the insurance was only $2000.

Last week Mrs. A. C. Koenig presented her husband with a bouncing baby boy.

We congratulate Mr. and Mrs. Ernst Kruse on the birth of their son last week.

While Judge Abbott is in Hot Springs, Justice of the Peace Fox will preside in Police Court.

Twenty-three year old railway worker M. McGee fell 70 feet from the Plattsmouth bridge and died from injuries sustained in the fall.

Mssrs. Sondermann and Buchheit were in Elm Creek Sunday for the funeral of Miss Roe Arendt, sister of Mrs. Frank Buchheit.

Elderly farmer John Treba of Columbus was thrown from his wagon Saturday, and so severly injured that he died.

Eighteen year old J. Armstrong was riding his bicycle to Hastings, when suddenly someone knocked him to the ground and robbed him of the contents of his pocketbook, $1.10.

Bert McANNELLY is finally on his way to reform school. After many complaints on other counts, he was caught Sunday with Mr. Baldwin's family horse, trying to sell it.

At Mr. Clapper's home Wednesday, elderly Mrs. Bulger suffered an apoplectic attack. Her right side was paralyzed and she was uncon-


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Nebraska Courier Cont'd.

scious 24 hours. Her daughter from Omaha, Mrs. Weecks came at once. Mrs. Bulger died without regaining consciousness and was buried yesterday. 

Sam Herter and his daughter left Tuesday for a visit in Chicago.

Lightning killed four cows belonging to Mr. Compton of Alba.

Miss Lilly Suehlsen and her brother Robert who have spent the summer here with relatives, will return to their home in Chicago next week.

Petria, nine year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Christ died Wednesday of typhus.

The convalescence of Mrs. McKinzie, who has been in a Lincoln care home is making good progress and she is expected home shortly.

Thirty-four year old railway worker Nick Anderson fell under the wheels of a U. P. train at the Ames Station Thursday, and was killed. The body was badly mangled and pieces were strewn along the track for yards.

Mr. Burr of Hastings, was riding his bicycle toward the business district Thursday, carrying his little son on the handlebars. Near the Occidental Hotel he ran into another vehicle and the son's head was completely crushed.

Mrs. John Waltemath, of Tecumseh, tried to put her enraged cow out of its misery. She had finished milking, and was busying herself with the calf, when the cow broke loose, threw her to the floor and began to stab at her with its horns. Only the timely arrival of her daughter saved Mrs. Waltemath from a terrible death.

Adv: (2 columns by 5 inches) Hope For All Who Have Kidney, Liver & Stomach Ailments. Cramer's Kidney and Liver Cure. $1 per bottle, six bottles for $5. Cramer Chemical Co., Albany, N.Y.

Adv: Grand Island Brewing Co., Fred Lohmann, Prop.

Adv: W. H. Harrison Dealer in all kinds of woodwork.

Adv: Rehder & Co Groceries. Free Home Delivery.

Adv: C. F. Haack Largest Grocery Store in Grand Island. H. C. Miller Painless Dentist.

Page 4. The annual teacher's institute for Hall County opened today. Supt. Fishburn announced that anyone who hoped to teach in Hall County this year must attend. The Professors are J. W. Searson of Wahoo, Matthews and Sutton of Grand Island and Miss Burget of Beatrice.

While Peter Gakemeier was loading his wagon with corn at Louisville, Nebr. last Friday, the spout from the bin stopped running. The body of Gakemeier's 8 year old son was found plugging the spout. He had been playing in the bin, and had been sucked into the spout, where he suffocated.

On Monday, milkman Olaf Jesperson of Omaha had fully loaded his wagon with milk and eggs just before stopping at 19th and Farnam to make a delivery. A young boy decided to try his new whip, and hit the horses so expertly about the neck that they threw off the harness and raced down the street. Milk and eggs were scattered left and right. Finally at 18th and Harney, the wagon hit a telphone (sic) pole and the wreckage spread a white and yellow mess all over the street.

Grand Island Market Prices: Wheat, $.5475; New Oats, $.185; Corn, $.26; Rye, $.35; Ham,$.125; Cream, $.09; Butter, $.14; Pullets, $.07; Lard, $.06.


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Submitted & Abstracted by Mrs. Georgene Morris Sones, Omaha, NE

THE SCHUYLER MESSENGER

COLFAX COUNTY, NEBRASKA
NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 1909

County Affairs:
Directory: J. H. O'CALLAGHAN, Treasurer; Ant. J. KASPAR, Sheriff; B. F. FARRELL. Attorney; M. F. SHONKA, Clerk; Dr. EBY (Leigh), Coroner; W. I. ALLEN, Judge; I. W. FUNK, Surveyor; F. J. VOGLTANCE, Supt. of Public Instruction

Commissioners
Henry BINDER, F. W. PROKES, S. P. SHULTZ
Jess L. WOODS, Clerk of the Dist Court
Proceedings of Co. Commissioners meeting Nov. 22:
Geo. H. WELLS, appointed JP for Schuyler prct.
A. V. KOVAL, W. I. ALLEN, Homer ENOCHSON, Jos. SMITH, Chas. SMITH, Henry HANSSEN, David KLUCK, John SMITH & SON, John MOURAL, George LOSEKE, Con SCANLAN, Otto MAROHN, John HENKE, Jos. VAVRA, P. J. MAPLE, John IMMIEL, F. J. DOBRY, F. R. FOLKEN, F. J. POKORNY, Alex MARVELS, George CRAIG, Louis HOREJSI, Frank RICHTIK, R. H. MAN, John STEVENS, Fred MOELLER, Fred REDMAN, Chas. KUHLE, A. A. AUKERMAN, F. E. DUDEK, F. N. BIGGS, O. VANHOUSEN, Fred SHERMAN, J. B. SCHULTZ, Jos.
KRIKAC, Jos. M. SVOBODA, Jos. MINARIK, Adolph FIALA, Adderson BOLTON, Carl WITTENBURG, J. F. NEIMAN, V. V. ROBINSON, Geo. MCCUE, Albert LONGWITH, Larie ROUSE, Chas. KOLM, Otto OTRADOVSKY, Fritz SCHROEDER, Stanley TRACHTA, James MOHR, Richard HOGEL, Ed CHMELKA, Anton VALISH, M. J. HIGGINS, Louis GARRETTS

DEC. 3, 1909 Paper Continues:
Geo. HEIDLEY, J. D. WOODS, Mike O'HARE, Fred HOARE, Joseph KREJCI, Logan SHULTZ, Prokop CASTEK, Charles HOBZA, Thomas CASTELLO, S. R. DUTTER, Jos. BERAN, E. H. STONE, Ed. NOVOTNY, Jos. K. SEMERAD, T. J. BUSCH, J. B. SINDELAR, F. J. PRUCHA, William SOLL, J. W. DOBRY, M. F. SHONKA, F. W. PROKES, Henry BINDER, Williamn (sic) MONTGOMERY, James DMCINTOSH (sic), J. FD. GUTSCHOW, Dr. James for FAJMAN case, C. H. SMITH, C. J. SAFARIK

Poor Farm Fund:
J. H. SIXTA, C. J. SAFARIK, PAVLICEK Bros., Mrs. H. CRABB nursing FAJMAN, Henry CRABB sitting with FAJMAN, KOLM Bros., J. R. VRBA, P. F. CAREY to bury FAJMAN

Road Fund:
Frank HURICH, dist 2; William BRUHN, dist 4; Henry KLUG dist 5; Percy HOOPER, dist 6; Rudolph HOBAZ, dist 10; Rob FARGESON, dist 10; J. W. BLACK, dist 10; D. J. DUNN, dist 10; Frank SUMERS, dist 10; George MAXSEN, dist 10; William MAXSEN, dist 10; Peter MAXSEN, dist 10; John KAMPSECHNEIDER, dist 12; Kasper KLUTHE, dist 12; Henry PARR, dist 12; Homer PONT, dist 12; James BURESH, dist 12; Frank BART, dist 12; Joseph LIEKHUS, dist 12; Willie PARR, dist 12; Frank KASSMEIER, dist 12; Benny LICKHUS, dist 12; Frank BELINA, dist 12; Frank DLOUHY, dist 12; Frank EVERT, dist 12; Theodore KUNST, dist 12; Frank SEBEK, dist 12; Conrad THIEM, dist 12; Conrad EICKMEIER, dist 12; Cameron GRAN, dist 12;
Ed SMITH, road grade; JOS. H. HOLECEK, nails & bolts; Henry LOSEBE, plow;

Bridge fund: C. E. BEATY; George A. HOAGLAND, lumber; REISCH Bros. lumber.

The Board voted that the co. attorney is to recover from W. C. FAJMAN, son of Joseph FAJMAN, deceased, the sum of $76.50 expenses paid by the county for the burial & care of Joseph FAJMAN.

City Affairs from Nov. 26, 1909 issue:
Mayor ZUELOW
Councilmen: J. L. DUDEK, S.S. GREEN, C. H. SMITH, Ed. F. VRZAK, F. E. DUDEK

Clerk: F. J. KOVAR
in proceedings:
R. D. MOORE, H. D. MOORE, H. D. HAMPSON, WELL-ABBOTT-NIEMAN Co., T. B. HORD Grain Co., W. LUNEBURG, FREEMAN, ARNOLD & FREEMAN, Geo. J. LITTLE, C. P. CHILDRESS, SMATLAN Bros., John J. KADING, John R. EDGAR, Adam KUNKLE, J. C. KAHL, John GAETH, A. J. SPIDLE, E.E. GREEMAN, Fred MUEHLISCH, J. T. SUMNER & Co., Jos. J. LAMBRECHT, J. H. BURKERD, Burgess GRANDEN & CO., Jos. H. HOLECEK, John GUTSCHOW, R. L. SALAK, Chas. CUDA, P. F. CAREY, Frank SCHRADER, Geo. WERTZ, JOHNSON Elec. Co., Jos. LEHMER, SHELLY Elec. Co., Jos. SIMMONNS, Jos. LEHMER.


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EARLY HISTORY OF GORDON
BY GRACE HUMMEL

In 1883 Rev. SCAMAHORN, of Sullivan, Ind., attended an exposition at Louisville, Ky., and at the hotel where he was stopping he made the acquaintance of Judge TUCKER, who was then the United States land commissioner at Valentine. Judge Tucker was "boosting" Nebraska as the "Paradise of the Northwest." He soon found that Rev. Scamahorn was seeking a new location, and the judge assured him that northwestern Nebraska was the Garden of Eden of this world, with a climate not to be excelled in any state in the Union. This was what Rev. Scamahorn was seeking after his long service in the Civil War - from 1862 to 1865. On returning to his home at Sullivan, the subject of a trip out to this new country was thoroughly talked over with a number of his friends, and that fall (September, 1883) a party of seven men - namely Rev. Scamahorn, John CROWDER, Elza WALLS, C. H. SHATTUCK, John HUNT, Merve HERBERT, and Frank HUMMEL - came out to Valentine to look over this new country.

They stayed at the Valentine House, which was run by Peter DONOHER. These men ate so heartily and slept so well that they were assured this was indeed a healthful climate. About the first thing they did was to see Judge Tucker and make a visit to the land office to find out the lay of the land in the Antelope Valley, over 100 miles west of Valentine. They were advised to hire a guide with two teams and wagons to take them in this new country. They left Valentine one morning, going west, following the railroad survey to where Cody now stands. The first night in camp, a storm came up and blew down their tent, but next morning all hands were up early, and breakfast at a camp fire was enjoyed by all.

At Valentine, John REED and Don WARD, from New York, joined the party. In due time the party reached Boiling Springs Ranch, where it spent the night. At this ranch, the men crossed the Niobrara River, over to the south side, and from there went to the Neuman Ranch on the north side of the river. There they spent a short time, and then went up the old Kearney Trail to the northwest for some miles and then north to the Lone Willow Tree. While eating their lunch, they found that their guide, Denis DAILEY, knew no more about this new country than they did, so they returned to the Newuman Ranch and spent two days looking over the country. They then returned to Valentine and to the land office where they made their filings on the claims they wanted in this new country.

These filings were made on September 15, 1883. In a few days the men returned to Sullivan, Ind., and most of the men gave a very favorable report of their trip to Nebraska.

In March, 1884, Rev. Scamahorn, at the head of a colony of 104 men, women, and children left Sullivan for Nebraska. The men chartered cars and brought their livestock and household goods.

The trip was rather hard at this time of year. A big snowstorm caught them at Wood Lake, and the train was snow-bound and had to be dug out of the snow drifts; but in time the emigrants pulled into Valentine. Some of the colony went to the hotel while others camped on the prairie. Valentine at that time was the end of the railroad. They spent about a week in Valentine before starting on the long trip with wagons to the Antelope Valley. There were very few houses at that time along the Minnechadusa Creek, but upon reaching the Ben ARNOLD log house they found a very sick child. The mother, Mrs. Arnold, was glad to see some women with the movers. She was afraid her child was going to die, and her great lament was that her baby had never been baptized, as no minister had ever come that way. You can imagine her joy when Mrs. Scamahorn said, "My husband is a minister and he will baptize your baby."

So it was there in this lonely little home on the prairie that Rev. Scamahorn held his first services in Nebraska. The mother in her great gratitude gave the minister two dollars, and to his wife she gave a dried peach pie.

The colony kept moving on west, each day bringing new surprises to all. One day a prairie fire came over the sandhills, and on another day Rev. Scamahorn's oxen ran away. The women were in great fear of rattlesnakes.

In time they reached Boiling Springs Ranch on the Niobrara River, where they stopped for a day and made their crossing of the river to the south side. They followed the old trail to the Neuman Ranch, and here they crossed over to the north side of the river and followed the old Kearney Trail some miles to the northwest. Then they turned off to the Lone Willow Tree, where they went into camp.

It must have been decided before leaving Sullivan, or on the way, to call the new post office Gordon. John GORDON, of Sioux City, was in charge of the outfit of covered wagons which was on its way to the Black Hills in May, 1875, to dig gold but was overtaken by soldiers from Fort Robinson. Their outfits were burned at a place about 20 miles southeast of where the city of Gordon now stands.

Rev. Scamahorn received the appointment of postmaster, and his tent was used as the post office. Mrs. Scamahorn emptied a trunk, and, with a box of stamps, the post office was open for business. Each evening, when she locked the trunk, the post office was closed for the day.

A number of log houses were built east of where Gordon now stands, but in 1885 when the railroad came through, the town moved west to its present location. Every day brought new strangers to the country, some coming on the train, some in covered wagons, and others on


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Early History of Gordon Cont'd

horseback. There were many scares and fears of Indians, outlaws, and prairie fires.

The first newspaper, called the Gordon Press, was edited by a man by the name of Hull. The first term of school was taught in 1885 by Kitty HIDE as teacher for a term of three months.

The churches were the Methodist, Presbyterian, and the Catholic. The Indians never caused Gordon any serious trouble in the early days.

Old Ranches Near Gordon

Some of the old ranches that were near Gordon in the early days were:

The N-Bar Ranch, 1878, run by the NEUMAN Brothers, located near the mouth of Antelope Creek, some 12 miles southeast of Gordon. Billy IRWIN was the first foreman, and in the early days this ranch handled 10,000 to 15,000 head of cattle.

The HUNTER Ranch, about 20 miles west and up the Niobrara River from the Neuman Ranch, one of the well-known ranches in the early days. Buff TININ, of Rushville, isd (sic) now the owner of this ranch.

The Ed. ROSS Ranch of early days, about five miles west of the present site of Irwin. It is now owned and operated by Roy ROSS.

The Modisett Ranch, located south and east of Rushville.

The Bennett IRWIN Ranch, located about three miles west of Irwin. In the early days this ranch was known far and wide for its hospitality. Mrs. Irwin was one of the very first ranch women in this part of the country, and she was a typical southern woman. This ranch has changed hands a great many times in the past few years. Mr. GOODIN is now operating it.

The Joe SAULTS Ranch, located southeast of Gordon in Cherry County.

The Dan HILL Ranch. Dan Hill came here in 1886, taking a homestead in a canyon of the Niobrara River. He later sold this homestead and took a relinquishment of a tree claim in 1891. He first started out with a small herd of Shorthorn cattle, later switching to Herefords. At the time of his death in May, 1915, he was the owner of 2,000 Hereford cattle. The Dan Hill Ranch, comprised of 24,000 acres, was all deeded land, purchased from many homesteaders. This ranch was located 22 miles southeast of Gordon, and the original sod house, built in 1891, is still in use.

The RICHARDS and COMSTOCK Ranch, better known as the "Spade." It ranged from the Niobrara River on the north to the Burlington railroad on the south. In 1900 they were running a herd of about 25,000 cattle. This (sic) and is now owned by many smaller ranchers.

The Star Ranch, southeast of Gordon in Cherry County. This is another very well known ranch. It is owned and managed by F. P. MILLS, who lives in Gordon.

The J. C. CARSON Ranch located northeast of Gordon. This ranch is well remembered by old-timers. Mr. and Mrs. Carson have both gone to the Great Beyond, and the ranch is now owned and managed by George MCGINLEY and Sons.

The HULL ranches north of Gordon. These were established many years ago and are well-known ranches.

Best Men Came

We were fortunate in the type of character of the original pioneer settler. They came largely from the older middle-western and eastern states, and from these states came the best. In the majority of cases they were young men, full of ambition, hope, and courage, eager to build a home on the wide-flung prairies of the new country.

Pioneering in a new country is a test of courage and will power, of endurance and hardships.

As a rule, the journey was long, the trail was rough and new; but physical strength and determination won the day for the men with the covered wagon.

And now, one by one, many of these old pioneers have left the country, and we can almost hear the angels shout, "Here they come to Heaven, for their camp fires have gone out."

(The husband of Mrs. Grace HUMMEL was one of the pioneers of the Gordon country.,--Ed.)
---AMERICAN CATTLE PRODUCER

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

DID YOU KNOW? There are two ancestors in the first generation (your parents); thirty-two in the fifth generation; 1,024 in the tenth generation; 32,768 in the fifteenth; and, 1,048,676 ancestors in the twentieth ganeration!

MHGS REGISTER     VOL. XXI 41


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Submitted by Ila S. Christensen (daughter of Minnie Knight Snyder) York, Nebraska

SOUVENIR OF VILLAGE SCHOOL

SPRING RANCH, CLAY COUNTY, NE

May 20, 1899

Teacher Charles J Geyer
School Board
William P Rhodes Director
James Bainter Moderator
T.M. Albright Treasurer

 

Pupils

Oran White Fred Max Lucy Ecalbarger
Neil Albright Mabel Jackson Sammy Ecalbarger
Anna Albright Ruth Bainter Henry Williams
Marion Turner Cora Bainter Maggie Williams
Effie Turner Nettie Bainter Gladys Geyer
Oakley Kemp Rosa Bolli Fannie Lindsey
Eunice Kemp Clara White Mary Jackson
Ray Yost Bertha Albright Addie Jackson
Minnie Yost Ray Babcock Clara Bainter
Maud Allen Arthur Turner Lizzie Bainter
Clarence Gardner Earl Buchanon Hazel Hunt
Clark Brown Ralph Kemp Jesse Hovey
Bertha Brown Etta Kemp Myrtle Hovey
Charlie Coba Henry Yost
Hazel Coba Bert Allen
Dena Rosendahl Floy Allen
Hattie Rosendahl Beth Gardner
Minnie Knight Harvey Brown
Willie Clifton Ruby Brown
Esther Clifton Minnie Coba
Ellis Null Willie Rosendahl
Mabel Wheeler Kate Rosendahl
Blanch Wheeler Ralph Knight
Edith Stratton Merle Knight
Effie Ecalbarger Vada Clifton
John Williams Harry Null
Anna Williams John Brinkema
Fennie Williams Hazel Wheeler
Cynthia Lindsey Addie Stratton


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NSGS LIBRARIAN: Mrs. Rose Marie Hulse
Route 2, Box 28
Exeter NE 78351
Tele: 402-266-8881

INSTRUCTIONS FOR ORDERING LIBRARY BOOKS On 3 x 5 card, write your name, complete adress (sic), membership number from the mailing label arid title of the books you want. Only 3 books allowed per order. Enclose a SASS and $2.00 for each book ordered. The address of the library is: Nebraska State Genealogical Library, Route 2, Box 28, Exeter, NE 68351

Alice Asa of Santa Barbara, CA donated the following 8 items:

CHRISTIAN HOMES OF THE EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA located in Holdrege, NE. Summer 1982; August and December 1983; February, June and December 19814 and August 1985. Each consists of 8 pages of residents biographies, obituaries, birthday and anniversary lists with other stories.

AMERICAN MISSIONARY FELLOWSHIP a quarterly published in PA, consists of 1+ pages of stories, memorials, directory of officers and board members.

AXTELL THE FIRST 100 YEARS 1885-1985 donated by the Axtell Centennial Committee and the Axtell public Library, is a 224 page hard bound book consisting of the town's history, its businesses, churches, schools and organizations. Also 100 pages of family histories which are in alphabetical order.

BERTRAND THE FIRST 100 YEARS 1885-1985 donated by the Bertrand Centennial Committee,
consists of 126 pages in a hard bound book of the towns history by year.

WEAVERS LOOM KEEPSAKE is a quarterly edited and donated by Donald Juilfs of Lincoln, NE, This issue, Volume 1 #3, consists of 9 pages for the WEAVER/WEEVER/WEABER/WEBBER/

WEBER/WEVER, etc. spellings.

CENTURY OF BLESSINGS ST. JOSEPH CENTENNIAL 1884-1984, donated by St. Joseph Catholic Church Parish of Platte Center, NE, is a 128 page hard bound book. This book tells the history of the 3 churches built through the century, history and pictures of parish priests, sisters from the community, its school with list of teachers, service men and women, officers of St. Anne's Society through the years and histories of parish families.

DODGE CRITERION donated by the Dodge Criterion Newspaper, came in two issues of 25 pages each. The June 26, 1986 issue is the pre-Centennial Souvenir Edition telling all the upcoming events during the 3 day celebration. The July 17 Centennial Souvenir Edition shows all the centennial happenings in stories and pictures.

HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY NEBRASKA donated by the Washington County Historical Museum, is an 80 page hard bound book with index. This book is a reproduction of the county history published in 1876 by John T. Bell, a law reporter, who told of its early settlement, resources, advantages and future prospects. The index was added on its reproduction.

A CENTENNIAL HISTORY OF CAMPBELL NEBRASKA 1886-1986 donated by Rev. John McCarthy of Albany, New York in memory of Zachorie and Marie Louise Bondreau who came to homestead from Canada in 1878 and lived in Campbell from 1890 to 1905 when they moved to Missoula, Mt. This 406 page hard cover book with index, includes a history of the town and 258 pages of family histories.

SUTTON'S SOUTHWEST NEBRASKA written by E. S. Sutton in 1983, was donated by Margaret Sinn of Curtis, NE. This 315 page hard cover book is a very early history of the southwestern part of Nebraska. An early map of Dundy, Chase, Hayes and Hitchcock Counties in Nebraska, Cheyenne and Rawlins Counties in Kansas and Yuma County in Colorado showing the ranches, cattle trails, roads, towns and historical sites is included.

THE HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY, IOWA published in 1982 is a 1460 page hard cover book with surname index, donated by Margaret Sinn of Curtis, NE. There are 103 pages of county history and 345 pages of family histories.

GENEALOGICAL HELPER 1956 to 1979 consisting of 109 issues, were donated by Gay Darwin of Lincoln, NE. Our library appreciated those from 1956 to 1972.


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A SHORT ACCOUNT OF THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF ALBION NE 1872-1957 and a 100 YEAR PROGRAM 1872-1972 donated by one of the authors, M. Gwen Myers Noble in memory of Dean Oliver Myers. The book, consisting of 28 pages, lists the church clergy, clerks, 60 and 50 year honor roll. The program consists of 8 pages.

AMBROSE MAULDING - Supplement 3 donated by Denil Maulding of Valdes, Alaska, consists of 14 pages with index of Richard and Jane Maulding genealogy.

THE HISTORY OF THE KERCHAL FAMILY IN THE UNITED STATES - Revised in 1986 was donated by the author D. Ray Kerchal of Newton, CT. This 200 page book is the ancestry of Charles and Rosalie Krchal-Kerchal and their 9 children with many Nebraska towns represented.

SEARCHING ILLINOIS ANCESTORS-Volume 2 #4, is a bi-monthly periodical of Illinois records, donated by the editor, Helen Cox Tregillis of Shelbyville, IL. 20 of the 102 counties are represented in this issue.

THE FAMILY TREE OF MARTIN AND ANNA (NEE VLCKOVY) KOCI, THEIR CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES donated by the author, Marilyn Giles of Denton, NE, is a 56 page splral bound book of stories, pictures, documents, names and dates.

Kilgore Memorial Library of York, NE donated the following 10 items:

1278 and 1979 KEARNEY CITY DIRECTORY including Buffalo County Taxpayers with a Kearney address, consists of 600 pages of names and addresses.

1975 and 1979 NORTH PLATTE CITY DIRECTORY including Lincoln County Taxpayers with a North Platte address, contains 740 pages of names and addresses.

1976 HASTINGS CITY DIRECTORY including Good Samaritan Village, consists of 879 pages. and 1980 McCOOK CITY DIRECTORY including Red Willow County Taxpayers with a
McCook addres contains 300 pages of names and addresses.

1974 and 1976 FAIRBURY CITY DIRECTORY including Jefferson County Taxpayers with a Fairbury address, contains 210 pages of names and addresses.

1974 NEBRASKA CITY DIRECTORY including Otoe County Taxpayers, with a Nebraska City address, contains 278 pages of names and addresses.

CENTENNIAL HANDBOOK 1854-1954 donated by Ray DeVries of Lincoln, NE, is a 75 page book of planning ideas for a county or town centennial, a historical sketch of the Nebraska Territory and many reference books to use for ideas.

SOME KUHL'S OF STAKENDORF (PROBSTEI) DUCHY OF HOLSTEIN AND IOWA-NEBRASKA donated by William Page of Marlton, N.J., is a 32 page history of Peter and Anna Steffen) Kuhl and their nine children, most of whom came to the United States settling in Iowa with branches in Dakota, Douglas, Sherman and Lincoln Counties of Nebraska.

PURCHASED BOOKS

McPHERSON COUNTY HISTORY consists of 800 pages with index of history of the county, post offices, churches, cemeterys, schools, businesses, organizations and homesteaders. 400 pages of family histories.

HISTORY OF GARDEN COUNTY 1885-1985 is a 587 page book with surname index, published by the Historical Society of Garden County. This is an early history of the county, its towns and communities with 431 pages of family histories and pictures.

DODGE, NEBRASKA CENTENNIAL HISTORY BOOK 1886-1986 is a 328 page hard bound book with index, containing a history of the town, schools, churches, businesses, veterans with 200 pages of family histories. A unique feature of this book is the listing of owners and dates of each lot in the business district.

CURTIS NEBRASKA-THE FIRST 100 YEARS is a 337 page hard bound book with a surname index. It has the history of the town, including 210 pages of family history.

BOONE COUNTY HISTORY 1871-l985 compiled by the Boone County Historical Society, is a 758 page book with surname index. It includes 370 pages of family histories and 51 pages of business histories.


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BULLALO (sic) COUNTY CEMETERY INSCRIPTIONS
  Volume 1 60 pages with surname index includes 13 cemeteries and 6 private burials from Central Buffalo County. Townships: Beaver, Cedar, Center, Divide, Loup, Rusco, Riverdale and Thornton
  Volume 2 61 pages with surname index includes 10 cemeteries and 2 private burials from Eastern Buffalo County. Townships: Cherry Creek, Gardner, Garfield, Gibbon, Platte, Schneider, Sharon, Shelton and Valley.
  Volume 3 55 pages with surname index includes 7 cemeteries and 3 private burials from Western Buffalo County. Townships: Harrison, Grant, Sartoria, Armada, Scott, Logan, Odessa and Elm Creek.
  Volume 4 70 pages from the Kearney City Cemetery for years 1861 to 1920. Collins Township.
All 4 volumes were compiled in 1981 by the Fort Kearney Genealogical Society.

 

1921 LINCOLN HIGH SCHOOL ANNUAL donated by Ray DeVries of Lincoln, Ne, has 225 pages of faculty, board members, seniors, underclassmen, etc. in pictures and stories.

1893 REFERENCE BOOK OF RICHARDSON COUNTY NE donated by Ray DeVries of Lincoln, Ne, has 123 pages of residents names, addresses and occupation in alphabetical order. The residents credit rating is also included.

MARRIAGES OF SOME AMERICAN RESIDENTS AND GUIDE TO DOCUMENTS-VOLUME I was donated by the compiler and publisher, Yates Publishing Company of Ozark, MO. It consists of 193 pages, with husbands and wives names cross indexed in alphabetical order, giving year of birth, date and place of marriage. Another list has an index of authors names and addresses who published genealogys' from which these marriage records were taken.

1985 MID-KANSAS AREA TELEPHONE DIRECTORY donated by Karolyn Andrews of McPherson, KA, includes 52 towns.

Allen Ostdiek of Ostdiek Publishing Company in Lawrence, Ne donated the following 2 books.

LAWRENCE NE DIAMOND JUBILEE HISTORY BOOK 1890-1965 is a 112 page book of a history of the town by years, its churches, schools and businesses with advertisors.

LAWRENCE NE CENTENNIAL HISTORY BOOK 1886-1986 consists of 160 pages of the towns history, plus a yearly summary continued from the Diamond Jubilee History Book. 95 pages of family histories and a 1900 map of Lawrence is included.

1983 DIRECTORY OF SOUTHVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH in Lincoln, Ne, donated by Ray DeVries of Lincoln, Ne. is a 13 page booklet roster of members names, addresses and family pictures

VOLUME 6 of CURRENT GENEALOGICAL PUBLICATIONS donated by the publisher, Claudette Maerz of Bloomington, MN, is an 86 page catalog with index of genealogical publications currently available.

WRIGHT BOOK OF FAMILY SHEETS-VOLUME I donated by the publisher, Claudette Maerz of Bloomington, Mn, is a 147 page book with index consisting of ancestry sheets submitted by Wright researchers and family members.

GENIE'S WORKSHOP OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA donated by Robin Thornton of Long Beach, CA, is an 88 page spiral book of names listing birth date and place, parents names, marriage date and spouse and death date and place. Many ancestor charts are included.

The following 4 books were purchased by the Society using the Library Book Budget.

BAYARD CITY CEMETERY CENSUS 1886-1980 consists of 99 pages of name of deceased, birthdate, deathdate, lot and block number with an index.

LOOMIS CENTENNIAL HISTORY BOOK 1886-1986 consists of 267 pages. Index for the 176 pages of family histories only.

CRAWFORD CENTENNIAL HISTORY BOOK 1886-1986 consists of 238 pages with surname index. There are 170 pages of family histories with pictures.

THE EAST FRIESENS IN AMERICA published in 1917 by Pastor George Schnucker, is a 300 page book with index of persons, places and churches. This book describes the migration of Germans from East Friesen to America, establishing 18 colonies in Illinois, Iowa, South Dakota and Minn.

New Family Newsletters and Quarterlys in the Library:

GEER FAMILY ASSOCIATION NEWSLETTER published by John Fladder John in Berwyn, PA, is Volume 3 Number 2 - Fall 1986 issue

NESBITT/NISBET SOCIETY NEWSLETTER published by William B. Kelsey in Panama City, Florida, are the Spring and Summer 1986 issues.


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BRAY NOSTELIGA is published by Cheryl Clark of Elwood, NE. She donated October 1985; Index for 1985; February and June 1986.

RICHARDSON FAMILY RESEARCHER & HISTORICAL NEWS is published at Broken Bow, NE. September 198:3; September and December 1985 and March 1986 issues are in the library.

CAQUELIN CHRONICLE published by Vel Clark of Jackson, MS is 10 pages for February 1986.


New Newsletter and Quarterlies from other states in the Library

THE ILLUMINATOR a bi-monthly newsletter of Zion Genealogical Society at Zion, ILL. Volume 2 Number 4 and 5 published in 1986.

CALIFORNIA GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY NEWSLETTER - Volume 17 Number 3 for June 1986 is published in San Francisco, CA.

PIONEER TRAILS Volume 6 Number 2 for June 1986 is published by Pioneer Sons and Daughters Genealogical Society of Des Moines, LA.

CHICKASAW COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY NEWSLETTER Volume 3 Numbers 2 and 3 for Spring and Summer 1986 is published in New Hampton, IA.

SAN GORGONIO PASS GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY NEWSLETTER The May, June and July 1986 issues were published at Beaumont, CA.

THE MOUNTAIN EMPIRE GENEALOGICAL QUARTERLY covering Eastern Kentucky, Western North Carolina, Eastern Tennessee, Southwest Virginia and Southern West Virginia is published at Pound, VA.


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