sweet_grass_tidbits17.htm

Tidbits and Tales, Part 17
October 1936 - February 1937

Return to Sweet Grass County Home Page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, October 1, 1936:

Death came Monday to Bud Hanson, 68, one of the pioneers of the lower Sweet Grass, also one of the most substantial and best liked residents of this county, following an extended illness with cancer.

Mrs. C.A. Rupert, 53, a most estimable resident of the Melville country, was buried from St. Joseph's church this morning, interment being in the Briley family plot in Mountain View.

Mrs. H.W. Hanson died at her home in this city this morning after a long illness with cancer. Deceased was about 64 years of age and had been a resident of this county for 40 years, on Upper Deer creek, then at Grey Cliff, and for several years past at Big Timber.

A gift shower honoring Mrs. Jake Westre and her infant daughter was given at the home of Mrs. A. Holbeck yesterday. Twenty-five friends were present.

Big Timber Lutheran Laides Aid will be entertained at the Parish Hall October 8, by Mrs. A.E. Grosfield, Mrs. Anton Lien, Mrs. Jonas Mauland and Mrs. Carl Frederickson. Serving will be from 4 to 7:30. Other Ladies Aids and the public invited.

While playing football Thursday of last week, Sonny Baskett broke his left arm near the shoulder.

Junior Auxiliary Girls, at a meeting presided over by Yvonne Husebye, chose Mary Evelyn Deegan, chaplain, and Wilma Clayton, sergeant-at-arms.

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Wullum and son, Herbert, Mrs. Everett Farr and daughter, Ruth, Mr. and Mrs. S.W. Fanning and son, Claire, Mr. and Mrs. Bud Deeney and Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Farr drove to the top of Bear Tooth mountains Sunday, on the new Red Lodge-Cooke City highway. It was a grand sight, with fall foliage working, and snow plows were also at work in places.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, October 8, 1936:

Born, to Attorney and Mrs. John N. McFarlane of this city, October 3, a son.

Local fans, many of them this year, got a big kick from the World Series baseball pool put on by the Big Timber cafe. The first day $10 was the prize, Donnie Dodge winning. A raise in contributions to 25 cents ran it up to $25 for the winner of the other three days, there being no pool for the fourth and six games, B.F. Henry, Alva L. Lamb and Mr. Teeters winning.

Reed Point Notes:
Mrs. Carl Eder suffered a severe attack of appendicitis Friday evening and was rushed to the hospital in Billings where an emergency operation was performed at once. Reports inform us she is recovering nicely.

A Junior Leauge party was held at the Evangelical church basement Thursday evening. Games, under the leadership of Mrs. Roukema and Mrs. Warner, were enjoyed and a lovely lunch served to Owen McKeith, Billy Langford, Milo Collins, Jr., Lewis Schuyler, Harry Hawks, Adelbert Neumann, Junior Nelson, Nora Young, Betty Schuyler, Charmain Baxter, Helen Mysse, Martha Bare, Joyce Groth and Dora Mae Cain.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, October 15, 1936:

Over 200 friends of Mr. and Mrs. George A. Loasby were at the Lutheran Parish Hall Tuesday afternoon, between 3 and 8 p.m., to offer sincere congratulations on the 50th wedding anniversary of this well known couple, and partake of light refreshments served by the ladies of Boulder valley, where Mr. and Mrs. Loasby have lived since 1889.

Floyd Bailey, Clive W. Haas and Donald Voges left Sunday morning for the Buffalo Fork country, to spend several days hunting for any kind of big game.

Seventeen boys went through the ceremony to the Green Hand degree of the Future Farmers of America on Monday night at the Ag building. The following were initiated: Gene Carl, Bob Clark, George Clayton, Harold Clouse, Edward Duffey, Edward Fellows, Raymond Grande, Kenneth Haugstad, Fred Liebel, Lee Noe, Dan Officer, Burton Robinson, Kenneth Rools, Alfred Rudd, Eugene Tierney, Bill Watson, Robert Burns. The initiation committee was composed of June Ewan, Clarence Lemp, Bob Thompson. Lunch was given by the junior class members of the Big Timber Chapter of Future Farmers, and was followed by an hour of boxing by different members.

Mayor Nordstrom informs the Pioneer that the city will begin work next week on the lot at the corner of Third and Anderson, to convert it into a first class skating pond. The pond will be 140 by 170 feet, and well lighted. Its location will be a considerable satisfaction to parents who are unwilling to let their small children go to either of the rivers for this sport.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, October 22, 1936:

Floyd Bailey, Clive Haas, Donald Voges, and Chief of Police Busha returned Tuesday from a big game hunt in the Buffalo Fork country. They brought back four elk and two bear.

The annual fall tournament of the local golf club ended Sunday when A.R. McDonald won from S.H. Solberg in a match that extended over 52 holes of play. Of the first flight match that finished two weeks previous, Jack Watt won first with H.A. Anderson runner-up.

Wm. Stewart, manager of Montana Power office at Fromberg the past seven years, greeted old friends here the first of the week. He was en route to Jardine on a big game hunt.

The first five deer killed in the Crazy mountains this year were one each for Bordie Green, Bob Langston, Wallis Schallack, John Johnston and Lloyd Rein.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, October 29, 1936:

Whilhelmina Steensland, daughter of Mrs. Ethel K. Steensland, and Bennie Elgen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Elgen of Grey Cliff, were married in Livingston, Monday afternoon by the Rev. Lewis D. Smith of St. Andrew's Episcopal church. Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Braaten were their witnesses. Tuesday they left for Fort Peck, where Bennie is employed on the government project.

C.A. Rupert of Melville returned Wednesday from a visit with his brother, near Sioux City, Ia. He reports politics hot all along the line in that state. Both of the major parties claiming presidential vote. While there Mr. Rupert heard a great speech, in a neighboring town, by Senator Burton K. Wheeler of Montana.

The Gamble store moved Sunday into the old Irvine building, recently occupied by Bill Miller. The Beley building is being readied for the restaurant of Mrs. A.A. Strand, who will vacate for A.W. Strickland, purchaser of the Steiner building.

The ice skating rink, on the city lots back of the post office, was started on its way Monday morning, the first work being the removal of the City band stand by Albert Wagner.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, November 5, 1936:

Henrietta Egeland, techer at the Lower Dry Creek school, went into the ditch Monday morning when her car skidded on the icy road. The car was considerably damaged, she was scratched some, and the three Helvik children riding with her escaped unhurt.

Ray and Larence Shwindt gave a Halloween party for twelve of their boy friends Friday evening. Guests arrived at 6 o'clock and were served a delicious supper, after which games were played until 9 o'clock.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, November 12, 1936:

Helen Irene Roquet has been chosen of among 125 college women who compose Northwestern University's glee club. Membership is determined by competitive examination. During the year the club presents a series of concerts, several of them in other cities than Chicago and Evanston.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, November 19, 1936:

A.P. Larson left the first of the week for New York, to sail on the Queen Mary, England's biggest and best passenger boat, for Malmo, Sweden, his old home. He expects to be absent at least two months, visiting his sister in his childhood home where he last visited 34 years ago. Tomorrow Matt Tonnesson will leave for Norway to spend the winter at his old home.

A farewell party was given at the J.G. Johnson home last Thursday evening for Matt Tonnesson, who is leaving for Norway on the 19th. He was presented with a beautiful gift as a remembrance from his friends. A delicious lunch was served.

County Surveyor C.E. Busse was in White Sulphur Springs last week as a witness in the big water suit, on trial before Judge B.E. Berg of Livingston.

An early Sunday night fire at the ranch home of Frank Berrie, on Highway 10, burned a hay stack about 20 tons, a barn and a cow shed. How it started is unknown.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, November 26, 1936:

Mrs. Almeda Hermanson is erecting a lunch stand featuring hamburgers, on Highway 10 just back of the Cort hotel. It will be an ideal location during the tourist season.

Robert Kellogg, who is a student at the agricultural college in Bozeman, left that place last week with a shipment of the college livestock to be exhibited at the big show in Chicago.

The sheriff's office was busy the latter part of the week searching for Elias Holen Jr., of the Sweet Grass, who left home and got lost. He just wanted to see some new country, but when it came time to return home and do chores he found that he was lost. He did a lot of wandering and some running. Coming to the road the next day he inquired the way to the Fanning ranch, thinking he could make it home there. His parents were delighted when he was returned and especially thanked Sheriff Bartels and other friends for finding him.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, December 3, 1936:

At the national cheese institute of all high schools girls, held at Plymouth, Wis., Betty Jean Hanson of Big Timber won a prize of one dollar. The first prize was $200, second $100 and third $50. Entries were judged from the standpoint of ingenuity and the variety of cheese dishes included in the menu.

By not being present on Wednesday nights at which awards are made at the State theater, the combined Conwell families are out $170 in cold cash as follows: Gertrude Conwell, $40; Millie Conwell, $10; Allen Conwell, $30; W.A. Conwell, $50; Mrs. W.A. Conwell, $40, the last name being called Wednesday night of last week. The only one not a loser is the granddaughter, Patsy.

Frank A. Bowman of Red Lodge in charge of relief work in this district, was here the first of the week on matters pertaining to the lay off of men on relief. So far 83 have beeen taken from the list. This number includes all farmers, who will be sent back to the farms, under the resettlement program, on dole, giving the needy in town an opportunity when work starts again. Their layoff dates from the first of this month. Just what the future will bring is uncertain, except that it may be some time before there is a resumption of work.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, December 17, 1936:

Mike Hoyem was here last week from Silver Gate, Mont., where he is preparing to go into business on an extensive scale next year. He has 2,000 logs cut, sufficient to build 40 cabins. Silver Gate is three miles from Cooke City, on the new Red Lodge highway.

The annual Christmas tree of the Knights of Pythias was placed in position yesterday having been brought in by Fred Tucker from the head of Little Timber Creek, in the Crazy mountains. It is shorter but wider than previous trees, affording a better opportunity for effective illumination by the Montana Power Co. Distribution of candy for the kids will be made the night of December 23.

Dusk on Saturday brought the end of a perfect day for kids, and Mayor Nordstrom and the city council should have realized 100 percent on their ice rink. During Friday night cold added to an already good pond of ice, and Saturday morning found a happy combination of skates, sleds, coaster wagons, dogs, kids sliding on their shoes at work. It lasted until evening with hope of a continuation Sunday, but a dust storm, followed by a chinook, ended the sport temporarily.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, December 24, 1936:

Among nine commutation of prison sentences yesterday by the state board of pardons, was one to Ed Hoyt of Sweet Grass county. He was convicted in June, 1926 of a statutory offense, many believing the case a frameup, and sentenced to not less than 30 or more than 60 years in the state penitentiary by Judge Miller. At that time he was a rancher on Tin Can Hill. He will spend tomorrow, Christmas day, outside prison walls, a free man.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, January 7, 1937:

Ed Bartels and wife and daughter, Mary Lee, returned last week from a Christmas visit with relatives in Denver and Akron, recovering from the flu, with all three having a hard attack. Sheriff Bartels states that Denver is flu from one end to the other. Schools there were closed this week.

A.H. Sibbit, rancher in the Reed Point country, visited Big Timber Monday. He reported the worst dust storm in that locality he has witnessed since coming to Montana, and that is more than 20 years ago. Dust drifted in four foot drifts, shingles were blown from roofs and winter wheat was damaged.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, January 14, 1937:

C.A. Rupert, living east of Melville, who came in yesterday to visit Mr. and Mrs. G.W. Briley, flu victims, reported a strong cold wind from the north in that country. He also estimated the amount of snow on the ground following the storms, at a foot deep.

Sievert Raisland is en route to grazing country near Wilsall, in the Shields River Valley, with his band of sheep. Cold weather and high winds have made traveling slow. Monday noon he had reached Elton, Park county, 22 miles from Big Timber. There are well over 11,000 Sweet Grass county sheep being wintered in the Shields Valley around Wilsall and Clyde Park.

Margaret Jarrett of this city was one of the successful applicants for a clerical position in the House of Representatives in Helena.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, January 23, 1937:

Walt Osborne of Big Timber, P. Treadwell of Glasston, Preston H. Sanders of Grey Cliff and J.P. Groth of Reed Point were among the 12 jurors starting work last week.

R.G. Woodward, operator of the huge Diesel - powered truck of the Montana Transport Co., passing through here about 9 p.m. was nearing Springdale when he noticed a red reflection on the snow, got out and found his load afire. After a large extinguisher failed to check the fire he beat it for Livingston 20 miles away. It was a wild ride and a hot one with the flames only a few feet away. He made it inside the city limits, parked near a hydrant and called the fire department. Damage to the truck was about $2,000; frieght inside the truck, weighing about 10 tons, included a large quantity of chocolate, was a total loss.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, January 28, 1937:

Miss Claire Frang, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Emil Frang, was one of a hundred guests entertained by Eddie Cantor at a New Year's party at his Hollywood Home.

Buster Garnier, junior member of the Montana Sport cigar manufacturing firm of Livingston, was here Saturday on a business visit. The Sport is one of the first brands of cigars made in Montana territory, and has held its own for more than 50 years.

Rev. A.A. Holbeck is in Spokane this week attending a ministerial conference, he will return tomorrow. Services at the Lutheran church Sunday will be in English.

Arthur Zeleny returned last week from a vacation trip south and west. In Denver he found flu, 100 schools closed. He drove to Grand Junction, Colo., then to Price, Utah, down to Las Vegas, where he inspected the Boulder dam, and to California. He drove across the new bridge at San Francisco, uniting that city with Oakland, and thinks it one of the wonders of the world. The trip was fine except for bad roads in many places.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, February 4, 1937:

At Livingston last night the Elks Lodge observed past exhalted rulers night with a special program and feed. Members from Big Timber who attended were Sheriff Ed Bartels, W.D. McKenzie, Robert Kepler, Odell Barbour, Guy Hart, S. Oie and Jack Fjelde.

Mr. and Mrs. Leo J. Cremer together with Sol Frank, secretary of the Livingston Roundup Association, left for Reno, NV., to attend a session of the National Rodeo Association Jan. 29 and 30. They were accompanied by Carl Spillum and Hugh Murphy, officials of the Butte Rodeo Association. The meeting attracts more than 300 delegates and prize winners. During the session prizes are presented to the riders and ropers who placed high in the championship events. Montana winners to receive awards this year are: Otto Zumwalt, Doff Aber and Harry Hart, all of whom appeared at the '36 Roundup here.

Miss Claire Frang, Big Timber young lady, has been promoted to the head designers department of the Caltex company, makers of ladies ready-to-wear, in Los Angeles. The company employs 1,500 persons, with but 15 in this department.

Ole Hoiland was here Monday en route to Anaconda, from a visit since last August to his old home at Stavanger, Norway. Weather there was fine he states, green grass being already in evidence. The water was rough coming back, but the ship, part of the Cunard line, made the trip in six days. He is glad he went, also glad that he is back.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, February 11, 1937:

Lloyd Rein, Adolph Tronrud and others who were in from Melville the first of the week reported a snow fall of about five inches, also high winds and big drifts.

Under Sheriff Floyd McAllister and Ceryl V. O'Leary were the high point team in the American Legion Bridge tournament played at the Dugout Saturday and Monday evenings. Prizes were given for each evenings play, also and lunch was served.

The annual Banquet of the Big Timber Volunteer Firemen was given at the fire hall last evening. Roquets served a delicious turkey dinner, places being laid for 50. Mayor Nordstrom and the city council were guests.

A car occupied by Harlan Holtan and Clyde Fredrickson went overboard on the highway Saturday night, the latter receiving a cut chin and ear. It was a case of not being able to hold the car on the road partly covered by snow and ice.

In company with his son, Vincent, of the State college, his daughter, Aloha of Missoula, and Miss Harriet Harvey of Big Timber, W.J. Hannah, spent Saturday and Sunday watching the state government in operation at Helena. Saturday Mr. Hannah joined parties from Glendive, Billings, Bozeman, Helena, Missoula, Great Falls and other cities in a vigorous protest to the senate committee on education against the ever recurring proposal for free state text books for the benefit of private and sectarian schools.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, February 18, 1937:

George Washington Cook will be entertained at 4 o'clock dinner at the Big Timber Cafe, Sunday in celebration of his one hundred and first birthday the following day. Members of the Sweet Grass Pioneer Society will be hosts.

Audrey Dahl, a freshman at the Dillon Normal, was recently pledged into the Kampus Kadets, a pep organization which makes special feature of attractive drills presented between the halves at basketball games.

Miss Audrey Graff has earned 35 credits in dramatics, which entitles her to membership in Masquers, a dramatics club at the University of Montana.

Annual banquet of the Big Timber Rod & Gun Club was held at the Big Timber Cafe Monday evening. Ross E. Shaver acted as toastmaster, speakers being G.E. Martin and E.A. Wilson of Livingston. Directors for the coming year, who will later name officers, were chosen as follows: Floyd McAllister, Dr. J.D. Herries, G.W. Cole, G.E. Campbell, Ross E. Shaver, Dick Mjelde and O.A. Sippel. More than 50 attended.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

From the Big Timber Pioneer, February 25, 1937:

Twenty-nine old friends of George Washington Cook honored his 101st birthday anniversary with a Dutch treat Sunday afternoon at the Big Timber Cafe. The honor guest was one of the brightest of the gathering, all noticing that in lifting a coffee cup to his mouth he did it with the east of a school boy, not a tremor. Sixteen lighted candles graced the birthday cake in front of him, all of which he blew out at the proper time. Chairman T.T. Olson of the board of commissioners was toastmaster, calling upon various guests for reminiscences. Those responding were G.A. Loasby, A. Whitney, Mrs. Roy Osburn, E.H. Ellingson, G.O. Rostad and Paul L. Van Cleve Jr., representing his aged father who could not attend owing to the road conditions between here and the Van Cleve ranch. Chairman Olson told the best story of Mr. Cook, who in the early days traded one of his numberless horses for 20 hogs. The hogs, of course, ran hog wild, a source of annoyance to the new owner and neighbors. Later Mr. Cook met the man with whom he had made the trade and said, "If you will take your hogs back home I will give you another horse." The life of the party was "Dad" Murray, who will celebrate his 85th birthday anniversary Sunday, most intimate playmate of Mr. Cook.

Return to the top of the page.

+++

This page was last updated April 24, 2012. It was created on 23 September 2006. Copyright 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 by Joan Shurtliff 2012 Bunny Freeman