The Towns of Franklin County, MO

This website is dedicated to preserving the history of Franklin County, Missouri and to providing helpful information and resources to people researching Franklin County history and genealogy. It is not connected to any historical society or governmental body; however information about such organizations is included herein. The content is copyrighted and is not to be used without permission.

 History and Genealogy of  Franklin County, Missouri

 

 

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The Towns of Franklin County

Gerald      New Haven / Miller's Landing     Pacific/Franklin     St. Clair / Traveller's Repose     Sullivan     Union     Washington / Bassora       

 

The Communities of Franklin County

Rucker's Prairie (Luebbering)

 

Gerald

The village of Gerald is located on the Rock Island Railroad in the western part of Franklin County, 81 miles west of St. Louis. It was named after the Fitzgerald family, pioneers in the vicinity and former owners of the land, which was purchased from the government in 1853, during the administration of President Tyler. The village was incorporated under state laws in 1907, with H. J. Tieman, J. F. Lefmann, Dr. W. P. Fitzgerald, C. H. Koetting, and W. U. Haase, serving as the first trustees. Dr. Fitzgerald was elected as the first chairman of the board of trustees and acting mayor, while Benjamin Tappmeyer was the first village clerk. The village is situated on high , rolling ground, surrounded by good farm land. Redoak and Burbois (Bourbeuse) streams on the south and Beouf on the north, have some very fine valley land, which produces large crops of all cereals. It now has a population of nearly 300, and is the center of the fire clay, timber, and livestock and poultry industries of the western part of the county, several carloads being shipped each day. Three rural mail routes supply a large number of farmers in the surrounding community with daily mail. Six general stores, two hardware stores, flour mill, elevator, millinery store, lunch room, and two banks, look after the needs of the community and all do a good business.

Source: 1919 Franklin County Atlas, Patrons’ Reference Directory

Provided by Norma Jean Freburg

 

New Haven

New Haven - A town in Franklin County, on the Missouri River and the Missouri Pacific Railway, 67 miles west of St. Louis. In early days it was known as Miller's Landing, named for Philip Miller, a pioneer. In 1856 it was laid out as a town by William Ming and others, and the name changed to New Haven. It was incorporated in 1881, and became a city of the fourth class in 1882. It has Baptist, Catholic, Christian, Methodist and Lutheran Churches, a public school, bank, flouring mill, elevator, and a stock medicine manufactory. It is one of the most important shipping points in the county. There are two papers, the "New Haven Notes," independent, and the "Leader," Republican. A steamboat plies between the town and adjacent points. In 1890 the population was 767; 1899 (estimated), 1,000.

Source: Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri, a Compendium of History and Biography for Ready Reference, edited by Howard L. Conard, Volume VI, The Southern History Company, 1901.

Provided by Sue Cooley

 

Pacific

Click here for 1869 "map" - allow time for photo to load

Pacific - A city of the fourth class, in Franklin County, on the Meramec River, at the junction of the Missouri Pacific and the St. Louis & San Francisco Railways, 34 miles west of St. Louis. It was originally platted as the town of Franklin, by William C. Inks, in 1852. In 1859 the name was changed to Pacific by act of the General Assembly. Its business interests include a bank, flour mill, a large canning factory, an elevator, tripoli factory and bottling works, and it is an extensive shipping point for glass sand, fire-brick clay, lumber and livestock. The city has an excellent electric lighting system, and telephone connection with St. Louis and intermediate points. The Missouri Pacific Railway bridge and building department has its headquarters in the city. There are Baptist, Catholic, Christian, Methodist, Presbyterian and colored Baptist Churches, a graded public school, the building for which cost $8,000, a school for colored children, and a Catholic School. The "Transcript" is a newspaper, published by Collins Close. In 1890 the population was 1,184; 1899 (estimated), 1,500.

Note: The towns of Old Franklin (long abandoned due to inroads by the river) and New Franklin were in Howard County on the Missouri River. They are often confused with Franklin (Pacific) in Franklin County.

Source: Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri, a Compendium of History and Biography for Ready Reference, edited by Howard L. Conard, Volume VI, The Southern History Company, 1901.

Provided by Sue Cooley

 

St. Clair

St. Clair -- a town in Franklin County, on the St. Louis & San Francisco Railway, 52 miles southwest of St. Louis. It was settled in 1849 by B. J. Inge, who called it Travelers' Repose. In 1855 the name was changed to St. Clair. It has Congregational, Methodist and Colored Baptist Churches, two schools, a flour mill, a lead smelter and a large department store. It is a large shipping point for zinc and lead from adjacent mines. In 1890 the population was 208; 1899 (estimated), 500.

Source: Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri, a Compendium of History and Biography for Ready Reference, edited by Howard L. Conard, Volume VI, The Southern History Company, 1901.

Provided by Sue Cooley

 

Sullivan

Also link to official Sullivan webpage

A city of the fourth class, in Franklin County, on the St. Louis & San Francisco Railway, 68 miles southwest of St. Louis. It was platted in 1859 by Stephen Sullivan, for whom it was named. It has a bank, two flouring mills, an elevator, four churches, a school, a fine hotel, two large stores and the "Sentinel" newspaper, independent. It is a shipping point for lead and copper from adjacent mines. In 1890 the population was 325; 1899 (estimated) 700.

Source: Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri, a Compendium of History and Biography for Ready Reference, edited by Howard L. Conard, Volume VI, The Southern History Company, 1901.

Provided by Sue Cooley

 

Union

To come

 

Washington

Link to City of Washington
Washington Visitor's Information
Washington Chamber of Commerce

A city in Franklin County on the Missouri River, and the Missouri Pacific Railway, 54 miles west of St. Louis by rail and 84 miles by water.

The earliest settler, who is clearly identified, was C. Eberius, whose marriage to Miss Trousdale or Trussell, in 1832, was the first wedding at this place. He erected the first frame building in 1834 and opened the first store. Bernard Fricke kept the first tavern the same year, in a log cabin which years afterward was replaced by the Washington House. In 1836 Phineas Thomas built the first brick house. During these years a ferry to the opposite side of the Missouri River was operated by a man named Murphy; the craft was composed of two canoes lashed together, supporting a plank floor. A H. Kruger was the first druggist, in 1837. Heinrich Tamm established a brewery in 1843.

     Daniel Q. Gale was the first lawyer, and one of the early judges; in the absence of ministers, he performed many marriage ceremonies. The next lawyer was John R. Martin, who became judge afterward.

     Dr. Jacobs was the first physician; he did not remain permanently, and Dr. Elijah McLean and Dr. Benjamin L. Burch may be regarded as the pioneer physicians.

     A portion of the town was platted in 1836 by George Morton and others, and called Bassora. In 1837, it was laid out under the present name by Mrs. Lucinda Owens. Various additions were subsequently made.

     In 1840 it was incorporated as a town, with William J. Cowherd, Andrew Cochran, Daniel Q. Gale, John Bihi, Samuel McAllister, Elijah McLean and Samuel Bruhir as trustees; Andrew Cochran was chosen chairman and J. F. Mense clerk. In 1850 a town hall was built.

     In 1873 the town was incorporated as a city, with L. Wattenberg as the first mayor, and the following councilmen: Gerhard Tod, H. H. Beinke, John B. Busch, H. Mittendorf, Julius Conrad, Henry C. Hollmann, M. Monkhaus and J. C. S. Foss. In 1878 it was incorporated as a city of the fourth class, with John A. Collins as mayor.

     In 1853, a public school was opened with the Rev. J. F. Fenton as teacher. September 30, 1871, a school building was erected at a cost of about $11,000. In 1887 the Washington high school was built. The course of study is comprehensive, covering the ordinary academical curriculum, and requires four years for completion. There are also grammar schools, and a school for colored pupils. A Catholic parochial school, and a boarding school and academy for young ladies, both under the Sisters of Notre Dame, occupy an edifice containing school rooms and an exhibition hall, built at a cost of $14,000. There is also a Lutheran parochial school.

     The Church of St. Francis Borgia, Catholic, was organized in 1833 by the Rev. Father Verhagen, S. J. The first church building was a log cabin, built in 1837, and the second, of brick, was built in 1846. The present edifice dates from 1868.

     Early annals make mention of a German Protestant body which built a log house of worship in 1838. From this probably came St. Peter's Evangelical Church, organized in 1845 by the Rev. Edward Arcularius; in 1845 it built a frame edifice, at a cost of $2,000; in 1852, one of brick, costing $3,500, and in 1868 the present structure, costing $15,000.

     The Lutheran Immanuel Church, organized in 1862 by the Rev. F. W. G. Mathuschka, occupies a building erected in 1882 at a cost of $8,000.

     The Methodist Episcopal Church, South, was organized about 1855, and in 1858 a house of worship was erected at a cost of $6,000, and dedicated by Bishop Marvin.

     The Presbyterian Church was organized in 1850, with Rev. Joseph F. Fenton as the first pastor, and a building was erected in 1853. Its membership became divided during the war, but were long ago reunited.

     There is also an African Methodist Church.

     The leading social organization is the Washington TurnVerein, organized in 1859 by Francis Wilhelmi, Robert Reichard and others. Its memebership joined the Union Army in 1860 and the organization was abandoned until 1865. In 1866 a hall was built at a cost of $4,000. There are also lodges of Masons, Knights of Pythias, Odd Fellows and United Workmen, all with large and active membership.

     The earliest newspaper was the "Courier," Democratic, dating prior to the war, conducted by Adelbert Baudessin and Dr. Crumsick. It became the "Washington Gazette," under J. O. Matthews, and was suppressed by the military authorities in 1861. The Washington "Free Press" and the "Polish Eagle" were papers having brief existence between 1865 and 1875. The "Franklin County Advertiser" was begun in 1859. In 1862, while in the hands of H. C. Allen, it was suppressed by the military authorities, when J. C. Magan was placed in charge and published it as a Republican paper. In 1865 it became the "Observer," Democratic, and is now the "Franklin County Observer." Other papers published are the "Washington Journal" and the "Post" (German), both Republican.

        The industries of the city include a zither manufactory, the largest in America, founded by Franz Schwarzer; the John B. Busch Brewing Company, founded in 1854 and incorporated in 1894; a foundry and machine shops, two flour mills, a sawmill, a shoe factory, three cob pipe factories, horse collar and broom factories, and excellent stores in various mercantile lines. It has numerous substantial financial houses. The Bank of Washington, capital $50,000, was organized in 1877, succeeding to the Washington Savings Bank, instituted in 1866. Two building and savings associations date from 1871 and 1884, respectively. There are three hotels.

     The city has a fine system of waterworks, costing $60,000; an efficient fire department and electric light and telephone service. Thrift, public spirit and intelligence are marked characteristics of the people, and all their enterprises are substantially founded and prosperous. In 1900 the population was 3,015.

Source: Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri, a Compendium of History and Biography for Ready Reference, edited by Howard L. Conard, Volume VI, The Southern History Company, 1901.

Provided by Sue Cooley

 

This page was last updated Tuesday February 21, 2012 .

  Sue Blesi, Franklin County Coordinator, Missouri USGenWeb Project

 

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