Canterbury, John H. MAGA 2000-2011
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PAST AND PRESENT OF THE CITY OF SPRINGFIELD AND SANGAMON COUNTY ILLINOIS
By Joseph Wallace, M. A.
of the Springfield Bar
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., Chicago, IL
1904



Page 1037

JOHN H. CANTERBURY. - Of the farming interests of Fancy Creek township John H. Canterbury is a worthy representative. His home is on section 17, and there he is engaged in the production of grain and the raising of stock. He owns and operates a farm of two hundred acres, which is well improved with modern equipments, and it forms one of the pleasing features of the landscape. Mr. Canterbury is a native of Illinois, his birth having occurred in Menard county, April 14, 1860. His father, Oliver P. Canterbury, was born in Fleming county, Kentucky, July 21, 1824, and the grandfather, Asa Canterbury, was a native of Virginia, his birth having there occurred March 7, 1788. When he was but a child his father died and he removed with his mother to Bath county, Kentucky. He was married in Aberdeen, Ohio, to Peggy Hornback, a native of Fleming County, Kentucky. They came to Illinois at a later date, Asa Canterbury being one of the first settlers of Sangamon county, the year of his arrival being 1826. This was only eight years after the admission of the state into the Union, and the most far-sighted could not then have dreamed that the little cross-roads village of Springfield would one day be the thriving, populous and beautiful capital of Illinois. Securing a tract of land, Asa Canterbury there opened up and improved a good farm. Oliver P. Canterbury was reared on the old homestead, and after arriving at years of maturity was married, in Sangamon county, to Elizabeth Council, a native of this county and a daughter of William Council, who was born near Tarboro, North Carolina, October 1, 1791. Coming to Illinois, he first located in White county and was there married, in 1819, to Mary Graves. In 1821 they removed to Sangamon County and their daughter was here born. After the marriage of Mr. And Mrs. Canterbury they lived for a time in this county and then removed to Menard county, where he became the owner of a large tract of land, which lay in both counties. He was a very prominent farmer and carried on agricultural pursuits for a long period, but eventually retired from business cares and removed to Cantrall, where he spent his last years, there dying on the 23d of October, 1899. His wife still survives him and is yet a resident of Cantrall.

John H. Canterbury was reared to manhood in Menard and Sangamon counties and to the common schools is indebted for the educational privileges he received. On the 27th of March, 1884, in this county, he was united in marriage to Elizabeth E. Fisk, a native of Mason county, Illinois, who was reared, however, in Sangamon county. Her father, Moore Fisk, was one of the enterprising agriculturists of this county for many years, but is now living in Petersburg. After his marriage Mr. Canterbury located on his father's land in Menard county and resided there continuously until 1892, when he removed to the farm in Fancy Creek township, upon which he now resides. He had previously purchased forty acres here and began farming the property, further improving it as the years passed by. He has now brought it up to a very high state of cultivation and he has extended the boundaries of the farm until it comprises two hundred acres. He has built a good residence, barn, granary, has tiled and fenced his land and has made other modern improvements which add to the value and attractive appearance of his place, which is regarded as one of the best farms of the locality. His fields annually return good harvests and in his pastures are found good grades of stock, which find a ready sale upon the market.

Mr. And Mrs. Canterbury have two sons: Clare E., who is a well-educated young man, having graduated from the Springfield high school; and Harold, who is a student in the Cantrall school. Politically Mr. Canterbury is a stanch Republican, who has cast his ballot for every presidential nominee of the party since attaining his majority. He has never sought or desired office, preferring to give his attention to his business affairs. He and his wife are members of the Christian church of Cantrall and he is connected with the Modern Woodmen of America and with the Knights of Pythias fraternity, also with the Fraternal Army. His entire life has been spent in this section of Illinois and he has always carried on the work of the farm. His life has been one of untiring industry and his well-directed labor has resulted in bringing to him gratifying success. All who know him esteem him as a man of genuine worth and upright qualities, and in matters of citizenship he has never withheld his support from the movements calculated to prove of general good.


1904 Index