BIOGRAPHIES

BIOGRAPHIES

The biographies below are from the book 'MEMOIRS OF GEORGIA", Historical and Biographical Sketches, by S. Emmett Lucas, Jr.,  PUBLISHED IN 1896.
These may have been 'paid' bios since they do not include all the county leaders of that time.  These bios help us document people of Monroe County and give us a real insight to the life and times and perhaps information about them we did not know.

If you have a biography you would like to submit to include herein, or if you have place of burial on any of these men, please send the information to the County Coordinator and we will add it to this database.  Also, a picture of the individuals would be interesting.

(These biographies were typed for us by Donna Wall who has volunteered to help with all typing.  We are especially grateful to her for her hard work. The two Zellner Bios were typed by Michele H. Mills who has contributed so much to the Monroe County files.)
Biographies in the Archives
CASTLEBERRY, J. T
CASTLIN, WILLIAM H
CLEMENTS, WILLIAM P.
CORLEY, W. C.
CULLODEN, WILLIAM
HEAD, G. W.
MCGOUGH, R. C.
MONROE, E. M.
NORWOOD, WILLIAM A.
PARKER, W. H.
PERKINS, CAPT. A. L.
PONDER, JAMES M.
REDDING, ANDERSON
REDDING, CAPT. D. S.
ROBERTS, JOHN ARTHUR
ROBERTS, WILEY JONES
SANDERS, W. E.
SCOTT, THOMAS G.
SEARCY, JAMES T.
SHANNON, JOHN R.
SPAIN, BENJAMIN
SPIRES, MARY JANE
SIMMONS, JAMES MADISON
SIMMONS, MARTHA M.
STONE, WILLIAM D.
SUTTON ANCESTORS
TAYLOR, EDEN
THOMAS, J. M.
WALTON, T. E.
WILLIAMS, R. L.
ZELLNER, JUDGE B. H.
ZELLNER, WILLIAM J.

MONROE COUNTY SKETCHES  AND BIOGRAPHIES

CAPT JAMES M. PONDER.

(The below is a collection of miscellaneous articles and information about the Captain James M. Ponder family

 (Note by Transcriber:  This represents only three pages of a file held in the Monroe County Historical
Society and does not include all the information on this family)    
2010 - NOMINATED TO HALL OF FAME OF 48TH BRIGADE :
To Honor CPT James M. Ponder
Submitted by: SFC Matthew R. Hanson, The 148th Brigade Support Battalion
To chronicle properly and systematically the history of the Quartermaster's Department would be to write a history of the Army, 
of which it forms so important a part, with which it is so intimately associated, and without which it could not exist; for 
otherwise our Army would be but a predatory mob, organized but not supplied; dependent upon chance for its existence, and 
for its supplies upon forays, like the forces of the feudal barons of medieval times. 1 - Captain Oscar F. Long U.S. Army Asst 
Quartermaster 
 (1 Long, Oscar F., The Quartermaster’s Department, The Army of the United States: Historical Sketches of Staff and Line 
with Portraits of Generals-In-Chief (New York; Maynard, Merrill, & Co., 1896), Brevet Brigadier General Theophilus F. 
Rodenbough and Major William L. Haskin, editors.)
 LETTER OF NOMINATION FOR JAMES M. PONDER CAPTAIN, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES 

James Monroe Ponder is hereby nominated for recognition by, and admittance to, the 48th Brigade Hall of Fame. He is the first 
logistics officer mentioned in the history of the 148th Support Battalion. The Battalion draws its lineage and honors as far 
back as the formation of the Monroe Musketeers in 1826 in the town of Forsyth, Monroe County, Georgia. These Musketeers were 
reorganized as the Quitman Guards in 1859. It was this unit into which the young James Ponder enlisted just prior to the Civil War,
 and over which he was appointed first sergeant. 

On 20 April 1861, at the age of 15, First Sergeant Ponder mustered into one year of active Confederate service with the newly 
reorganized Company K (Quitman Guards), 1st Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry. About one of the battles in which 1SG Ponder 
participated, in western Virginia, one U.S. Soldier wrote: “Each [Confederate] brigade in turn, right, left and center, repelled 
wave after wave of attacking [Federal] troops, driving them back with galling rifle fire, and each brigade in turn came under 
heavy artillery fire. … The Confederates fought with a spirit they had not before shown, and yielded the ground only as they 
were driven.”2 1SG Ponder led the unit with the company commander, Captain James S. Pinckard, under such distinguished senior 
leadership as General T. J. “Stonewall” Jackson. 

After his first year of combat duty and a two-month break, when the unit was mustered for a second tour of active service, 
1SG Ponder was elected company commander of Company K (Quitman Guards), now assigned to 53d Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry. 
The 16 year old Captain Ponder led the unit for another year; through the bloodiest single day of combat in American history, at 
Sharpsburg, Maryland, near Antietam creek; through perhaps the greatest tactical victory of the war, at Chancellorsville, Virginia, 
near Fredericksburg, when the 53d Georgia captured the colors of the 2d Rhode Island; and through the South’s most daring 
incursion into the North at Gettsyburg, Pennsylvania, when the 53d Georgia was at the Devil’s Den. 

After Gettysburg, during his third year of combat duty in the Civil War, CPT Ponder was appointed Regimental Assistant 
Quartermaster. During his fourth year, he was appointed Brigade Assistant Quartermaster. He performed these staff officer duties under 
such distinguished senior leadership as Lieutenant General James Longstreet, during such engagements as Cold Harbor, Virginia, about
 which General U.S. Grant remarked that his order to assault the well entrenched Confederate lines was the only one he wished he’d 
never given, as over 13,000 Union casualties were suffered. 
------------------
MILITARY CAREER SUMMARY OF JAMES M. PONDER CAPTAIN, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES 

18 Mar 1861 – Appointed first sergeant of Company K (Quitman Guards), 1st Regiment (Ramsey's Regiment), Georgia Volunteer Infantry 

20 Apr 1861 – Mustered into active Confederate service at Macon, Georgia, with duty in Pensacola, FL for two months 

7-11 Jul 1861 – Present at battle of Laurel Hill (Rich Mountain), western Virginia 

3 Oct 1861 – Present at battle of Greenbrier River (Camp Bartow), western Virginia 

6 May 1862 – Elected company commander of Company K (Quitman Guards), 53d Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry; unit mustered 
into active service for second tour 

1 Jul 1862 – Present at battle of Malvern Hill (Poindexter’s Farm), Virginia 

16-18 Sep 1862 – Present at battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam), Maryland 

30 Apr-6 May 1863 – Present at battle of Chancellorsville (Fredericksburg), Virginia 

1-3 Jul 1863 – Present at battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 

9 Jul 1863 – Appointed Regimental Assistant Quartermaster 

31 Aug 1863 – The 53d Regiment, under Colonel James P. Simms, is assigned to the 1st Army Corps, under Lieutenant General James 
Longstreet, as part of the Army of Northern Virginia 

5-7 May 1864 – Present at battle of the Wilderness, Virginia 

31 May-12 Jun 1864 – Present at battle of Cold Harbor, Virginia 

Oct 1864 – Appointed Brigade Assistant Quartermaster 

19 Oct 1864 – Present at battle of Cedar Creek, Virginia 

Nov 1864 – Became ill, returned home to Monroe County, Georgia 

25 Jan 1865 – Furloughed for 24 days 

5 Mar 1865 – Appears on list of quartermasters and commissaries 

7 Oct 1919 – Applied for military pension 
-----------------------
BIOGRAPHY OF JAMES M. PONDER CAPTAIN, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES 

Born 1 January 1846, died 13 August 1926. 

His father, Daniel Ponder, left him $3,000 in land and property in Forsyth, a large sum in the late nineteenth century, which 
set him up for success in his life as a businessman after the war. 

Married to Ella M. Ensign; their daughter was Abigail. 

Service in the Army of the Confederate States of America 1861 – 1865. 

Other possible Ponder relations in the military from Monroe County (relationship undetermined) may include: Major John M. Ponder,
 born 17 April 1795, died 17 May 1864. Private John L. Ponder, joined 6 May 1862, wounded at Chancellorsville, VA, 3 May 1863, 
appointed 2d Sergeant November 1863, captured at Farmville, VA, 6 April 1865, released at Newport News, VA, 26 June 1865. 

His daughter married attorney Samuel Rutherford, from a prominent family in the area, who later became a U.S. Congressman. 
One of Samuel and Abbie’s daughters was Eleanor, who married Albert Bunn, from another prominent family in the area. 
Albert’s son, Sam, is alive and well today in Griffin, GA. 

He attended the Hilliard Institute. He worked on a farm for many years before coming to town to clerk for Proctor & Ponder 
at their two-story brick store in Forsyth. When Proctor & Ponder went out of business, CPT Ponder and Mr. Dick Ham bought 
out the dry goods stock and moved into another building, doing business in that store for many years. Mr. Ponder bought out 
Mr. Ham's interest and moved the business twice more to new buildings.3 

Years after the war, CPT James M. Ponder was still a prominent member of Monroe County and was possibly the wealthiest man 
in the county at the turn of the century. He was owner of a cotton mill and large amounts of farming land. He was owner of 
a fine house and purchased a beautiful new house for his daughter after she married. He was elected captain of the Quitman 
Guards association, a position he held for many years. He was president of the board of trustees of Monroe Female College. 
He was a Mason and finally a Knight Templar.4 

He founded Bank of Forsyth and was later owner and president of First National Bank of Forsyth, two banks he founded along with 
other local citizens. Two of his cashiers, family friends Will and Charner Hill, from yet another prominent family in the area, 
learned banking from “Cap’n Ponder” and later went on to found Monroe County Bank, which is still doing business today. 
-------------------------
CONTACT INFORMATION FOR JAMES M. PONDER CAPTAIN, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES 

Closest living relative: 

Great assistance was provided by the following, in researching more detailed information about Mr. Ponder: 
Elizabeth Robertson, Monroe County Coordinator, GAGenWeb 

The Monroe County Historical Society :
Ralph Bass 
Paul Jossey 
Jane Newton 
Meredith Clapper 
Evelyn Bugg 
Lynn Cunningham 
Ernest Morgan 
Buddy Mitchell  Notes for JOHN LEWIS PONDER:
Enlisted as a private 5/6/1862 Co K, 53rd Regt Ga Infantry. Wounded at Chancellorsville May 3,1863.
Appointed 2nd Sgt Nov 1863.  Captured at Farmville, Va April 6, 1865. Released at Newport News, Va. June
20.
More About JOHN LEWIS PONDER:
Civil War: 06 May 1862, Enlisted as a private Co K, 53rd Regt Ga Infantry.
Children of JOHN PONDER and SARAH ENSIGN are:
i.    JULIAN7 PONDER.
201.           ii.   EVELYN PONDER, b. 12 Aug 1883; d. 17 Oct 1977, Lakeland, Fl.
202.          iii.   RALPH ENSIGN PONDER, b. 24 Jun 1887.
109. JAMES MONROE6 PONDER (DANIEL J.5, JOHN4, DANIEL3, RICHARD1, JOHN1) was born 01 Jan 1846 in Forsyth, Ga, and died 13 Aug 1926 in 
Forsyth, Ga. He married ELLA MARIE ENSIGN 14 Dec 1869 in Forsyth, Monroe Co., Ga, daughter of ISAAC ENSIGN and SARAH PHELPS. She was 
born 28 Feb 1 85 1 in Forsyth, Monroe Co., Ga, and died 19 Feb 1924 in Forsyth, Monroe Co., Ga.
Notes for JAMES MONROE PONDER:
Last Will and Testament.
To my Grand daughter Juliett Rutherford
1 State Ga Bond #V-45- for $5,000.
1 State Ga Bond #V-46- for $5,000.
1 State Ga Bond #V-47- for $5,000. Making $15,000.
I have given her before 10,000 bonds and delivered to her and registered in her name making in all $25,000.
To my Grand daughter Eleanor Rutherford 1 State Ga Reg in name of J. M. Ponder - V- 48 - $5,000 V- 49 - $5,000
 V- 149 - $5,000 V- 125 - $5,000 V-150- $5,000  Total $25,000 Making her equal to Juliett. And my daughter 
Abbie P. Rutherford all the balance of my estate consisting of realty, notes, mortgages, cash and bonds of every 
description except the bonds above conveyed to Juliette and Eleanor P. Rutherford without administration or requiring 
her to give or make bond. She has the sole power to sell as she thinks best without any order of court of making any returns. 
(s) J. M. Ponder Dec 20, 1925
Military Service
1st Sergeant March 18 1861. Resigned January 20, 1862. Elected Captain of Co. K. 53rd Regt Ga Inf May 6, 1862. 
Appointed Asst Quartermaster July 9, 1863. Brigade A. Q. M. Oct 1864. Furloughed for 24 days January 24, 1865. 
Appears on list of Quartermaster & Commissaries, Army of Northern Virginia, Dated March 5, 1865.                                                                
More About JAMES MONROE PONDER: Civil War; 18 Mar 1861, 1st Sergeant
Child of JAMES PONDER and ELLA ENSIGN is:
203.           i.   ABIGAIL ELIZABETH7 PONDER, b. 22 Sep 1877, Forsyth, Monroe Co., Ga; d. 03 Mar 1946, Forsyth, Monroe Co., Ga.
1 10. ELLA LAVINIA6 PONDER (DANIEL J.5, JOHN4, DANIEL*, RICHARD*, JOHN*) was born 05 Mar 1847 in Forsyth, Monroe Co., Ga, and 
died 21 Sep 1895 in Forsyth, Monroe Co., Ga. She married HENRY JACKSON CARSON 28 Nov 1867 in Monroe County, Ga, son of DAVID 
CARSON and MARY. He was bom 12 Jan 1848, and died 15 Feb 1915.
More About ELLA LAVTNIA PONDER: Twin: Emma Ponder Hale
37
Children of SARAH ENSIGN and JOHN PONDER are:
i.    JULIAN9 PONDER.
13.           ii.   EVELYN PONDER, b. August 12,1883; d. October 17,1977, Lakeland, FL.
24.           iii    RALPH ENSIGN PONDER, b. June 24,1887.
MARIE8 ENSIGN (ISAAC Whiting7, MOSEs6, Isaac5, MOSES4, THOMAS3, DAVID2. JAMES1) was born February 28, 1851 in Forsyth, Monroe Co., GA, 
and died February 19, 1924 in Forsyth, GA. She married JAMES MONROE PONDER December 14,1869 in Forsyth, GA, son of DANIEL PONDER and 
ELIZABETH MCMICKLE. He was born January 01, 1846 in Forsyth, GA, and died August 13, 1926 in Forsyth, GA.
Notes for JAMES MONROE PONDER:
Marriage Notes for ELLA ENSIGN and JAMES PONDER: Married by S. J. Hillier, MG
Child of ELLA ENSIGN and JAMES PONDER is:
25             i.   ABIGAIL ELIZABETH9 PONDER, b. September 22, 1877, Forsyth, GA; d. March 03,1946, Forsyth, GA.
I
20. CHARLES ALBERT8 ENSIGN (ISAAC Whiting7, MOSEs6, ISAAC5, MOSEs4, THOMAS3. DAVid2, JAMES1) was born May 21, 1854 in Forsyth, 
GA/Forsyth, Monroe Co., GA, and died November 21, 1935 in Forsyth, GA. He married NANCY SUTTON PROCTOR September 28, 1882 in
 Forsyth, GA, daughter of DANIEL PONDER and MARTHA SUTTON, She was born May 08, 1860 in Forsyth, GA, and died February 15, 1920 in 
Forsyth, GA.
Children of CHARLES ENSIGN and NANCY PROCTOR are:
76.            i.   ADDE M.9 ENSIGN, b. May 17,1884, Forsyih, GA/Forsyth, Monroe Co., GA; d. October 24,1919.
27.             ii.   OLIVER PHELPS ENSIGN, b. March 17,1889, Forsyth, GA/Forsyth, Monroe Co., GA; d. August 15,1968,
Forsyth, GA.
iii.   CHARLES WILLIAM ENSIGN, b. November 30,1892, Forsyth, GA/Forsyth, Monroe Co., GA; d. January 14, 1974, Glenn County, GAj; 
m. MARY LEILA PATTERSON; b. September 05,1900, Griffin, GA; d. May 03, 1979.
28.            iv.   CORNELIA AMELIAPHELPS ENSIGN, b. February 14, 1901, Forsyth, GA/Forsyth, Monroe Co., GA; d.
February 14,1979.
II. MARY ANNE8 ENSIGN (NATHAN RALEIGH*, MOSE&, ISAAC*, MOSES*, THOMAS*, DAVID*, JAMES*) was born ay 20,1868 in Forsyth, Monroe Co, GA. 
She married GERRIAH NEWELL March 20,1902.
child of MARY ENSIGN and GERRIAH NEWELL is:
i.   NATHALIE9 NEWELL, b. June 1906.
November 05, 2000
========================================
Following Information copied from family Bibles 
Daniel, Ponder was born 31st day of October, 1794   
BIRTHS:
Daniel'Ponder  0ct. 31, 1794   
Elisebeth Ponder April 1st, 1811   
Peter McMickle Feb. 6, 1809
Nancy M Ponder  Aug 14, 1830
Amos M.Ponder  Aug. 12, 1841
Daniel J. Ponder  Jan. 14, 1843
John L. Ponder May 19th, 1844 
James M. Ponder  Jan. 1st 1846
Emma Ponder  Mar. 5th, 1847                                               
Ella Ponder March 5th, 1847  (Emma and Ella were twins)     
William P. Ponder  Dec. 20th, 1848        
L. Mack Hale   Jan 31st, 1882                                             
Hubert B. Hale Feb. 26th, 1884         
Bessie Mae Hale  April 19, 1890                      
Georgia A. Ponder Sept. 14th, 1850  (She was a daughter of Dulane Ponder. Her father came from Clarke County, Georgia and was not the 
Dulane Ponder who is connected with the Ponder family listed in Monroe County Courthouse records.                                  
William F Hale  Dec. 5th, 1842 
Mary E. Hale  Mar. 21, 1870 
Edgar Hale  July 23, 1871 
W. Frank Hale Sept. 27, 1873 
Georgia E.Hale Jan. 7th, 1876 
Ada L Hale  Sept. .21, 1878
L. Mack Hale  Jan. 31, 1882 
Hubert B. Hale Feb. 26, 1884 
Bessie May Hale Apr. 19, 1890 
Robert I. Hale Sept. 9, 1893
Deaths:
Daniel Ponder Nov.. 6th, 1867 
Elisebeth Ponder  Jan. 1, 1880
Peter McMickle, Oct. 9th, 1882 
Daniel J.Ponder May 6th, 1865
Georgia A. Hale Oct. 7th, 1878 
Robert L Hale Sept 10, 1893 
William F. Hale Oct. 10, 1907
The following was contained In an old clipping In one of the Biblee. 
Roster of. Company K Quitman Guards 
First Regiment, Georgia Volunteers , C.S.A. 1861; 
Jamas M. Ponder First Sergeant                                     
Private: O. H. Ponder, D. j. Ponder.       
2010 ELECTED TO THE 48TH BRIGADE HALL OF FAME:
NOMINATION PACKET
HALL OF FAME ORDER 

CULLODEN, WILLIAM.   (Please note:  This is not an official biography but a collection of various references
to William Culloden in Monroe County. E. Robertson.  The information is taken from various sources. Feb. 22, 2008,  As you read this you will see there is conflicting information.  The original inquiry on William Culloden stated:   " I believe he had two sisters, Rebecca who married a Benjamin ENGER or EAGER, and Jemima who married a Andrew English. I would be interested in hearing from any members of those families.

4 William is said to have been involved in an Indigo plantation in India.
My 3Xgreat-grandfather, John CULLODEN was a merchant in India and mentions a
nephew William in his Will. I suspect William of the town of Culloden was
not the nephew but I would be interested if anyone has any information about
William's time in India.)" (This query was from Rosemary Tearle, Northland New Zealand)
    William Culloden's will is in Book A, Page 15. The will was dated Feb. 3, 1830 but the probate date is not shown.
Listed in the will are: Sister, Rebecca Culloden (w/o Benj. Enger); Neph: Andrew English (s/o Jemima Culloden English);

On Page 69 of the book "Monroe County, a History", it states: "William Culloden, the Scottish trader and merchant for whom Culloden is named, never married and so left no children to perpetuate his name.

On Page 122: "Fourteen miles south of Forsyth, on Highway 83, is a town that antedates it by 43 years. Culloden was founded in 1780, and has an interesting history of its own. U. S. Postal service here dates from March 29, 1825, when William Culloden took office as its first postmaster.

Page 192: (Subject Culloden Schools)... It was in 1780 that William Culloden, a Scottish Highlander, began merchandising there. By that time many wealthy Virginia planters moved to the Culloden community. ....Culloden's store became the Indian trading post and station for the stage coach lines. Hence, the settlement received its name from William Culloden..."

Lynn Cunningham https://sites.rootsweb.com/~archreg/vols/00011.html#0002535 February 22, 2008, 8:32 am

The Macon Telegraph February 22, 1892

Some of the Memories Which Hang Around the Place
Culloden, Feb. 20. - [Special]

Culloden is one of the quaint towns of Georgia. Her people make money, but
take the world easy, and thus there is about them a charming sociability.
Culloden boasts of the first brick church ever built in the state. It is in a
splendid state of preservation and the basement is used for school purposes.

The house where Nat Hammond was reared has now been replaced by a modern
cottage, but a widespreading magnolia marks the spot where stood his and his
father's law office.

The old blacksmith shop still stands where Governor Milton Smith served his
apprenticeship when a boy, and there, too, is the old shoe shop erected by Tom
Norwood's father, and where the ex-senator himself learned the trade.

Culloden is the old home of Judge Robert Trippe, and the room where Judge
Emory Speer was born is pointed out with pride to the visitor.

Culloden has just now a most interesting visitor. It is Mr. William L.P. Eager
of Toronto, Ont., who came to Culloden to visit the grave of his uncle,
William Culloden, after whom the village was named. Andrew Culloden,
grandfather of William, was a Scotchman, and fought at the celebrated battle
of Culloden. After the battle, disastrous to his side, he went to Ireland.

William Culloden was born at Mullinger, Ireland. His father, John Culloden,
possessed large estates in Hindoostan (sic), went out there, engaged with a
rich Italian, Col. Finch, in the indigo business. This firm failed, and
William sought the inviting fields of the new country. He came to Savannah in
1818, and then settled in Monroe county. He owned a farm and ran a country
store, and in time the place took his name. He died in 1832, and the law firm
of Poe & Nisbet of Macon represented the estate. Mr. Eager, an old man
himself, intends visiting Macon, and made inquiries about the descendants of
his uncles attorneys. His visit to Georgia is one of love.

Mr. Eager praises enthusiastically his adopted country, Ontario. The condition
of farmers there, he says, is better than in the South - and yet they raise no
cotton.
-------------------------
(Submitted by Valerie Garton, e-mail to: vbgarton@optusnet.com.au
12th Septem 1848 (I am not sure if this date refers to this document or the one above)

Georgia Monroe County

To his Honor John J Floyd Judge of the Superior Courts of the Monroe County Flint District Entertaining Jurisdiction in Chancery

            Humbly complaining sheweth unto your Honor your Orators Benjamin Eager & his wife Rebecca Eager formerly Rebecca Culloden and Andrew English only child of Edward & Jemima English formerly Jemima Culloden, said Jemima having departed this life in the month of February 1813, leaving said Andrew her only child; said Rebecca and Jemima being the only sisters of William Culloden late of said county & state, and said William having but one brother to wit Lawrence P Culloden who has assigned in said William’s estate to your Orators

That in the month of February 1830 the said William Culloden departed this life in the said county & state.  That before his death he made and executed his will a copy of which is hereto annexed by which said will he bequeathed all his property (excepting certain negroes) to said Andrew English and Rebecca Eager – and as to said negroes consisting then of two Rachael & June – He directed his Executors to permit them to hire their time at the annual hire of Fifteen dollars; and by said will constituted and appointed William H Pritchard and Arthur Ginn of said county of Monroe his Executors. Your Orators shew unto your Honor that one of the said slaves to wit, Jane – has, since the death of said William Culloden given birth to three children to wit Christianna, Frances & an infant female child and that the same are now living together with the two named in the will, & are under the control & management of one or both of the said Executors and that said Executors have collected the annual hire of said slaves from the year 1830 (the time when William Culloden departed this life) to the present time, amounting to a large sum to wit the sum of three hundred dollars.  Your Orators state to your Honor that all the just debts of William Culloden (save what was due your Orators) have been fully paid off and discharged many years ago. And subsequently to that time on the     day of    Eighteen hundred & forty seven your Orators through their attorney demanded said slaves as the only lawful heirs of William Culloden from said Executors, and also the hire due – and your Orators well hoped that said Executors would have delivered said slaves and paid said hire to your orators, as in justice and equity they were bound to do.  But now so it is please your Honor the said defendants combining and confederating etc do insist that they are not bound or authorized to deliver said slaves or to pay said hire to your Orators because they are required by said will to protect said slaves and to permit them to hire their own time – whereas your Orators charge that said permission in said will is directly in violation of a Statute of the state of Georgia prohibiting slaves from hiring their own time – and likewise contrary to another Statute of said State which renders void every instrument or will having for its object the manumission of slaves within the limits of this State.  And your Orators further charge that although the said act were not in opposition to the laws and policy of said State, yet the said William Culloden could not in equity and good conscience make such disposition of his said property because your Orators charge that said William was at the time of his death largely in   …………….the sum of thirty thousand Dollars or other large

(here endth three photocopies)

***************************************************

(I am sure this is part of the above photocopy but I am not sure if a page or pages is/are missing)

….. sum for money of Andrew Culloden father of your Orators used & appropriated by said William in British India and for which said William afterwards gave his obligation , a certified copy of which said Arthur Ginn has been furnished with, and your Orators pray that he may be compelled to produce it in court or append it to his answer. – And so far as Lawrence P Culloden’s interest in said bond is concerned your Orators note that said said William satisfied him, & the said Lawrence being the executor of the said Andrew transferred the same to your Orators.

            In tender consideration where of and for that your Orators are remediless in the premises at & by the strict rules of the common law & can have adequate relief only in a court of equity where matters of this kind are properly cognisable and reliable. – To the end therefore that the said Arthur & William H may upon their several corporal oaths full true & perfect answers make not only to the facts within their own knowledge but also to the best of their hearsay information & belief touching the charges in said bill of complaint contained – And that the Arthur & William H may be decreed to deliver to your orators the said several slaves & account for the annual hire of the same – And that your Honor would grant unto your Orators such other and further relief in the premises as to your Honor seem meet & in accordance with equity – May it please your Honor to grant unto your Orators the States writs of Subpoena to be directed to said Arthur Ginn & William H Pritchard requiring them personally to be an appear at the next Superior Court to be held in and for the said county of Monroe then & there to ?stared? to and abide by such further order and decree as your Honor may make in the premises and which shall be agreeable to equity – And your Orators will ever pray etc.

Copy of Last Will and testament of William Culloden

Georgia
Monroe County

In the name of God Amen

I William Culloden being of sound mind and memory do make this my last will and testament, to wit, as follows

First after all my just debts are satisfied, I give & bequeath to my beloved sister Rebecca Culloden the wife of Benjamin Eager the one half of my property and in the event of her decease to be equally divided among her children except that which is hereafter named.

Secondly  I give and bequeath the other half of my estate to Andrew English the son of my sister Jemima Culloden alias English except that which is hereinafter named.

Thirdly  I dispose of my Negro woman Rachael & girl that they may be allowed to hire their time at fifteen dollars per annum under the direction of my executors

I appoint Wm H Pritchard and Arthur Ginn my executors this 5th day of February 1830

                                                                                                            Wm Culloden (Seal)

Witness
George L Bledsoe
Edward H Evans

Georgia Monroe County

Personally came in open Court Geo L Bledsoe & Edward H Evans, who being duly
sworn on oath say that they saw William Culloden late of this county deceased sign

seal and  (pages missing but a smaller copy says:) acknowledge the ???  ???  as his
 last will and testament and that at the time of said signing sealing and acknowledging he
 was of a sound and disposing mind  and memory and that they both subscribed said will
 attesting witnesses in the presence of the said William Culloden.

(here endth two photocopies)

***********************************************

Georgia Monroe County

To his Honor John J Floyd Judge of the (Superior Courts of the Flint District) Entertaining Jurisdiction in Chancery

Humbly complaining sheweth unto your Honor your Orator Benjamin Eager and your Oratrix Rebecca Eager, formerly Rebecca Culloden, wife of the said Benjamin; and your Orator Andrew English, that William Culloden before departing this life to wit on the fifth day of February Eighteen Hundred and thirty in said county of Monroe executed his last will and testament, which said last will and testament was after the death of said William to wit, on the   day of   Eighteen Hundred and thirty – admitted to record by the court of ordinary of said county.  And said last will and testament William H Pritchard & Arthur Ginn of said county of Monroe were appointed Executors, which said Executors on the day & year last aforesaid proved said will & entered upon the duties of the trust contained in & created by said will.  Your Orators and Oratrix further shew to your Honor that they are the only legatees of said William Culloden under and by virtue of his said last will and testament – The said William Culloden having by the first Item in his said will bequeathed that after all his just debts were satisfied he gave and bequeathed to your Oratrix the one half of his property, and in the event of the decease of your Oratrix then said property to be equally divided among the children of your Oratrix except that which was thereafter named – which was a negro woman & Girl

And by the second Item of said will the said William Culloden bequeathed the other half of said estate to your Orator Andrew English, except as above excepted in all which will more fully appear by reference to said last will & testament a copy of which is hereunto annexed marked Exhibit A. to which your Orators & Oratrix pray leave of reference as often as may be necessary.

                        Your Orators and Oratrix shew unto your Honor that the said William Culloden departed this life on the   day of   Eighteen Hundred and thirty – leaving a large estate amounting to twenty thousand Dollars or other large sum in lands, Negroes and personal property of various kinds – That the said William was at the time of his death engaged in the mercan……. in the said county of Munroe known as Cullodenville ………………………. various

(here endth two photocopies)

This is a transcript of the pages sent by Jane Newton after asking if there were more pages due to the possible missing sections found above. I have kept the spellings, extra words, etc etc as they appear in the text. As there are some long and complicated parts, I occasionally made a break in the text by making a paragraph at what appeared to be a "natural" break.  Typed 23 - 24 June 2008.

Georgia Monroe County; To his Honor John J Floyd Judge of the Superior Court of Flint District Entertaining Jurisdiction in Chancery

Humbly complaining sheweth unto your Honor your Orator Benjamin Eager and your Oratrix Rebecca Eager, formerly Rebecca Culloden, wife of the said Benjamin; and your Orator Andrew English, that William Culloden before departing this life to wit on the fifth day of February Eighteen Hundred and thirty in said County of Monroe Executed his last will and testament which said last will and testament was after the death of said William to wit, on the ~ day of ~ Eighteen Hundred and thirty ~ admitted to record by the Court of Ordinary of said county.  And by said last will and testament William H Pritchard and Arthur Ginn of the said county of Monroe were appointed Executors, which said Executors on the day & year last aforesaid approved said will & entered upon the duties of the trust contained in & created by said will.  Your Orators and Oratrix further shew to your Honor that they are the only legatees of said William Culloden under and by virtue of his said last will & testament – The said William Culloden having by the first Item in his said will bequeathed that after all his just debts were satisfied he gave and bequeathed to your Oratrix the one half of his property, and in the event of the decease of your Oratrix then said property to be equally divided among the children of your Oratrix except that which was thereafter named – which was a Negro woman & girl.

And by the second Item of said will the said William Culloden bequeathed the other half of said Estate to your orator Andrew English, except as above excepted – all which will more fully appear by reference to said last will & testament, a copy of which is hereunto annexed marked Exhibit A to which your Orators and Oratrix pray leave of reference as often as may be necessary

Your Orators and Oratrix shew unto your Honor that the said William Culloden departed this life on the ~ day of ~ Eighteen Hundred and Thirty ~ leaving a large Estate amounting to twenty thousand Dollars or other large sum in lands negroes and personal property of various kinds –

That the said William was at the time of his death engaged in the mercantile business at a place in said County of Monroe known as Cullodenville, and that he was possessed of many debts in notes and accounts upon various individuals to a very large amount – and as your Orators and Oratrix are informed believe had very shortly before his death taken the said Arthur Ginn into copartnership, but on what terms your Orators and Oratrix  have no means of knowing; but this they believe, that it must have been far from terms of equality as the said Arthur was without capital and had been the Clerk of the said William Culloden.  For your Orators and Oratrix charge that all the property left by the said William came into the possession of the said Arthur and William H as Executors as aforesaid – and that after paying all the just debts of the said William their testator, there was a surplus amounting to ten thousand Dollars or other large sum to wit on the ~ day of ~ Eighteen Hundred and thirty ~ to be paid over to your Orators and Oratrix according to the provisions of said last will & testament – And your Orators and Oratrix well hoped that said defendants would have delivered to them the Estate of the said William Culloden after paying all his said debts and the expenses incident to the execution of said will, according to the provisions of said will, as in justice and Equity they were bound to do.

But now so it is may it please your Honor, the said Defendants combining and confederating to & with divers other persons to your Orators and Oratrix unknown, but whose names when discovered your Orators and Oratrix pray may be inserted with apt & fit words to charge them in the premises – sometimes pretend that said William did not leave more than sufficient to pay his just debts and the expenses incident to the execution of his will – And other times they contend that if there was anything remaining after the payment of said debts they have already paid over the same to your Orators and Oratrix –

All which pretences, evations, & subterfuges your Orators and Oratrix charge to be untrue – and do charge that the said William Culloden left a very large Estate which after the payment of his just debts amounted to the sum of ten thousand Dollars or some other large amount. That the said Arthur Ginn & said William H and especially the said Arthur have made large profits upon the money belonging to the said Estate, And that the amount of interest accruing upon said surplus far exceeds the principle, and that the said Arthur has grown rich out of said Estate, all which actings and doings are contrary to Equity and good conscience & tend to the manifest injury of your orators and Oratrix – In tender consideration whereof, and for that your Orators and Oratrix are remediless in the promises at and by the strict rules of the common law and can have adequate relief only in  a Court of Equity where matters of this kind are properly cognisable and relievable – To the end therefore that the said Arthur gin & William H Pritchard and each of them may upon their respective corporal oath full true and perfect answers make to the several charges contained in this bill, and not only to their own knowledge but also as to their information, hearsay & belief – and more especially that they may answer and discover whether said William Culloden did not depart this life possessed of a very considerable estate and how much that estate was worth at the time of his death?  How much said William owed at that time, and to whom he was in debt? What his property consisted of, stating particularly its items and component parts? If said Arthur Ginn was a partner of said William at the time of his death, how long he had been such partner and upon what terms? How much capital said Arthur put into said concern? Whether he has not used the property & funds of said estate in his own business and to what amount? – And that the dais defendants may answer every charge and allegation contained in this bill * - may it please your Honor to grant unto your Orators and Oratrix the states most gracious writ of Subpoena requiring said defendants upon a certain penalty therein to be inserted to be and appear at the next Superior Court to be holden in and for said county of Monroe then and there to stand to & perform such other & further order in the premises as to your Honor shall seem meet and agreeable to Equity – and your Orators and Oratrix will ever pray

Poe & Nisbet

Compts Solicitors

* And that the said Defendants may be decreed to come to a full fair and Equitable account of their management of said estate to be decreed to pay over to your Orators and Oratrix their respective portions of the same with interest – and that your Honor would grant unto your Orators & Oratrix such other and further relief (this was added by a ? in the ?)

(Exhibit A)

Georgia

Monroe County

In the name of God Amen

I William Culloden being of sound mind and memory do make this my last will and testament, to wit, as follows

First after all my just debts are satisfied, I give & bequeath to my beloved sister      Rebecca Culloden the wife of Benjamin Eager the one half of my property and in the event of her decease to be equally divided among her children except that which is hereafter named.

Secondly I give and bequeath the other half of my estate to Andrew English the son of my sister Jemima Culloden alias English except that which is hereinafter named.

Thirdly  I dispose of my Negro woman Rachael & girl that they may be allowed to hire their time at fifteen dollars per annum under the direction of my executors

I appoint Wm H Pritchard and Arthur Ginn my executors this 5th day of February 1830

                                                                                                            Wm Culloden (Seal)

Witness
George L Bledsoe
Edward H Evans

Georgia Monroe County

Personally came in open Court Geo L Bledsoe & Edward H Evans, who being duly sworn on oath say that they saw William Culloden late of this county deceased sign seal and acknowledge the foregoing instrument as his last will and testament and that at the time of said signing sealing and acknowledging he  was of a sound and disposing mind  and memory and that they both subscribed said will as attesting witnesses in the presence of the said William Culloden.

Edward H Evans

Geo L Bledsoe

Subscribed & sworn to in presence of John Powell D.C.C.O.

 

Georgia
Monroe County

I Elbridge G Cabaniss Clerk of the court Ordinary of said County do hereby certify the foregoing to be a true copy from the records of my office of the last will & testament of William Culloden decd.

Given under my hand this 26th day of January 1846

E G Cabaniss C.C.O.

Georgia

Monroe County

To the Sheriff of said County – Greeting

Bill for account relief & Discovery

Benjamin Eager & his wife Rebecca Eager formerly Rebecca Culloden & Andrew English
VS
Arthur Ginn & William H Prichard executors of the last will & testament of William Culloden decd

For certain causes offered before us in our Court of Chancery by the bill of complaint of the above complainants against the defendants therein named

You the said defendants are hereby required laying all business aside and notwithstanding any excuse to be and appear before us personally in our Superior Court of said County of Monroe on the first Monday in March next then & then to answer concerning those things which shall be objected to you and to stand to & perform such order & decree in the premises as shall then & there be had by said Court & this you are in no wise to omit under the penalty of five hundred Dollars

Witness the Honorable John J Floyd Judge of said Court this 29th day of January 1847

Elbridge G Cabaniss Clerk

 

I acknowledge service of the Bill & Subpoena & waive a copy & service by the Shff.  January 30th 1847 Wm H Prichard

Served the defendant A Ginn personally with a copy of this bill January 30th 1847 R J Pinckard Shff

 

The several answer of Arthur Ginn defendant to the bill of complaint of Benjamin Eager and his wife Rebecca Eager, formerly Rebecca Culloden, and Andrew English complainants, against Arthur Ginn and William H Pritchard Executors of William Culloden deceased. Defendants

This defendant now and at all times hereafter saving and reserving to himself all and all manner of benefit and right of exception to the manifold errors and insufficiencies in the complainants said bill contained, for answer thereto or to so much thereof as this defendant is a dirsed? is material for him to make answer unto, he answers and says, That William Culloden late of the County of Monroe departed this life as stated in the bill of the complainants with the immaterial exception that his decease took place on the seventh of February eighteen hundred and thirty instead of the fifth as stated in said bill.  Said Culloden executed his last will & testament as stated in the bill, and which last will and testament was afterwards admitted to record as stated by the complainants and William H Prichard and this defendant being the executors appointed in and by said last will and testament after the same was proved, took upon themselves the execution of the same and the duties of executors thereto.  This defendant believes and so far as he knows admits that the complainants are the only legatees of the said William Culloden, with the qualification set forth in their bill.  This defendant also admits that the bequests of the said will are correctly set forth by the complainants and that the copy annexed to their bill is a true copy.

For several years preceeding the death of the said William Culloden he gave as part of his taxable property a lot of land described as being lot number two hundred and ten in the tenth district of Decatur County and containing two hundred and fifty acres of pine land, but this defendant has not been able to find any title papers for said land, nor has he any knowledge as to the manner in which the claim of the deceased to said land originated, nor indeed has this defendant knowledge as to state of the title to it on the part of the said deceased and this defendant did not feel authorised to take any steps toward making a disposal of said land, nor to incur expenses in going to examines the same or to ascertain its value, if indeed it be of any value at all, and this defendant has been the disposed to pursue the course suggested in regard to said land from the fact of his having been informed by persons who said they had seen the same that is was a piney woods lot of land and was of little or no value.  So far as this defendant or his acts are concerned said lot remains just as it was at the time of the decease of William Culloden.  This defendant wrote to the clerk of the superior court enquiring whether any deed had been recorded to the deceased for said land but no reply to his letter was ever received by this defendant.

At the time of the decease of said Culloden he had an interest, as one of the firm of Culloden & gin, of one half in lot of land number one hundred and fifty in the eighteenth district of Lee County in this State, which lot contained two hundred two and a half acres, and was sold, after being duly advertised, on the first Tuesday either of the month of October or November, this defendant believes the first Tuesday in November eighteen hundred and thirty eight, for the sum of one hundred and eight dollars and which sum has been properly accounted for in the returns this defendant made to the Inferior Court of Monroe County when sitting for Ordinary purposes.  The said William Culloden had no other real estate nor any claim to any land that has ever come to the knowledge of this defendant than as has been by him here now stated.  Said Culloden at the time of his decease owned two negro slaves Rachel an old woman and Jane her daughter which have not been sold or otherwise disposed of as touching the title to them for reasons that apparent from the will of the deceased who was also at the time of his decease the owner of an interest of one half in a negro fellow Randal belonging to the firm of Culloden & Ginn and which negro Randal, being an infirm negro, has been sold according to the rules prescribed for the sale of negro property at the price of two hundred and fifty dollars and the amount regularly accounted for in the returns of this defendant. So much in regard to the negroes of the deceased.

At the time of his decease said Culloden was possessed of a small separate personal property, besides the negroes Rachel and Jane, and also some individual notes and accounts, mostly out of date, which personal property was appraised at the value of three hundred and forty five dollars eighty seven and a half cents and afterwards sold, at executors sale, for the sum of three hundred and thirty nine dollars and six and a quarter cents, the notes and accounts were inventoried and amounted to the sum of two hundred and fifty three dollars twelve and a half cents, and after being found by this defendant to be entirely unasailable, have been returned as insolvent and and worthless.  There was on hand at the time of the decease of said Culloden twenty three dollars and sixty eight and three fourth cents in money, and up to the twenty fifth day of December eighteen hundred and thirty six this defendant received, or at least charged himself in his returns, with the sum of ninety dollars for the pay of Rachel and Jane for six years at fifteen dollars by the year.  Since the time last mentioned said negroes have been under the supervision and protection of this defendants co-executor doctor William H Prichard.  In discharging the individual debts of William Culloden and defraying expenses incurred on account of his separate property this defendant has has paid out the sum of six hundred and fifty eight dollars forty one and three fourth cents and all of which disbursements with proper vouchers for the same have been returned to the Ordinarys office for this county of Monroe, and which said payments on account of the individual debts of said Culloden and the liabilities of his individual property exceeds the amount received from that source by this defendant the sum of two hundred and five dollars sixty six and a quarter cents.

Sales                $339 061/4

Cash on hand      23 683/4

Rachel & Jane     90 00

                        $452 75

Paid out           $658 413/4

Balance due Executor   $205 663/4

This defendant and William Culloden entered into partnership some six years before the decease of said Culloden, that is to say, on the tenth day of February eighteen and twenty four and said Culloden, as already stated, departed this life on the seventh day of February eighteen hundred and thirty.  This defendants never was at any time Clerk to said Culloden, though if he had been such he would have considered an honorable station to be in the employment of a gentleman and friend whose character was eminently distinguished for integrity of purpose and goodness of heart.  The capital of said partnership was but small being limited to the sum of five hundred dollars on the part of each of its members, though this little capital was from time to time increased by such further additions, never of very large amounts, as each member found it convenient make, until the capital invested or paid in by said Culloden amounted between twelve hundred and ninety four dollars three and one fourth cents, and that of this defendant to fourteen hundred and thirty eight dollars and seventy five cents. During the whole time of said partnership the amount withdrawn from the stock by said Culloden or rather the amount of his undebtedness to the firm was one thousand and twenty three dollars six and a quarter cents, and the undebtedness of this defendant to the partnership during the same time was eleven hundred and thirteen dollars forty one and a quarter cents all of which will appear by the books of the firm which will at any time when directed by this Honorable Court be produced for the inspection and examination of the Court or of the complainants or their Solicitor.  The terms of said partnership were intended to be those of perfect equality as will appear by the articles of partnership signed and sealed by the said Culloden and this defendant a copy of which articles is hereto attached and marked Exhibit A and to which this defendant asks the usual leave of reference.  During the continuance of said partnership this defendant was always in advance of William Culloden so far as related to the capital paid in and the books of the concern will show to the satisfaction of any, as this defendant believes, that during a considerable portion if not the whole time during which the partnership existed this defendant furnished two thirds or more than two thirds of the capital that was left for the support of the partnership business.  This defendant desires here to state that the deficiency of capital on the part of said Culloden towards the light investment that he and the defendant were able to make was not owing to any want of disposition on the part of said Culloden to bear his full and equal portion of the advances, but alone to the want of means and ability on his part to make them, and as the property of said Culloden during the existence of the partnership and at the time of his decease, seems to be thought by the complainants to rise to a very formidable sum, this defendant craves the kind indulgence of this Honorable Court whilst he gives a very brief statement of some individuals that preceeded and in part led to his subsequent connexcion with said Culloden.

In the year 1819 said Culloden brought a letter of introduction to this defendant, then a resident of Milledgeville, from a mutual acquaintance; said Culloden from a disaster which had befallen in the Indies was at the time first mentioned reduced to circumstances of utmost destitution and poverty in somuch that this defendant had to furnish, or at least did furnish said Culloden with the means of paying his board bill during his short stay at the place first mentioned and also with the means of travelling about less or more in quest of employment, but while making this statement defendant feels it a high duty to the memory of his deceased partner and friend to add that notwithstanding fallen and reduced circumstances William Culloden throughout to bear himself with an honorable manliness and candour that won strongly not only upon the confidence but upon the good will, indeed it might be almost said the love of all who knew him.  Said Culloden through the introduction and assistance of defendant soon entered into the employment of Shackleton & Kean, then merchants of the county of Twiggs, and so continued for some two or three years, more or less, and in this way obtained the limited means which he brought into the partnership with this defendant  - believes that the means and resources of William Culloden during the time referred to are still known to and remembered by many others beside the defendant.

The separate deed individual property and debts at the time of said Cullodens death have been herein already set forth.  The inventory and appraisement of the partnership effects have been regularly made and returned to the Ordinary’s office and are readily accessible to the complainants or their Solicitor and defendant cannot suppose that it will be necessary for him to incur the expense and trouble of procuring a transcript to be attached to this his answer, and Defendant asks permission from this Honorable Court to refer to the records of the Clerk of the Court Ordinary as often as may be necessary in the progress of this cause.  As touching the disposition made of the affects or assets belonging to the estates of William Culloden defendant believes he cannot in any way more clearly satisfactorily answer the bill of the complainants than by stating results, as to his management of the estate in question, referring however to the records in the proper office to sustain each and every statement contained in this his answer, of the partnership effects this defendant has from first to last, collected the sum of eleven thousand and seventy four dollars twenty and three fourth cents.  In paying the first debts of the partnership and the separate liabilities of the estate of William Culloden defendant has disbursed the sum of seven thousand six hundred and ninety dollars nineteen and a half cents leaving of the partnership fund the sum of three thousand three hundred and eighty four one and a quarter cents and to one half of which the complainants are, or rather have been entitled, being the sum of sixteen hundred and ninety seven dollars, and defendant has long since, that is to say, in the years eighteen thirty eight and nine paid to the complainants the sum of seventeen hundred dollars and which sum would have been paid to the complainants sooner than it as paid    $11074.203/4

but for the reason of conflicting claims between      7690.191/2

the complainants and Lawrence P Culloden who  2/3385.011/4

notified defendant of a debt more than sufficient  $ 1697

to exhaust the whole estate and which he claimed to hold against the deceased William Culloden and defendant was notified not to pay out any legacies but at his own peril. These conflicting claims however were afterwards adjusted between the parties themselves and the sum mentioned paid to the complainants.  All the notes and accounts that have not been collected have been returned as worthless and insolvent which they really are.  As touching this defendants management of the partnership property and the amount which he has been able to collect from that property defendants deems it not improper to state that he has now in his possession a memorandum or Schedule of the part=ship effects and their value which is in the hand writing of William Culloden himself and in which schedule the whole of the partnership effects were estimated at the value of ten thousand six hundred and twenty five dollars and the debts of the firm are these marked at the estimated amount, six thousand one hundred  and sixty seven dollars.  This memorandum was made out by said Culloden only some two or three months before his decease and after the partnership business had ceased only so far regarded collections and settlements and after the place where the partnership business had been transacted was sold.  In reviewing the returns of this defendant as recorded it will ascertained there has a mistake happened in footing up by which the amount received by the defendant is made out to be sixty five dollars and twenty three cents more than it really is.  This defendant has not in any instance appropriated the partnership property or funds to his own individual use, but on the contrary he can state with the otsest? Truth that there was not one single day from the first formation of the partnership up to the time of it final settlement that the individual funds of this defendant were not used or being used for the benefit of the partnership without interest being either asked or charged in favor of defendant.

This defendant asks leave now to close this his answer by avering to this Honorable Court that he has in all this touching the estate of his deceased to the very utmost of his ability endeavoured to discharge his duty fully and faithfully and he believes that he has done so and that too for a very meagre and inadequate compensation and he has some reason to fear with perhaps an ungrateful return from those for whom he has with much self sacrifice laboured faithfully and laboured long.  And defendant having as he believes answered fully prays to be hence dis?…f/s?ed with his reasonable costs in this behalf wrongfully sustained.

King & Gordon

Defendants Solicitors

 

Georgia

Monroe County

You Arthur Ginn do swear that your foregoing answer so far as the same relates to your own act or deed is true of your own knowledge and that so far as it relates to the act or deed of any other person you believe the same to be true.

Sworn to and subscribed before me this Sept 1847 Benjamin King J. P.

Arthur Ginn

Copy of Schedule refered to in answer

Chas Rockwell & Co              1336.00           John T Rowland          350.00

A B & H Weed                       746.00            A & E Wood               173.00

A & E Wood                           808.00            Peter Fealey                  25.00

W H Wakeman                       468.00             M Douglas                  350.00

M Pendergrast                         289.00             C Bayne                      100.00

Lay & Hendrickson                107.00             B Stewart etc              100.00

G W Coe                                 387.00             Cotton & Harrison      166.00

Hugh Cassidy                         185.00             J Bowers                     70.00

W J Danielly                           486                  Childer & Wiley          21.00

(carried up)                                                               6167.00

 

Due Culloden & Ginn on Notes to Nov 26th              $3234

Deduct collected                                                            1318

                                                          Leaves             $1916.00

Do      Do    Do                                                             1708.00

                                                                                    $3624.00

                                         Book Accounts                  5000.00

                                         Stock on hand                       400.00

                                                                                    $9024.00

                                         Jones notes                           1600.00

                                                                                   $10624.00

(Exhibit A)

 

Georgia Baldwin County

1st        We the subscribers mutually agree to enter into copartnership for the purpose of carrying on the mercantile business in the County of Monroe & state aforesaid ~

2nd        Each partner to furnish the sum of five Hundred Dollars, that being the sum agreed upon to invest in said business ~

3rd        The whole of the capital shall be retained without diminutaion until the partnership shall be dissolved together with the increased profits arising from the same, and to be employed exclusively in said business ~

4th        All articles of stock such as Houses, Lands (attached to the store) Horses, Cattle Hogs etc shall be held & considered as the Joint property of the concern ~

5th        In the event of the death of either party during the term specified in the articles of agreement, the business shall be conducted by the survivor as heritoforc? Unless otherwise directed by deceased ~

6th        The copartnership shall continue for the term of five years from the date of said Investment

Feby 10th 1824                                                            Arthur Ginn                Seal

                                                            William Culloden        Seal

 

 

September Term 1847 answer and replication filed & cause set down

September Term 1848 Decree

1  William S Norman       5  George W Edwards       9   Levi Morrison

2  William Z? White         6  William M Pledger       10 George W Fouche

3   Edmund M Butler        7   Jackson Bush               11 Wiley? Currey

4   Welburn H Bankston    8   George W Fouche       12  Thomas Mays

  We the Jury find in favor of the complainants in this Bill, and decree that the respondents Arthur Ginn & William H Prichard do deliver the negro slaves Rachel, Jane, Christiana, Frances & Mary to Poe & Nisbet the Attornies at law & in fact of the complainants, and we further find the sum of one hundred and thirty one dollars in the hand of William H Prichard arising from the hire of the said slaves which to be applied to the payment of costs in this & the Bill filed by the legatees under the will of William Culloden, & the balance together with Lot of Land in the County of Decatur number one hundred & ten (110) in the fourteenth (14th) District be devoted to the payment of the expenses incurred by the Respondents in this litigation – And that the Executors the said Ginn & Prichard make a Deed to Angus M D King their attorney at law for said Lot of Land  in part payment for his services as such attorney in said cases.

                                                                                                William S Norman Foreman

 

September term 1848.  Whereupon it is ordered adjudged and decreed by the Court that the complainants do recover of the respondents the negro slaves Rachel, Jane, Christiana,

Frances & Mary, and that the said respondents do forthwith deliver them to Poe & Nisbet the Attorneys at Law and in fact of said complainants.  And it is further adjudged and decreed that the sum of one hundred & thirty one dollars in the hands of the said Wm H Prichard arising form the hire of said slaves be applied first to the payment of the costs incurred in this Bill and the Bill filed by the legatees under the will of William Culloden, & the balance together with the Lot of Land in the County of Decatur number one hundred & ten in the fourteenth District be devoted to the payment of the Expenses incurred by the respondents in this litigation; and that the Executors Ginn & Prichard make a deed to Angus M D King their attorney at law for said Lot of Land in part payment for his services as such attorney in said cases & the Respondents in mercy to

 

Poe & Nisbet

Compt Sols

 

12th Septem 1848 (I am not sure if this date refers to this document or the one above)

Georgia Monroe County

To his Honor John J Floyd Judge of the Superior Courts of the Monroe County Flint District Entertaining Jurisdiction in Chancery

            Humbly complaining sheweth unto your Honor your Orators Benjamin Eager & his wife Rebecca Eager formerly Rebecca Culloden and Andrew English only child of Edward & Jemima English formerly Jemima Culloden, said Jemima having departed this life in the month of February 1813, leaving said Andrew her only child; said Rebecca and Jemima being the only sisters of William Culloden late of said county & state, and said William having but one brother to wit Lawrence P Culloden who has assigned in said William’s estate to your Orators

That in the month of February 1830 the said William Culloden departed this life in the said county & state.  That before his death he made and executed his will a copy of which is hereto annexed by which said will he bequeathed all his property (excepting certain negroes) to said Andrew English and Rebecca Eager – and as to said negroes consisting then of two Rachael & June – He directed his Executors to permit them to hire their time at the annual hire of Fifteen dollars; and by said will constituted and appointed William H Pritchard and Arthur Ginn of said county of Monroe his Executors. Your Orators shew unto your Honor that one of the said slaves to wit, Jane – has, since the death of said William Culloden given birth to three children to wit Christianna, Frances & an infant female child and that the same are now living together with the two named in the will, & are under the control & management of one or both of the said Executors and that said Executors have collected the annual hire of said slaves from the year 1830 (the time when William Culloden departed this life) to the present time, amounting to a large sum to wit the sum of three hundred dollars.  Your Orators state to your Honor that all the just debts of William Culloden (save what was due your Orators) have been fully paid off and discharged many years ago. And subsequently to that time on the     day of    Eighteen hundred & forty seven your Orators through their attorney demanded said slaves as the only lawful heirs of William Culloden from said Executors, and also the hire due – and your Orators well hoped that said Executors would have delivered said slaves and paid said hire to your orators, as in justice and equity they were bound to do.  But now so it is please your Honor the said defendants combining and confederating etc do insist that they are not bound or authorized to deliver said slaves or to pay said hire to your Orators because they are required by said will to protect said slaves and to permit them to hire their own time – whereas your Orators charge that said permission in said will is directly in violation of a Statute of the state of Georgia prohibiting slaves from hiring their own time – and likewise contrary to another Statute of said State which renders void every instrument or will having for its object the manumission of slaves within the limits of this State.  And your Orators further charge that although the said act were not in opposition to the laws and policy of said State, yet the said William Culloden could not in equity and good conscience make such disposition of his said property because your Orators charge that said William was at the time of his death largely in debt to your orators to wit in the sum of thirty thousand Dollars or other large sum for money of Andrew Culloden father of your Orators used & appropriated by said William in British India and for which said William afterwards gave his obligation , a certified copy of which said Arthur Ginn has been furnished with, and your Orators pray that he may be compelled to produce it in court or append it to his answer. – And so far as Lawrence P Culloden’s interest in said bond is concerned your Orators note that said said William satisfied him, & the said Lawrence being the executor of the said Andrew transferred the same to your Orators.

            In tender consideration where of and for that your Orators are remediless in the premises at & by the strict rules of the common law & can have adequate relief only in a court of equity where matters of this kind are properly cognisable and reliable. – To the end therefore that the said Arthur & William H may upon their several corporal oaths full true & perfect answers make not only to the facts within their own knowledge but also to the best of their hearsay information & belief touching the charges in said bill of complaint contained – And that the Arthur & William H may be decreed to deliver to your orators the said several slaves & account for the annual hire of the same – And that your Honor would grant unto your Orators such other and further relief in the premises as to your Honor seem meet & in accordance with equity – May it please your Honor to grant unto your Orators the States writs of Subpoena to be directed to said Arthur Ginn & William H Pritchard requiring them personally to be an appear at the next Superior Court to be held in and for the said county of Monroe then & there to stand to and abide by such further order and decree as your Honor may make in the premises and which shall be agreeable to equity – And your Orators will ever pray etc.

                                                                                            Poe & Nisbet

                                                                                            Compt sols

Georgia

Monroe County

In the name of God Amen

I William Culloden being of sound mind and memory do make this my last will and testament, to wit, as follows

First after all my just debts are satisfied, I give & bequeath to my beloved sister Rebecca Culloden the wife of Benjamin Eager the one half of my property and in the event of her decease to be equally divided among her children except that which is hereafter named.

Secondly  I give and bequeath the other half of my estate to Andrew English the son of my sister Jemima Culloden alias English except that which is hereinafter named.

Thirdly I dispose of my Negro woman Rachael & girl that they may be allowed to hire their time at fifteen dollars per annum under the direction of my executors

I appoint Wm H Pritchard and Arthur Ginn my executors this 5th day of February 1830

Wm Culloden (Seal)

Witness George L Bledsoe

 For certain causes offered before us in our Court of Chancery by the bill of complaint ofthe above complainants against you the said Arthur Ginn & William H Prichard Executors of the last will & testament of William Culloden defendants.

You the said defendants are hereby required laying all business aside and notwithstanding any excuse to be and appear before us personally in our Superior Court to be held in & for the County of Monroe on the first Monday in September next to answer concerning those things which shall then and there be objected to you, and to stand to & abide by such order & decree in the premises as shall then & there be made by said Court and this you are in no wise to omit under the penalty of five hundred dollars

            Witness the Honorable John J Floyd Judge of said Court this 5th day of July 1847

Elbridge G Cabaniss Clerk

 

I acknowledge service of this Bill & Subpoena & waive copy

July 28 1847                                                                            Wm H Prichard

Served the defendant A Ginn personally with a copy of this Bill

August 7th 1847                                                                      R J Pinckard Shff

The just and several answer of Arthur Ginn and William H Prichard to the bill of complaint of Benjamin Eager and his wife Rebecca Eager and Andrew English against Arthur Ginn & William H Prichard Executors of the last will and testament of William Culloden deceased.

These defendants now and at all times hereafter saving to themselves all and all manner of benefit and right of exception to the manifold errors and insufficiencies in the complainants said bill of complaint contained for answer thereto or to so much thereof as they advised is material for them to make answer unto they answer and say

That William Culloden late of Monroe County Georgia departed this life as stated by the complainants in their bill, and so far as these defendants know or believe the complainants may stand in the relation to the deceased as stated in their bill.  The said Culloden executed his will as stated by the complainants and the copy exhibited is a true copy.  So far as respects the bequests mentioned in said will the same will be responded to by the defendant Ginn in his answer to another bill filed by the complainants against these defendants the said Ginn having had almost the entire execution of said will so far as concerns any claim of bequests under the same. These defendants were appointed executors to the will of said Culloden and the negroes Rachael and Jane up have to this time been disposed of as directed by said will and are now residing near the town of Forsyth where they have lived for the last ten or eleven years.  The woman Jane has given birth to three children as stated in the bill and which children are now living with their mother and grandmother as above.  Up to the first day of January eighteen hundred and thirty six Rachael and Jane lived under the supervision of the defendant Ginn and since that time they have lived under the protection of the defendant Prichard and he during the year eighteen hundred and thirty six paid over to his co-executor Ginn the fifteen dollars for the hire of said negroes that year.  Since the first day of January eighteen hundred and thirty seven the defendant Prichard admits himself to be accountable for the fifteen dollars per annum hire, but these defendants deem it due themselves to state that they have never at any time received any benefit from the services of said negroes as slaves or servants and that they have at all times paid said negroes for any kind of work done by them in the same manner as these defendants were in the habit of setting with other persons.  These defendants both state that they have both been put to great inconvenience and trouble in attending to said negroes and for which they submit to this Honorable Court whether they are not entitled to a reasonable compensation to be settled by the Court on proof being made of the circumstances.  The defendant Prichard that he has incurred expenses and liabilities to the amount of eleven dollars for medical aid and assistance rendered the woman Jane; they have both incurred expense by paying the taxes of said negroes up to the present year and have returned the taxes for this year.  The amount for, and vouchers for, said expenses are not now at hand to attach to this answer but defendants expect soon to be able to procure them and to make an exhibit in the usual way.  These defendants admit that a demand or something equivalent to a demand was made of them for said negroes sometime during the spring season of this year by the complainants solicitor Washington Poe Esquire, but they add also that up to the time just mentioned they were left subject to all responsibilities imposed by the will of the deceased in regard to said negroes, and that for more than seventeen years after the decease of William Culloden no objection was ever made by the complainants or others against the execution of said will respecting said negroes, although the complainants as these defendants are prepared to prove had free knowledge of all the provisions of said will within a few months of the decease of said Culloden.  These defendants state to this Honorable Court that on their receiving sufficient proof as to the identity of the complainants and their right to any portion of the property of William Culloden these defendants would promptly have delivered the same but for the obligation which these defendants have felt themselves under to carry out so far as they may be permitted or directed by this Honorable Court the provisions contained in the will of the deceased concerning the negroes in question. These defendants submit to this Honorable Court to determine the intention and desire of said Culloden from the will aforesaid and to direct these defendants whether they may not be authorised by the order and decree of this Honorable Court to remove said negroes to some State when the object expressed in said will may be lawfully carried into effect.  These defendants know nothing of their own knowledge in regard to the alleged indebtedness of William Culloden or on account of the British India matter mentioned in the complainants bill.  These defendants have heard that there was some pretence of claim on account of such an indebtedness but they are not prepared to admit or deny ought in regard to said indebtedness, and if that question should hereafter be deemed important by this Honorable Court these defendants desire that the complainants may be held to full and strict proof of the same.  The defendant Ginn admits that he may have received several years ago a copy bond or the copy of some other instrument purporting to relate to some settlement or other transaction between William Culloden and Lawrence P Culloden but this defendant is not by any means certain as to the purport or contents of said copy instrument as he looked upon the same as being of but little importance in any event, he does not now remember when he last saw copy instrument nor does he now know where the dame is, this defendant though promises to make faithful search for the same and if it can be found it shall be promptly forthcoming before this Honorable Court.  In addition to the statements herein before made these defendants say that they have both incurred further liability and expense in answering and defending another bill or suit in Chancery brought by the complainants against these defendants and they pray your Honor to review the circumstances under which said bill was brought and to determine in behalf of these defendants whether they are not equitably entitled to be reimbursed by the complainants for all the expenses already incurred or hereafter reasonably to be incurred in the answering and the defending of the said other bill so brought against these defendants as aforesaid.  And the defendant Ginn states to this Honorable Court that said bill was brought after he had to the very best of his judgement and ability executed the will of said Culloden, except as to the negroes, and had paid to the complainants all that they were entitled to under said will, and without any objection being made as herein already stated as to the execution of the clause of the will respecting said negroes. And these defendants would ask leave more especially to urge their claims before this Honorable Court for compensation and reimbursement in the premises in case the clause of the will just now and before adverted to should be declared inoperative and void and the said negroes to be sold or otherwise disposed of for the benefit of the complainants upon the grounds that these defendants might well feel and did feel themselves under obligations to incur expense and undergo labour and trouble in carrying out the wishes and desires of a deceased testator and friend whom no such obligation might exist towards those who have no such claims upon these defendants, and who are also in point of fact, however the question may stand in point of law, endeavouring to defeat and frustrate the declared purpose and intention of their deceased relation and kinsman.  These defendants ask leave to State in conclusion of this their answer that they will promptly and cheerfully conform to any such order or direction as this Honorable Court may be pleased to give them or either of them touching their duty in and concerning the premises.  And these defendants having as they believe answered fully pray to be hence dismissed with their reasonable costs in this behalf wrongfully sustained.

King & Gordon for the Defendants

 

Georgia

Monroe County

You Arthur Ginn and you William H Prichard do each swear that the facts set forth in your foregoing answer, so far as the same related to your own act or deed respectively is true of your own knowledge and that so far as said answer relates to the act or deed of any other person you believe the same to be true.

                                                                                                Arthur Ginn

                                                                                                 Wm H Prichard

Sworn to and subscribed before me this Sept 6th 1847

Jon a Johnston J.P.

The several answer of William H Prichard to the bill of complaint of Benjamin Eager and his wife Rebecca Eager and Andrew English against Arthur Ginn and William H Prichard Executors of William Culloden deceased.  This defendant with the usual reservations answering says that so far as he has any means of knowing the statements of the complainants in regard to their relationship to William Culloden deceased are true.  This defendant presumes they are true.  As touching the decease said Culloden this defendant admits the correctness in substance of the statement of the complainants.  The copy of the will exhibited is a true copy so far as this defendant remembers or believes,  As to the amount of the estate of said Culloden or its value this defendant of his own knowledge knowledge knows but little except so far as regards the negroes Rachel and Jane and the children of Jane and in regard to this this defendant refers to the joint and several answer of himself and his co-executor Arthur Ginn filed to another bill brought by the complainants against said Ginn and this defendant and in which he believes his actings and doings so far as concerns the said negroes will be found to be sufficiently set forth.  As touching the execution of the will of William Culloden so far as the rest of his estate besides the negroes is concerned this defendant knows nothing that could be certainly and distinctly set forth in this answer as the execution of that part of the will has been by him left he may say entirely to his co-executor Arthur Ginn Esquire, and so far as regards that part of the estate of William Culloden this defendant asks leave to refer to the answer of his said co-executor which he understands has been made to the present bill of the complainants and in which answer this defendant has no reason to doubt the complainants will find the estate of William Culloden except as above fully accounted for.  Besides the negroes Rachael and Jane and the children of Jane no part of the estate of William Culloden ever came to the hands of this defendant to be administered by him.  This defendant denies all fraud and combination and having as he believes answered fully prays to be hence dismissed with his reasonable costs in this behalf wrongfully sustained.

                                                                                                King & Gordon

                                                                                                Defendants Solicitors

Georgia

Monroe County

You William H Prichard do swear that the facts set forth in your foregoing answer so far as the same relates to your own act or deed are true of your own knowledge and that so far as relates to the act or deed of any other person you believe the same to be true

                                                                                                            Wm H Prichard

Sworn to and subscribed before me this Sept 6th 1847

Jon a Johnston J. P.
-------------------------------------
One thing further on William Culloden. The 1828 Tax Digest for Monroe County transcribed by LeRoy Gardner and Carolyn Floyd Beck in 1999, states the following:
"The following are deceased persons that someone else returned their taxes. The dates are
death dates or will/probate filing. No death record could be located for those with no date."
William Culloden, Feb 1836, Feb 3, 1830."


SUTTON , (Monroe Advertiser, April 15, 1910.) (File contributed by Jane Newton, transcribed by E. Robertson)
"...OUR ANCESTORS..."  by Frances M. Smith
       The Suttons were Normans in the beginning and before anybody had surnames in the modern sense.  It is one of the few names
which are practically without variants, although one New England forbearers tried "Sutten"---apparently, however, with indifferent success, as few, if any, of the family now spell it with an 'e'.  The first Sutton was a Norman, and in the train of William the Conquerer when he started out upon his never-to-be-forgotten expedition.  Sutton-upon-Trent was granted to him as his share of the spoils, to have and hold forever, and so the Norman became English Sutton. 
    Sud-ton, meaning a place for dwelling in the South, is the original form of Sutton, and is the name of a large number of towns in England.
    More than 50 coats of arms have been granted to the family, which indicates their rank among the English gentry.  There were the Suttons, of Sutton, in Holdernesse; The Suttons, of Sutton-Madec, in Shorpshire, and the Suttons, of Sutton-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire.
These were three among the many branches of the family tree planted in England by the Norman founder.
    Norwood Park, Nottinghamshire, was one seat of the Suttons.  Richard Sutton, of Norwood Prk, was created a Baronett in 1766.  He descended from Roland, son of Harvey de Sutton, of Sutton-upon-Trent, who lived in the thirteenth century.
    Sir Richard left a large family by his three wives - nine children.  He was son of Sir Robert Sutton, Privy Councillor, who in 1725 married Judith Countess-Dowager of Sunderland and the daughter of Benjamin Tichborne.
    James Sutton, the Virginia colonist, is said to have been of this lineage.  One of his ancestors was Sir William Sutton, Knight of Aram, who had four sons, Robert, Richard, Henry and George.
    Of these Robert, for devotion to the royal cause, was created Lord Lexington of Aram by Charles I.
    James Sutton, who is called the forefather of the Southern line, was living in Wicomico Parish, Northumberland County, Virginia in 1874.  Traditions regarding James are misty and uncertain - just enough to lend an air of romance to the tale, but he was a vestryman of the parish.
    He is supposed to have had a brother, and either he or his brother had the honor of leading the fair Miss Coppage to the altar.  Seven children were born of this union. All married and lived in Virginia, with the exception of one son, Lewis Sutton, who married Miss Dorsey and settled in Maryland.  John Sutton, perhaps of this branch of the family, was Deputy Recorder of Maryland.
    Taylors of Virginia and Terrells of North Carolina married into the Sutton family.
    Of the Suttons of New England and New York, the historical of the clan, quoting Chaucer, says:  "
This firate stock was full of righteousnesse.  True of his word, sober, pious and free"
    What is said of the first generation may truthfully be repeated of generations all along the line.
    John of Hingham, Mass., is a forefather of the Northern Suttons.  He came over in 1638, in the Diligent with his wife, Julien; a son, John, and three other children.  He is thought to have had three daughters born here. - Esther, Anne and Margaret.

    George Sutton, of Seituate, Mass., 1683 married Sarah Tilden and left issue.  William Sutton was living in Cape Cod in 1666.
    The Suttons of New York place Thomas Sutton, Cavalier, at the top of their family chart.  In 1647 he was living on Long Island.
    A line of descent from him is through Thomas, his son; Thomas, the third of the name; Benjamin and Byron, who married Caroline Sears, of the seventh generation from Richard Sears, the colonist.  Byron and Caroline had nine children.
    Thomas of the second or third generation, born on Long Island, at a place which rejoiced at the title of "Madman's Neck" went to Greenwich, Conn., and in 1718 bought 200 acres of land at Rye, N. Y.  With Joseph Sutton, who was, doubtless, his brother, he bought land in Newcastle on the Byram River, paying F64 for 38 acres and F27 for 16 acres.  Joseph is regarded as the founder of the Newcastle branch.
    The Suttons were among the principal proprietors of Newcastle, together with the Haights, Hyatts, Kipps, Reynolds, Kirbys, Davenports, Van Tassels and Secors.
    The 'oldest inhabitant' cannot remember when the Suttons did not own land on Byram river, and 'along King street".  Descendants are now living in part of the old property.  One of this lineage owns the old family Bible, which has records going back to 1722.
    Greenwich records mention old houses and mills built many years ago by the Suttons.
    Marriage connections of the Suttons include such well known New York families as Haight, Underhill, Sands, Cornell, Carpenter, Griffen, Kingsland, Richardson, Palmer, Hyari and Field.
    Lieutenant Thomas and two Benjamins - father and son - of this line were soldiers of the revolution.  Among those of the Southern branch of the family English Suttons who fought for our freedom where Lieutenant James Sutton, of North Carolina, and Paymaster John, of Virginia.
    The arms used by the family of New England and New York are illustrated.  Their blazon is: or, on a chevron between three annulets gules as many crescents of the field.
    Crest:  A grayhound's head couped ermine, collared gules, garnished and ringed, or on the collar three appulate of the last Fidelis usque ad mortem.
    The coat-of-arms of the Suttons of Virginia quarters the Lexington arms and is blazoned:  Quarterly; first and fourth argent, a canton stable, for Sutton; a second and third argent, a cross fiery azure, for Livingston. 
    Crest a wolf's head, erased gules,
    Motto: Toujours prest - "Always ready."
    The motto is given in old French as is not infrequently the case in arms of ancient grants.


SPAIN, BENJAMIN (File contributed by Gerry Hill, November 2006

Benjamin Spain was  born 1781 in Hillsboro, Orange, NC. He died abt 1860 probably Monroe Co Ga.

He was the son of  Lt. James Spann and Amy E. Fox  and married in Pitt Co NC Jan 13, 1813 to Mary Cobb born 1783 NC died aft 1870 probably Macon Co Ga. She was the child of David Cobb .

 

In 1808- a male child was born-name not  known.

In 1810-1812- a female child was born-name not known

On  the 16-Jul. 9-Baralby Rolly Bumby was born  inWashington Co Ga. She

   died 27 Apr 1903 in Potterville, Taylor Co Ga. and is buried at Mt. Olive Free

   Will Baptist, Taylor Co Ga.

On  about 1821--Mary Berthia was born in  Washington Co Ga  She died 3 Aug

    1847.

In 1827-Mary Jane was born Monroe Co Ga.. She died 1868

In  1830-John B. H. was born Monroe Co Ga. It is not known when he died.

1832-William B was born Monroe Co Ga. It is not known when he died.

 

Baralby married Monroe Co Ga Dec.28  1834  Reuben O. Underwood

   They had 10 children, and he left her in Crawford Co Ga, after the birth

    of #1 and moved back to Monroe Co Ga. in 1857.

Berthia married  Crawford Co Ga Dec. 24  1844 Josiah Moody

   They had one daughter and  Berthia died a few days later. The baby was named

    for her.

Mary Jane married aft 1850 Whitmell Bunt Hill. No children are known, but they

   raised her niece Mary Bethia.

John married  7 Feb 1850 Monroe Co Ga Martha E Reese. It is not known where

     John went from there-and only one child is known- Frances Melvina.

William married  23 Jul 1854  Crawford Co Ga Mary J Cox.   This couple is found

   in Baldwin Co. 1860,with young daughters Mary E 5, and Ellinora 10 months.

   They are not found again until 1880- where they have only son Seigler Jerome in

    Crawford Co.

 

Time Line-Benjamin Spain-Mary Cobb

 

1813-Jan. 13 Deed  Pitt Co. NC  Book S pg. 394

    Division of Lands  of David Cobb Sr.

    Lot #1 to Benjamin Spain & wife

    Others David Jr.,Joseph,Obed & Reuben  Cobb

1815-Jan. 26 Pitt Co. N.C. Deed Book T 1804-1817 page 263 Benjamin Spain and Mary Spain wife   

         Grantor, Grantee Howell Hearn 18 1/2 acres $180--

1820 Received by Exp. Bethlehem Bab. Ch. 15 Sep  1820..Washington Co. Ga.

  Benjamin and Mary Spain had alrady been received 19 Aug..

1821-Land Lottery

    Spain, Benjamin  in Washington Co Ga Floyds Dist 126/15 Dooly

1822 Dismissed, Benjamin and Mary Spain from Bethlehem Bab. Ch.

      Original member of church in Forsythe.

1828-  Tax Digest of Monroe Co. GA,  Benjamin Spain Captain Ferguson's Military District. residents

    listed near him on the register appeared to own land in the 12th Land District of Monroe.

    Benjamin Spain's taxes consisted of the following:

       1 Poll Tax.

       202 1/2 acres land in Muscogee County District 21, Lot 227.

       202 1/2 acres of land in Dooly County District 15, Lot 126.

       Total taxes paid was 81 3/4 cents.
     Noted  from  Captain Turner's Military District that the taxes for 1 Poll was consistently 31 1/4

     cents; therefore, the taxes on the actual value of Spain's land was 50 1/2 cents.
     on Monroe Co. Ga. List-from  Birdcro@aol.com Dec.2002

1830 MONROE COUNTY GA CENSUS 49-307  SPAIN 201-207 UNDERWOOD 205

      SPAIN,  BENJAMIN  

  207  BENJAMIN SPAIN    1 MALE AGE:40/50

                                     1 FEMALE AGE-34/40  

                                     FEMALES:  AGE-5/10 (2)

                                     FEMALE    AGE  10/15 (1)    

        SPAIN  JOHN 

  201  JOHN SPAIN

         1 MALE: UNDER 5,

         MALE 5/10,

         MALE AGE 40/50

         FEMALES: 1 - 5/10;

         FEMALE  AGE 20/30

 

1840 MONROE CO., GA CENSUS  Dist. 559 D559 194 SPAIN B 188 UNDERWOOD REUBEN

 

 

         194    SPAIN, B. 50/60     (Only others in Ga. Littleberry - Hall 195,John Wm.

                  FEMALE 1 AGE - 40/50

                  MALES  (2) 5-10 

                  FEMALES (2) AGE 10/15  

                  FEMALE  (1) AGE 5/10

                  Female   (1)  0-5       

1844-Dec. 24-daughter Bethea married Josiah Moody Crawford Co Ga. (Parents did not live there

    only sister)

1850 Census 353-353 Monroe Co. Ga. 024  60th Div. PAGE 24B, lINES 30 - 41

    Benj. Spain 63 m Farmer $300 NC

    Mary   59 F NC NC

    Mary J 23 F  Ga

    William B 16 m student Ga

    Mary B. Spain 3 F (She was actually a Moody-grandchild of Benj. & Mary-later to Mary J)

    Mary Wilson 6 F (Born 12 May 1847 Culloden, Monroe, Ga

 

1860 Census-Culloden, Monroe, Ga

1861-Feb. 14-Mary (Cobb) Spain  married again- Osborn Wiggins in Macon Co Ga.

 

He apparently died not long after—

1870 Census:  #130 R  Taylor Co. Ga.

   Berrilla 51 $135 p.

   Sarah 19

   Reuben 18

   Rhody 15

   Ida 13

      James DWIGHT 8

      Mary WIGGINS-  77 her Mother

 

1870

Macon Co. Census 1870

W B Hill #26 50 Ret. Merch. $000 $6000 NC

 F C 21

Mary Wigging 75 NC

 

  Benjamin Spann in marriage

Benjamin Mcllwain to Ga in NICHOLAS COBB DESC.

 

Ms. Gerry Hill-  GerryInGa@yahoo.com

(John Spain's picture appears under Photo-Gallery-Monroe Co Ga

 


ANDERSON REDDING (File contributed by Carol Garrett ckgleo@aol.com September 5, 2005, 9:39 am)
                                        Author: Carol Garrett

Anderson Redding, Rev. War Sol., b. 1764, VA, d. 1843 in Monroe Co., GA and
buried in Salem Church Cemetery.  When a very young man he enlisted in the
Contiental Army as a private soldier and served throughout the Revolution,
being present at the surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown. Married Delilah
Parham.

Children:

1. William Chambless, mar. Margaret Flewellyn (d/o Abner Flewellyn, Rev.
Soldier).
2. Elizabeth, mar. John Green
3. Rowland
4. Thomas (1794-1877); mar. Maria Searcy
5. Lourania
6. Mary
7. James M.

Note: John H. (Hunt) Greene (1792-1877), s/o Rev. Myles Greene (1767-1853) and
Elizabeth Hunt (1769-1809), Hancock and Baldwin Cos., GA, married Elizabeth H.
Redding (1795-1883), Monroe Co., GA, d/o Anderson Redding, Rev. War Sol. and
Elizabeth Delilah Parham, Monroe Co., GA.   

William C. (Chambless) Redding (?-?), s/o Anderson Redding, Rev. War Sol. (1764-
1845) and Elizabeth Delilah Parham (1773-1835), Monroe Co., GA, married
Margaret Flewellen (?-?), d/o Abner Flewellen and ???.   

GA D.A.R. Rev. War Records (pp. 193-194)

William Redding, b. in VA, 1736; d. in GA, 1822.  Served with VA Troops and
received bounty land in GA for his services.  Moved to GA 1785.  Married Patty
Parham.

Children:
1. Charles, b. in VA, 1756; d. in GA 1815. A Rev. Soldier, married Edith ____.
2. Arthur, mar. Frances Wynne
3. Anderson, b. 1764 in VA; d. 1845 in GA; a Rev. Soldier, married Delilah
Parham

Note: The GA D.A.R. records has Anderson Redding's (RWS) year of birth to be 1764.
However, the records of Thomas Slade and Jean S. Willingham (1961) are showing
Anderson Redding's date of birth to be 1765, dying at the age of 80 yrs of age.
If this was the correct age of his death when he died then his birth would have
been in 1765 (NOT. 1764).

Anderson Redding's, RS, Pvt.,  wife,  Elizabeth Delilah Parham, d/o Henry
Parham and Agnes ???.

Children (additional info.):
Mary (Polly) Redding (1791-?), m. Gideon Johnson (1786-1839) and he is buried
in Salem Methodist Church Cemetery (Pea Ridge Rd., nr. Boringbroke, Monroe Co.,
GA).
Thomas Redding (1792-1877), m. Maria Searcy
Lourania Redding (1803-1884), m. Henry Wyche Walton (both buried in Salem
Methodist Church Cemetery).

Additional Comments:

Macon Messenger 24 Aug 1843

The plantation where the late Anderson Redding, of Monroe County lived, eight
miles from Forsyth, on the road leading to Clinton by way of Dame's Ferry.  It
is situated in a good neighborhood, and healthy; the tract contains about
thirteen hundred and fifty acres -- about 680 of which is woods, the balance is
under good fencing, a considerable portion of which is fresh and but a small
portion worn out.  There is a good two story Dwelling, with shed rooms and
porch, all finished; a good framed work house and meat house, (all new) an
excellent set of negro houses, built of logs with brick chimneys, large framed
stables, &c.  The land lies in good bodies of cultivation, and is considered
one of the best farms in the county.  It will be sold at private sale.  For
further particulars, call on either of the undersigned.               

John H. Greene
William C. Redding


Anderson Redding, Revolutionary Soldier, died 9 Feb. 1843, Monroe County, GA.
(See obituary: Macon Georgia Telegraph  21 Feb. 1843; Macon Messenger 9 Mar
1943)(1843?)
Macon Messenger
Anderson Redding, Revolutionary Soldier, died 9 Feb. 1843, Monroe County, GA.

Additional Comments:
Anderson Redding, Rev. War Sol., b. 1764, VA, d. 1843 in Monroe Co., GA and
buried in Salem Church Cemetery.  When a very young man he enlisted in the
Contiental Army as a private soldier and served throughout the Revolution,
being present at the surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown. Married
Elizabeth Delilah Parham, Monroe Co., GA


JOHN ARTHUR ROBERTS/MARTHA (MATTIE) MALINDA SIMMONS.. file submitted by Tom Roberts

      John Arthur Roberts, born September 22, 1854 in Cabaniss, Monroe Co, GA; died June 25, 1921 in Jasper Co, GA.  He was the son of Wiley Jones Roberts and Mary Ann Spires.  He married Martha (Mattie) Malinda Simmons December 03, 1874 in Monroe Co, GA.  She was born December 25, 1855 in Monroe Co, GA, and died September 25, 1940 in Monticello, GA.  She was the daughter of Marcus (Mark) DeLafayette Simmons and Sara Jane Johnson. 

      John Arthur Roberts’ parents gave him his grandfather Roberts name. My great grandfather Roberts lived for around forty years in Monroe County, but for some reason the family moved from Monroe County to neighboring Jasper County in 1896. In 1894 according to the Monroe Co, GA tax digest his family lived with his mother on 85 acres of land that his father Wiley J. Roberts purchased in 1839. At the time John Roberts had a net worth of $161. He owned this land in 1905/6 as a nonresistant according to the county tax digest. The 1880 Monroe Co, GA census and the 1900/1910/1920 Jasper Co, GA censuses listed him and his family: as a farmer living in a rented home with his wife and two/four/three children, respectively in 1880/1900/1910. In 1920 he and his wife Mattie lived with their son Zeph and his family. John purchased land and farmed it in Jasper County. The courthouse books on deeds list a purchase of lots #11 and #12 in Washington Park in Monticello on December 21, 1912 for the sum of $342.00 [Jasper County Deed Book R p41], 165 acres on 10/11/15 [Deed Book S p36] for $2000. He purchased of 50 acres east of Public Rd. on 12/14/1904 [Deed Book N p 25] for $300 and sold the land on 1/24/21 [Deed Book U p259] for $2140 paid over five years. His family sold the 165 acres on 10/26/39 for $1200 [Deed Books A-4 p579 and A-6 p86], which was $800 less than the land cost twenty-three years earlier.

      I do not believe my great grandfather could read. He enjoyed attending functions such as county fairs and liked to have a drink at times according to his granddaughter Martha Lois. His youngest son Bridges died in France during World War 1 in 1918, and my great grandfather never fully recovered from his son's death. According to John A. Roberts’ death certificate he became ill in early 1920 and died from heart disease in 1921. During the time of his illness several of his out-of-town relatives visited him on his farm. His will is on file in Will Book #15 p160 at the Jasper County courthouse. He left everything to his wife and named his son Z.T. executor of the estate. The family buried him in West View Cemetery in Monticello, GA. 

      Mattie Simmons, named for her paternal grandmother Martha Malinda Dennis, grew up during and after the ravages of the Civil War. After the war she would not stay alone in her house and refused to sleep in the bedroom by herself because of a frightening incident that happened. In the latter part of the Civil War, while her father served in the Confederate Army in Virginia, Yankee soldiers, who were a part of Sherman’s Army that marched to the sea through Georgia, broke into her parent’s home at night in November or December 1864. At least one soldier entered my great grandmother's bedroom while she slept, crawled across her bed, and kidnapped a female slave who also slept in the room with her. The northern troops most likely took everything of value in the house, including any food and animals, as well as any other slaves living there. They may have even burned my great grandmother’s home as well. Can you imagine the fear a young girl experienced with such a sudden evasion into her life, when she was only ten years old? No wonder she lived with such fear the rest of her life.

      In love at the age of 18 she married John Arthur Roberts on December 3, 1874 in Monroe Co, GA. Between her marriage and 1894 she gave birth to eight children of which five lived to be adults. Grandmother Mattie lived and worked hard on the family farms first in Monroe Co, GA and later in Jasper Co, GA. She, also, found time to be active in civic and religious affairs and to minister to the sick and needy. In 1918 her youngest son Bridges (see pages 14 – 18) died in France during World War I as a result of a machine gun wound to his abdomen, followed two and half years later by the death of her husband from heart diseases. I can only imagine how the deaths of these two family members and caring for the three young children so close to her must have affected her life. To add to her grief her granddaughter Mattie, who was named for her, shot and killed herself in 1931 and her son Will murdered a man in 1937.

       In 1921 Mattie Roberts moved with her son Zeph, my grandfather, to Monticello and lived with his family until her death. Being a strong willed, likable woman she ruled the household, which must have made for a difficult situation for her daughter-in-law and my grandmother Bessie. In her later years she spent much of her time working on some sort of knitting or crocheting making small gifts for relatives, friends or her preacher who visited her. She would not let them leave without taking a small gift. She rarely left her home after her husband and Bridges deaths. When she did leave she visited the cemetery. After the death of her husband in 1921 one of her grandchildren always slept in the room with her. None of the grandchildren, including my father, seemed to mind sleeping in her room for they had a great affection for her. My parents named their youngest daughter Martha Malinda.

      She died in 1940 and was buried beside her husband in West View Cemetery in Monticello, GA. Even with the tragedies in her life she lived an upbeat life to the age of 84.  

Picture of Mattie and John Roberts taken around 1920. File submitted by Tom Roberts


WILEY JONES ROBERTS AND MARY ANN SPIRES file submitted by Tom Roberts 

      1.  Wiley Jones Roberts, born February 27, 1812 in Caswell Co, NC; died June 17, 1893 in Monroe Co, GA.  He was the son of 2. John Arthur Roberts and 3. Nancy Hargis.  He married Mary Ann Spires March 08, 1840 in Monroe Co, GA.  She was born October 28, 1821 in GA, and died May 11, 1905 in Monroe Co, GA.  She was the daughter of Hezekiah Gaither Spires, Jr. and Marguerite (Margaret) McCorkle. 

      I do not know where his parents got Wiley’s first name, but his middle name Jones came from his material grandmother Mary Jones. I believe that both he and his future wife Mary Ann lived with his brother Jesse Hancock Roberts (see his write-up on page 46) after both of their fathers died and Jesse married Mary Ann's mother. The four of them moved from Lincoln Co, GA to Monroe Co, GA sometimes between 1825 and 1830. The Creek Indians in the Treaty of 1821 at Indian Springs agreed to cede the land between the Ocmulgee and the Flint Rivers in Georgia to the U. S. Government. This land included what is now Monroe County. Settlers mostly from eastern Georgia poured into the area including the Roberts. According to the 1850 census over 6,800 whites and 10,100 blacks lived in Monroe County. The Monroe County 1830/1840 census listed Jesse H. Roberts with children or young adults the ages of Wiley and Mary Ann.

      In 1835 Wiley enlisted in the Indian War from which he drew a land lottery in Forsyth Co, GA. He enlisted in the Civil War in 1864 as a Militiaman. On 12/31/1839 Wiley Roberts purchased about 100 acres (lot #148) in Monroe County for $475 located nine miles north of Forsythe, GA on the Cabinness and Indian Springs Road. His family lived in a home on this property until after 1900. On February 11, 1889 he and his wife sold twenty acres of lot #148 to a second party for $158.40. Son J. A. Roberts witnessed the sale. The 1850 Monroe Co, GA census list his wife, three children and spelled his name Roberds. The 1860/1870/1880 Monroe County census listed him as a farmer living with his wife and six/five/one children, the value of his real estate $1000/500/? and the value of his personal estate $450/450/?.  He was also listed in the 1853 Monroe County Tax Digest as owning 103 acres of land with a whole value of $1215. I could not find his or his wife's will. He and his wife were buried in Paran Baptist Church Cemetery, Blount, Monroe County on Indian Springs Road or Georgia Highway 42. On his grave marker it states, "Mark the perfect man and behold the upright for the end of that man is peace." 

      The spelling of Mary Ann’s last name on her marriage license appears to be Squires but the spelling of her name on the estate records of her father is Spires. Her mother Margaret McCorkle Spires married Jesse H. Roberts (Mary Ann’s future husband’s brother) after Mary Ann's father died. The court first appointed James McCorkle and then Samuel McCorkle as Mary Ann's guardian [Minute Book V 3/3/1823 p23 in Lincoln Co, GA courthouse] after her father died. Somehow Samuel became insolvent; therefore, the court named Jesse H. Roberts her guardian on November 2, 1835 [Guardian's Bonds Book, 1831-1857 Monroe Co, GA courthouse; Annual Return Book #4 1838-1847 p193+260 1/23/1841 and 4/18/1842 in Lincoln Co, GA courthouse]. That Monroe county record indicated she was the orphan child of Hezekiah Spiers. A record dated February 1838 in Court of Ordinary Annual Returns Book C 1831 - 1856 Monroe County confirms Jesse as her guardian.

      The 1894 Tax Digest for the Cabaniss District, Monroe Co. GA showed her living on 85 acres of land valued at $320 with her son John's family. She had a net worth other than the land of $90. She and her husband were buried in Paran Baptist Church Cemetery in Monroe County. On her grave marker it states, "She has gone to her home in Heaven, And all her afflictions are over." She most likely lived a hard life and must have suffered in her last years. 

Children of Wiley Roberts and Mary Spires were:    James Monroe Roberts, born March 15, 1843 in Monroe Co, GA; died October 08, 1929 in Coffee Co, AL; married Martha Elizabeth Castleberry December 07, 1865 in Monroe Co, GA; born April 27, 1848 in Butts Co, GA; died February 03, 1921 in AL. 

           In September 25, 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate Army at Jackson, Butts Co, GA. He was in company B (later A), 30th regiment Georgia Volunteer Infantry, Army of Tennessee, Butts Co, GA "Bailey Volunteers." He achieved the rank of 4th Corporal on September 25, 1861 but was listed as a private in 1862. The regiment was organized on October 7, 1861 and consolidated with other regiments during the war. They fought in sixteen battles including Vicksburg, Chickamauga, Chattanooga and Atlanta. He caught typhoid fever and recovered in a hospital in Forsythe, GA. After he recovered he went back into service but was wounded on July 22, 1864 on top of his shoulder near his neck in the battle of Atlanta. By the time he recovered the war was over and he returned to his home. Sherman's army had come through and desolated the area. Some people said the union troops left that part of Georgia in such poor condition that a crow could not find enough to eat. The poverty in some areas of the south was so bad that many people moved to other states. Perhaps for this reason in 1871 his family moved to south Alabama near his uncle Jessie H. Roberts. He is listed in his brother John Arthur Roberts' obituary on page 40 as living in Enterprise, AL. His will is on file in Coffee Co, AL, and he left his estate to his children. He and his wife are buried in the Damascus Baptist Church Cemetery located in Coffee County. 

                     George T. Roberts, born Abt. 1847 in GA.
  Margaret or Rebecca Roberts, born Abt. 1849 in GA; died after 1921; married Stanford T. Pirkle
  John Arthur Roberts, born September 22, 1854 in Cabaniss, Monroe Co, GA; died June 25, 1921 in Jasper Co, GA; married Martha (Mattie) Malinda Simmons December 03, 1874 in Monroe Co, GA
 Eliza J. Roberts, born Abt. 1857 in GA; died after 1921; married Ed Wooten
 Susan E. Roberts, born 1859 in GA.
Ella Roberts, born Aft. 1860; died Aft. 1921.  Ella and Eliza are listed in Wiley and Mary Ann son John Arthur Roberts' obituary living in Jackson, GA, and Margaret is listed as living in Enterprise, AL.
 Willie Ann Roberts, born July 27, 1863; died June 15, 1946; married George William Colbert 

      John Arthur Roberts, born Abt. 1766 in Charlotte Co, VA or Orange Co, NC; died 1822 in Lincoln Co, GA.  He was the son of 4. David Montgomery Roberts and 5. Caroline Mills.  He married 3. Nancy Hargis March 25, 1789 in Caswell Co, NC.  Nancy Hargis, born Abt. 1766 in Danville, VA; died Abt. 1864 in Lincoln Co, GA.  She was the daughter of  Richard Nalley Hargis and  Mary Jones.

Children of John Roberts and Nancy Hargis were: Quisenbury Roberts, married Mary Cates; Sarah Roberts, married John Peed 1821 in Person Co, NC.;  Mary Roberts, married Thomas Farrar;  Nancy Roberts, married John Hunt;  Celia Roberts, married Thomas Wynne 1847. ;  Lavinia (Viney) Roberts, born August 13, 1797 in NC; died October 27, 1862 in Lincoln Co, GA; married Zachariah Spires 1817; born August 31, 1794 in Lincoln Co, GA; died April 27, 1866 in Lincoln Co, GA.;     Jesse Hancock Roberts, born 1800 in Person Co, NC; died July 07, 1884 in Pike Co, AL; married (1) Marguerite (Margaret) McCorkle November 02, 1825 in Lincoln Co, GA; born Abt. 1801 in GA; died 1870 in Pike Co, AL; married (2) Mary W. Whaley 1871 in Pike Co, AL; born Abt. 1818 in GA. 

[He was an adventurer. During the 1820's Jesse rode horse back from Lincoln County to visit his grandfather in Lowndes Co, AL and later to Lee Co, GA to look at some land. During the latter trip Indians shot him but he escaped. In 1836 he enlisted in the Indian Wars. While living in Lincoln County Graves Military District he won a land lottery in 1821 in Monroe Co, GA (#193/15). After his marriage in 1825 and before 1830 his family moved to Monroe County. He was listed in the 1830, 1840 and 1850 Monroe County census living with his wife and children and in the Monroe County Tax Digest in 1853 where he owned over 400 acres of land, four slaves and had a whole property worth of $5985. During the 1850’s his family moved to Alabama, where he and his wife Margaret were listed in the 1860 and 1870 Pike Co, AL census. According to these censuses he farmed the land and could not read but the value of his real estate/personal was $1440/$7800 and $1000/$500. In 1860 he owned seven slaves living in one slave house. The 1880 census listed him and his second wife Mary W. In 1884 he died of paralysis from a fall and left no will but there are numerous probate records in box 51 at the Pike County courthouse naming his children and listing his assets of $1000. ]

   Francis (Fanny) Roberts, born 1803; died 1869 in Thomson, GA; married John Crawford March 14, 1821 in Lincoln Co, GA.;  Haywood D. Roberts, born 1804 in NC; died 1863 in Bullock Co, GA; married Rhoda Bohler December 28, 1826 in Lincoln Co, GA; born Abt. 1810 in GA. 

Living in Lincoln County Graves Military District when he won a land lottery in Union or Lumpkin Co. (#722/21).    Greenwood W. Roberts, born Abt. 1806 in NC; married Mary Anne Ramsey November 08, 1836 in Lincoln Co, GA; born Abt. 1823 in GA.;   Rebecca (Bicky) Roberts, born Abt. 1810 in NC; married John M. Eubanks December 03, 1832 in Lincoln Co, GA.
 Wiley Jones Roberts, born February 27, 1812 in Caswell Co, NC; died June 17, 1893 in Monroe Co, GA; married Mary Ann Spires March 08, 1840 in Monroe Co, GA.


MARTHA (MATTIE) MALINDA SIMMONS ANCESTORS file submitted by Tom Roberts

Martha (Mattie) Malinda Simmons, born December 25, 1855 in Monroe Co, GA; died September 25, 1940 in Monticello, GA.  She was the daughter of  Marcus DeLafayette (Mark) Simmons and  Sara Jane Johnson.  She married (1) John Arthur Roberts December 03, 1874 in Monroe Co, GA.  He was born September 22, 1854 in Cabaniss, Monroe Co, GA, and died June 25, 1921 in Jasper Co, GA.  He was the son of Wiley Jones Roberts and Mary Ann Spires. 

Marcus (Mark) DeLafayette Simmons, born January 19, 1834 in Putnam Co, GA; died July 19, 1881 in Monroe Co, GA.  He was the son of  Dudley L. Simmons and 5. Martha Malinda Dennis.  He married 3. Sara Jane Johnson September 19, 1854 in Monroe Co, GA. Sara Jane Johnson, born March 30, 1838 in Monroe Co, GA; died July 15, 1883 in Monroe Co, GA.  She was the daughter of  Ahab Johnson and  Lucretia Davenport. 

Mark D. Simmons and Sara Jane Johnson Simmons

     

Marquis de Lafayette (the French General) spoke in Clinton, Jones Co, GA on March 19, 1825. Marcus' parents must have been in attendance and impressed because they named their fourth son after the famous French general. Most young men in the south at the time of the Civil War felt it their duty and an honor to volunteer for service in the Confederate army. Mark at age eighteen, therefore, joined Company D, 45th regiment Georgia voluntary infantry Army of Northern Virginia, Confederate States of America, Monroe Co. GA, McCowan guards as a Private on March 4, 1862. The regiment, organized on March 15, 1862 under the command of Colonel Thomas Hardeman, was sent to the killing fields of northern Virginia where they fought in some of the bloodiest battles of the war. The 45th fought in twenty battles including the second Bull Run, Harpers Ferry, Fredericksburg, and Gettysburg and surrendered at Appomattox Court House, VA on April 9, 1865. One can only guess the hundreds of miles he marched to get from one battlefield to another. In units like his the men faced the shadow of death during every battle, and they became very close because of all the time they spent with each other and all the campaigns they fought in together.

      In 1862 the Army appointed Mark Simmons 4th Corporal. For 36 days ending on May 10, 1862 Mark was on sick furlough. On June 30, 1862 the doctor admitted Mark to Chimborazo Hospital No. 3 in Richmond, VA due to a gunshot wound in the head. On July 6 he returned to active duty, but the army readmitted Mark to a hospital from October 7 to 13, 1862 for observation. From May through August 1864 he missed service because he was on sick furlough due to paralysis. He returned to his unit in September 1864. He was allowed to return home for some period of time in October of 1864 because his daughter Isadore was born in July 1865. He returned to Virginia and surrendered at Appomattox with General Lee’s Army. Fortunately he lived through all of his sicknesses and injuries, although around 25% of the southern men his age died during the conflict. If he had not survived the injuries many of his descendants reading this history would not be alive today. After the war he trudged most likely by foot from Virginia all the way back to his home in central Georgia. Along the route he must have stopped at farmers homes for food, to rest and to relieve his pain from his battle wounds. When he returned to Monroe County he found most of the area totally devastated because of Sherman’s march to the sea where 62,000 Yankee troops destroyed the land across a sixty mile wide path from Atlanta to Savannah.

      Many returning solders left Georgia after the war because of the devastation, but his family stayed. He was listed as Mark D. Simmons in the 1870 and 1880 Monroe Co, GA census and as Marcus Simmons in the 1860 Monroe County census. Daughter Mattie M. was listed in the 1870 census in her parent’s household but in the 1860 census in the John R. Wyche household. Most likely she was visiting the neighbor at the time the census taker came by. The censuses listed his occupation as a farmer. He and his wife both died early and were buried in Hollygrove Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery on Dames Ferry Road near Rum Creek in Monroe County. His early death may have been due to his extensive Civil War injuries. 

      Sara Jane was an invalid when her husband died, and her children at home cared for her until she died two years later.  Children of Marcus Simmons and Sara Johnson were:

      Martha (Mattie) Malinda Simmons, born December 25, 1855 in Monroe Co, GA; died September 25, 1940 in Monticello, GA; married John Arthur Roberts December 03, 1874 in Monroe Co, GA.; Augustus Simmons, born 1858; died 1861; William (Sid) Sidney Simmons, born September 16, 1860 in Monroe Co, GA; died April 24, 1926 in Macon, GA; married Olive Dee Tyner February 17, 1889; born April 05, 1870; died September 12, 1944 in Macon, GA.; Isadore (Dode) Simmons, born July 18, 1865 in Monroe Co, GA; died December 01, 1954 in Monroe Co, GA; married John Michael Browning December 03, 1885 in Monroe Co, GA.; Augustus Ahab (Gus) Simmons, born March 29, 1868; died July 11, 1913; married Mary Lizzie Maynard; born 1876; died 1965.; Vallie Lucille Simmons, born April 01, 1871; died March 08, 1957 in Jasper Co, GA; married John Joseph King; born August 02, 1864; died February 11, 1910.Walter Matthew Simmons, born May 12, 1874; died January 25, 1911; married Lillie Florence Smith;   Katherine (Kate) Lena Simmons, born April 28, 1877; died Aft. 1971; married James Andrew King January 21, 1894 in Jones Co, GA; died December 12, 1912 in Jones Co, GA. 

 Dudley L. Simmons, born January 02, 1803 in GA; died April 16, 1877 in Williamson Co, TX.  He was the son of Benjamin Simmons and  Sarah.  He married  Martha Malinda Dennis September 15, 1825 in Hancock Co, GA.   He married Sarah Alice Caldwell Smith December 04, 1854 in Monroe Co, GA. She was born August 10, 1830 in GA; died June 06, 1890 in Williamson Co, TX. Sarah Caldwell previously married a Smith..  Martha Malinda Dennis, born Abt. 1805; died Aft. 1841.  She was the daughter of Joseph Dennis and 11. Ellendor or Ellenor.; 

      Dudley lived in Putman Co, GA in 1830 and 1840 with his family according to census data and lived in Monroe Co, GA with wife or maybe a relative Caroline according to 1850 census, occupation farmer. Neither he nor Caroline could read or write. In 1840 a woman age 70 to 80 lived with him, which most likely was his mother-in-law Ellendor Dennis (see page 79). The Monroe County Tax Digest listed him in 1853 as owning 111 acres with an $800 value on his whole property. Some time after 1854 he and his family moved to Tallapoosa Co, AL. In 1860 the family was listed (wife Sarah) in the Tallapoosa Co, AL census. They moved back to Georgia after 1860. Following the Civil War at the request of Dudley’s Uncle William C. Simmons the family left Georgia for Texas. They most likely made the difficult trip by boarding a steamboat at West Point, GA and traveling down the Chattahoochee River to the Gulf of Mexico. They crossed the gulf and landed at Galveston, TX. From there they moved by wagon to Williamson County. They went to Texas to help take care of his old Uncle. In 1873 Dudley’s uncle deeded 100 acres of land in Texas to him for his help. 

Children of Dudley Simmons and Martha Dennis were: Alburtus J. Simmons, born October 02, 1826; married Sara Jones December 23, 1844 in Jones , GA.;      William Capers or Copus Simmons, born February 21, 1829 in GA; died 1884 in Putnam Co, GA; married Mary Jane Frances Branham November 09, 1848 in Putnam Co, GA. Sidney Boulevar Burris Simmons, born January 13, 1833 in GA; died Aft. 1906 in Bibb Co, GA; married Mary T. White November 26, 1866 in Putnam Co, GA. ; Marcus (Mark) DeLafayette Simmons, born January 19, 1834 in Putnam Co, GA; died July 19, 1881 in Monroe Co, GA; married Sara Jane Johnson September 19, 1854 in Monroe Co, GA.; Ruphus J. Simmons, born March 08, 1838 in Putnam Co, GA.; Samantha J. Simmons, born March 08, 1838 in Putnam Co, GA; married James W. Garner; Mary E. Simmons, born 1841 in Putnam Co, GA.       

Children of Dudley Simmons and Sarah Caldwell were: Dudley L. Simmons, Jr., born Abt. 1856 in Camp Hill, Tallapossa Co, AL; died 1931; married Julia Brenhan;       Green Duncan Simmons, born October 15, 1857 in Camp Hill, Tallapossa Co,  AL; died March 25, 1955 in Thrall, TX; married Emma Giles Williams; born 1862 in TX; died 1952.;  Thomas Perry Simmons, born May 27, 1859 in Camp Hill, Tallapossa  Co,  AL; died March 27, 1927 in Thrall, Williamson Co, TX; married Amanda Ellen Barber August 01, 1881 in Lee, TX.;  Eugene Bedford Simmons, born March 05, 1861 in Monroe Co, GA; died 1886; married M. A. Allcorn; born 1865.; Carsa Augusta Simmons, born October 27, 1864 in Monroe Co, GA; died 1940; married Milly; Lula Forence Simmons, born April 14, 1865 in Monroe Co, GA; married J. Washington Smith; born 1852 in TX; died 1906. 

Ahab Johnson, born October 14, 1801 in Newberry Co, SC; died February 1874 in Monroe Co, GA.  He was the son of  Daniel Johnston and  Sarah Hill.  He married  Lucretia Davenport Abt. 1826 in Newberry Co, SC.   Lucretia Davenport, born January 25, 1811 in Newberry Co, SC; died February 23, 1894 in Monroe Co, GA.  She was the daughter of  Raymond Davenport and  Patise Adams.
      Ahab Johnson and his wife moved to Georgia in 1828, and the Jones/ Monroe Co, GA census listed them in 1830/1850. In 1830 the census listed his occupation as a farmer and in 1830 he owned three slaves. In 1850 the value of his real estate was $500. His will and a listing of his estate are on file in the Monroe Co, GA courthouse. He left all to his wife and the value of his estate was $674 including 85 acres of land valued at $350. Son-in-law M. D. Simmons was noted in the accounting of his inventory of assets. 

      Lucretia was the mother of 3 boys and 8 girls. Widowed living with daughter Sara’s family in 1880 (census). She was buried near the Hollygrove Primitive Baptist church cemetery in Monroe Co, GA. 

Children of Ahab Johnson and Lucretia Davenport were:           Louisa Johnson, born Abt. 1830 in GA.;           Mary Johnson, born Abt. 1832 in GA.  Martha Johnson, born Abt. 1834 in GA.;       William Johnson, born 1838 in GA.;.     Sara Jane Johnson, born March 30, 1838 in Monroe Co, GA; died July 15, 1883 in Monroe Co, GA; married Marcus (Mark) DeLafayette Simmons September 19, 1854 in Monroe Co, GA.;          Lucy Johnson, born Abt. 1840 in GA.; Emeline Johnson, born Abt. 1846 in GA.           Elizabeth Johnson, born Abt. 1849 in GA


JAMES MADISON SIMMONS AND HIS SIMMONS ANCESTORS File submitted by Tom Roberts 

      James Madison Simmons, born May 03, 1843 in Monroe Co, GA; died December 14, 1922 in Attala Co, MS.  He was the son of John William Simmons and  Bethiah Middlebrooks.  He married (1) Sarah Jane Jenkins February 11, 1864 in Jasper Co, GA.  She was born May 06, 1846 in Jasper Co, GA, and died March 29, 1877 in TX?.  She was the daughter of Francis M. Jenkins and Elizabeth (Elmira) Pye.  He married (2) Nancy Jane Newby February 14, 1878 in Jones Co, GA.  She was born June 04, 1851 in GA, and died January 28, 1897 in Attala Co, MS.  She was the daughter of Daniel Jefferson (Jeff) Newby and Sarah Elizabeth (Betsy) Cleland.  He married (3) Annie Murphy Holly April 18, 1898.  She was born June 16, 1858 in MO, and died January 28, 1913. 

CIVIL WAR SERVICE

      Most young men in the south at the time of the Civil War felt it their duty and an honor to volunteer for service in the Confederate Army. They believed that foreigners from up north were invading their country. On March 18, 1861 young James at age seventeen, therefore, joined as a private along with his brother Robert, Company K, 1st Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Confederate States of America. Around 1200 soldiers enlisted from Monroe County. A company had from 60 to 100 solders usually from a single county and many times had a name like Quitman Guards. An elected captain led the company. About ten companies usually from the same geographical region made up a regiment led by a major. In units like this, the men became very close because of all of the time they spent with each other and all of the battles they fought in together. Volunteers made up the 1st Infantry Regiment, which organized on April 3, 1861 at Camp Oglethorpe in Macon, GA. The 1st regiment Company K volunteers officially mustered into Confederate service at Pensacola, FL on April 16, 1861. The Confederate Army first assigned his company to the Pensacola area and later to the Army of the Northwest. They fought in two battles: Corrick's Ford and Greenbrier River.

      James Simmons mustered out at Augusta, GA on March 18, 1862 because the regiment disbanded and then reenlisted as a 4th Corporal in Company K (Monroe County Quitman Guards), 53rd regiment Georgia Infantry on May 6,1862. The Army promoted him to 2nd Corporal in October 1863 and 1st Corporal in August 1864. For some unknown reason two months pay was deducted by sentence of Court Martial on March 17, 1863, and he was placed "in arrest" on February 28, 1865. Since no details exist about his pay deduction and the “in arrest” on his war records, they must have been for minor offences.

      The 53rd Infantry Regiment was organized on May 12, 1862, and they boarded a train bound for Richmond, Virginia on June 20, 1862 to serve with the Army of Northern Virginia and fight in McClellan's Peninsula campaign. The regiment arrived in Richmond on June 25, 1862, combined with other regiments and camped at the old fairgrounds north of the city. On July 2 the 53rd fought in the Battle of Malvern Hill north of Richmond. They with stood heavy shelling and charged through the woods, briars, bushes and swamp knee deep with water and mud to rout the Yankee soldiers. After the battle the Regiments slept in the pouring rain with no tents while listening to the moans of wounded soldiers.

      In the fall of 1862 they marched north into Maryland and fought in the Battle of Sharpsburg. The Regiment lost twelve killed and sixty-three wounded, and their elected Colonel Sloan died of his wounds. At times they survived long marches with little food and at other times they received plenty of food and rest. After a return and some rest near Richmond the Regiment fought in the Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville Campaigns before marching towards Gettysburg in June of 1863. The 53rd suffered heavy casualties during the campaigns. After returning to Richmond by foot they boarded a train in mid September for Atlanta and on to Chattanooga arriving on September 20.

       Starting in November they fought in the Tennessee Campaign under cold adverse conditions and suffered a large number of casualties. On March 30, 1864 the Regiment marched from their camp at Greenville, TN up the railroad to Bristol and then by train to Gordonville, VA to rejoin the Army of Northern Virginia for the Wilderness Campaign. They fought at Spottslyvania, Cold Harbor and other Battles before returning to Petersburg and Richmond in early August. In Late August the unit returned to northwestern Virginia and took part in battles including Cedar Creek and again returned to Richmond.  The Army of Northern Virginia surrendered at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. Less than 120 men were left in the 10th and 53rd combined down from  more than a 1000 men at the beginning of the war.

      James was wounded twice first at Cedar Creek in the Shenandoah Valley of Northern Virginia on October 19, 1864 and then April 6, 1865 near Appomattox in Virginia. Both were flesh wounds. He was not listed as a parole of the Army of Northern Virginia issued at Appomattox Courthouse on April 9, 1865. This must have been due to his injury on April 6.

      At the end of the war he trudged most likely by foot from Virginia back to his home in central Georgia. Along the route he may have stopped at farmer’s homes for food and to rest to relieve the pain from his battle wounds. When he returned to Monroe County he found many homes and mills destroyed by the union troops although the county was not pillaged as much as some just to the east. Most of Sherman's army moved to Savannah from Atlanta through Milledgeville rather than Monroe County. He later received the Southern Cross of Honor from the United Daughters of Confederacy. Somehow he lost his cross and on September 10, 1919 he applied and was approved to receive a new one.

Only Confederate Veterans were awarded the Southern Cross of Honor. Mrs. Mary Ann Erwin conceived the award to be given from the United Daughters of the Confederate to solders to honor their service to the south. The metal was in the shape of a maltese cross and is shown to the left. 

AFTER THE WAR...      James Simmons was listed in the 1870 Monroe Co, GA census with wife Sarah J. and two children, in the 1880 Jones Co, GA census with his second wife Nancy J. and five children, in the 1900 Attala Co, MS census with his third wife Annie and six children, and in the 1910 Attala Co, MS census just with wife Annie. His occupation was listed as a farmer. Family tradition says he and his family moved to Texas in the 1870's where Sarah Jane died in 1877. Before 1880 they moved back to Georgia. Back in Georgia he married Nancy Jane Newby.

      Sometime around 1889 the family moved from Jones County to Attala Co, MS most likely for new better farmland. On September 2, 1903 he applied for a pension as an indigent solder of the late Confederacy under Chapter 73, Acts of 1900. He claimed that he was a farmer and unable to support himself. At the time he did not own any property and lived in a rented place. The pension application asked if he had any sons sixteen to twenty-one years of age? He answered, “two, but both left me and one of them is cripple.” Late in life he lived with his son Oscar’s family on a farm outside of Kosciusko, MS and spent some considerable time with his son Alva and daughters Bessie and Eula in 1917 and 1918. He died on December 12, 1922 from cancer of the bladder according to his death certificate. He had suffered from bladder problems and rheumatism for several years. His family buried him in Center Point Cemetery near the home of his son Frank in Attala Co, MS three and one half miles west of Kosciusko on Highway 19. I have found no picture of him, and the only information that I have on his looks is that he grew a long white beard late in life.

      There is a marker in the cemetery with his, Nancy J, and son Preston's names on it. Each death date on the marker does not agree by two to five days with the dates used here which came from the bible records in reference 17 and his death certificate. On the marker he is listed as a Rev. with "Thy Will Be Done" under his name. No church records in this area of Mississippi mentions him as a preacher. His daughter and my grandmother Bessie Mama always claimed he was a Primitive Baptist minister. The Center Point School House held church services at times. This school was next to were he was buried; therefore, maybe he preached at the school on some Sundays.

      Sarah Jenkins was born on May 6, 1846 in Jasper Co, GA, married James Simmons on February 11, 1864 in Jasper Co, GA and died on March 29, 1877 in TX.

      Nancy Newby died on Jan 28, 1897 three months after her last child, Preston was born. Her family buried her at Center Point Cemetery, Attala Co, MS.

      Annie Holly was born June 16, 1858 in Missouri and died on Jan. 28, 1913. She and James had no children. Her father was born in Ireland and her mother in Mississippi. 

      2.  John William Simmons, born May 28, 1809 in GA; died January 11, 1873 in Monroe Co, GA. He was the son of 4. William Simmons and 5. unknown.  He married 3. Bethiah Middlebrooks September 11, 1827 in Monroe Co, GA.  Bethiah Middlebrooks, born January 14, 1811 in Monroe Co, GA; died June 03, 1877 in Monroe Co, GA. She was the daughter of  Robert Middlebrooks and Nancy Talbot. 

      John Simmons became the Primitive Baptist preacher of the New Hope Primitive Church (organized on Feb. 6. 1813) on Caney Creek Road in northwestern Jones Co, GA in 1858 and served until 1871. He, also, preached at the Ephesus Baptist Church in Monroe County at least in 1866 and 1869 and belonged to the Towaliga Baptist Association from 1848 - 1856 and the Ocmulgee Baptist Association. Reverend Simmons and his wife lived on Julliette Road outside of Forsyth, GA, and the Monroe Co, GA census listed the family in the 1840, 1850, 1860, and 1870. In 1840 they owned one female slave. In 1850/1860/1870 his real estate/ personal property values were $3000/?, $10000/$10500 and $2300/$830. Also, two of his late brother James' children lived with his family in 1860, and the county appointed he and his brother-in-law Alfred Middlebrooks guardians of at least two children [Guardian Bonds 1837+1841 Monroe Co, GA courthouse].

      John W. Simmons was listed in the 1828 and 1853 Monroe County Tax Digests located in the county courthouse. In 1828 he had no net worth, but in 1853 he owned over 600 acres, ten slaves and had a whole value of $11239. He bought and sold number of land plots in Monroe County from 1833 to 1869 including transferring land to his children. In addition, he was the administrator for his brother James estate in the 1850's.

      He died intestate and the court appointed his son James M. Simmons and brother-in-law Alfred Middlebrooks administrator of his estate. He owned 516 acres of land at death (value about $7 per acre) and he was worth $5035 [Monroe County Minutes - Court of Ordinary Book D 1869-1877 p 268, Annual Returns Book O p 682 - 688 and Letters of Administration 1856 - 1920 p 64, Monroe Co, GA courthouse]. Descendants indicated that John William Simmons, his wife, and daughter Caroline were buried in unmarked graves off of Edwards Road near the marked grave of son-in-law Hiram Edwards. Three of his sons were reported to be very tall. See the picture of New Hope church above.

      Bethiah Middlebrooks died intestate and the court appointed her brother Alfred Middlebrooks administrator of her estate [Letters of Administration 1856 - 1920 p 92, Monroe Co, GA courthouse].  

Children of John Simmons and Bethiah Middlebrooks are:         Nancy Simmons, born 1828 in Monroe Co, GA.;         John William Simmons, Jr., born 1830 in Monroe Co, GA; died May 12, 1863 Spotsylvania, VA; married Sophronia (Sarah) Ann Pitts January 06, 1847 in Monroe Co, GA; born Abt. 1829. He and his wife Sarah had six children and were listed in the 1860 Monroe Co, GA census. He worked as a farmer. He joined Company D 45th Regiment McCowan Guards, Confederate States of America and was a private on March 4, 1862. The company was made up of soldiers from Monroe County. He was killed in battle at Spotsylvania, VA.;     Andrew Simmons, born 1832 in Monroe Co, GA; died 1832 in Monroe Co, GA.;  Anna Caroline Simmons, born May 6,1834 in Monroe Co, GA; married J. Hiram Edwards 1855.   The 1860 and 1880 Monroe County censuses listed them. He worked as a farmer and she at keeping the house.  ; Missouri Jane Simmons, born July 19, 1834 in Monroe Co, GA; died October 22, 1886 in Navarro Co, TX; married Thomas Jefferson Cannon on April 10, 1853; born February 18, 1829 in Jasper Co, GA; died September 30, 1913 in Houston Co, TX.;  James Robert Simmons, born 1838 in Monroe Co, GA; died January 08, 1863 in Fredericksburg, VA; married Elizabeth Chambliss in 1862; born December 12, 1841 Monroe Co, GA; died September 17, 1907 Monroe Co, GA. 

The 1860 census listed him as a farmer/ laborer. On March 18, 1861 Robert enlisted as a private along with his brother James M. into Company K, 1st Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Confederate States of America. On October 10, 1861 the Army appointed him 2nd Sergeant. He mustered out at Augusta, GA on March 18, 1862 and reenlisted as a 2nd Sergeant into Company K, 53rd Regiment Georgia Infantry on May 6, 1862 along with his brother James. He died of smallpox at Fredericksburg, VA in 1863. ;     Columbus Simmons, born 1839 in Monroe Co, GA; died 1859 in Monroe Co, GA.;
            James Madison Simmons, born May 03, 1843 in Monroe Co, GA; died December 4, 1922 in Attala Co, MS; married (1) Sarah Jane Jenkins February 11, 1864 in Jasper Co, GA; married (2) Nancy Jane Newby February 14, 1878 in Jones, GA; married (3) Annie Murphy Holly April 18, 1898.;  Adeline Bethiah Simmons, born 1845 in Monroe Co, GA.;             Mary (Polly) E. Simmons, born 1846 in Monroe Co, GA; died 1906 in MS; married M. H. Thompson; Jefferson Simmons, born 1847 in Monroe Co, GA; died 1847 in Monroe Co, GA.;         Josephine Simmons, born 1849 in Monroe Co, GA; died after 1917.   Palestine (Pallie) Leigh Simmons, born September 08, 1851 in GA; died 1886 in Lindale, Smith Co, TX; married Samuel Jackson Williamson April 09, 1872; born April 08, 1851 in GA; died April 11, 1919 in Monroe Co, GA.;          Frank Monroe Simmons, born 1853 in Monroe Co, GA; died 1902 in MS; married (1) Flora Bef. 1876; married (2) Mary J. Prather November 19, 1876.;  Abye Roberta Simmons, born May 26, 1856 in Monroe Co, GA; died January 28, 1918 in Monroe Co, GA; married Samuel Jackson Williamson January 29, 1888 in Jones Co, GA; born April 09, 1851 in GA; died April 11, 1919 in Monroe Co, GA. 

 William Simmons, died 1825 in Jones Co, GA.  He married 5. unknown. She died before 1814. He married Rachel Simmons October 26, 1814 in Jones Co, GA. She died after 1832.     The 1820 Jones Co, GA census listed two William Simmons. Our William Simmons (1) died intestate in 1825 and a division of his estate was recorded in the Annual Returns Book F 1825 - 28 on page 23 dated January 4, 1826. The record listed Rachael as his widow and the county appointed trustees assigned her one slave. The record also listed Elizabeth Simmons as receiving about one hundred acres of land while Sophia, John and James Simmons each received one slave. George Washington Cook the husband of Ruth Simmons also received one slave. The record does not list them as his children, but one must conclude that the five Simmons were indeed his children by his unknown wife. The two children of Rachael born after 1814 were minors at the time and therefore not listed. See the write-up on Sophia and James below for confirmation that the seven were indeed brothers and sisters.

      From examining the probate records it appears that Rachel married or was the only child of another William Simmons (II). This William died intestate most likely in early 1814 and a list and deposition of his estate was recorded on September 9, 1814 in the Jones County Record Book A page 127. Rachel received most of his estate, but there was no mention of their relationship (wife or daughter or other). Later in 1814 she married William Simmons (1) in Jones County. After he died in 1825 she was listed in the deposition of his property and in the 1830 Jones County census but not in the 1840 or 1850 Jones County censuses. On December 9, 1831 Alfred Middlebrooks sold Rachel one hundred acres of land for $344 [Jones Co, GA Deed Book P 1831-39 p50]. This land was likely the same one hundred acres Alfred's wife Elizabeth Simmons received from her father William in 1826. Rachel did not remarry in Jones County.       

Children of William Simmons and unknown are: Elizabeth Simmons, born in GA; died July 26, 1854 in GA; married Alfred E. Middlebrooks March 08, 1831 in Jones Co, GA; born January 30, 1809 in Monroe Co, GA; died July 26, 1887 in Forsyth, Monroe Co, GA.;

The 1860 census listed him as a farmer with a personal wealth of $22,500. He fathered
ten children by Elizabeth and ten children by his second wife Nancy. Sixteen of the children lived to be adults and they produced a total of sixth-eight grandchildren for Alfred. Two of Elizabeth’s sons served for the Confederate States of America, and one, Calvin, was killed in action at Ocean Pond, FL in 1864.; Ruth Simmons, born in GA; married George Washington Cook Bef. 1826.;  Sophia Simmons, born Abt. 1806 in GA; died May 05, 1873 in Jones Co, GA; married John S. Middlebrooks June 30, 1831 in Jones Co. GA; born Abt. 1807 in GA; died Bet. 1860 - 1870 in Jones Co, GA.

She and her husband lived on a farm and had no children. Their wills were recorded in Jones Co, GA. He left his estate to his wife and some nephews, and she left her estate to her brothers, sisters and one niece. She listed the names of her brother John W. and half brother Thomas, two sisters Ruth Cook and Elizabeth (deceased wife of Alfred Middlebrooks), half sister Adaline Pledger of Alabama and niece Elvina Stubbs (daughter of her brother James). She did not list her late brother James. Her will was written in 1868 but she was listed in the 1870 Jones County census age 64 working as a domestic. [Will Book E p 62 and 116-7, 1864 -1890, Jones Co, GA]

John S. Middlebrooks was Alfred Middlebrooks double first cousin; he was the son of Sims Middlebrooks (the brother of Robert who was Alfred’s and Bethiah’s father) and Elizabeth Talbert/Talbot (the sister of Nancy who was Alfred’s mother).   

John William Simmons, born May 28, 1809 in GA; died January 11, 1873 in Monroe Co, GA; married Bethiah Middlebrooks September 11, 1827 in Monroe Co, GA.

James Simmons, born 1810 in GA; died Abt. 1850 in Jones Co, GA; married Piety Hart December 20, 1835 in Jones Co, GA; born Abt. 1812 in GA. 

The court appointed James' brother John W. Simmons, brother-in-law John S. Middlebrooks and a Joseph Messer on January 14, 1850 to handle his estate [Bonds Guardianship and Administration Book B, p 164, 1841 - 1858, Jones Co, GA].   The Jones County 1850 census listed Piety as age 38 with her five children aged two to twelve. 

Children of Rachel and William Simmons are: Thomas Simmons, born in GA; died Aft. 1868 in GA.;.    Edaline or Adaline Simmons, born Abt. 1820 in Jones Co, GA; died in AL.  She married (1) Elias Mims February 12, 1838 in Jones Co, GA; died Bef. 1850 in Jones Co, GA.  She married (2) William M. Pledger Aft. 1850; She and her husband Elias are listed in the Jones County 1840 census. After her husband died sometimes between 1845 and 1850 she and her three children moved in with half sister Sophia per the 1850 Jones County census.


J. T. CASTLEBERRY, merchant, Cabaniss, Monroe Co., Ga., is a son of Jephtha and Susanna F. (Bass) Castleberry, and was born in Monroe county, April 24, 1845. His father was born in Warren county, Ga., and went toMonroe county about the time he reached his majority. He married soon afterward and engaged in farming, which he continued in Monroe county until 1856, when he removed to the vicinity of Indian Springs, in Butts county, where he died April 27, 1866. His wife survived him about twenty years, dying July 30, 1887. Of ten children there are now living: Mrs. Mary A. Tingle, Mrs Martha E. Roberts, Jeptha T., Mrs. Savannah F. Scarborough, William P., John P., Theresa M. and Mrs. Carrie O. Scarborough. As the civil war was precipitated about the time Mr. Castleberry reached the age when the blood runs hottest and the impulses are strongest, he hastened to volunteer as a member of Company A., Thirtieth Georgia regiment, and did his duty as a private in the Western army. He participated in the battles about Jackson, Miss., at Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge, and was with Gen. Johnston as he retired before Gen. Sherman. In the memorable and bloody battle of July 22, 1864, his brother was mortally wonded, from which he died at La Grange on July 28, and he was himself severely wounded in the right leg below the knee and left on the field of battle. He was taken prisoner and kept within the enemy’s lines, most of the time at Chattanooga, until the surrender. Mr. Castleberry is the merchant at Cabaniss, a prosperous community in the northeastern portion of Monroe county, where he has been doing business since the war. His fine business ability and his great popularity in that section has attracted to him the large trade he enjoys. He is also conducting a quite large planting interest and operating three public ginneries at different points. Mr. Castleberry began his business life in 1868 as a clerk for Steele & Watson. In 1871 he bought an interest in the business, the firm then being Steele, Watson & Castleberry. In 1873, Steel & Castleberry bought out Mr. Watson, and in 1874 he (Mr. Castleberry) bought out his partner, and for the last twenty years has been sole proprietor. He carries a $2,000 stock of merchandise and plantation supplies and does a nearly cash business. Mr. Castleberry was married in Butts county, November 28, 1872 to Miss Maggie L., daughter of Richard W. Willis, a pioneer and substantial citizen of Butts county. They have had but one child, James E., nineteen years of age and a law student at Forsyth. Mr. Castleberry is an ardent democrat and a Missionary Baptist, and a reliable working member in each cause.


WILLIAM H. CASTLI N, planter, Culloden, Monroe Co., Ga., son of John and Eliza (Goodin) Castlin, was born near Taylorsville, Hanover Co., VA., Jan. 27, 1827. His grandfather, John Castlin, was a native of Wales, and came to America and settled in Virginia before the revolutionary war, he being a soldier in the patriot army. He had two sons, Andrew and John. Andrew died, and John, after his marriage, came with his family to Georgia and settled on the Flint River in Upson county. In 1845 he moved to Monroe County and settled where William, the subject of this sketch, now resides. In 1856 he removed to Macon, Ga., where he died in January 1861, aged seventy-three years. He started a very poor boy, but was a model farmer and manager, and left a quite large estate. He reared a family of ten children: John, Gold Hill, Ala.; Sarah, widow of a Mr. Coffin, Thomaston, Ga.,; W. H. the subject of this sketch; Flemming, physician, deceased; Ann, wife of Peyton L. Cocke, Bolingbroke, Ga.,; Edwin, White Bluff, Chatham Co., Ga.; Bradford, Thomaston, Ga.; Marcellus, merchant, Thomaston, Ga., ; Catherine, wife of Addison P. Cherry, South Mills, Camden Co., N. C.; Caroline, wife of John S. Timberlake. His wife died June 10, 1887 aged eighty-seven. Mr. Castlin was reared, and has continued to be a planter. In 1862 he enlisted as a private in Company D, Thirteenth Georgia regiment, and went to Savannah with the regiment. His health failing he returned home, and went into a regiment of state troops. He was again discharged on the ground of disability. About 1852 he removed from Monroe to Upson county, where he lived some years, then returned to near Culloden. After a brief stay he went to his Upson plantation again, where he remained until 1870, when he moved back to his present location. Mr. Castlin was married on the line of Monroe and Crawford counties, December 13, 1852, to Miss Mary A. daughter of Irvin H. Woodward. She was of an old and prominent family, and had two brothers of great influence, and who wwere high-toned, honorable gentlemen. To Mr. And Mrs. Castlin ten children have been born: Irvin H., drummer for Tidwell & Pope, Atlanta; Willie, wife of Charles Gray, Fort Valley, Ga., ; John H. deceased; Eugene, deceased; Woodward, at home; Sallie M., deceased; Clifford and William, both at home. In the suburbs of the far-famed old school town, Culloden, in an old-time southern mansion, Mr. Castlin is spending his declining years on a plantation of 1,600 acres. He has another in Upson county of 300 acres. He is a democrat and a master Mason. He is a member of the Methodist Church.


WILLIAM P. CLEMENTS, merchant and postmaster, Brent, Monroe Co., Ga., son of Wesley and Jane (Smith) Clements, was born in Muscogee county, Ga., March 19, 1855. His grandfather, Davis Smith, one of the earliest settlers of the county \, was the son of Dixon and Elizabeth Smith, and was born in Washington county, Ga., in 1793. Early in life he engaged in merchandising in Dublin, Laurens Co., in which he was very successful. During this period Mr. Smith married Mrs. Elizabeth Jordan, and , in 1820, moved to Forsyth. Son afterward he acquired possession of the 400-acre tract of land on which William P. Clemments now lives, between five and six miles southwest of Forsyth. In 1825 he moved and settled upon it, and established a planting and mercantile interest which laid the foundation of a fortune. He carried on his business, and was a central figure in the community for a lifetime. He became one of the largest land and slave-owners in that locality, and attained to a strong and wide influence. At one time he owned 2,000 acres of land, and when emancipation was proclaimed he had some hundred slaves. He was elected colonel of militia, then regarded a distinction, and being a strong whig partisan and politician was elected several times to represent the county in the general assembly.

He was a Missionary Baptist, and began early in his Christian life to speak in public, and for the greater part of his lifetime was a local preacher of that denomination, Col Smith died in 1867, and his wife in 1868. They reared nine children: Miranda, widow of Orlando Holland, Monroe county; Mary, deceased; T. T., retired merchant, living at the old homestead; Davis, Habersham county, ga; Elizabeth and John D., both deceased; James, Macon, Ga.,; Judson, killed in the last battle of the war, at West Point, Ga.; Jane, married to Wesley Clemments, who was killed while in the Confederate service. By Wesley Clements she had three children: William P., the subject of this sketch; Thomas, in railway service, Athens, Ga., and Lizzie, wife of J. E. Chambliss, Macon, Ga., After the war Mrs. Clements married Thomas Y. Brent, formerly of Louisville, Ky. But now a merchant, Macon, Ga. By this last marriage she has two children: Taylor Y., plant, Monroe county, and J. I., merchant, Macon, Ga., William P. Clements was reared on a farm, in the community of which he is now a member. At the age of nineteen he embarked in the mercantile business, for which he has shown such remarkable aptitude, and in which he has been so successful. Besides the store he has large planting interest. Through his instrumentality the postoffice of Brent was established, of which was made postmaster. The firm is Brent & Clements, and carries a stock of $3,000, but Mr. Clements has the sole control and responsibility. The management of these three interest- plantation, store and postoffice - requires good business capacity, energy, close attention and up-to-date information, and all those Mr. Clements gives and displays. He evidently inherits the superior business sagacity and judicious enterprise of his grandfather Davis, combined with hustling activity, else he would prove unequal to his work. Politically Mr. Clements has always been devoted to the democracy, and feels that he is yet, so far as Jeffersonian principles are concerned. He ardently favors the reform embodied in the platform of the people’s party, and is giving his influence to its success. Mr. Clements was married Oct. 28, 1885, to Miss Sallie, daughter of Mrs. Julia D. Thweatt, of Forsyth. She was born in Columbus, and by her name will be recognized as a member of an old and very prominent family. Fourt children have been born to thenm: John Brent, deceased; Julia Thweatt, Jennie Brent and Marie Keto. Mr. Clements and his wife are active, enthusiastic Methodist; and he takes great interest in all church work, especially the Sunday school, of which he has been superintendent four years.


W. C. CORLEY, planter, Forsyth, Monroe Co., Ga., son of Austin W. and Margaret N. (Matthews) Corleyt, was born in Troup county, Ga., Oct. 24, 1838. His grandkfather, Austin V. Corley, of Irish descent, was born in South Carolina in 1745, and was a soldier in the revolutionary war. By his uprightness and thriftiness he attained to considerable influence, and was repeatedly elected a member of the legislature. Later in life he removed from South Carolina to Troup county, Ga., and thence, after some years, to Meriwether county, where he died in 1850 at the advanced age of 105 years. His wife, also very old, died about the same time. Both were devout, consistant members of the Missionary Baptist church. His father was born, reared and married in Richland Dist,m S. C., and the next fall after his marriage he removed in wagons to Troup county, Ga., and settled. The Indians were still there, and he helped to move them. He was absent thirty-six days during which time his wife and child were entirely alone. His parents lived in Troup county about twenty years, and then moved to Meriwether county, where his father died in 1868 and his mother in 1872. Although his father began life quite poor, he succeeded by his industry and frugality and good management in accumulating a comfortable fortune. He was a democrat and a warm partisan; himself and wife were active and prominent Missionary Baptist, and did much toward upbuilding and advancing the denomination wherever they lived. They reared seven children: J. E., planter, Baker Co., Ga.; Martha E. deceased; W. C., the subject f this sketch; S. M. single lady at home; Robert B., deceased; Simeon B. , deceased; Austin V., enlisted in Confederate armn, and was killed in battle of Perryville, Ky. Mr. Corley was reared partly in Troup and partly in Meriweather counties. When eighteen years old age went to Cuthbert, Ga., and became one of the firm of John R. Hull & Co. wholesale grocers. Several years afterward he went to Doughterty county and engaged in planting in that and in Calhoun county. The war between the states occurred while he was in business in Cuthbert and he enlisted in the Randolph Light guards, was made second sergeant, and while stationed at Pensacola participated in the Santa Rosa fight. His command did guard duty about Savannah for a time, was in the conflicts of Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge, was in the Georgia campaign, and finally surrendered at Bentonville, N.C. In 1877 he went to Monroe County, where, October 24 he was married to Miss Ellen S., daughter of Thomas and Sena Dewberry. This family was among the pioneers of the county, having settled in it in 1825, moving from Warren county. He was a wealthy planter before the war, worth probably $300,000, largely in several valuable tracts of land. Their children were: Madison, deceased; Thomas, Jr., deceased; William F., planter, Monroe county; Martha, deceased; Mary, widow, in Alabama; Sarah F., deceased; Jane, deceased; Amanda, deceased; Ellen S., deceased; Moses J., Monroe County; Berry w., Monroe county. Capt. Corley’s wife died childless, Feb. 25, 1894.* Her demise was sudden and unexpected, occasioned by internal hemorrage. She was reputed to have been one of the most beautiful ladies in the county, which was emphasized by a very delicate organization bordering on the ethereal. His delightful home is about six miles south of Forsyth, and contains 700 acres; and he has another tract of 800 acres near by. In addition he has 330 acres with half a mile of the city limits of Columbus, Ga. He is a great lover of fine stock, and is perfecting arrangements to establish a stock farm on the property near Columbus. Capt. Corley is a democrat in politics, and a Missionary Baptist. He is also a master Mason.

{*Note: I assume this means she outlived all of her children since were 11 listed)


G. W. HEAD , planter and merchant, High Falls, Monroe Co., Ga., son of Dr. J. D. and Nancy H. (Underwood) Head, was born in Monroe County, Dec. 18, 1847. Mr. Head’s great-grandfather emigrated from England to Georgia before the revolutionary war, during which he served in the patriot army. On one occasion a band of tories visited his home and drove off all the stock. The old patriot visited his home soon after, and being told of the raid went to the tories and at the point of a pistol made them return the spoils. William Head, his grandfather, raised his family in Clarke county, Ga. Mr. Head’s father was a physician of no inconsiderable prominence, and married his wife in Putnam county. They raised a family of five children; Thomas j., planter, near Griffin, Ga., and a Primitive Baptist preacher; Savannah E., widow of Dr. L. J. Dupree, Milner, Ga., G. W., the subject of this sketch; Hattie H., single; Emily E., wife of R. F. Strickland, Griffin, Ga., His father died in 1882, and his mother in 1888. When he was six years old Mr. Head’s family moved to Butts county, where he was raised and educated. Not being old enough to enter the regular service during the war, he joined a cavalry troop of Georgia reserves and was principally with the scouting forces, where his experience oftentimes was very exciting, to say the least of it. On one occasion, when out on a scout, he fell in with the Texas brigade that surrounded the Union Gen. Kilpatrick, and was present when he broke through. He was about Atlanta on the same duty when Gen. Sherman held the city, and would often run into his scouts. He took the measles a little later, and was at home at the time of the surrender. After the war Mr. Head spent four years in the west, from Texas to California and Mexico, in stock business and mining, and one year in Pike county. He then returned to Butts county and engaged in farming with the most satisfactory results. He started with very small means, but prospered beyond his most sanguine expectation.  He has added merchandising to his planting interest, and is one of the largest land-owners in Monroe county, owning 2,200 acres, and occupying a spacious brick dwelling near High Falls.  The immediate surroundings are wildly beautiful and romantic in the extreme---few localities in Georgia surpass the locality in this respect.  The name "High Falls" is derived from falls on the Towaliga river near by, the scenery presented to view being thus described in W. C. Richard's Georgia Illustrated, published half a century ago:  "So fine is the view afforded from many different points that it is difficult to decide which is the most attractive; and passing from rock to rock the beholder is ever delighted with new features.  This variety is the greatest charm of the scene.  The river above the falls is about 300 feet wide, flowing swiftly over a rocky shoal.  At its first descent it is divided by a ledge of rock, and forms two precipitous falls for a distance of fifty feet."  The Towaliga is a stream of large volume and constant flow, and at this point has a fall of 100 feet within one-fourth of a mile.  Great as the water-power is there is but one small grist-mill on it.  Mr. Head was married in Monroe County, March 14, 1875, to Miss Carrie, daughter of J. G. and Eliza (Stewart) Phinazee, who has born him nine children:  Lucy, Hattie, James P., Robert T., Nancy E., George D. , Carrie, Philip and Benjamin.  For many years Mr. Head has been aflicted with rheumatism, and has to use an invalid wheel chair.  Notwithstanding his affliction he is genial, jovial and hospitable, and hence, very companionable.  He is an ardent populist, and a master Mason, member of Patillo Lodge No. 360.


R. C. MCGOUGH, planter, and member of general assembly of Georgia for Monroe County, 1894-1895, son of Bob G. and Sandal (Cabaniss) McGough, was born Sept. 24, 1831.  The McGoughs are of Scotch-Irish blood, whose ancestors were colonized in the north of Ireland during the protectorate of Oliver Cromwell.  About 1760, Matilda Carson McGough, a widow with five or six children, in company with other emigrants, relatives and neighbors, settled in North Carolina.  John McGough, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, though still a minor, enlisted in the patriot army under Col. William Washington and participated in the battles of Brandywine, Eutaw Springs and Saratoga, where he saw the proud Burgoyne surrender to Gen. Gates. He was twice wounded, once on the head by a saber in the hands of a British officer, and once by a gunshot.  Soon after the revolution he was married to Margaret Mill and settled in Edgefield district, S. C. from which place he moved to White Plains, Greene County, GA. where he died in 1847, at the ripe age of eighty-six.  Mr. McGough's maternal grandfather, George Cabaniss, was of a French Huguenot family, which settled in Maryland or Virginia early in the last century.  About the beginning of this century he, G. C., came to Georgia, settled for a while in China Grove, in Oglethorpe county, from whence he moved to Jones county, where he farmed, merchandised and traded with the Indians from across the Ocmulgee river.  Robert McGough, father of R. C., was born in Edgefield district, S. C. March 28, 1876 and was soon after brought by his father to White Plains, Ga., where he grew to manhood.  In early life he settled in Jones county, where in 1810 he was married to Miss Sandal Cabaniss.  To them were born ten children, six boys and four girls:
John, merchant, Columbus, Ga., accumulated quite a fortune in ante-bellum days, now deceased; Matthew O.., was never married, deceased; Sarah B., married to Jacob A. Clements, Buena Vista, Ga., ; Matilda died unmarried; Elizabeth, wife of Ezekiel Hollis of Brundidge, Ala., deceased; William T., mortally wounded at the battle of New Home Church, died in Atlanta, July 1864; George L., merchant, Columbus, Ga., deceased; Mary A., deceased, married to Robert Minten, Buena Vista, Ga.; Robert C., farmer, Marion county, Ga; C. C., entered First Georgia regiment, 1861, and after his time of enlistment expired joined the Forty-fifth Georgia, was made first lieutenant for gallantry on the field of battle, in 1862, and was killed leading a forlorn hope at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863.  Robert McGough was a soldier in the war of 1812, and for his services drew a pension.  He moved from Jones county, where he was married, to Monroe in 1823, clearing out a road through the primeval forest to his new home on Little Tobesofkee creek, where he opened a good plantation, reared and educated his children, and spent the remainder of his life.  He was what is termed a good liver and accumulated a handsome property. Though he never connected himself with any church and did not believe in any creed except that of right conduct, he was always partial to the faith of his mother, who was a devout Presbyterian.  He died without recantation, March 10, 1882, aged ninety-six years, lacking eighteen days.  R. C. McGough received a preparatory education in the schools of the state in 1852, graduated in 1855, taught school the next year at Brownwood academy, LaGrange, then a flourishing institution under the management of Hooten & Cox, and the next two years at Russellville, Ga.  He studied law under the Hon., Cincinnatus Peeples and was admitted to the bar in 1860; but war coming on immediately, he was engaged in the service of the Confederacy either as soldier, enrolling officer, or tax assessor during its whole continuance, and after its close retired to his farm.  He served as postmaster under President Cleveland's first administration, but resigned in favor of the present incumbent before the expiration of his term. 
Mr. McGough was married Jan. 10, 1860, to Maggie Hollis, daughter of one of the most successful farmers and earliest pioneers of Monroe county.  His wife died April 9, 1871.  To them were born five children:  Thomas H., now a merchant at Leavenworth, Wash. ; Maud, Nell and Robert at home,; and May, wife of Dr. F. L. Cato, DeSoto, Ga.  Robert was graduated with the degree of A. B. at the Georgia university in 1890.
Mr. McGough after the death of his consort, devoted himself to the rearing and education of his children, endeavoring to supply the place of both father and monther.  He has a good library and devotes much of his time reading and tries to keep in full accord with the progress of the age.  He has an interesting family and kind and appreciative neighbors.  He is a rationalist, believing that faith should be subordinate to reason.  He is a true democrat, who thinks as long as reason is unfettered, humanity will advance; that all repressive laws that cannot be enforced are mischievous, the parent of crime, and the greatest government is the greatest individual liberty consistent with the rights of others.


E. M. MOORE, planter, Forsyth, Monroe C., Ga., son of John and Nancy (Curry) Moore, was born in Monroe county, June 15, 1827.  His grandfather, Elijah Moore, migrated from Maryland to Georgia in the latter part of the last century, and settled in Baldwin county, where he died.  His father was born in Maryland in January 1792, came to Baldwin county with his father, where he grew to manhood.  was married in Hancock county in 1813 to Miss Nancy Curry (of Irish descent), who was born and raised there.  Ten children were born to them, of which eight were raised to maturity:  James C., deceased; Narcissus, widow of David Davis, Stewart Co., GA.; Mary, widow of D. M. Davison, Pike county, Ala; E. R., planter, Bossier Parish, La.,;  B. F.,, deceased; E. M., the subject of this sketch;  Jemima, deceased wife of Robert McGinty; John C., enlisted in Confederate service in 1862, and was killed in the battle of Fredericksburg.  Mr. Moore's parents lived in Baldwin county until 1826, when they removed to Monroe county and settled eight miles south of Forsyth, where they lived until their death--that of the father occurring in 1870, and that of the mother in 1871.  Both were members of the Primitive Baptist church.  Mr. Moore was of quiet and retiring disposition, caring nothing for politics except voting for his democratic friends; had no use for courts, and was so good a manger as to accumulate a handsome estate.  He is reputed to have seen some service in the war of 1812.  E. M. Moore, the subject of this sketch, has passed his life in Monroe, at the homestead where he was born, and lived the life of a farmer.  In November, 1855, he was married to Miss Ann, daughter of Duncan and Mary(Holmes) MCGowen, Monroe county, by whom he has had ten children:  Dodie, wife of J. R. Worsham, Monroe county; John t., cotton factor, Macon, Ga.,:  B. M., planter, Monroe county; James M., at home; Lelia, at home: Annie, deceased wife of J. A. Smith, Houston county, Ga.,; Alice, wife of D. M. Owen, Athens, Tenn.; Gussie, at home.  During the war he was in the state militia, for home defence, and was detailed to help on the farm.  Mr. Moore has a fine 1,250-acre plantation---reduced to that by giving off tracts from time to time to his children.  He is a quiet, sociable and sensible country gentleman, looks carefully after his farm interest, and is complanionable around his own hearthstone.  His stock is sleek, his barns and corn cribs are never empty ---"he lives at home." He is a democrat and a Primitive Baptist.


WILLIAM A. NORWOOD, planter, Culloden, Monroe Co., Ga., a son of Caleb M. and Jane (Manson) Norwood, was born in Charlotte, N. C., Dec,. 3, 1819. His father was of english and his mother of Scotch parentage; and both were born in Tennessee. After their marriage the young couple moved to North Carolina, but after living there eight years went back to Tennessee. In 1824 they moved to Georgia and settled in Talbot county, where they lived and thrived, until 1837, when they moved to Culloden, in Monroe county. They lived there until they died - his father in 1854, and his mother October 26, 1878. Mr. Norwood’s father was a planter, but he operated a tannery and a shoe factory in addition, and was very successful in all. He was a man of great energy, enterprising and thrifty. He was one of the trustees of the school. This couple raised six children, all yet living; all have done well; one or more distinguished: Mary A., a widow of Philip J. W. Echols , Columbus, Neb.; Rebecca J., widow of James Alston, near Eufaula, Ala.; William A., the subject of this sketch; Oscar A. laywer, Navasota, Texas; Elizabeth, widow of William Askins (with son-in-law Robert O. Banks)., Forsyth, Ga.; Thomas M. lawyer, Savannah, Ga.,, ex-United States representative and senator. Mr. Norwood was a democrat, and a member of the Methodist church. After the death of his father, Mr. Norwood continued his enterprise until the war, when, the hands going into the war, he abandoned all except farming - a pursuit he has since very profitably followed. April 15, 1852, Mr. Norwood was married to Samantha E., daughter of William Askins - born near Culloden, Sept. 17, 1833. To them eight children have been born: Anna M., wife of James M. Ponder, Atlanta; Jane M., deceased, wife of John Colbert; Amelia, wife of O. Winn, Dallas, Texas; Evelyn, wife of W. W. Griffin, Atlanta; Caleb M. and three others. Mr. Norwood is enjoying life on his fine 1,100-acre plantation, near the old school town so famous in Monroe’s history as an educational center, where many of Georgia’s distinguished men were academically educated. Mr. Norwood is a democrat, a royal arch Mason, and a Methodist.


W. H. PARKER, planter, Strouds, Monroe Co., Ga., son of Christopher and Sallie (Stroud) Parker, was born in Monroe County, March 29, 1832. The family is of Irish origin, and settled in North Carolina some years before the revolutionary war, in which Mr. Parker’s grandfather, John Parker, was a soldier. He removed from North Carolina to Georgia and settled in Putnam county late in the last century, and after several years’ residence there moved, about 1803 to Monroe county, where the family has since made its home. Of a family of six children, none are living. Mr. Parker’s parents were born (his father about 1806) in Monroe county, where they were also married. To them twelve children were born: W. H., the subject of this sketch; Seaton, deceased; Frances, Wife of Joseph Dennis, Ark.,; Sarah, wife of James Rodney, Roanoke, Ala.; L.B. deceased; Mary, deceased wife of Fletcher Owens, Pike county, Ala.; Amanda, widow of a Mr. Fambro, Atlanta, ; Levi, enlisted in the Confederate army and killed in Pickett’s famous charge at Gettysburg; John, deceased; Christopher, Arkansas; Owen, Arkansas, and Sallie, deceased; an unnamed infant, which caused the death of the mother in 1859. Mr. Parker’s father was a man of great energy, very prominent and popular. He was a democrat, but such was his popularity that in the forties he overcame a whig majority of 200, and was elected to represent the county in the general assembly. He was a "war" democrat, and though exempt by age from military duty, he enlisted and served through the war, becoming the adjutant of his regiment. He was a master Mason and a member of the Primitive Baptist church. He died June 3, 1893. Mr. Parker was reared and educated in Monroe county, where he has made a life-business and a very successful one, of farming. He was married in Monroe county to Miss Nancy, daughter of Eleazor and Mary

Adams, Nov. 11, 1853, but whom he has had two children, one an unnamed infant, and Eunice, wife of E. C. Elder, Barnesville, Pike Co., who is the mother of five children: William, George, Samuel, Eunice and John. On a splendid 1,000-acre plantation, eleven miles south of Forsyth, 500 acres in cultivation, producing 150 bales of cotton, Mr. And Mrs. Parker are spending their declining years. He lived after the war a few years in Barnesville, but superintended his plantation. He is a very positive man, prominent in county affairs, a royal arch Mason and himself and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist church.
{Note: William Henderson Parker is buried in Riverside cemetery in Macon, GA. He is in the Parker-Elder
plot, lot # 3 C 24, in the Rose section. He died 13 Feb 1911. His wife, Nancy Adams Parker is also there. She died 27 May 1926.

His daughter Eunice and her husband Eustace Clifton Elder are also there, along with a few of their
children.Note contributed by Lionel Brown}

Capt. A.L. PERKINS, planter and capitalist, Bolingbroke, Monroe County, Georgia, son of Alexander and Selete (Jernigan) Perkins, was born in Monroe County, January 25, 1827.  The family is of Scotch-Welsh origin, and have been in the main agriculturists.  Capt. Perkins’ grandfather, Archibald Perkins, was born in North Carolina, and before he was of age, went to Virginia, where he lived during the Revolutionary War, engaged as an overseer.  There he married a Miss Gibbs, and not long afterward migrated to Georgia and settled in Greene County, where they raised a large family of children, and where they died, the grandfather at the age of ninety-six.  As the children settled in life they remained mostly in Georgia.  Alexander Perkins, the captain’s father, was born in Greene County, February 8, 1795.  During the War of 1812-1814 he was in the army on the Indian frontier.  He met and married his wife, Miss Jernigan, in Hancock County, Georgia (where she was born and reared), December 26, 1816.  A brother of hers, Seaborn Jernigan, is now living at White Pains, Georgia.  Mr. Perkins lived in Greene County five years, then in Jasper two years, and thence in 1823 removed to Monroe County and settled about eight miles southeast of Forsyth on the road to Dame’s Ferry.  Here they raised a family of eight children:  Adeline, who married A.D. Steele, both deceased; Archibald, deceased at twenty-one; Elizabeth, wife of Henry Sharpe, Atlanta; A.L., subject of this sketch; W.H., deceased; Frances, wife of W.C. King of Monroe County; John, enlisted in the Fourteenth Georgia regiment, after serving in several campaigns, died of measles at Alum Springs, Virginia, and Albert C., Monroe County.  Mr. Perkins was a systematic, painstaking and hard-working man, and accumulated considerable property, including land and slaves.  He was also abstemious in his habits; chewed a little tobacco, but never smoked.  He was a Whig in politics, and a Methodist in religion.  His wife died May 17, 1875, aged seventy-five years, and he died March 26, 1892, aged ninety-seven years.  The family is remarkable for longevity, reaching years from eighty to ninety-seven.  Capt. Perkins was married in Monroe County Dec. 20, 1849, to Miss Mary Jane, daughter of Amos and Nancy M. (Head) Ponder.  She was born and raised in the county, her father having come to Monroe in 1824, and settled five miles north of Forsyth.  To this happily-mated couple only two children have been born:  Josephine Lee, at home, and Mary Lee, wife of S.B. Price, ex-mayor and present postmaster, Macon, Georgia.  He is one of the most popular and influential - indeed one of the foremost men in Georgia’s “central city.”  At his large plantation of 3,300 acres at Bolingbroke, managed and cultivated under progressive, up-to-date ideas, his beautiful, modernly arranged home and elaborately laid-off and beautifully adorned grounds, Capt. Perkins is enjoying his well-earned wealth and dispersing that lavish hospitality so characteristic of the “old-time” southern planter.  Capt. Perkins is as public-spirited as he is wealthy, takes great interest in everything calculated to advance the community, and in political matters – local and Federal.  In addition to his extensive farming interests, Capt. Perkins owns stock in the oil mills in Forsyth, in which he is the largest stockholder.  He is a Democrat and a Mason of forty years’ standing.


Capt. D. S. REDDING, planter, Juliette, Monroe County, Georgia, son of Thomas and Maria (Searcy) Redding, was born in Monroe County, July 5, 1832.  The Redding family is of Irish descent and members of it came from Ireland to America about the middle of the last century.  The grandfather of Capt. Redding, Anderson Redding, was a soldier in the Patriot army during the Revolutionary War, and was present at the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown.  He migrated from Virginia in 1782 and settled on land subsequently included in what is now Baldwin County, Georgia.  He lived on this land until late in the twenties, when he followed his son (the father of Capt. Redding) to Monroe County, where he lived the remainder of his life.  He raised a family of six children – all now dead.  One of his sons, W.C., represented his county in the General Assembly.  He was a Methodist and very devout.  Mr. Redding’s father was born in 1792 and was married in Baldwin County and moved to Monroe County in 1822 and settled near Pope’s Ferry, on the Ocmulgee River.  Later he moved to where Capt. Redding now lives, and the house he then built is still standing.  Here nine children were raised, of whom two only are living.   These children were:  Martha, died in Macon; William A. and James M., killed at Griswoldsville, Georgia; Thomas A., killed at Jonesboro, Georgia; Charles, captain of Floyd Rifles of Macon, Georgia, killed at Gettysburg in Pickett’s famous charge; Mary E., widow of Thomas Dougherty, Macon, Georgia; D.S., the subject of this sketch; Sallie M., deceased wife of Capt. Joseph H. White, who was killed at Manassas; John M., a member of Capt. Redding’s company, killed in the battle of the Wilderness.  Capt. Redding’s father began life very poor, but by hard work, economy and good judgment he accumulated a good property.  He was one of the first settlers in Monroe County, which was organized in 1821.  His mother’s father (Searcy) was a teacher quite prominent in his day and accumulated a fortune, and one of her brothers was a fine physician, and another was a Baptist preacher.  She died in 1857.  Mr. Redding was a Democrat and a very pious member of the Methodist church.  He died in 1877, aged eighty-five years.  Excepting when absent during the war, Capt. Redding has passed his life on his plantation in Monroe County.  He enlisted in March 1862 in Capt. J.H. White’s company, which became Company D, Forth-fifth Georgia regiment, and was made sergeant.  The command went at once to the front, and subsequently participated in the great battles of Chancellorsville, Fredericksburg, the Wilderness and others.  Having been detailed to guard prisoners, he was not in the Pennsylvania campaign.  In 1864 he was appointed captain of the company, and was captured at Petersburg six days before the surrender.  He was taken to Johnson’s Island, where he was kept about two months.  It is an incident worthy of record that of six brothers in this family, five of them gave their lives to the “lost cause.”  Few families can parallel this devotion, and such a sacrifice for what they deemed the right.  Capt. Redding was married the year he was twenty-seven years old (1859) to Miss Clara P. Blantor, of Spalding County.  She was a graduate of the Female College of Griffin, Georgia in 1860, was the valedictorian of her class and was a woman of a superior mind and much intelligence.  Her education and refined habits enabled her to be of great aid of her children in their early training; and by them she was idealized.  Her goodness endeared her to neighbors and friends and it can be truly said, “None knew her but to love her.”  She was a conscientious Christian and was president of the Woman’s Missionary society of her church when she died.  Twenty-five years of a happy married life and she passed to the other shore, leaving by her pure life, holy influences, good lessons and bright works such as impressions that even time can never obliterate.   By this marriage there were born to him nine children:  Charles D., physician, Bibb County, Georgia; W.B., teacher, Bibb County; Mamie, teacher, Bibb County; Julia, teacher, near home; Annie, at home; Alice, wife of Redding Howard, Houston County, Georgia; and Rosa; Arthur T.; and James A., all at home.  The mother of these children died in 1885, and Capt. Redding was married in Jones County, December 4, 1888, to Miss Addie J., daughter of J.C. and Addie C. White.  Her grandfather, James White, migrated from Virginia to Georgia, and lived first in Meriwether County, and then in other counties, and died at the age of forty-eight years.  Her father settled and lived in Jones County, where his father had lived before him, and where her parents raised ten children, of whom, besides Mrs. Redding, four are living:  George B., William F., Thomas A. and Carrie, wife of F.C. Goolsby.  Altogether the Redding family has a rather remarkable history in war and in peace, in its patriotic sacrifices through generations, for country, and in its historic connection with the portion of the state in which they live.  Among the first settlers in Baldwin and Monroe Counties, on both sides, their names are connected with their historical records, and written in blood on battlefields.  It is the pride of Capt. Redding that he gave all his children the best education in his power, that they are intelligent and useful members of the communities in which they live, and are honored and esteemed, the elder ones who have gone out into the world occupying honorable positions.  Capt. Redding is a Democrat and has served a term as county commissioner.  He lives and is enjoying life on a fine 500-acre plantation nine miles east of Forsyth.  He is a master Mason and is a member of the Methodist church, of which he has been a steward and class leader for forty years. 
( Note: Daniel Searcy Redding and Clara Pope Blanton were married 24 January 1861 (not 1859).  They were married by the Reverend Wm. A. Rogers in Spalding County, Georgia, in the home of her parents, William McKendree Blanton and Julia Elizabeth Thompson. [Mg. notice in Macon Messenger, issue of 13 February 1861]
       Mariah Searcy Redding, wife of Thomas and mother of Daniel S., died 13 October 1858, (not 1857).  [Obit. in Southern Christian Advocate, issue of 18 November 1858]
       Additional notes:  Daniel Searcy Redding died 25 April 1905; Clara Pope Blanton Redding died 31 March 1889.  Both are buried in the cemetery of Juliette Methodist Church, Juliette, Georgia, (Monroe County).
      Submitted by Ruth Sutton Odom Reddick)


THOMAS G. SCOTT, planter, Brent, Monroe County, Georgia, son of Peter and Eliza S. (Gary) Scott, was born in Newton County, Georgia, December 12, 1828.  The family is of Scotch descent, whose ancestors, as also those of Gen. Winfield Scott, were adherents of Charles Edward, the pretender.  Persecution which followed the defeat at Culloden in 1745 compelled them to flee from England, and they came to America and settled on the Appomattox River in Dinwiddie County, Virginia, about the middle of the century.  Mr. Scott’s grandfather and other members of the family were soldiers in the Patriot Army in the Revolutionary War.  Between 1790 and 1800 his grandfather, Thomas Scott, together with two brothers, Woodlief and Frederick Scott, migrated with their families to Georgia and settled in Hancock County.  Here Mr. Scott’s father was born in March 1800 and grew to manhood.  He married his wife in Newton County, but he lived on and cultivated his plantation in Hancock County until his death.  Six children were born to them:  Thomas G., the subject of this sketch; H.G., who, after faithful service in the Confederate Army, was killed at the battle of Chickamauga; Duke H., died at the age of twenty-six; Elizabeth, married William H. Means, who was killed at Sharpsburg.  She afterward married W.W. Lawrence, and is now deceased.  Peter W. died in his youth; Benjamin S. served in the Confederate Army and is now a planter in Monroe County.  Mr. Scott’s father was a very quiet man, conducted his planting interest with excellent judgment and success and was highly esteemed.  Politically he had excellent judgment and success and was highly esteemed.  Politically he was a Democrat.  In religion himself and his wife were ardent, working Methodists; he a pillar in, and both are alive to, the interests and advancement of Methodism.  He died in 1853 and she in 1856.  Thomas G. Scott was reared in Hancock County and educated at Emory College, Oxford, Georgia, whence he graduated in 1853, with the degree of A.B. and taking the first honor.  Adopting the profession of teaching he taught first at Sparta, Hancock County, three years; next at Eatonton, Putnam County, two years; and then at Forsyth – the first teacher and principal of Hilliard Institute – until near the close of the war.  He made his residence where he now lives in 1862.  Mr. Scott was married December 25, 1859, where he now lives, in the room now his family room, in which all his children were born, to Miss Emma L., daughter of Early and Lucy (Wilder) Cleveland.  Mr. Cleveland came from Elbert County, Georgia, to Monroe County early in the twenties, and, although not a college graduate, became one of the most distinguished and successful educators in that part of the state.  Among others he prepared for college were Rev. Edward Myers, D.D., and ex-Judges Robert P. Trippe and Alexander Speer, men who rose and rank high as members of the legal fraternity and of the judiciary, and in the councils of the state and nation.  His educational work covers thirty years of time – the scope of its influence none can measure.  Mr. Cleveland was a successful planter as well as a ripe scholar and eminent educator.  He was an ardent Whig and a prominent and devoted Methodist.  To Mr. and Mrs. Scott eight children were born:  Milton C.; Lucy S., wife of George P. Rankin, Macon, Georgia; Lizzie E., died in infancy; Thomas G., Jr., student at Emory College; Mary; Alice; Early Cleveland; and Edwin; all at home.  His attractive old-time home – “Pleasant Grove” – is one of culture and refinement, sunshine and happiness; himself well read on all subjects, his wife a congenial companion and his children educated and intelligent.  It has been the home of his wife since she was two years old.  Mr. Scott is a Democrat, and Royal Arch Mason.  He is a devoted, working Methodist, has been a local preacher forty-one years – thirty-six of them in the community in which he lives.  In 1877 he was elected county school commissioner of Monroe County, and has held the office continuously since.  His reputation as an educator extends far and wide.


W. E. SANDERS, merchant and mayor of Forsyth, Monroe County, Georgia, son of Brown and Elizabeth A. (Smith) Sanders, was born in Jasper County, Georgia, October 13, 1851.  The family came from England to South Carolina before the Revolutionary War.  Mr. Sanders’ great-grandfather, Ephraim Sanders, a soldier in the Patriot Army, was killed in the battle of Eutaw Springs, South Carolina, September 8, 1781.  The latter part of the last century, his grandfather, a planter, migrated from South Carolina to Georgia and settled in Jones County, where he raised a large family, whose members scattered and made homes elsewhere.  Here Mr. Sanders’ father was born in 1808 and grew to manhood.  He then moved over into Jasper County, where he married in 1850.  His mother’s family was of Georgia birth, and she was raised by her grandfather, Aquilla Phelps, one of the older of the first settlers.  After their marriage his parents moved to Jones County, where they lived seven years, and then returned to Jasper County to the old Phelps Plantation, where they are living now, his father engaged in his lifetime business of farming.  They had four children born to them:  W.E., the subject of this sketch; Mary A., died at thirteen; Frances M., died when eighteen months old; Florence, died when seventeen years of age.  Mr. Sanders was reared in Jasper County, and educated in the county schools and the Monticello high school, and took a course in the Macon Business College.  In 1871 he clerked in Monticello, Georgia, and beginning with 1872, he clerked for L. Greenwood & Brothers, Forsyth, for several years – clerking in the fall and winter – making a crop in the summer in Jasper County.  In 1877 he engaged with Solomon & Mount, remained with them until 1881, when he went into business with E.R. Roberts, under the firm name of Roberts & Sanders.  The firm continued until 1883, when they were burnt out.  Mr. Sanders then bought his partner’s interest, and has since conducted the business with phenomenal success on his own account.  He carried a fine assorted general supply stock.  He was elected mayor of Forsyth in 1890, re-elected since in 1892, 1893 and 1894, and is mayor now.  He is captain of the Quitman Guards (Company K, Second Regiment Infantry, Georgia Volunteers).  This is a “crack” company, and he has been a member of it twenty years.  He is also a member of the Military Advisory Board of the State of Georgia.   Mr. Sanders was married Dec. 13, 1876, in Forsyth, Georgia, to Miss Ada O., daughter of W.B. and Mattie A. Chambers, who now live in Griffin, Spalding County, Georgia.  To them seven children have been born: Florence;  W.B., died in 1890;  May;  Charlie; an infant, died unnamed;  W.E., Jr., deceased.  Mr. Sanders is a Democrat.  He is very popular, ranks high for energy and business capability, and commercial integrity.  His accomplished success gives assurance of a brilliant business future.


 JUDGE B. H. ZELLNER, Forsyth, Ga., is the head of one of the largest and most influential families in Monroe county, all of whose members occupy honorable positions in their several communities, commercially and socially.. For seventy years, continuously, Judge Zellner has been a resident of the county, during which period he has come to be regarded as one of the most reliable and trustworthy of men-a man of the sternest morality and of unbending integrity.  So conspicuous have been these characteristics, and so excellent his business capabilities, that he has been entrusted, as administrator or executor, with the management of more estates than any man in the county.  He has the remarkable record of having settled some twenty-three estates, some of them the largest in the county, without the loss of a dollar or the aid of the courts.  The family is of German origin, George Zellner, the judge's grandfather, having been born and reared to young manhood in Hanover, Germany.  The independence of the United States having been established he concluded to cast his lot with the new nation, and came first to North Carolina and settled in Bertie county, where not long after be married a Miss Mary Capheart.  Several years afterward, in 1799, he migrated to Lincoln county, Ga., thus introducing the name into this state.  He was not robust man, his constitution having been impaired in consequence of medicine having been carelessly administered in his youth, and he died at a comparatively early age.  He raised a family of four sons and two daughters, who scattered after his death to Tennessee, Alabama and elsewhere.  Andrew Zellner, Judge Zellner's father, was born in North Carolina in 1798, and was only six months old when the family came to Georgia. He was reared in Lincoln county, and was married in 1818, just across the line in Wilkes county, to Rebecca Holmes, who bore him eight children: B. H., the subject of this sketch; Francis A., deceased; George; Andrew B., John W., planter, Monroe county; James, deceased; Mary, widow of Ebenezer Pharr, Forsyth, Ga., and Sarah J., wife of William Walker, Thomaston, Ga.  In 1824 be moved with his family to Monroe county and settled about eight miles southwest of Forsyth, where he lived until 1837 when he moved to the place where Judge Zellner now lives, four miles southeast of Forsyth. His wife died in 1875, aged seventy-two years, but he survived until 1892, having attained to his ninety-fourth year.  In some respects he was a remarkable man, his longevity being largely due to his methodical habits and abstemiousness, it being a fact worthy of note and imitation that he never used tobacco in any form, nor drank a drop of liquor except as a medicine.  Before the war he was a whig in politics; a Primitive Baptist always. Judge B. H. Zellner was born in Lincoln County, Feb. 2, 1820.  He received a common school education such as the time and the locality afforded, and his youth was passed in the pursuits congenial to the planter-life of the day.  In 1850-51, as soon as he attained to his majority, he served the county as sheriff, and for several years following as one of the justices of the inferior court.  Before the war he was a whig and strongly opposed to secession.  In the convention which nominated the delegates to represent the county, his name was presented without his consent, but he came within four votes of being chosen.  Although opposed to secession, he acquiesced in the action of the convention, and earnestly supported the cause to the end.  Having large planting and milling interests, he was exempt from military duty; but he contributed largely to the support of the army, and sent two of his sons to the front to do battle for the cause.  He was elected to represent the county in 1868-69 in the general assembly, and again in 1878-79. In 1876 he was chosen as one of the new board of county commissioners and served until 1883, which terminated his official life.  There has been no period in the life of Judge Zellner when he did not feel a profound interest in the welfare of the county -- local, state and Federal -- whether in office or not.  In all the trusts confided to him he has maintained his character for faithfulness and strict integrity, and given the same careful attention to public business as to his private affairs.  He was at one time one of the largest land owners in Monroe county, but he has divided his holdings among his children until he has reduced his own to about 5oo acres.  Judge Zellner was married in Monroe county, Sept. 7, 1842 to Susan, daughter of Thomas M. Evans.  She was born in Jones county, but her family moved into Monroe county about the same time the Zellners did. Judge Zellner and his wife have had eight, children born to them: Thomas J. and Andrew J., planters, Monroe county; Nancy R., widow of Dr. B. F. Chambliss, Culloden, Monroe Co.; Emma, wife of Hon.  W. A. Worsham, Monroe county; Wiley E., planter and county treasurer; William J., planter, Monroe county; Charles J., merchant, Forsyth, Ga., and Lillie, wife of Col. C. J. Shipp, lawyer, Cordele, Ga.  Although an ardent whig before the war, he cheerfully fell into line with the only white man's party, and has since acted with the democrats.  For fifty-two years himself and wife have harmoniously "kept together" on life's pilgrimage, and for more than fifty years he has been a constant member of the Primitive Baptist church, and can now look back upon a well-spent life and duty faithfully done, and look-confidently forward to the fulfillment of the glorious promises "to him that overcometh."


WILLIAM J. ZELLNER, planter, Strouds, Monroe Co., Ga., son of B. H. and Susan (Evans) Zellner, was born in Monroe county, Jan. 3I, 1857.  He was reared and educated in the county and has thus far passed his life as a planter, deriving his chief enjoyment and most real pleasure from the successful management of his plantation.  This is a tract of nearly 6oo acres of as choice land as can be found in Monroe county, about ten miles southwest of Forsyth.  Intelligent and progressive in his methods, and availing himself of improved machinery, he realizes the most satisfactory results.  Mr. Zellner was married in Spalding county, Ga., May 23, 1889, to Miss Hattie, only daughter of D. C. and Pelly (Jones) Fountain, who has borne him one child, Elsie Louise.  Mr. Zellner is a worthy representative of one of the deservedly most honored families in Monroe county, and is himself held in the highest esteem by his fellow-citizens.  Upright and blameless in life, of irreproachable character and unswerving integrity, he is justly entitled to the confidence reposed in him by his neighbors and friends.


JAMES T. SEARCY, planter, Bolingbroke, Monroe Co., Ga., son of Dr. Daniel B. and Camilla 3. (Thweatt) Searcy, was born in Monroe county Jan. 13, 1834
Of the many old families of Monroe and adjoining counties none stood higher in the estimation of their fellow-citizens than that represented by this estimable citizen and gentleman. For many years prior to the war the wealth and intelligence and conspicuous moral characteristics of his ancestry, on both sides, made them social and political in their several communities. His great-grandfather, Searcy, - was a citizen of North Carolina and reared three sons, one of whom went to Tennessee, one remained in 2 Carolina, and the third, William, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, came to Georgia between 1770-80: He was a school teacher by profession, and early in life followed it, but became a planter and amassed a large property in Talbot county, where he died at the advanced age of ninety-seven years. He left three sons: John, a Baptist preacher; William a planter, and Daniel B., physician, and father of James T. Daniel B. was given a good education, studied medicine, and was graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical college, Philadelphia. He located in the southern part of Monroe county, where he built up a practice whose extent was limited only by his endurance. Dr. Searcy is affectionately remembered as a man of deep religious convictions and high moral principles; one who was actively foremost in every good work and movement promotive of the community’s welfare and advancement. The sterling qualifies of his character caused him to be elected several times as the standard - bearer of his party for legislative honors, but the county being largely whig, and he a democrat, he never succeeded. He came to Monroe county a poor man, but his great skill and ability as a physician, supplemented by uncommon sagacity in the investment of his gains, caused him to become one of the wealthiest men in the county: Dr. Searcy was married the year he came to the county, 1833. His grandfather on his mother’s side, James Thweatt, was a physician, and was a surgeon in the army during the war of 1812-14. He became very wealthy, was unusually intelligent, prominent and active in politics, and quite frequently represented his county in the general assembly. The family was of Scotch descent, and moved from Hancock to Monroe county in 1821, about the time the county was organized. Dr. and Mrs. Searcy were blessed with four children: James T., the subject of this sketch; W. K H., Griffin, Ga.; Fannie, wife of A. T. Holt, Macon, Ga.; and Carrie, deceased. The last mentioned married first B. F. Davis, who died leaving her with several children, and afterward married L. 0. Hollis, and, after bearing him one child, died. Dr. Searcy was an ardent, working Methodist, and died Aug. 1, 1885; his wife died Nov.17, 1885, aged sixty-nine years. Mr. James T. Searcy was reared in Monroe county, and has lived there all his life. He was educated at Emory college, Oxford, Ga., from which he was graduated in 1854 Early in the war he enlisted in Company D, Forty-fifth Georgia regiment, and was made second lieutenant, but was soon promoted to the first lieutenancy. He participated in the seven days’ battle around Richmond, Va., but becoming disabled by sickness he came home and put in a substitute. He afterward served, however, in the Georgia militia. Mr. Searcy was married in Monroe county Aug. 21, 1854, the year of his graduation, to Miss Sarah V., daughter of John H. and Elizabeth (Redding) Greene. The Reddings were also among the earliest settlers of Monroe county, having come from Baldwin county about the time Monroe was organized. The Greenes came from Virginia, and are reputed to have been related to the great revolutionary general, Nathaniel Greene. Mrs. Searcy has two brothers living—James B and William A., both in Lee county, Ala. To Mr. and Mrs. Searcy ten children have been born: John D., planter, Monroe county; James Thweatt, physician, Waco, Tex.; Charles R., planter, Monroe county; Henry and Herbert, at home; Kittie, single, at home; Annie, wife of Albert Harries, Meriwether county; Julia, wife of J. T. Lamar, Macon, Ga.; William E. and Abner H., deceased. Mr. Searey has resided at his present delightful home since the war, where he enjoys his ample income and the domestic comfort and pleasure it is his good fortune to be blessed with.


JOHN R. SHANNON, physician and surgeon, Cabaniss, Monroe Co., Ga., son of John and Rachel (Johnston) Shannon, was born in Cabaniss, Aug.15, 1858 His grandfather, Mathew Shannon, a native of Monahan county, Ireland, raised five Sons, all highly educated. Of these, three—James, Joseph and John—came to the United States in 1822. James became a very distinguished educator: First, was professor of ancient languages in the university of Georgia; then was president of the university of Louisiana, next he was president of the university of Kentucky, and, lastly, chancellor of the university of Missouri, in which position he died. Joseph, after graduating at the medical college of Georgia, established himself in the practice of medicine in Louisiana, where he died. John Shannon, the doctor’s father, was born in Monahan county, Ireland, in 1807, and came to Georgia when fifteen years of age. He read medicine with Dr. Milton Antony, and, also, while boarding with his brother James, in Athens, with Dr. Hen Hull. He then entered the medical college of South Carolina, Charleston, and, graduating in 1830 located in Clinton, Jones Co., Ga.; but, after remaining there a year, removed to Cabaniss (then Gullettsville), where he remained as long as he lived. He married his wife—whose family had recently removed thither from Elbert county—just after ten children were born: Sarah J., deceased wife of Fleming J. Ward; Annie E., wife of Judge Monroe Clowerm, Forsyth, Ga.; James M., Cabaniss; Susan B., married Judge Mobley, now deceased; James H,  Company H, Thirty-second Georgia regiment, killed at bombardment of Charleston. in 1864; Elizabeth B., deceased wife of W. B. Watts; William L., Company H, Thirty-second Georgia regiment, killed at Rivers’ bridge, in 1864; John L., died in infancy; Walter D., died in infancy; John R, the subject, of this sketch. His reputation for skill as a physician was excellent. He also took great interest in politics—and was a member of the constitutional convention of 1866. He died in July, 1872, and his wife in August, 1891. Dr. Shannon was educated at Hilliard institute, Forsyth, where he took the scholarship of the university of Georgia, from which institution he graduated with the degree of A. B. in 1873. Only fifteen, out of a class of sixty, obtained degrees. He then took a course at the Eastman Business college. In 1874-75’he engaged in mercantile business in Forsyth, and in 1875 traveled in the west. The next three years he taught school at his old home, Cabaniss. He then merchandized at Cabaniss until 1893, when he entered Atlanta Medical college. When he graduated, was valedictorian of his class. He located at Cabaniss, where he has taken high rank, and is building up an excellent and prospectively lucrative practice. Well educated, and of superior intellectuality, a refined gentleman, literary and scientific in taste, and ambitious of distinction, he is quite certain to rise in his profession. He is, as yet, unmarried. He is a member of the board of education, of which he has been president twice. He is a democrat, a royal arch Mason, and a Missionary Baptist


WILLIAM D. STONE, lawyer, Forsyth, Monroe Co., Ga., son of Charles and Mary S. (Griffin) Stone, was born in Dadeville, Ala., Sept 12,1844 His grandfather was of English descent, and came from Virginia to Georgia, went to Florida, and, later, thence to Montgomery county, Ala. He was a planter, and was very wealthy in both land and negroes. He was married three times, and had twenty-four Sons and three daughters. Judge Stone’s father was born in Montgomery county, Ala., and he grew to manhood in that state. He was a planter and a prominent politician. As a whig he represented Tallapoosa county in the legislature of Alabama from 1835 to 1846. After that he went as first lieutenant of Capt. Dennis’ company of volunteers to the Mexican war. He was married in 1838, in Dadeville, Tallapoosa county, to Miss Mary E. Griffin, who was born in Columbus, Ga, whence her family moved to Alabama. About 1858 his father moved to Lafayette, the county-seat, for the purpose of educating his children, and died there in 1865. He was a member of the Missionary Baptist church. Judge Stone’s parents raised a family of seven children: Fannie, deceased, wife of Thomas B. Mitchell, Gilmer, Texas; William D., the subject of this sketch; Eugenia, wife of George Bertram, Macon, Ga.; Alice B., widow of Charles P. Toney, now Mrs. Joseph Copps, Macon, Ga.; Tecumseh, paying teller, Central bank, Macon Oceola B., and Black Hawk. Mr. Stone’s mother makes her home with him. Mr. Stone received his early education at Lafayette, and, later, at Southwood, Talladega, Ala.  He ran away from school and enlisted in the Tuskegee Zouaves, at Winchester, Va., which became Company B, of the Fourth Alabama regiment He participated in the first Manassas battle, and saw Gen. Bartow fall, when killed. His regiment went into battle 1,000 strong, and came out with a little over 100—Mr. Stone was slightly wounded, and reported killed. He remained in the army in Virginia two years, and was in the seven days and other bloody battles. He got a discharge and returned home; but in two or three months joined Forrest’s cavalry,  Sixth Alabama, and remained with him until the surrender. - He was in the battles of Resaca and New Hope, and on the retreat from Atlanta, and was paroled at Forsyth. After a farming venture he taught school at Hilliard institute, Forsyth, meantime studying law under Col. A. D. Hammond, and was admitted to the bar in 1867. He entered into partnership with his preceptor—the firm being Hammond & Stone, which continued until 1872, when he withdrew and purchased an interest in the “Monroe Advertiser.” After a year’s editorial life he sold his interest in the paper and resumed the practice of law in partnership with J. H. Turner—as Stone & Turner. Mr. Turner moved away and Mr. Stone was appointed judge of the county court—a position he held four years—1879-83. He next entered into partnership  with G. J. Wright, as Wright & Stone, which continued –1889-92, when he went into partnership with William Clark, as Stone & Dark, which firm still exists. Judge Stone has an excellent patronage, and stands high in rank with the bar and the people. When at home on a furlough, March 1, 1865, Judge Stone was married to Miss Mary E., daughter of 0. H. P. Ponder, who was born and raised in Monroe county. Two children have been born to them: Charles 0., and Clyde. Charles is in business with Cox & Corbin, wholesale supply house, Macon, Ga. He is married to Addie, Mr. Corbin’s daughter, who was educated by Judge Stone, when he was principal at Hilliard institute. Clyde, the daughter, who is at home, finished her education at Wesleyan Female college, Macon Ga. Judge Stone is a very ardent and enthusiastic Mason—a Knight Templar, past high priest of his chapter, and past eminent commander of William Tracy Gould commandery. Judge Stone has in his possession a very interesting—and to him very valuable—heirloom of his family, in connection with masonry. It is a masonic apron—real sheepskin— beautifully and elaborately embroidered with colored silk, which has passed from generation to generation in the Stone family for nearly eight centuries. It was presented to Lieut. Donworth—who married a Stone—in England, in 1102 and, as may be supposed, Judge Stone is very proud of it, and cherishes it most fondly. Judge Stone is member and a steward of the Methodist church.
(Note: Submitted by Meredith Clapper: William D Stone 12 Sept 1842-26 Apr 1901 and wife Mary E Griffin 1 Mar 1845 -25 Oct 1828 are buried at the Forsyth city cemetery in Monroe
Co., GA.)
 

Obituary of WILLIAM D. STONE, Monroe Advertiser, May 3, 1901. Contributed by Jane Newton.

WILLIAM D. STONE

A Notable Man has Passed Away to his Reward.

    William D. Stone lies on sleep beneath the sod of Oakland, and the hearts of those who knew and loved him are heavy with sorrow.
    After an illness of only a few days, the fatal character of which was scarcely suspected, he passed away at five o’clock last Friday afternoon. His death came as a shock to the aged mother and fond wife who knelt by his bed, but all their grief could not call him back.

    Though Alabama was the state of his birth, Georgia claims him as her own, and in her bosom he rests at the end of life’s journey. He was born in 1848 in Alabama, and though he had not attained his majority when the Civil War came on, he enlisted under the Southern banner and fought thro’ the entire conflict. He was among the bravest of the brave men who rode with Forrest.

    In 1865 he found a fair lady in Georgia, and cast his lot here with the people of her whom he loved.

    In the trying times of Reconstruction, he was one of the staunchest and most fearless champions of the rights and privileges of the South. In his endeavor to serve his people, he never thought of self, but often took his life into his hands to check the aggression of carpetbaggers and scalawags.

    He was a lawyer of the old-fashioned type, and for several years he edited the Monroe Advertiser. Afterwards he founded and became editor of the Forsyth Chronicle.

    On last Thursday he was found in his office in a stricken condition and removed to his home.

    His illness was not considered critical, and the absent members of his family were not summoned. As late as two o’clock Friday, he was thought to be improving.

    He was to have responded in behalf of the veterans who received the crosses of honor from the Daughters of the Confederacy. He had said frequently that he would rather wear a cross than receive the highest honor that monarch or nation could confer. And he meant it, for no man loved the South more.

    But as fair hands pinned on gray coats the crosses of honor, he who would have liked so well to be there was lying in a darkened room battling with the one foe who could conquer him.

    Those lips that would have so gladly have given to Southern women praise justly due were white with the whiteness of death.

    At five he was stricken with congestion of the heart, and in five minutes he had passed over the river to join those comrades upon whose graves the garlande of the sunny Southland had just been placed. The guns of the Guards salute had scarcely died away when there was heard the sound of sorrow. The heroes in gray mourned for the comrade whose life had gone out on the anniversary of the day that the life of a fair young nation had gone out.

He was a Mason and a Methodist. At eleven o’clock on Sunday morning a large concourse gathered at the Methodist church. Rev. J. S. Bryan conducted the service. The Masons and members of the bar attended in a body. At Oakland cemetery his brethren took charge of the services and commended his spirit to his Maker.

To the mother and the wife, to the son and the daughter the heartfelt sympathy of many friends goes out.

"In Coelo Quies Est."
 


EDEN TAYLOR, planter, Popes Ferry, Monroe Co., Ga., son of Job and Mary (Warthen) Taylor, was born in Monroe county, Nov. 8, 1834. He is a descendant on both sides, from some of the best Virginia families, and from the earliest settlers in Washington and Monroe counties, a noble scion of old, honorable and honored ancestral stock. Job Taylor, his father, was born in Virginia, and, at maturity, came with his brothers, George and Robert to Georgia, and, in 1824, settled in Monroe county, a few miles east of Forsyth. As he prospered he added to his domain until he was the largest land-owner in the county, his holdings amounting to 10,000 acres in Monroe and adjoining counties, besides - about 30,000 acres of wild lands in Alabama. He lived to accumulate the largest landed and slave property of any citizen of the county, and at the same time was known and recognized as one of the most austerely religious of men. Mr. Taylor is remembered by the older citizens as one who possessed, in a very remarkable tree, true piety and extraordinary business ability, a rare combination to maintain, as the money-making faculty too often overshadows or entirely overcomes, the religious sentiment. It was often remarked of him that Job Taylor came nearer serving God and mammon” than any man of his time. In the use of his wealth Mr. Taylor was exceedingly public-spirited and charitable. No school or church committee ever failed to receive a liberal response, while he was ever ready to extend generous aid to neighbors in obtaining facilities for utilizing or making their products. When the Central railway was projected (then known as the Monroe railroad) he was one of its earliest and staunchest supporters in his locality.  He finally lost over $30,000 in consequence of his excess of enthusiasm and over-zealousness, as he graded a large number of miles for which he never received a cent. As already remarked, Mr. Taylor lived his religion. It entered into every act of his life. The family altar was as much an institution of his home as his dining table. It is said that, no matter what time of night he came in, if delayed from any cause, the candles were lit and the entire family assembled to be present at prayers. Mr. Taylor married Miss Mary Warthen, in Washington county, when she was but sixteen years old—he being thirty-five. She proved to be a helpmate indeed, a woman fit in every respect to be his life-companion. Loving, affectionate and charitable, she was the embodiment of Christian gentleness. In her latter days she became entirely blind, but it is related that during the war, notwithstanding this sad deprivation, she kept an entire company supplied with socks, knitting them with her own hands. She died in 1880, aged eighty-two years, having outlived her husband twenty- four years. This union was blessed with ten children: William, deceased; Sarah, widow of Col. W. B Long; Frank, deceased, George, deceased; Mary, deceased; Job E., deceased; Eden the subject of this sketch; Camilla, deceased; Elijah B., Monroe county, and Rebecca, deceased. Eden Taylor has passed a life of usefulness on his plantation in Monroe county. He is best known throughout the state as the efficient secretary of the state grange during its entire existence, from 1872 to 1888. It is but just to say that the success of that excellent farmers’ organization in Georgia was largely due to his untiring efforts. He is now a member of the board which has charge of the state experiment station. Mr. Taylor has been married twice. He was first married near Perry, Houston Co., in 1859, to Miss Georgia V. Tharp, by whom he had four children: Guy, farmer, Bibb county, Ga.; Maud, deceased; Claudia, wife of Will G. Bass, Bibb county, and Georgia E., a lovely girl, who died June i, 1894. The mother of these children died in 1872, and Mr. Taylor contracted a marriage in 1874, near Hayneville, Houston Co., with Miss Sallie H. Brown. This second union has been blessed with four children; Rosa, Odille, Brown and Eden, Jr. As were his people before him, he is a member of the Missionary Baptist church, a public-spirited citizen, and a courteous gentleman.


J M. THOMAS, planter and stockman, Forsyth, Monroe Co., Ga., son of John  H. and Nancy (Carr) Thomas, was born in Monroe county, March 9, 1839. Mr. Thomas’ father was born and reared in Jones county, Ga. About 1835 he moved over into Monroe county and settled within three miles of Forsyth. A few years afterward he moved into the town, where he engaged in merchandising, trading and speculation. He was cautious and shrewd, a careful manager, and regarded as a man of the highest integrity. For these reasons he was frequently selected as administrator of estates. He was a strong democrat, and although he cared nothing for the distinction or emoluments of office for himself, he took great interest in the success of his friends. He was very successful and accumulated a large estate before his death, which occurred in 1858 His last wife died in 1890. He was married twice and reared a family of nine children, all of whom are dead but two. His first wife was a Carson, by whom he had two children: W. J., deceased, and Sallie, now wife of W. W. Jackson, of Culloden, Monroe Co. Of Mr. Thomas’ full brothers and sisters only two lived to maturity: Isaac, now deceased, and Lucy, who married Alvin Stafford, of Barnesville, Ga., now dead. Mr. Thomas was reared in Monroe county, and received his early education at Hilliard institute and Mercer nniversity, and was at the university of Virginia when the war between the states began. He came home, and, in conjunction with his brother W. J., assumed the management of his father’s business. During the war he operated a tannery for the government, and made shoes for the soldiers.  . Since the surrender he has been engaged in planting and trading in stock. He owns several plantations, aggregating about 500 acres, near town, and is one of a company owning several thousand acres in the county. Mr. Thomas was married in Macon, Ga., Nov. 26, 1863 to Miss Greta, daughter of Dr. D. W. Hammond, of Macon, formerly of Culloden, where she was born and reared. She was of a family, which, though not numerous in Georgia, is conspicuous for its intellectuality and religion. Five children blessed this union: Leola, wife of C. L. Edwards, Atlanta;  Greta, wife of J. B. Fleming, planter, Monroe county; Ida, single, at home; Ella, widow of J. B. Barnes, formerly of Marietta, Ga., who, with her daughter, is with her father, and Jeffle, also at home. Mr. Thomas’ wife died in June, 1890. She was a member of the Methodist church, of which Mr. Thomas and the children are also members. He is also a master Mason.
 


T K WALTON, merchant and farmer, Bolingbroke, Monroe Co., Ga., son of Henry W. and Lorania P. (Redding) Walton, was born in Monroe county, June 7, 1884. His father was born and reared to manhood in Virginia. When of age he came to Baldwin county, Ga., and, about 1820, married his wife, who belonged to an old pioneer and influential family. In 1825 he moved to Monroe county, and settled about twelve miles east of Forsyth. Here were born and reared nine children: B. F., planter, New London, Ark.; Rebecca D., wife of J.H. Evans, Monroe county, Ga.; David A., deceased; H. H., Grapeland, Texas; Mary E., wife of B. F. Cadenhead, Sand Mountain, Ala.; J. G. It, enlisted man Alabama regiment and died of typhoid fever soon after the battle of Bull Run; Martha L., wife of J. H. Cates, McRae, Ga.; Thomas E., the subject of this sketch; William W., planter, Monroe county. His father was a member of the Methodist church and died in 1854; and his mother died in 1884 aged eighty-one years. Mr. Walton was reared on a farm and his education limited to county common schools, but he was industrious, saving and ambitious. In 1869 he bought an interest in the general merchandise business of J. W. Jackson, and continued it under the firm name of Jackson & Walton; subsequently Mr. Ewing bought Mr. Jacks interest, and the firm was changed to Walton & Ewing, under which it is now conducted. From a small beginning he has built a good trade, has a good stock of general merchandise, and a nice farm and comfortable home. In 1876 Mr. Walton was married in Monroe county to Miss Fannie B. Ewing, who died childless in 1881. In February, 1883, he was married to Miss Sallie, daughter of Peyton and Annie E. Cocke, who was a native of the county, and who has borne two children: Thomas E., Jr., and Annie Lou. Mr. Walton is a democrat, a member of the Methodist church, of which he is a steward and Sunday school superintendent, and is held in high estimation by the community in which he lives.
 


B L WILLIAMS is the principal merchant in the prosperous little community of Juliette, on the E. T., Va. & Ga. railway, in the northeastern part of Monroe county. Although young in years, Mr. Williams is old in experience, having been reared and thoroughly educated in the business in which he has been so successful. His genial, and jovial, and sunshiny nature has drawn to and around him hosts of friends and a liberal patronage, which his unswerving integrity of character, and tile downright honesty of dealings have kept, and disclose the real reason for the large trade he commands. Mr. Williams is the son of R. M. and Virginia (Chambliss) Williams, and was born in Tazewell county, Va., June 1,1861 His father was also born in the same county, but in his young manhood came to Monroe county, Ga. His stay, however, was not long, as after his marriage he returned  with his young wife to his Virginia home. After the birth of his boy Mr. Williams brought his wife and child to Monroe county, and placing them in charge of her parents that they might be safe from the impending ravages of war, he returned to Virginia and entered the Confederate army and served faithfully to the end. In 1863 Mr. Williams’ mother died leaving him to the care of his grandparents. After the war his father returned to Monroe county and married Miss Alice Chambliss, sister of his first wife, who survives him, at Juliette. He engaged in merchandising for some years at Forsyth, and then in the country, where, in addition, he had extensive planting interests. Being a man of excellent business judgment, combining enterprise with prudence, and a complete master of the details of business, he was successful in his undertakings, and at his death, in 1884, left his family in comfortable circumstances. R. L. Williams was reared behind the counter. After passing his eighteenth birthday he supplemented his common school education with a thorough business course at the Eastman Commercial college at Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Returning home thus equipped lie engaged for a year as a clerk with J. J. Cater & Co. at Forsyth. In 1882, in company with his father, Mr. Williams established the business at Juliette, which, under his able management, has grown to such magnitude and attained to such prosperity. Occupying a spacious and cheerful-looking store building of his own, eligibly situated and carrying a $3,500 stock of merchandise and plantation supplies, combined with his superior business training and capabilities, his commercial future is bright in the extreme. Mr. Williams was happily married June 1, 1884, to Miss Lizzie, daughter of Dr. William and Melinda (Harris) Speer, who, at the age of seventeen, graduated with the first honor at the Georgia Baptist seminary, at Gainesville, Ga. Dr. Speer was a successful and prominent physician in Monroe county, who had two children besides Mrs. Williams: Robert J., reading law, and acting as stenographer in the law office of Dessau & Hodges, Macon, Ga, and Annie Belle, at Macon. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Williams has been blessed with eight bright children: R. L., Jr., Paul R., Jack H, Guy W., Helen V., Alice E., Charles M. and Malinda M. Mr. Williams in politics is a democrat. He is a master Mason, a member of Zabud lodge No. 175, and a Methodist, a steward in the church at Juliette.


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