Vessels Cleared from Newfoundland Ports, 1836 & 1838

NL GenWeb

Vessels Cleared from Newfoundland Ports, 1836 & 1838.

Consider whether there were any vessels which visited Newfoundland during 1836 and 1838, but are possibly missed by this current listing? Newfoundland is not listed in plural of the voyages below. The Port of origin, and the destination Port, are usually recorded for the several voyages. Newfoundland more often, was considered as an interim lading port.

Transcribed and contributed by David Anstey, July, 2022. While I have endeavored to be as correct as humanly possible there may be errors. Please compare with original documents when possible.


Vessels Cleared from ports in Newfoundland...1836 ( Note: St. John's entries not extracted. )

Cleared from Burin, 1836.

Oct 18. "Emma", 109 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Fowey, 1814. Captain W. Flinn, for Waterford. ( For W. Cusack. Vessel belongs to Newfoundland. )

Dec 5. "Susan", 51 Tons, 5 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1814. For Poole.

Cleared from Carbonear, 1836.

Jun 27. "Eagle", 121 Tons, 8 Men. Built at Poole, 1819. Captain J. Hunt, For Poole. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. )

Jul 6. "Lark", 98 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Nova Scotia, 1811. Captain T. Power, For Liverpool. ( For Bemister & Co. of Carbonear. Vessel belongs to Carbonear. )

Jul 12. "Cornelia", 90 Tons, 6 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1833. For Liverpool.

Jul 25. "Hope", 153 Tons, 10 Men. 1809 Prize. Captain Shaddock, for Poole. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. )

Aug 13. "Cornhill", 110 Tons, 8 Men. Built at Shoreham, 1816. Captain Florence, for Poole. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. )

Sep 8. "Mary Ann & Martha", 94 Tons, 8 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1834. For Liverpool.

Sep 19. "William the Fourth", 122 Tons, 9 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1831. For Bristol.

Sep 27. "Experiment", 121 Tons, 8 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1825. Captain Williams, for Poole. ( For Fryer & Co. Vessel belongs to Poole. ) ( *In 1842, Captain W. Tucker for Fryer & Co. )

Dec 10. "Julia", 106 Tons, 7 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1830. For Liverpool.

Dec ? "Lark", 98 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Nova Scotia, 1811. For Bristol.

Dec 15. "Hope", 153 Tons, 9 Men. 1809 Prize. For Poole.

Jan 4, 1837. "Cornelia", 90 Tons, 6 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1833. For Liverpool.

Cleared from Ferryland, 1836.

Jul 11. "Elizabeth", 142 Tons, 8 Men. Built at Nova Scotia, 1831. For Liverpool.

Oct 29. "Phoenix", 94 Tons, 10 Men. 1811 Prize. For Bristol. ( 1811/1815 a Holdsworth Brig, Dartmouth to Newfoundland. Built at Marblehead, 1804. )

Nov 14. "Theresa", 71 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Prince Edward Island, 1829. Captain S. Poland, for Goodrich, Teignmouth to Newfoundland.

Cleared from Fogo, 1836.

Jun 14. "Perseverance", 110 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Dunbar, 1805. Captain J. Brewer, for Poole. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. )

Jul 20. "Montague", 103 Tons, 6 Men. His Majesty's Service, 1786. Captain J. Quinton, for Poole. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. )

Nov 8. "Montague", 103 Tons, 6 Men. His Majesty's Service, 1786. Captain J. Quinton, for Poole. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. )

Nov 23. "A-la-mode", 156 Tone, 7 Men. Built at Poole, 1833. Captain Samways, for Poole. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. )

Nov 29. "Perseverance", 110 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Dunbar, 1805. Captain J. Brewer, for Poole. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. )

Dec 17. "Earl of Selkirk", 181 Tons, 8 Men. Built at Prince Edward Island, 1818. Captain W. Froud, For Poole. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. )

Cleared from Harbour Grace, 1836.

Jan 9. "Providence", 112 Tons, 9 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1825. For Liverpool.

Jul 15. "Lord Nelson", 85 Tons, 6 Men. Built at Nova Scotia, 1817. Captain Markwell, for Bristol/London. ( For Markwell & Co. Vessel belongs to London/Bristol. )

Jul 27. "Louisa & Frederick", 132 Tons, 7 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1834. Captain Stevenson, for Liverpool. ( *Stevenson of St. John's. Vessel belongs to St. John's. )

Jul 28. "St. Patrick", 131 Tons, 7 Men. Built at New Brunswick, 1827. For Liverpool. ( Captain A. Bryan for Power & Co. Vessel belongs to Newfoundland. )

Sep 6. "Intrepid", 111 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Prince Edward Island, 1832. For Liverpool.

Oct 20. "St. Patrick", 131 Tons, 7 Men. Built at New Brunswick, 1827. For Liverpool.

Nov 30. "Bustler", 74 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Bridport, 1811. Captain J. Poland, for Plymouth. ( For J. Soper of Plymouth. Vessel belongs to Plymouth. )

Dec 22. "St. Patrick", 131 Tons, 7 Men. Built at New Brunswick, 1827. For Liverpool.

Dec 26. "Marnhull", 102 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Poole, 1816. Captain J. White, for Bideford. ( Captain & Co. of London. Vessel belongs to London. )

Cleared from Little Bay, 1836.

Jun 20. "Mary", 125 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Prince Edward Island, 1834. Captain J. Carlisle, for London. ( For Bromham of Plymouth. )

Sep 10. "Goose", 106 Tons, 7 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1832. Captain L. Okey, for London. ( Vessel belongs to London. )

Sep 14. "Micmac", 205 Tons, 11 Men. Built at New Brunswick, 1823. For Hull.

Dec 17. "Vulture", 165 Tons, 11 Men. Built at Shaldon, 1828. For London. ( Captain E, Grills? )

Cleared from Placentia, 1836.

May 28. "Blenheim", 131 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Cape Breton, 1834. For Waterford. ( In 1826, the "Blenheim", Captain Warren, from Waterford to Newfoundland. )

Jun 10. "Mermaid", 117 Tons, 9 Men. Built at Prince Edward Island, 1835. For Waterford.

Aug 29. "Emeline", 137 Tons, 6 Men. Built at Bideford, 1800. For Waterford. ( In 1826, the "Emeline", Captain Tucker, from Newfoundland to Oporto. )

Nov 23. "Blenheim", 131 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Cape Breton, 1834. For Waterford.

Dec 9. "Emeline", 137 Tons, 6 Men. Built at Bideford, 1800. For Waterford.

Cleared from Port de Grave, 1836.

Jan 6. "Hazard"/"Hasard", 114 Tons, 8 Men. Built at Shaldon/Teignmouth, 1818. Captain Churchward, for Liverpool. ( For N. Howard of Dartmouth/Exeter. )

Jun 22. "Nelson Packet", 124 Tons, 8 Men. Built at Cork, 1825. Captain Noseworthy, for Poole. ( Vessel belongs to London. )

Jun 25. "Ianthe", 126 Tons, 8 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1831. Captain George Brown?, for London. ( For Robert Brown. Vessel belongs to Newfoundland. )

Aug 27. "Highlander", 125 Tons, 8 Men. Built at Prince Edward Island, 1832. For Liverpool.

*Cleared from St. John's, 1836. ( *Not extracted in this file. )

Cleared from Trinity, 1836.

Jan 16. "Trinity", 131 Tons, 8 Men. Built at Poole, 1828. For Poole. Captain S. Walker, for Poole. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. )

Jul 2. "William Kelson", 126 Tons, 9 Men. Built at Poole, 1820. Captain J Robbins, for Poole. ( For Slade & Co. )

Jul 6. "George Robinson", 167 Tons, 10 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1833. Captain J. Hallett, for London. ( For Robinson & Co. )

Jul 15. "Otter", 81 Tons, 6 Men. Built at Southampton, 1817. Captain J. Dunn, for Poole. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. )

Jul 26. "Jessy", 89 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Bristol, 1825. Captain J. Oldis, for Poole. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. )

Oct 17. "William Kelson", 136 Tons, 8 Men. Built at Poole, 1820. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. )

Nov 4. "Deborah", 158 Tons, 10 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1829. Captain T. Stark, for Cork/London. ( For Robinson of London. )

Nov ? "Jessy", 89 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Bristol, 1825. Captain J. Oldis, for Poole. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. )

Nov 22. "George", 148 Tons, 8 Men. 1807 Prize. Captain J. Dugdale, for Poole. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. )

Nov 30. "Otter", 81 Tons, 6 Men. Built at Southampton, 1817. Captain J. Dunn, for Poole. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. )

Dec 19. "Fame", 129 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Poole, 1834. Captain A. Harris, for Poole. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. )

Dec ? "Trinity", 131 Tons, 9 Men. Built at Poole, 1828. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. ) ( *In 1842, Captain W. Taylor, Exmouth - ? For Exmouth merchants. Ex. Sh. Co. )

Dec 31. "Garland", 177 Tons, 11 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1836. Captain Hayward, for London. ( For Robinson of London. )

Cleared from Twillingate, 1836.

Nov 25. "Seal", 97 Tons, 7 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1825. Captain W. Brown, for Poole. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. ?Colbourne vessel? )

Nov 30. "Nymph", 105 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Poole, 1831. Captain J. Tubb, for Poole. ( Vessel belongs to Poole. )



Cleared from ports in Newfoundland...1838. ( Note: St. John's entries not extracted. )

Cleared from Brigus, CB, 1838.

May 15. "Nelson Packet", Schooner, 124 Tons, 8 Men. Built at Cork, 1825. For Cork. Captain Noseworthy for Goss & Co., of Poole. Poole - Lisbon.

Jun 27. "Comet", 104 Tons, 8 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1832. For Liverpool. ( *In 1842, Captain H. Spencer, Liverpool-Newfoundland, for P. Brown. Vessel belongs to Newfoundland. )

Jul 25. "Experiment", Brig, 101 Tons, 8 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1820. For Poole. Captain Williams for Fryer & Co. ( Vessel built at Carbonear by John Meaden? )

Sep 15. "Samuel", 110 Tons, 8 Men. Built at Newfoundland, 1831. For Poole.

Nov 15. "Sisters", Brig, 90 Tons, 8 Men. Built at Poole, 1822. Captain T. Royal, for Robert & John Slade of Poole. To Liverpool.

Cleared from Burin, 1838.

Dec 1. "Three Sisters", 76 Tons, 6 Men. Built at Nova Scotia, 1801. For ?

Cleared from Carbonear, 1838.

Jan 15. "Ann", 117 Tons, 10 Men. Built at Littlehampton, West Sussex, 1827. For Poole.

Feb 5. "Perseverance", Brig, 178 Tons, 10 Men. Built at Appledore, 1810. Captain J. Ford, for Poole. For Harrison & Co. London - Newfoundland.

Jun 30. "Triumvirate", Brig, 180 Tons, 8 Men. Built at Poole, 1816. Captain W. Green, for Poole. For Fryer & Co.

Jun 30. "William the Fourth", 100 Tons, 8 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1831. For Bristol.

Jul 19. "Rowena", Brig, 92 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Nova Scotia, 1832. Captain Goldsworthy, for Liverpool. *Owner, Robert Prowse of Newfoundland. Voyage, Teignmouth - Figueira.

Sep 13. "Providence", 93 Tons, 8 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1823. For Liverpool.

Nov 27. "Flora", 157 Tons, 11 Men. Built at New Brunswick, 1838. For Poole. ?Captain J. Mowlam? ( *In 1841, Captain Shaddock, Poole-New York, for Fryer & Co. )

Dec 13. "Mary Ann & Martha", 94 Tons, 8 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1834. For Liverpool. ( *In 1841, Captain Brown, for merchant Farrel. Vessel belongs to Dundalk. Voyage, Liverpool to London. )

Cleared from Fogo, 1838.

Jul 19. "Olive Branch", 93 Tons, 6 Men. Built at Poole, 1789.

Nov 5. "Seal", 97 Tons, 5 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1825. For Poole. ( *In 1832, J. Colbourne owned a vessel "Seal". )

Dec 3. "Faith", 143 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Poole, 1838. For Poole. ( Cox & Co.? In 1845, owned by Cox & Co. )

Dec 14. "Prince Eugene", 116 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Redbridge, 1819. Captain J. Quinton, to Liverpool, for Slade & Co. of Poole.

Cleared from Greenspond, 1838.

Nov 14. "Otter", 81 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Bucklerhard, 1817. For Poole. ( *In 1842, Captain J. Pepper, Portsmouth - ? For J. Pepper. Vessel belongs to Arundel. )

Dec 17. "Fame", 129 Tons, 8 Men. Built at Poole, 1824. For Poole.

Cleared from Harbour Grace, 1838.

Jun 19. "Elizabeth", Brig, 82 Tons, 9 Men. Built at Nova Scotia, 1829. For Liverpool. ( *In 1833, Captain P. Power, for Thomas Ridley. *In 1842, Captain P. Hunt, Liverpool – Hmbro/?Umbro? For Ridley & Co. )

Jul 17. "St. Patrick", 108 Tons, 8 Men. Built at New Brunswick, 1827. For Liverpool. ( Captain A. Bryan for Power & Co. Vessel belongs to Newfoundland. ) ( *In 1841, Captain C. Evel, for T. Foley. Liverpool-Newfoundland. )

Aug 29. "Enterprise", 89 Tons, 7 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1838. For Liverpool.

Oct 17. "James", 80 Tons, 8 Men. Built at P. E. Island, 1829. For Bristol.

Nov 6. "Fly", 78 Tons, 6 Men. Built at Plymouth, 1824. Captain F. Soper, for Plymouth. For J. Soper of Plymouth. Plymouth-Newfoundland.

Cleared from Little Bay, 1838.

Jun 5. "Elias", 113 Tons, 8 Men. Built at Dartmouth, 1831. For London.

Nov 9. "Vulture", 165 Tons, 11 Men. Built at Shaldon, 1828. Captain E. Grills, for London. ( *In 1841, Captain T. Gilbert, for Newmans. Vessel belongs to London. Voyage, Teignmouth - ? )

Nov 27. "King Fisher", 221 Tons, 12 Men. Built at Quebec, 1827. For London.

Cleared from Placentia, 1838.

May 2. "Blenheim", 101 Tons, 6 Men. Built at Cape Breton, 1834. For Waterford.

Aug 6. "Erin", 81 Tons, 6 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1833. For Waterford.

Aug 16. "Blenheim", 101 Tons, 6 Men. Built at Cape Breton, 1834. For Waterford.

Oct 13. "Placentia", 120 Tons, 9 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1838. For Waterford. ( *In 1841, Captain D. Doody, Waterford-Cadiz. For Sweetman. Vessel belongs to Waterford. )

Nov 22. "Blenheim", 101 Tons, 6 Men. Built at Cape Breton, 1834. For Waterford.

*Cleared from St. John's, 1838. ( Not extracted in this file. )

Cleared from Trinity, 1838.

Jun 11. "William Keelson", 126 Tons, 8 Men. Built at Poole, 1820. For Poole.

Jun 15. "Vestal", Schooner, 139 Tons, 8 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1834. Captain J. Neville, for London. For Robinson of London.

Jul 3. "George", 148 Tons, 8 Men. Prize, 1807. For Poole.

Jul 13. "Otter", 81 Tons, 6 Men. Built at Southampton, 1817. For Poole.

Sep 5. "Superb", 129 Tons, 8 Men. Built at Poole, 1825. Captain W. Barter, for Poole. Vessel belongs to Poole. ( *In 1841, for Cox. & Co. Poole-Newfoundland. )

Sep 14. "George Robinson", 148 Tons, 10 Men. Built in Newfoundland, 1835. For London. ( *In 1841, Captain Lockier, London-Hamburg, for Robinson. Vessel belongs to London. )

Sep 25. "Louisa Hannah", 165 Tons, 10 Men. Built at Bermuda, 1809. Captain T. Biel, for Poole. Belongs to Poole.

Sep 25? "Adonai", 99 Tons, 7 Men. Built at P. E. Island, 1834. Captain J. Ritchie, for Cork. For W. Warren. ( *Vessel belongs to Newfoundland. Liverpool - Copenhagen. ) ( *In 1841, Captain E. Roach, for Wallis & Co. of Cork. Cork Coaster. )

Nov 13. "Elizabeth", 186 Tons, 8 Men. Built at New Brunswick, 1836. For London.

Nov 19. "William Keelson", 126 Tons, 8 Men. Built at Poole, 1820. For Poole.

Cleared from Twillingate, 1838.

Jul 18. "Prince Eugene", 132 Tons, 6 Men. Built at Southampton, 1819. For Poole. Slade vessel. ?Captain Matthew Cook? *The Cook family of Poole, and Twillingate. ( *In 1841, Captain J. Quinton, for Slade & Co. )

Jul 23. "Pomona", 97 Tons, 6 Men. Built at Poole, 1822. For Poole. ( *Cox & Co. vessel in 1833. )

Nov 21. "Velocity", 68 Tons, 5 Men. Built at Nova Scotia, 1837. For Poole. ?Colbourne vessel? ( In 1839, the Velocity, Captain Charles Whiteway, for T. Colbourne. In 1840, for J. Colbourne. ) ( *In 1841, Captain T. Wills, for Bloomfield. Whiteway and J. Colbourne crossed out. Bloomfield a Poole captain. )

Dec 5. "Nymph", 105 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Poole, 1821. Captain J. Tubb, for Poole.

Dec 15. "Olive Branch", 93 Tons, 7 Men. Built at Poole, 1789. For Poole. ( *In 1820, Captain J. Facey, for Roser & Co. of Poole. Liverpool-Labrador. ) ( *In 1825, Captain C. Rogers, for Cox & Co. of Poole, Liverpool-Newfoundland. ) ( *In 1830, Captain J. Harris, for Cox & Co. of Poole. Liverpool-Newfoundland. ) ( *In 1835, Captain J. Veal, of Poole. )

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ENDNOTES:

*Vessel tonnage changes are commonly seen in varying listings, for differing reasons. Repairs, remodeling, diverse customs “vessel capacity evaluations”, etc.

*Circa 1790, Fryer, Andrews & Co. was formed. A private bank including William Fryer, Edwin Andrews, John Fryer, & William Rolles Fryer. Alias, the Wimborne, Poole, and Blandford Bank. It was acquired by the National Provincial Bank of England in 1840.

*In 1820, William Fryer, John Gosse, and Robert Pack, took over the Carbonear Kemps business.

*In 1836, John Fryer, son of William Fryer, operated the business of his father. In a partnership with Robert Pack.

*William Rolles Fryer retired from "Fryer, Gosse, and Pack," and Pack, Gosse, and Fryer"; on Dec. 31, 1838.

*John Fryer wed Ann Rolles, daughter of John Rolles, who died at Wimborne in 1778.

*John Fryer wed Anne Gulliver, daughter of Isaac (1745-1822 ) and Elizabeth Gulliver??

*Wimborne Fryer family Esquires, held presence at Poole.

*Mar 2, 1841, John Fryer, Edwin Andrews, William Rolles Fryer, and William Frederick Fryer, dissolved their banking partnership.

*1841 Fryer family members included William Rolles Fryer of Lychet Minster, Esquire; John Fryer of Wimborne, Esquire; Isaac Fryer of Wimborne, Gent; Henry Edmund Fryer of Burley Wood, East Woodhay, Hampshire, Clerk; Charles Gulliver Fryer of Wimpole Street, Middlesex, Clerk; Frederick William Fryer of Wimborne, Esquire; and Edward Castleman of Wimborne, Gent.

*It appears Captain Noseworthy captained the vessel "Robert", circa 1826-1833. Next, he captained the vessel "Nelson Packet".

*In 1833, Noseworthy captained the "Robert", for Harrison & Co., of Poole.

*In 1842, Captain Noseworthy voyaged for John Fryer & Co., of Poole.

*In June 1834, the firm of John Colbourne of Sturminster Newton/Twillingate, was declared bankrupt. It appears later, that Colbourne & Co., owned transatlantic vessels, Poole to Fogo/Twillingate.

*Creditors of Hugh William Danson, Newfoundland merchant, bankrupt; held meetings at Bristol, on June 10 & 11, 1831.

*Born in Newfoundland…

*Washington: Northwest Frontier. Volume 4. By: Edgar Irving Stewart. New York. 1957. Page 447.

Mark and Patience ( Mercer ) Gosse of Conception Bay and Vancouver. Mark located in British Columbia in 1887. Following the fire of 1889, Mark moved to Seattle. Mark Gosse followed the career interests of his father, Captain Robert Gosse. Commercial fishing has been of interest to many generations of the Gosses since the first forebear came to Newfoundland in 1666 from Poole, England. When they received crown grants in Newfoundland. Mark Gosse died Dec 26, 1954.

*William Gosse ( 1812 - 1883 ) who was born in Newfoundland, learned his medicine at Poole in Dorset.

*The history of South Carolina; v. 04. New York. 1934. Page 858.

Rev. John Martin Pike, born in Newfoundland in 1840. Son of Captain George Pike, Artic seafarer. He became a Methodist minister. Rev. Pike died May 16, 1932, aged 92. His brother Richard Pike, was born in 1834 at Carbonear. Richard was on the first expedition of Peary to the Artic. Richard Pike at age 19, commanded the vessel "Union". Richard commanded steamships "Retriever, 1869, "Mastiff", "Ranger", "Proteus", "Walrus", "Kite", "Falcon, and the "Hope". He wed Catherine Andrews of Harbour Grace, in 1860.

https://www.scencyclopedia.org/sce/entries/pike-john-martin/

*History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and representative citizens. Chicago. 1914. Pages 939/940.

James and Fannie Roberts Clarke of Ludlow, Maine, had a son George B. Clarke, born Aug 16, 1869. James Clark was a Methodist. James Clark was born in Newfoundland, of English heritage.

*Biographical review : … containing life sketches of leading citizens of Burlington and Camden counties, New Jersey. Boston, 1897. Page 439.

1832 Newfoundland. Richard and Mary ( Stair ) Brace. Mary Stair, a daughter of William and Mary ( Cromwell ) Stair. Thomas Brace, the father of Richard Brace. He left England and went to Newfoundland. Philip Brace the great-grandfather of Richard, was veterinary surgeon in the royal stables of King William and Queen Mary, and also of Queen Anne. Richard Brace Senior, son of Thomas Brace, was engaged in the fishery and cooperage business at St. John's. He lived to be 93 years of age. Richard Brace Sr. had a son named Richard Brace born in 1799, who became keeper of the prison for the northern district at Harbour Grace for over twenty years. The keeper of the prison Richard Brace, had a son Rev. F. R. Brace; who was born in 1832. He left Newfoundland for Trenton, New Jersey in 1853. In 1866, F. R. Brace moved to Berlin, Camden County, New Jersey.

Also: *The History of Camden County, New Jersey - George Reeser Prowell · 1886. Page 318.

*In 1832 Richard Brace, schoolmaster at Bareneed, population 350, was salaried at 15 Pounds annually. By the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel.

*Biographical history of Clark and Jackson Counties, Wisconsin: containing portraits of all the presidents of the United States, with accompanying biographies of each, and engravings of prominent citizens of the counties, with personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Published: 1891. Page 226.

Matthew K. Pynn, a prominent farmer of Jackson County, was born in Harbor Grace, Newfoundland, May 25, 1827, the son of Edward Pynn, who was born in Muscato, same country, March 29, 1804. Edward Pynn came to this country June 6, 1849, locating in Waukesha County, Wisconsin. He followed the life of a sailor in Newfoundland for twenty years, after which he followed various other pursuits, and also held several minor offices in his county. He died in Waukesha County, at the age of seventy-two years. He was a well-to-do man, and was a member of the Episcopalian Church. His father, Thomas Pynn, was a native of the same country, and was also a sailor all his life. Our subject's mother, nee Anna Karney[Kearney], was born in Harbor Grace in 1806, and died at the age of eighty years, in Waukesha County, Wisconsin. She was the daughter of Matthew and Anna (Garland) Karney, the former a native of England, and the latter of Ireland, and both died at an advanced age. The father was a merchant and ship-owner, and was a very prominent man. Mr. and Mrs. Pynn were the parents of thirteen children, viz.: Matthew K., Edwin J., Angelena, George, Edward, Julia, Katherine, Anna, Mary, Arnold, Frances, and one who died in infancy. Edward J. and Julia are now deceased. Matthew K., their eldest child, was reared and educated on a farm in Harbor Grace, and in 1843 began life as a sailor, and made six voyages, seal hunting on the coast of Labrador, and spent three summers on the coast of Labrador, coasting and trading among the Esquimaux. In 1849 he came to this country with his father, locating in Waukesha, Wisconsin. He was a member of the Methodist Church.

?the former a native of Ireland, and the latter of England?

*Loyalists of the American Revolution...

Nathan Parker was present and assisted with the Tea Party in Boston Harbour. Nathan Parker's friend and business partner, Deacon James Melledge; was born in 1767, in South Street, Boston. At age 8 or 9 years during the beginning of the American Revolution, he was sent to live with his relatives in Newfoundland. ( Wayland, Massachusetts marriages. 1806. James Melledge of St. John's, Newfoundland, and Catherine Curtis. Aug 10, 1806. ) 1813. James Melledge at St. John's. 1817. Nathan Parker and James Melledge, residents of Boston. 1825. James Melledge of Boston, merchant. 1851. Importation of fish from St. John's, Newfoundland, into Boston, by J. P. Melledge, for Thomas C. Nuttall. Invoice value 389 Pounds, 8 shillings, 8 Pence. Importation of 4 quarter casks of cod-liver oil from St. John's, Newfoundland, by J. P. Melledge...

*CO 184/57. Pages 116/117. Oct 20, 1816.

From F. Pickmore at Fort Townshend; to John Hanley, for James Melledge and John Sarrell. Receipt of allowance for performing divine service at Twillingate for the Church of England.

From F. Pickmore at Fort Townshend; to Henry Knight for Samuel Woolfrey. Receipt of allowance for performing divine service at Moreton's Harbour for the Church of England.

*In the year 1770, Coughlan's hands were strengthened by the arrival of another devoted Irishman... Mr. John Stretton of Waterford, son to Mr. John Stretton of Limerick, a prominent friend of Methodism in the early day.

The Pennsylvania magazine of history and biography - v. 65, no. 1 (Jan. 1941). Page 65. In 1775, Rev. James Balfour visited Carbonear. One third of the inhabitants were dissenters. They obtained a minister, John Stretton, and built a chapel. Balfour expected to use the building, but in November, 1775, they closed it in his face.

Classified Digest of the Records of the Society for the ... - Page 815. Charles Frederick Pascoe · 1894. Page 92. Again, in January 1785, whilst he was officiating in the same Church, "one Clement Noel pointed to John Stretton, who thereupon suddenly mounted the pulpit behind Mr. Balfour; who for fear of a riot, thought it best quietly to leave the place, though much hurt "by the "insult... offered to the whole Church of England"

Clement Noel, ?Methodist?

*Nov 3, 1718. The "Satisfaction" of Lyme, Burthen 80 Tons, James Perryman Commander, laden with Fish, bound on a voyage from Newfoundland to Oporto, was by stress of weather driven into the Harbour of Vigo. The Ship and cargo were seized. The Ship was burnt, and the cargo sold. John Burridge Esq. and Co. were owners of the said ship and cargo, amounting to 1,214 Pounds.

*Report from Select committee on shipwrecks of timber ships; with the minutes of evidence, appendix and index, ordered to be printed 2nd August 1839. Author: Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons.

*1838. Vessel "Falcon", Captain Huie, 172 Tons, of Liverpool; left Milford for St. John's, Newfoundland. Missing.

Owners: John Butler & Richard Ferris.

*James MacKay of St. John’s was the builder of the 213-ton brig Falcon in Exploits Bay, Newfoundland, in 1835.

*Society for the propagation of the Gospel. A List of the Society's Missionaries, Catechists, and School-masters, with their respective Salaries, and the Places at which they officiate in Newfoundland. Per 1806 and 1818 reports.

1806. [ Apparent annual reporting of the Missionaries baptisms, marriages and burials. *John Harris' report covers two years. ]

Mr. John Harris, Missionary, St. John's. 100 Pounds. ( During the last and present year, He baptized 138 children, married 69 couples, and buried 305 individuals. )

Mr. Lionel Chancey, School-master, St. John's. 15 Pounds.

Mr. Lewis Anspach, Missionary, Harbour Grace and Carbonear. 100 Pounds. ( He has baptized in Out Harbours 78 children and adults. Among whom was one woman of age 52 years, and another of age 68 years. ) ( He as administered the Lord's Supper at Port de Grave to nearly 50 Communicants. ) ( He baptized 59 children and adults, married 26 couples, and buried 9 individuals at Harbour Grace. )

Mr. William Lampen, School-master, Harbour Grace. 15 Pounds.

Mr. John Tucker, School-master, in Conception Bay. 10 Pounds.

Mr. John Clinch, Missionary, Trinity Bay. 100 Pounds. ( He has baptized 45 children, married 10 couples, and buried 11 individuals. )

Mr. John Thomas, Catechist and School-master, Silly Cove. 15 Pounds.

Mr. ____, Missionary, Placentia, 100 Pounds. ( Not yet supplied. Vacant Mission. )

Mr. ____, Missionary, Ferryland and Bay Bulls. 100 Pounds. ( Not yet supplied. Vacant Mission. )

Mr. George Bemister, Catechist and School-master, Bonavista. 15 Pounds.

1818.

Mr. David Rowland, Missionary, St. John's. 200 Pounds.

Mr. Marshall, School-master, St. John's. 15 Pounds.

Mr. Frederick Hamilton Carrington, Missionary at Harbour Grace and Carbonear. 200 Pounds.

Mr. William Lampen, School-master, Harbour Grace. 20 Pounds.

Mr. Pearce Connor, School-master, Carbonear. 15 Pounds.

Mr. John Tucker, School-master, in Conception Bay. 10 Pounds.

Mr. John Clinch, Missionary, Trinity Bay. 200 Pounds.

Mr. Thompson, School-master, Bonaventure. 15 Pounds.

Mr. Williams, School-master, Bay Roberts. 15 Pounds.

Mr. John Thomas, Catechist and School-master, Silly Cove. 15 Pounds.

Mr. Thomas Plumleigh, School-master at Brigus, Conception Bay. 10 Pounds.

Mr. William Tulk, School-master, Burin. 15 Pounds.

Mr. Edward Mulloy/Mullaby, School-master, Bonavista. 15 Pounds.

Mr. T. A, Grantham, Assistant at St. John's. 200 Pounds.

Mr. John Leigh, Missionary, Twillingate. 200 Pounds. ( Since his arrival in Twillingate, he has performed 30 baptisms, 7 marriages, & 14 burials. ) ( At Fogo he has performed 13 baptisms, 8 marriages, & 8 burials. )

Mr. Thomas Whalley, School-master, Greenspond. 15 Pounds.

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*Calendar of the Carew manuscripts, preserved in the archiepiscopal library at Lambeth. [Vol.6, 1603-1624.] / ed. by J.S. Brewer and William Bullen... Published 1873. Author: Great Britain. Public Record Office. Page 140.

Letter of Edward Hayes to Lord Carew, Dec 7, 1611. "no sorts of fish are in so great request and use in Spain, as the Newland fish commonly called by the names of Bascalen, or Poor John."

*Dec 8, 1615. Examination of Daniel Baker, late steward to Captain John Smith in the "Return" of Plymouth, taken before Sir Lewis Stukley, knight. "1/3 of a Newfoundland ship's Company employed to serve a stage, carry a barrow, and turn poor-john."

*The Planter's Plea; or, The Grounds of Plantation Examined, and usual objections answered... London, 1630. Chapter VII. Objection 1. All experience is against hope and good success of colonies; much money and many men's lives have been spent upon Virginia, St. Christopher's, Newfoundland, etc., with no proportionable success, and what reason have we to expect other event of this? Colonies are work for a state and not for private persons... and that is the true cause of their miscarriage...

*The fish and fisheries of colonial North America: a documentary history of the fishery resources of the United States and Canada selected and edited by John C. Pearson ; [prepared for National Marine Fisheries Service]. v.1. Published 1972. Author: Pearson, John Cleary, 1902. ( A good read on the basics of the early Newfoundland fishery. ) Pages 6-8. A letter to Richard Hakluyt containing a report of the true state and commodities of Newfoundland, 1578. By Anthony Parkhurst. London, 1598-1600. Includes: The kinds of fish besides cod. Newfoundland fisheries described by an English supercargo on a fishing voyage to the New World. "with three hooks stretched forth in the end of a pole; I make, as it were, an eel spear... and with that tool I may take up in less than half a day, lobsters sufficient to find three hundred men for a day's meat.

Newland fish. ( A term used during the 1500's & the 1600's. )

Newfound island. ( A term used circa 1600 era. )

Newfoundland. ( The more common terminology, used for centuries. )

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