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CNR Historical (c1905) Map of Western Canada Index


Alberta
CNR Historical (c1905) Map of Western Canada Index
                                    ALBERTA
	This province presents a great variety of farming conditions
nd natural resources, and offers opportunity of some kind to
almost everyone looking for a location. Over 60% of the pop-
ulation live on the land and produce each year farm products
worth from 125 to 175 million dollars. Most farmers know, too,
Alberta's wonderful record in capturing World's Championships
for grains.
	Topography varies from some level prairie in the south land
central portions to rolling lands and mountains towards the
Rockies in the west, with gently rolling stretches of park and
prairie country in the Peace River and Athabaska regions to the
north. As might he expected from such topography, soil,
climatic and farming conditions vary greatly. An
approximate division for settlement purposes may he made as follows:
1. Prairie Country. Rolling, treeless prairie lands extend
from the International Boundary to 100 miles north of Calgary.
For a distance of 60 miles the western side of this area is of foot-
hill character. Throughout this southern area the altitude is
high and the rainfall generally somewhat light.  Irrigation is
employed on some of the flat land areas. Even without irriga-
tion and by a system of dry farming, many million bushels of
wheat are grown annually. Livestock can he kept out of doors
the year round as the winters are comparatively mild, and cattle
ranches are still a permanent feature, especially in the foothill
country. Desirable farm locations in southern Alberta are
available to those with capital to purchase at fair prices for im-
proved land. Insofar as ranching is concerned, the holdings
are quite large and the new-comer should he prepared to finance
a fairly heavy purchase of land and livestock.
	2. Park Country. North of the foregoing division, and
occupying approximately the central portion of the province, is
a typical park country presenting attractive opportunities in
fully or partly improved farms at low prices. Ideal for mixed
farming, with soil and climatic conditions favorable to both
grain and stock raising, this portion of the Province has much to
offer to the new settler with limited capital.
3. Peace River and Northern Sections.  extending in scattered
areas from the Park Country almost to the north boundary of
the Province, provide an agreeable diversity, open prairies lying
closely beside lightly and heavily wooded areas. Extensive
tracts of spruce and poplar are available for local farm use. Rail-
ways serve a wide area of this section of the Province an which
the productive Peace River country is situated. Great impetus
to the construction of roads is one of the direct benefits already
apparent in the building of the Alaska Highway. Land seekers
should become familiar with regulations governing provincial
lands before planning an inspection trip.
         
	The natural resources of Alberta include 130,000 miles
of forested lands, an estimated 30,000 square miles of
bituminous sands, immense clay deposits, a growing oil pro-
duction, and 14% of the coal reserves of the whole world. Al-
berta's industrial payroll is already an important factor in the
purchase of farm products.



CNR Historical (c1905) Map of Western Canada Index
Copyright: Monday, 10-Sep-2018 20:31:26 MDT
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