Slaves in Diary of S.A. Agnew

SANKOFA'S TIPPAH CO. MS PAGES

Black Slave Ancestors Named in the
Diary of Samuel A. Agnew

Ripley, Tippah County, MS 1863 - 1864

Slaves of Dr. Enoch Agnew (father of Samuel A. Agnew):

Tom (Agnew): "They [Yankees] asked the negroes where they [mules] were, and one even presented a pistol at the breast of Tom, to make him tell, but fortunately none of the negroes knew where they were." - Oct. 6, 1863

Becky (Agnew): "Becky & Eliza were faithful and the Yankees called Becky 'Secesh' because she told them she was not willing to leave her master." - Oct. 6, 1863

Eliza (Agnew): "Becky & Eliza were faithful and the Yankees called Becky "Secesh" because she told them she was not willing to leave her master." - Oct. 6,
1863

Wess (Agnew): "He [Allen] gives some intelligence in reference to the negroes from this country. Wess in dead, Lucy is also dead, and all her children but one." -
Dec. 7, 1863

Lucy (Agnew) and children: "He [Allen] gives some intelligence in reference to the negroes from this country. Wess in dead, Lucy is also dead, and all her children but one." - Dec. 7, 1863

Martha (Agnew): "He [Allen] gives some intelligence in reference to the negroes from this country." "Martha & Haly are still there, Haly is cooking for some officers." - Dec. 7, 1863

Haly (Agnew): "He [Allen] gives some intelligence in reference to the negroes from this country." "Martha & Haly are still there, Haly is cooking for some officers." -
Dec. 7, 1863

Jim (Agnew): "He [Allen] gives some intelligence in reference to the negroes from this country." "Jim and Wash are teamsters, Holland's Tony is dead." -
Dec. 7, 1863

Wash (Agnew): "He [Allen] gives some intelligence in reference to the negroes from this country." "Jim and Wash are teamsters, Holland's Tony is dead." -
Dec. 7, 1863

Caroline (Agnew)
- "They have big parties at which Uncle Jo's, Brice's and our negroes resort. Our Caroline is the belle." - March 4, 1863
- "Tonight is a frolicsome time with our negroes. Caroline married Larkin Gambrell's Clay." - May 28, 1864

Isham (Agnew): "They have big parties at which Uncle Jo's, Brice's and our negroes resort." "Old Isham is independent, sits in his house and works at coopering, pocketing proceeds. These parties explain the stolen thread, wheat and chickens which have been missed in the neighborhood. Old Ross, Isham and their gang are verily great rascals." - March 4, 1863

Ross (Agnew): "They have big parties at which Uncle Jo's, Brice's and our negroes resort." "Old Ross, Isham and their gang are verily great rascals." - March 4, 1863

George (Agnew)
- "Caroline married Larkin Gambrell's Clay. The couple with attendants and candle holders came out in front of the back piazza and Big George tied the knot. His ceremony was short. He seemed much embarrassed, spoke rapidly. But when the knot was tied the party marched back to Eliza's house, and frolic was the order of the day." - May 28, 1864
- "This evening I rode to Watson's, Mahon's, Dugger's & Billingsley's investigating some charges against George. Some say he was in the Yankee army and fought
against us on the 10th ulto. I find no proof to sustain the charge. I believe it all started from an evil disposed being, but who I do not know. Mrs. Mahon reports that a Kentuckian told her that some of the citizens told him that one of Dr. Agnew's home negroes was in the battle and he (the citizen) saw him in the
battle, loading his gun, pushing the cartridge down. Now I know of no citizen who was in the battle, and I know that George was home, before the negroes got into
the fight. My investigations satisfy me that the charge is groundless." - June 30, 1864

Thompson (Agnew): "Tonight is a frolicsome time with our negroes. Caroline married Larkin Gambrell's Clay." "Thompson acted as master of ceremonies. The negro men and women were all dressed in their best and all seem to be enjoying themselves hugely." - May 28, 1864

Arch (Agnew): "Today a set were here claiming to have authority to examine for stolen property. While looking through our negroe cabins one of them [Confederate soldiers] stole some tobacco and a looking glass from Arch." - June 16, 1864

Slaves of Joseph Agnew ("Uncle Jo," brother of Dr. E. Agnew)

Dick (Agnew): "He [Allen] gives some intelligence in reference to the negroes from this country." "Uncle Jo's Dick and George are in the army." - Dec. 7, 1863

George (Agnew): "He [Allen] gives some intelligence in reference to the negroes from this country." "Uncle Jo's Dick and George are in the army." - Dec. 7, 1863

Dock (Agnew): "Uncle Jo's Dock got back from his Mooresville trip at noon" - Jan. 1, 1864

Slaves of Rev. J.L. Young

Allen (Young)
- "They [Yankees] shot at Rev. J. L. Young in Tishomingo bottom, wounding his mare Mollie severely. They took his negro Allen with them." - Nov. 27, 1863
- "He [Dr. E. Agnew] reports that Allen is back just from Corinth. The Yanks gave him and Allen's Willis a pass to come to Camp Davis but instead of going there they
bushed home. He says nearly all the negroes there would come back to their masters if they were not afraid that they would be whipped and sold."

Slaves of Mr. Young

Jim (Young): "Mr. Young contemplates a trip to S. C. next week to take Jim, Dice and 2 others of his negro women to a place of safety" - Dec. 8, 1863"
Dice (Young): "Mr. Young contemplates a trip to S. C. next week to take Jim, Dice and 2 others of his negro women to a place of safety" - Dec. 8, 1863"
general: "Mr. Young will start in the morning with some of his negroes to South Carolina" - Dec. 7, 1863

Slaves of Mr. Allen

Willis (Allen): "He [Pa] reports that Allen is back just from Corinth. The Yanks gave him and Allen's Willis a pass to come to Camp Davis but instead of
going there they bushed home. He says nearly all the negroes there would come back to their masters if they were not afraid that they would be whipped and sold."

Slaves of Mr. Hughes

Levi (Hughes): "Several negroes from this country are along with them, viz Hughes' Levi, Holland's Tony. Duke's John and Knowles' Bill. From Frank Young these 'highwaymen' took 200 dollars in money." - Nov. 29, 1863

Slaves of Mr. Holland

Tony (Holland)
- "Several negroes from this country are along with them, viz Hughes' Levi, Holland's Tony. Duke's John and Knowles' Bill. From Frank Young these 'highwaymen' took 200 dollars in money." - Nov. 29, 1863
- "He [Allen] gives some intelligence in reference to the negroes from this country. Wess in dead, Lucy is also dead, and all her children but one. Martha & Haly
are still there, Haly is cooking for some officers. Jim and Wash are teamsters, Holland's Tony is dead. Uncle Jo's Dick and George are in the army. All of Brice's men but Tom are in the army. One of Brice's women is almost crazy to get back home." - Dec. 7, 1863

Slaves of Mr. Brice

Tom (Brice): "All of Brice's men but Tom are in the army. One of Brice's women is almost crazy to get back home." - Dec. 7, 1863

Slaves of Mr. Duke

John (Duke): "Several negroes from this country are along with them, viz Hughes' Levi, Holland's Tony. Duke's John and Knowles' Bill. From Frank Young these
'highwaymen' took 200 dollars in money." - Nov. 29, 1863

Slaves of Mr. Knowles

Bill (Knowles): "Several negroes from this country are along with them, viz Hughes' Levi, Holland's Tony. Duke's John and Knowles' Bill. From Frank Young these 'highwaymen' took 200 dollars in money." - Nov. 29, 1863

Slaves of Mr. Richey

Dave (Richey): "About 9 o'clock a negro boy, Dave, of Richey's came up being sent by his master who said that Maj. Ham had received a dispatch saying that the
Yankees were at New Albany." - Nov. 30, 1863

Slaves of John Hanna

Thomas (Hanna): "A Negro Thomas belonging to Jno. Hanna of the 54th Tenn. Reg't passed this evening making his way from Gibson Co. Tenn. to his master in
Johnston's army." - Feb. 21, 1864

Slaves of Larkin Gambrell

Clay (Gambrell): "Tonight is a frolicsome time with our negroes. Caroline married Larkin Gambrell's Clay." - May 28, 1864

Slaves of Elizabeth Dorilla Richey Agnew (wife of James Agnew, brother of Dr. E. Agnew)

Abe (Agnew)
wife Adaline (Agnew)
son Franky (Agnew)
- "A melancholy occurrence took place at Aunt Rilla's today between 11 and 12 o'clock. Melly shot a little negro child (Franky) of Abe and Adaline, and the child died in a half hour after. It was accidental. Aunt Rilla sent Melly out with a gun (Mullinix's) to shoot a hawk. The little negroes were in great glee running after him. He wanted them to go back, and to frighten them he pointed the gun at them, when contrary to his expectation it went off, killing Franky." - March 31, 1864
- "Franky who was killed today was 4 or 5 years old." - March 31, 1864

Slaves of Mr. Siddall

John (Siddall): "They [Yankees] had negroes with them. Our negroes recognized Siddall's John and Dobbin's Harry. John said he was doing as well as he wanted to." - Oct. 6, 1863

Slaves of Mr. Dobbin

Harry (Dobbin): "They [Yankees] had negroes with them. Our negroes recognized Siddall's John and Dobbin's Harry. John said he was doing as well as he wanted to." - Oct. 6, 1863

Resource: Diary of Samuel A. Agnew. Academic Affairs Library, UNC-CH, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1999. electronic edition: http://docsouth.unc.edu/agnew/agnew.html


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